35 Burst results for "Rian"

Texans Trading CB Bradley Roby to Saints

The Sean Salisbury Show

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Texans Trading CB Bradley Roby to Saints

"Ian report tweets out. The texans are trading bradley roby. to the saints what. The deal is being finalized now. He has suspended week one. But it helps out the saints immensely. What what are they doing. What we get for him they. They want us to believe that they're trying to win. Okay this is called. We're not tanking but we thank you. We're not take it okay. I'm taking the under think about think about their defensive backs they have nothing. They have their defensive. Backfield is horrible will pass. We'll opponent opposing quarterbacks average two hundred eighty yards or more against him this year. yeah okay. he's not the he's not a. He's the greatest veteran who's played pretty good foot his career. He's got great bill. O'brien contract roby out three is in the. He's in the second year of thirty one million dollar deal. Yeah say if we just wrapped port an hour later. This won't even text. it did very rian. you might remember. He said i'm taking that. Hey i got. I got to check. This text may have been the fact that bradley road but he said if it was a texas saying he'd let us know so now that accident. I that that's exactly right and they don't like to do it until it at least is confirmed or close so bradley roby apparently getting

Bradley Roby Saints IAN Brien Roby Rian Bradley Texas
"rian" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

The No Limits Selling Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on The No Limits Selling Podcast

"Her range rover getting rushed to the hospital so that she allow. Yeah i mean it was. It was a whole. She wasn't hurt thing you know. They you know she. She ended up actually having to go to the hospital. Ba- cut four client. You know to make sure that not their offer and they were taking care of an ad that face to face interaction and we're taking care of so there are real stories like that that are very very powerful impacts so i agree with you yes. Stories are really powerful. It was such a delight does sitting down with you before we part company for other people that are starting teams are already leading teams. And they wanna do better. What would be three pieces of advice. You'd give them that would allow them to go I'm glad i listened to this. Podcast yeah so. I would rewind to the first part of our podcast right and are part of our episode here. Just because you're a good salesperson doesn't mean you are equipped to run a team. You have honest very real conversation in evaluation of your skillset. And what i would tell you. If you're doing it just for money just for you know to increase revenue. It's going to be a very very tough path for you to To succeed you have to have a vested interest in your people you have a vested interest like we talked about your culture yet have a vested interest in you know your people success the third thing that i would say to you is an and this is one of the things that i've seen happening a lot in our industry is people get into the business because they don't like you know they they give business to start selling homes. They realized they don't like selling home so they want somebody else to do it you. It's very very tough and difficult to lead people to get them to do things. You're not willing to do yourself to this day. I still love going out and listening houses when i get the opportunity. I take any opportunity again. Because i love it and i'm really good at and it's you know the most dollar productive activity i can actually do in our organization. Believe it or not so. Those are the three things that i would give somebody advice if they're looking to start a team. That is brilliant advice. I'll just back it up with. I've got a client. That is one of the leading recruiters in the country and every day he goes out to the bullpen and makes his calls with everybody else number. One i'm not doing in my office. I'm actually with you doing it. He walks his talk and he inspires people. That even when you're at the top you can't not prospect right. Prospecting is key to any business. that's another dip. I would give people looking to start a business or team. Is that you know. It's all about having a leads in it's all about keeping your pipeline full no matter what business you're in if you don't have customers or people to talk to. It's going to be tough to be successful. meeting with. People is called being unemployed. Aaron thank you so much for being on the program. I really appreciate it. I appreciate jabbed.

Aaron
"rian" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"But yes right. Aim high if you're going to be a thief but so the act of noticing you know you describe it as it feeling better than walking around and not knowing what the priorities are of the people who created this landscape but there's also just sort of a waking up from the dream of the sleepwalking that most of us are doing most of the time that is at least the buddha would argue and i would plus one him on this. It's better than the alternative. The waking up is now in what i like about it in the things that we do is that it's pretty easy to do. Like there's an information layer on the bill world that is literal words that you can read like plaques even read street signs you can read sidewalk stamps. You can read utility markings you can read. And so like. I was in the first step towards this kind of mindfulness is not anything that requires a lot of education or even knowing my show or knowing any of those things. It's just read like take a walk for five minutes and just read everything that is in front of you as words and you will find a ton. They're just in that. We have a mantra on the show. That's always read the plaque. And i'm a big believer in rian blacks. Now because plaques are true that often not often more a story of who wrote them than what they're written about but they're a good starting off point to show what are the values of the moment in time and the place that you are an and i find that to be really fascinating so i think that's the first sort of exercise in becoming more of a ninety. Nine percent of visible anchor is is like read everything that's available to you much more of my conversation with roman mars right after this you may not be feeling down and out and depressed or like you're at a total loss but if your stress is high. Your temper is shorter than usual. Or even if you're starting to feel strain in any of your relationships you could probably use the chance to unload unload the stress and get it out. Talked to someone who's completely unbiased about your life. Someone who isn't going to judge you or take sides on anything when you feel like you can't turn to family or friends to discuss. What's troubling you. Therapy can help. Better help as customized online therapy that offers video.

rian
How to Improve Subsoil Health and Crop Yields

ResearchPod

02:03 min | 1 year ago

How to Improve Subsoil Health and Crop Yields

"Where are the new productivity-enhancing farming practices that will enable the world to produce enough food to feed nine billion people by twenty fifty with a global population growing rapidly every year on with millions already having limited access to enough food. It's highly pertinent question. Studies have shown that the global demand for cereal greens will need to increase by almost a half from the two point. Zero seven billion tonnes produced in two thousand five to over three billion tons in twenty-fifty we don't have on limited space on which to grow crops so we need to find ways to improve the yield on existing farmland with rising global temperatures on more variable full. This will not be a simple task. Improving farming practices through. Research can not only improve the years that farmers are currently getting from their crops. What it can also turn down. That was previously difficult to farm into a more viable option. One ye farming practice with the potential to improve croppies. His cold subsoil maturing. This practice has been developed to ameliorate or improve dense. Clay subsoil dense clay. Subsoil is problematic for reinfected crops. The clay particles are densely packed together which restricts the rate at which rian can enter the clay much of the water. The doors enter. The clay is tightly held unavailable to plants the dense clay also restrict root growth. This means the subsoil Effectively capture on store a lot of reinforcing for use by crops. This is a critical issue. As the yields of healthy well managed rian fed crops directly depend on rainfall on the amount of rian they can take in through the roots transpire through their leaves dance class subsoil also limits the amount of error the confused to the spiring routes within the clay when it is moist this means the crop roots struggle for aaron. These wet soap soyuz. In addition the klay drian per day whenever there is a surplus of reinforced during the growing period the resulting poos of surface water can lead to waterlogging dommage for the crops.

Rian Aaron
"rian" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"A massive explosion. Ten times more powerful than a supernova being described as a magneto rotational hyper could provide the power to produce one of the most mysterious stars in the galaxy. The star is located some seven thousand. Five hundred lie is away in the halo of the milky way galaxy a supernova is the explosive death of a star a blast so powerful it can outshine in thai galaxy for weeks on end and even more powerful explosion than any supernova is a high turnover oblast generated by the merger of two neutron stars. And these have recently been confirmed as the source of the rapid neutron capture nuclear synthesis process which is thought to forge the periodic tables heaviest elements. But that still mon- enough to explain the levels or types of elements found in the specter of this mysterious star. This unusually strong start destroying blast. The magneto rotational hype over is the most likely explanation for the presence of unexpectedly high amounts of very specific signature element in this inch star. These include zinc uranium europeam and possibly gold all of which seem to have been detected in this extremely primitive star catalogued as sms. S j two double zero three double two point five four minus double one four two zero three point three. It's carrot address in the sky. The star is what's known as a population to star star produced directly out of the elements forged in the explosive core collapse supernovae marking the death of the very first stars in the universe known as population three stars population. Three stars unique. They'll produce directly out of the hydrogen and helium produced in the big bank. Thirteen point eight two billion years ago. They thought they were first. Formed somewhere around three hundred to four hundred million. After the big bang ending the cosmic dark ages and triggering. The epoch of rian is ation the process which made the universe looked away. That's

rian
New Type of Ancient Massive Explosion Explains Mystery Star

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:11 min | 1 year ago

New Type of Ancient Massive Explosion Explains Mystery Star

"A massive explosion. Ten times more powerful than a supernova being described as a magneto rotational hyper could provide the power to produce one of the most mysterious stars in the galaxy. The star is located some seven thousand. Five hundred lie is away in the halo of the milky way galaxy a supernova is the explosive death of a star a blast so powerful it can outshine in thai galaxy for weeks on end and even more powerful explosion than any supernova is a high turnover oblast generated by the merger of two neutron stars. And these have recently been confirmed as the source of the rapid neutron capture nuclear synthesis process which is thought to forge the periodic tables heaviest elements. But that still mon- enough to explain the levels or types of elements found in the specter of this mysterious star. This unusually strong start destroying blast. The magneto rotational hype over is the most likely explanation for the presence of unexpectedly high amounts of very specific signature element in this inch star. These include zinc uranium europeam and possibly gold all of which seem to have been detected in this extremely primitive star catalogued as sms. S j two double zero three double two point five four minus double one four two zero three point three. It's carrot address in the sky. The star is what's known as a population to star star produced directly out of the elements forged in the explosive core collapse supernovae marking the death of the very first stars in the universe known as population three stars population. Three stars unique. They'll produce directly out of the hydrogen and helium produced in the big bank. Thirteen point eight two billion years ago. They thought they were first. Formed somewhere around three hundred to four hundred million. After the big bang ending the cosmic dark ages and triggering. The epoch of rian is ation the process which made the universe looked away. That's

Rian
Create Synthetic Data Using AI With Alexandra Ebert (Full Episode)

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Create Synthetic Data Using AI With Alexandra Ebert (Full Episode)

"If i may i ask you how this unique title i usually say our guest is unique. But you have unique title also. You're not unique unique. Titled what do we understand on the from this chief privacy officer. That's a good question. I get asked quite frequently. Luckily i'm not the only chief trust office in the world. But you're right. It's usually a title. That's rather rare in the don't be. Very huge companies have traditionally achieve trust offices responsible to ensure that consumers trust away organization handles protection uses the data within mostly i. We provide our synthetic data solutions to our clients to large enterprises. So we may be. Don't handle any customer data therefore my main responsibility as chief trust officer within mostly i is to create trust in synthetic data and mostly is accompanied synthetic data. What do we understand from it because we are used to hitting did personal data and then we heard something synthetic identity from one of our guests. But what do you mean by now. Synthetic data good question so synthetic data would guess that he would get different answers depending on who you ask so we'll start with how i understand. Synthetic data for me specifically talking about a. I generated synthetic data. This is rian advanced. Immunization technology that allows you to retain basically all the information in me customer data set without risking the privacy of any of the individuals within the state to set. So how does this work. How is it different from traditional. Minimization technologies traditionally. When you wanted to anonymous data set you have different approaches. Like masking of your skating generalization and so on and so forth all these approaches from the nature destructive approaches so you always had a customer data set and try to delete mask of escaped those parts of the data set that you've deemed to that seem to be Re identifying dangerous to the privacy of deity data subject within this data set

Rian
"rian" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Happening in these states. And then also applying that research to people in various walks of life to make people more effective at the things that they're doing especially in a work capacity but we take a really fun deviation into the educational side of this and how we as parents can help nurture our kids into having high-performance mindset and a solid foundation for life using things like flow states. And how kids are naturally even better about this. We are so we can learn from them. Do some really cool research about their prefrontal cortex and their ability to drop into flow states fascinating episode. That takes a lot of really interesting twists and turns so. Let's join red rian. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me kate. It's a pleasure to be here. Well i'm excited to go deep on the topic of flow at especially applying this to ourselves in our families but before we get to that i have a research note that you ate the same thing for two years and i have to hear this story. That's good that's good research Yes i love. I love routines personally. I love being a very consistent. And i love automating things that i don't care that much. Your bags may personally. At least on one of those things is food not necessarily foodi so i asked for one intensive work period over two years just standardized exactly what And managed to stick to it for for a fairly long period of time to free up head space and time and energy to be able to do the things that that i cared more Also the the daily routine. I had the diet sitting too was was delicious so it wasn't too hard. What were you eating. That's fascinating if you really want to give you the breakdown. I'm happy but it was. So i was not kito diet. Which which makes it important to be consistent. Because they're crazy strict. I would eat every day. I would be two packets of nuts. Cashews almonds five hundred grams of of minced. Beef grass-fed irish minced beef to avocados six eggs. A bar of eighty five percent dark chocolates and a little bit of fried broccoli and some grains pretty much if daily one meal a day for two years so that was the routine. Well that's impressive district for that long fascinating to this episode is about the topic of flow which i've touched on war with steven kotler. We talked about briefly before we jumped in really really love him and his work. And i know that You guys worked together on the flow. Collective and i'm excited to go deep on this because i think there's so many springboard from my first conversation with him which i'll link to if you guys haven't heard it But to start broad. Can you kind of just give us an overview of when we say the word flow what we mean sure always helpful to define it so most people know of flow as being in zone. When you hear someone say that. I managed to get into the zone work today or i was out biking and i you know i got into stay. Or i got into a generally the referring to getting into the slow says and it's more technically defined as an optimal set of consciousness where we feel our best in we perform our best and then the descriptive definition is that flow occurs when action awareness merge time dilates so often minutes go by in in what feels like a longer period of time and then long periods of time go by and what feels like moments so you spend three hours in an afternoon writing for example and you look up check the time and it feels like only been writing for a few a few minutes. Sort of said is state of optimal performance and total immersion in the task. At hand is there are there. Differences happening neuro biologically. When we're talking about a flow state. I mean i certainly have had that experience and felt that difference in my mind focus and being able to work but are there actual physiological changes happening as well a great question. One of the questions that we get quite a lot is. What's the difference between flow and focus is in focus. You know just the same the same thing. What's what's actually the difference in the differences that first off flow often occurs after a period of uninterrupted focus. So the way the way that i like to describe it is that attention involves directing your awareness to a specific focal point when you hold that attention for an extended period of time we call that focus and often persistently focused. You're able to shift states and get into what we call So it kind of as attention focused flow and there are a number of physiological shifts that are distinct between a flow state and just being focused on something without being slow and those shifts occur across our neuro chemistry so the different neuro chemistry. That shows up. The shifts are measurable from your electric perspective to the to the shift in art brainwave state and then those shifts are also apparent in terms of experience in terms of what it actually qualitatively feels like versus just simply being focused for example. The time dilation. That i that i mentioned neuro chemically. We believe at least the research is largely. I believe that a non divide dopamine serotonin endorphins and nor epinephrine are all present during flow states. And that is that is distinct from a normal state of a focus and speak. And i know you guys have done a lot of research on some of these parts of understanding what's happening in a flow state and also in the practical application of how the this affects our lives and i think that's a really important point to delve into because i would guess most people listening have had the experience of that timeless flow state where is clicking into place and you totally lose track of time. I've had it happened with writing happened with art and creative pursuits off author really fun. Physical activities But it also seems like. I think a lot of us would say we've had that experience. But it's kind of elusive. It's not something we can just kind of. Find your turn on at will and i think interesting research around this area as well is that right. Yes not necessarily research. But i would say are our primary focus as a as a company as an organization at least from a training perspective is in helping people take this elusive sporadic state. That has meant benefits to the we all know off an have experienced and want more of a turn it into something that is accessible with consistency and on demand and in a way that we can actually predict or predicted at least as much as possible so that the goal is to take flow from this elusive thing. That sometimes shows up to making a consistent thing we can drive ourselves into so that we can get sustained performance and so the optimal performance and flow is not a matter of of luck chance but rather a matter of of circumstance And one of the things that's important clarifies that like this is not mechanistic. Its probabilistic of people. Often ask the push button thing. I need to do to drop into flow right now or be able to be able to drop into flow all the time and it's it's not unfortunately quite simply that rather it's probabilistic their stacks of things you can do. That are going to greatly improve your life the hood of accessing flow. But it's never going to be one hundred consistent that makes sense an important distinction although it does seem in conversations. I've had with really elite performers. Whether that be i ll athletes or elite performers and other realms they do seem to have developed the ability to do that more often or somewhat more reliably i as it makes sense not completely at will but what are some of.

steven kotler two years five hundred grams red rian two packets eighty today six eggs one hundred one three hours one meal a day over two years first conversation kate five percent One of the questions one intensive first
Episode 4 - Old Trafford Protest and Silverware Talk - burst 4

Added Time with Rian Garcia

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Episode 4 - Old Trafford Protest and Silverware Talk - burst 4

"So what this means is that we are guaranteed american to lift the away for champions league trophy. Either gonna be zach. Stephan who's the backup goalkeeper for manchester city or it's going to be christian. Pulisic for chelsea and christian is more than likely going to play in this game so he'll be the first american. Never play in that game stephane boring. Anything that happens to. Edison is probably going to be

Saturday Two Teams Manchester City Three Points Chelsea Everton Three Goals Fa Cup Fourth Place United States Manchester United United ONE Top Four Florida Tampa First Name Premier League West Ham This Summer Champions League Stephan Zach Stephane Edison
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Of the thing there one fan who you clearly see his face it in mask on or anything they probably have already prosecuted this man. He breaks into like the media. Any grabs a camera on a tripod and he just chuck's it like at least fifteen feet and there was a drop to would drops onto the ground And the camera breaks off the tripod. And it's just like bro media guys like thousand plus dollar camera and equipment and you just broke it for no reason. That's not going to solve any of your problems with the glazer's and then the second horrible thing that we saw was one of the One of the officials actually that was on the field ended up getting like socked in the eye and so he had like blood coming down from his cheek that they patched them up but there are some photos of that you can clearly seem so there's a bunch of angry fans that are like oh wasn't peaceful that man that's her breaking the equipment but that's why i appreciate what gary neville said. He came out. Same thing with jamie. Carragher who's a liverpool supporter. The two of them have teamed up and both of them were basically in agreement that it was a peaceful protest that in every sort of protests. There's gonna be one or two people or of people that just get violent that you know. Try to hurt stuff. Try to smash stuff you know. It doesn't really matter what it is. There's always going to be those kinds of people that want to do that. And cause harm and someone so it was a peaceful protest thousands and thousands of people that were there just chanting just standing on the field and it was powerful the see and what we saw after this was again the glazer's have not said anything woodward is going to leave the club at the end of the year but he's still in power right now and nobody has said anything and the reason why is because social media abuse so here we go another big problem..

gary neville jamie two both thousands thousand plus dollar two people Carragher second liverpool one fan thousands of people one at least fifteen feet end One of the photos
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Actually playing these games so leeds. United is playing liverpool who was announced to be in the super league. Leeds players. Come out with shirts that say football's for the fans just to stick it to him a little bit and not only this but following the game liverpool midfielder james milner came out and said that he did not agree with the proposal either and again florentino. Perez comes out that night and says the super league is not for the rich but it's to save football. If this continues football will disappear by twenty twenty four we would already be dead. This is the only way to save everyone big small and medium clubs and he is just so he's just pulling words out of his behind. You know literally. There's nothing wrong with the format and right now. Small and medium-sized clubs can compete for those championships. In theory than they do there's leicester city is gonna be in a champions league slot this year for the premier league. They're sitting in third place basically fourteen operas saying yeah arsenal spurs and liverpool her. All behind lester. So we want to get lester. Get all these teams. That are good like less. Get them the heck out of here. And let's get these these other good clubs that you know that we can profit off of their marketing and all that kind of junk so within twenty four hours. The league is nnounced. All these clubs ran. There's a ton of outrage by everybody and the next morning it's announced that chelsea in manchester city are going to be leaving and then manchester city coach pep guardiola literally one of the most renowned coaches in the world comes out and says it is not a sport where success is already guaranteed or does not a sport when it doesn't matter when you lose chelsea was supposed to play later that day against brenton. Hove album and they did. And there was swarms and swarms. Thousands of chelsea fans are outside the stadium protesting and they wouldn't even let the bus through with the players in it. The first domino basically fell after that. It's that ed woodward deke executive for manchester united the guy that manchester united fans have wanted out for years because he's been ruining their club and putting them in more debt. Edward announced that he had tendered his resignation and would leave the club at the end of the season man city then made it official and they're pulling out as did chelsea and later that night. Manchester united liverpool spurs and arsenal. The four remaining. Epl clubs all released statements confirming that they would not take part and by that night basically. The writing was already on the wall. All the other clubs started announcing their withdrawal and basically the super league was dead in forty eight hours so the question remains where we now basically all the chairman that i mentioned earlier. Agnelli the glazers henry. Even manchester city's chief executive forensic oriana. Everybody comes out and issue apologies. You know they're only apologizing because everybody was mad at them they really because it went this far. You know that these guys do not care and none of them have resigned. None of them have stepped down other than woodward but he wasn't even the owner or anything like that. So glazer's john henry Crunchies agnelli all. These people are still in charge and the premier league is basically called on them to resign on all of them..

james milner Edward Manchester united pep guardiola United liverpool manchester united Perez manchester city chelsea forty eight hours twenty four hours next morning fourteen operas this year arsenal one Thousands of first domino brenton
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"You know and then it was just the community it embraces the community so manchester united was the club in manchester until man city came. You know and then you have those two different clubs to choose from but for a place like liverpool where the beatles or from. That's literally the only thing they're the first club and everybody you know gravitated towards that club and all the sudden. Now they're basically throwing the workers out of the window they're throw in all the supporters out the window and they're just they just have a bunch of money and they're like yeah. Let's let's get all the biggest clubs in the world that's form a new league and there won't be relegation so the way relegation works in the premier league is the bottom. Three season in the league are demoted into the championship than in the championship. The top two teams are automatically promoted to the premier league and then in the championship. If you are in third fourth fifth and sixth you qualify for a playoff and then those playoff semifinals. None the final to see who that last team that gets in the premier league who it's going to be and similar formats are like this around the world and some don't even have that playoff format. It's really exciting. You know but it's more like money and tv and all that kind of stuff rather than just giving the third place team that other that other premier league slot basically they're throwing relegation out the window and the big quote was that edward of manchester united. Who was going to be on this board for the super league quote could not wrap his head around relegation so basically the european super league is going to be these fifteen big clubs that are already like the most financially well off clubs in the world and rather than all of them competing in their domestic league for the championship with all these other lesser teams. I say in air quotes they basically want to get rid of the whole lesser teams even being able to compete for the trophy and they wanna just basically have the top fifteen clubs in the world compete for.

manchester united fifteen clubs sixth first club man city fifteen big clubs two different clubs third place team manchester third fourth european super league premier league two teams Three season liverpool edward fifth league
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Spot for premier league insight. Unfortunately today we're not going to be talking about the premier league too much. We're gonna be talking about the european super league. And what this means for the future of football's we know it. And it's all coming up right after this. So before we get into the nitty gritty of the european super league. We gotta talk about where we're at right now. In world football there was no season teams have had to play the same amount of games that they've always had a plan and a lot of clubs of lost a lot of money without people being in the stands and without those ticket sales without those jersey sales the merge sales all the food and beverages at the stadiums a lot of clubs are that right now and unfortunately because of this we saw florentino perez. The president of rail madrid in laliga one of the biggest clubs in the world And a team. That always wins the champions league. They've won the tournament thirteen times. That's that's like the super bowl. That's as big as you can get in club football so we see florentino perez. Basically come out and make these plans until the world that hey there's gonna be a new super league. The champions league format right now is not going to be sustainable. Uefa has too much power and so basically florentino perez creates a ragtag group group of Owners and chairman and so he gets andrea agnelli of Of the italian club. You've venues to be the vice chairman. While perez is the chairman and then the other three men that are on this that we're on this board. Were joe glazer. John henry and stan kroenke. The three of these men are men that have interest in athletics and so cranky. He just did a la. I believe he did the entire stadium for the rams and the chargers. John henry is part of fenway sports group. They're the ones that own the boston red sox and they have he's also the owner of liverpool f c in england. And then joel glazer. The glazer family owns the tampa. Bay buccaneers just won the most recent super bowl and he is the co chairman of manchester united..

joel glazer andrea agnelli manchester united stan kroenke Uefa england glazer perez thirteen times today John henry one european super league three men florentino perez fenway sports group joe glazer boston red sox rail madrid Bay buccaneers
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Super a little background. On darrell decay and barnsley. Barnsley is a team playing in the sky bet championship championship is the english second tier. It's ripe below the premier league every year in the premier league the bottom three teams in the relegation zone get dropped into the championship and every year. The top two teams in the championship are automatically promoted to the premier league and then teams in the championship. Three four five and six duke. It out in playoffs semifinals and a final and the stakes are crazy. It's essentially like the difference between playing in the championship. Versus the premier league is like an automatic some of cash. that's an excess of one hundred million pounds which is just crazy so these these clubs are getting the tv rights contracts and then they can sign more players in their transfer budget goes up and they can sell players. Get more money you know. Change out some of those players that maybe were suited to the championship. But aren't good enough to be able to handle some of the teams in the premier league in level of competition. Daryl que daryl decay. Us men's international sensation. Right now Is twenty years old again. He's a center forward and striker So he he was loaned from orlando city to barnsley in february of this year. Twenty twenty one. He is played in fourteen games and he has eight goals. And that's just crazy He's played in seventy five percent of the possible minutes And he's scorn a of goals. Eight goals for them in fourteen appearances and barnsley is currently sitting in that championship. Playoff spot In the league and so if they if the league were to end today they would be in the playoffs and he would get a chance to help barnsley perhaps get into the premier league Of course that's the hard way there aren't good enough to be in the top one or two slots automatically be there. But it's really cool for barnsley. you know. there are middle of the table. And they got daryl decay and he is single handedly pushed them up into this playoff spot. So it's it's just really fun to watch. He was also recently called up to the international break by the us. Men's national team He i believe he was substituted on in one of the games and in the other game he came on for like two or three minutes as a sub some. He hasn't really played for the us men's national team but he is a very very exciting young talent and he's huge. He's got the body of lukaku plays for belgium. He's got the body of diego cost You know he's one of the biggest bodied strikers that there are right now and coming up in world football so it's just really exciting to watch and with that background. on darrell. decay of an toss it over to our special guest today. My really good friend. Quinton puzzled guys. Today we're featuring darryl decay. Who's the new kid on the block for the us. Men's national teams only had two caps so far he was just loaned from orlando in the mls to the english championship which is the second tier but he only played a season at orlando city. It was the covid season which is shortened season us just drafted by them fifth overall through a generation adidas contract which allows a us development player to get drafted a year early before going into professional play. And it's supposed to further develop the united states talent pool. He played two seasons with the cavaliers at virginia is first season. He got five goals one assist on thirteen games but in the second season he really blew up. He had twenty three games. Played with ten goals and eight assists. Getting in twenty eight points led his team so the fifth overall is pretty strong is a good player and he played for orlando for seventeen games and started fifteen. The loan to barnsley. Isn't it's only a temporary thing. So barnsley can use him this season. They really have really been blowing up because they offered a buyout of the buyout is twenty million. His there's been talks that he's gotten offers orlando city has declined from a big six per merely keen. The rumors are that it's chelsea but they declined the ten million dollars because the buyout for his loan. Currently barnsley is twenty million dollars. So that's not gonna get bought out either so orlando declining. The ten million dollars looks like they're trying to hold onto him so if he plays the rest of the season at barnsley he would still be able to return for the main part of. Mls's only really miss like the beginning. He had a choice. He could have gone for the nigerian national team. Buddy chosen the us men's national team. I like this kid. He's going to be great for us going forward and that is going to do it for today's episode special. Shout out to quin again for coming on today's show and next time we're going to be doing a deep dive on champions league. Fa cup semifinals and the league cup. Final thanks for listening guys and see next.

twenty million seventeen games thirteen games fourteen games fifteen ten million dollars twenty three games darryl decay ten goals adidas two twenty eight points fifth Eight goals seventy five percent eight assists twenty million dollars six fourteen appearances second tier
Apple to roll out new privacy controls

The Art of Online Business

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Apple to roll out new privacy controls

"Apple has not yet rolled out the whole. Att thing which is their whole privacy updates at the rolling out in the next version of ios k. so they've not yet ruled out however hopefully by now hopefully by the time that you're reading this rian that you're listening to this and say that you're listening to this. You have set up. You've done your preparations. Four when this rules out right because this is going to affect your facebook and instagram matt's heck it's also can also going to affect your any other kind of advertising that you're doing where there's a pixel

Rian Apple Instagram Facebook Matt
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Year the late start and fixture congestion. That would come from this. You know So not only are our teams in the primarily in the primarily competition but they might also be european competition whether that's the euro per the champions league. If you're at the top of the table you have the fa cup. If you're in any english professional soccer you play in the fa cup and you play in the premier league league cup the karabakh cup so there are just so many competitions. These players are competing in. They're literally playing every three days. Or every four days depending on whether or not they get a extra day of break and then they also. The english fa scrapped the winter. Break after christmas and boxing day so Every year around christmas and boxing day. These teams will play literally games every three or four days. Just like we're seeing every week with this schedule for this year season but it's never liked this. It's only around that christmas period where teams have a flurry of games that they have to get through And then right. After that there's an international break and players will have some time to heal up and all of that was scrapped So basically the fa had squeezed five-match weeks into the schedule with this month late. Start up and the winter break being scrapped. Basically what we're seeing is every tuesday through thursday this year. There's fa cup efl cup. Europa league and champions league games in the middle of the week every single day and then there's the actual premier league games and other you know if they're in other leagues around the world. Those league games are on saturday through monday. So teams in england again or playing every three days and enduring the only thing that really benefited the teams was that rules were changed to allow to five substitute players in any game versus the three that are normally available And then the rule has already been changed back so you know it helped everybody out for a little bit but now that we're out of we're kind of out of the woods we're seeing people getting vaccinated receive some fans back in the stadium. You know things are getting back to normal. So that's basically where we're at for the start of this season now that we've discussed covid nineteen and its implications on the twenty twenty twenty twenty one season. We're gonna talk about the us men's national team now that we've discussed covid nineteen and its implications on the twenty twenty twenty twenty one season. We're gonna talk about the us men's national team usa. Men's national team has been a laughing stock for the last several years the. Us men's national team failed to qualify for the twenty eighteen fifa world cup. That was in russia. I just stayed even like thinking about it. Really what it was was..

russia saturday england five-match three monday Europa league thursday four days premier league league cup this month covid nineteen five substitute players twenty twenty twenty karabakh cup this year twenty twenty twenty twenty tuesday christmas fifa world cup
"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

Added Time with Rian Garcia

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"rian" Discussed on Added Time with Rian Garcia

"Know when plays can resume we go we. We fast forward and other month. And we get to april twenty four th of twenty twenty and the netherlands announced that their league is just abandoned. No noah champion is going to be rewarded And this is the first league that does so but we see the french league do the same exact same three days later league one. The france lady announces the suspension of all sports Thous from the prime minister that announced that and psg was just kind of awarded the trophy and they said yes you next year. June twenty twenty daniel. Levy the spurs club. Chairman for tottenham hotspur in london announced that the club borrowed a hundred five million pounds from the bank of england to deal with effects of coronavirus pandemic on the club. This was the first major Monetary story that came out of the whole cove nineteen pandemic We're actually seeing one of the biggest teams one of the big six england having to take out one hundred and seventy five million pounds to deal with it you know and do whatever they needed to do with their club. Whether that's to you know pay their players and everybody that's Working with the club Whether that's to try to whether some of the No fans being in the stadiums you know none of that revenue so we don't really know about that And they're really one of the only club set deal with that kind of stuff other than like lower tier clubs. This is primarily club. They're getting hundreds of millions of dollars every single year And so that's why it's such a major story for them to have to do something like this. On june eleventh bundesliga returns and they're the first major league in the world to return to play and laliga returned later that day as well..

June twenty twenty april twenty four th london psg next year first league daniel hundreds of millions of dollar one hundred and seventy five m three days later a hundred five million pounds one tottenham hotspur france single year june eleventh bundesliga twenty twenty league one netherlands
Poly Styrene Documentary

Bigmouth

09:49 min | 1 year ago

Poly Styrene Documentary

"Today. Polystyrene i m cliche is directed by both her daughter. Celeste bell and documentary maker pulsing charting the rise of marian elliott as she was born. She saw yellow pages ad became polystyrene and formed punk band x ray specs as we know in this foam. Celeste goes through her mother's archive and visits. The places of hutch halted. So let's listen to the trader to get a feel for it. Some people think little go should have. But i think my mother was punk rock icon. People have asked me if she was a good mom. It's hard to know what to say your rebel. Today's society paulie had our own ideas. Student full fully trends. She was a woman of color in. Dc full of white middle class. men was singing. polly was singing about. I fell in love with her. I fell in. The news actually started singing. Because right we will dive right in nora snaps point. He was a big personality but as we see her life was extremely complicated on. This is as much. Her daughter's journey as police starring life story. Was that a good way in. I think definitely I think by this point. We also board like punk defecation. This point know the way. The bbc fool punk document generation. That watches him in the in the same way. That like my dad and grandad generation. What war documentaries old thing again and again and I think it's focus the that it's kind of deified in such a like i wasn't like incredible and radical umbro which it was in some ways but also rian just reinforced the status quo in other ways. Like the thing. I think is really great why i feel like the rohbock of this narrative restarted with like the vowel between book which From a couple of years ago when she you know really gets to the kind of watson order of it in a way that is much more punk than saying like. Oh we great you know like sex pistols type branding and i thought that this documentary was like a really peaceful continuation overseas. Not done by polystyrene by her daughter. And i think it's testament polystyrene like complexity and also to her sensitivity. But then i'll say for her callousness towards adulterer as well. I think it makes were much more well rounded portray of somebody and also no. It doesn't just a pain releasing on her. You know she has her own issues but it looks at how they're exacerbated by the society around like a mixed race woman in london at that time in the punk scene. There's a bit wet don. Let says that she goes and shaves her head while she's a party jordan lydon's house and when winter comes back down they just love her releasing. That seem horrendous. In retrospect i'm sure we're just kind of par for the course in in the seventy s and the other thing i was gonna say i think is important is she wasn't postponed. She was punk like she's really part of the the formative dna not very easily gets forgotten. Like when i was a teenager Bought three for twelve pounds. Buzzcocks clash kind of burundi's wound go from and see a whatever it was but it took a lot longer. It's come across x ray specs and to hear them kind of debt day fight in the way that they deserve She had a rough up. Brixton upbringing. shoes booted at school. Punk rock was a place for outsiders is the cliche but actually you see that. It's inevitable that she is going to get drawn to something that's so creative but also that she can break whatever more that she feels that she has been put into yet absolutely I think one thing that's really striking by the way that she Shared her images. While is the like. Obviously i don't want a undress will. The sex pistols did two like bridge society but fundamentally that kind of just like a boy band put together by iron. Witten really edgy branding. And that whole thing is is about dog individualism. When really it was really nothing the saw. And i think that you know. Even the police die polystyrene style for rewards more individual. She recognized herself as a cliche. And she played with the idea of like branding and identity in a way that i find much more interesting than just like sticking a safety pin on it And i think we have to use it. Today were authenticity. It comes from a very real place whether the sex pistols Taped on summertimes travis. The problems with poly seem to stem from x ray specs residency. Cbgb's in new york when they went over us punks hauled coal. There were a lot more into drugs. And i think that london it seems to say. Was this the breaking point for the band. Is this the kind of crux in the film. I think so. I mean i mean. That's the argument fuel. Makes the About what happened to the u k Members of the dolls came over an introduced heroin to the to the uk seen quite quite a heavy way otten Concur with everything that lord said about film. I think The framing the fact that it has selected celeste stories. Her as she's dealing with navas legacy in some respects her mother had had semi other people's expectations about what she should be being Star as in and being mixed race being hauled somali in britain and she's just so in the clips that they use the archive clips which from most of them from a a great arena documentary from nineteen seventy-nine he was she's just so alive him sparking intelligence on which me a very funny and in most What she's doing. I think you know how easy it is to get coal topping to the move Nexus these achieved up by the film. I descend Points about the breakdown. the failure in a way to work out. How will she is. She's diagnosed with schizophrenia. Kind of putting for bit. has serious by disorder Move into harry christmas On also in places you alluded to neglect which she treats celeste points during the spirit journey and was pursuing a common all and happened. How different thoughts regarding way with the male and female office Think about lockdown about. How much care women having to take on board and also agree with. I think that when another book that i would put in the frame is what is alvin. Is is kathy. Adams was drafted memoir of juden in other key. Figure the kind prison to look look upon pumpkin kind of liberating. It wasn't how you think about kind of male violence. Where is actually to the nearly point it was it was quite at transgressive sexually A lot of the gay pubs and clubs were up with the next to solve it. I'm so i can imagine that. The film doesn't does kind of raise interesting questions. As well as celeste father is interviewed in it on one of us and absent biggest because he died. regional manager. And pau falcons stewart. Now again. Severi seventeen seventy six. He was quite a bit older than when they get and how much care and they seem to hide it to a certain extent as well a friends didn't really know whether they were going out with each other or not. We just didn't look particularly cool Strangely enough this film from that era with hangs connor in it could breaking gloss than nyein and strangely seems to be almost so the police story in way which becomes this incredible figure And has sta machiavellian manage aaron and has this breakdown and so on so until daniels place. This full manager boyfriend Is i think it's really five documentary. Actually i think you mentioned he was a guest. Shot means the fact that one of zoe's earlier books whose how's your dad's some which is a an account to of stars children's. She's absolutely perfect for collaborator. On this end coming book as other as good as andrew. Did you like this a did. I really liked it because as as long as it's very fresh indifference it's a dream like quality. This is very much not your friday night documentary. Which begins with the stock footage of the miners. Strike rubbish piling in the winter of discontent. Yeah i've always about acronyms because hatches and didn't stop not your kind of off the pex tickets sold. It's it is a personal journey. It's quite slow and quite like i say quite dreamlike and which i found very refreshing change from the usual stakeouts poke documentary. I remember when i was a kid. I thought i thought police really disturbing because i lived in a very white suburban middle of nowhere type place and you just seems so odd and the fact that she but were shut brace on top of the pops and i now say that that is really good thing that it should be disturbed a little. You not white kids in places where i lived in in middle. middle class. spices. To encounter is person who didn't look like a boss didn't like pasta but was absolutely transfixed thing

Celeste Bell Marian Elliott Jordan Lydon Paulie Rian Celeste Polly Nora Burundi London Brixton Witten Watson BBC Cbgb Otten Navas Pau Falcons
Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

Radio From Hell

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

"Will be missed. At the age of 97 Rhonda Fleming has died. Redheaded actress who became a popular sex symbol in Hollywood westerns, filmed OIR and adventure movies Off the forties and fifties. She died in Santa Monica, California. His Fleming's roles included those off a beautiful Arthur Rian Princess in the Bing Crosby musical version of Mark Twain's novel, a Connecticut

Rhonda Fleming Arthur Rian Princess Bing Crosby Santa Monica Mark Twain Connecticut California
MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher  Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

Epicenter

04:08 min | 2 years ago

MacLane Wilkison: NuCypher Proxy Re-Encryption for Distributed Systems

"Using them. What are some of the hurdles that you've encountered in getting people to understand the value and utility of privacy preserving technologies, and are there some things that just most people will never really be able to pass off? The unfortunate reality of trying to sell technologies enterprise is that it's much more about like the enterprise sales mission and how good you are, how good your Oregon's at that that it is about the technology. So do you have sort of enterprise sales or they can reach these customers that can reach the influence these decision makers there's a whole lot of sort of comedian and bureaucracy to get sort of particularly something like this where it started touching their core infrastructure and encryption is very sensitive and it has regulatory and compliance implications for the end user like there's a lot of layers of approval that yet to go through. To go through compliance, they're going to want to know who you're institutional backers are they're going to your existing customers are because no one wants to be like the first bank to adopt something and then goes wrong. I think like if you're building enterprise -nology selling top down to CIO or. It's much less unfortunately about like the technology and much more about enterprise sales motion and whether you have that expertise inside of the organization and ashes not I think for for me not really a salesperson that's not something that I'm especially particularly intrinsic interest in. With Zero DB, what were some of the like technology that you had to use their? What's it like and how like related to sort of stuff you ended up building at new? Cyber. So she was actually quite simple. So it was an encrypted data end to end encrypted database where you encrypt everything client side before you uploaded to the server and the server never see the plain text data. So usually when you say that people like Oh, it must be like fully home orphee encryption was not it was much much simpler than that. So basically we would. Like remotely and incrementally traverse like a B index. This index clydeside sent it to the server, and then like we want search for something, we'd ask the server for the you know the included root of the tree fetch that down decrypted that we know which branch of the tree to go to next and we just basically do that. So it was pretty simple and kind of a little bit naive. It wasn't nearly like a fancy like fully morphou conscription sort of on everyone is looking for. Sort of like a client side search but like a smarter way of doing it basically. Exactly so like you couldn't really use it for applications that were performed sensitive, but you could use it maybe for things that you didn't really need to get a result back quickly. So the use case that we were pitching to enterprises, you can use us to archive stuff. So a lot of banks at the time and still currently I think are basically just habit archiving everything from like tapes whereas using zero DB they could theoretically throw that into something cloud storage like it abuse glacier or something, but still never exposed to Amazon would be able to query back. You know regulatory a regulator asks for something from eight ten years ago. So that was the basic technology and then we also built in this functionality to allow other people to query that encrypted data as well, and that was how we discovered this technology called proxy re encryption without proxy re encryption. Obviously, whoever has the key? Basically the person who included a client side? He's the only one query you know zero DB database but we started getting interested in proximity encryption because then like the enterprise could enable partners whether it's like. Supplier, regulator or customer whoever to also delegate access to that encrypted and allow them to do the search as well, and that ended up actually becoming like the the most interesting part zero was disability sort of delegate access to encrypted data, and that's ultimately what morphed into through this. The First Avenue Cypher Network, which is basically a decentralized network of a bunch of notes that perform this proxy Rian corruption function the basic idea of be sorta left behind. But this proxy rip jeter delegation to Encrypt data is what we kind of pulled out eventually

First Avenue Cypher Network Oregon CIO Jeter Amazon Rian
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Ladies' First

Your Brain on Facts

05:35 min | 2 years ago

Ladies' First

"Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests.

Valentina Tereshkova Tennessee Cornelius Vanderbilt President Trump Victoria Woodhall Muriel Siebert Victoria Claflin Woodhall Claflin United States Luke Soviet Government Frederick Douglass Rian Margaret Smith House Judiciary Committee Asthma United Clinton Congressman
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 2 years ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
"rian" Discussed on VCR Podcast

VCR Podcast

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"rian" Discussed on VCR Podcast

"Ends up being even more than one hundred bucks buy some crazy hooker, crook, thing and Holy Shit. That's GonNa make my decision a lot harder. To get the disk version. I would just take the hit and do digital. Only then when I trained in the system, I trade in the system oral. Do the yeah like so. What all the Games? I can't sell them to like. How much are some of these games really going to be worth at the end of? One hundred and fifty dollar difference some crazy number, hundred and fifty bucks, even two hundred. Yeah, the amount of games you'RE GONNA to get extra deals on is going to really need a tally up at that point yet and trading in something like if you have the horizon disc now, you're going to trade it into somebody. Yeah, you're getting like ten bucks. You're not that much. Yeah, you're getting like five dollars ten dollars like you'd have to have a lot of games. You're going to trade in at the end of the cycle in order to make it worth it. And a lot of games don't even release on disk because they're indie games and stuff, too. Yeah, it's there's also that. It's going to be interesting and I mean. Console that now that we know a little bit more him. Restore yet to see what it plays like on the inside. And all these other little features of they're going to throw in there. Because we've been told by several different people that we ain't even seen the tip of the iceberg yet. And, if that's to be true. Like I said, we've been used to for a few generations now. The the graphical difference being not as just or sorry, the the big change is being graphical. This is not that. This generation is going to be amazing from Gamer standpoint. This has nothing with working out. There everything being cleaner. The between PS. One PS. Two was drastic. Addition ps two NPS through drastic difference between PS Rian, PS, four non Swiss, was not drastic, but was still pretty like pretty visual. Noticeable or definitely not as dress this one. Technically feasible, but it's not a core feature like PS. Four to five is not. At its core graphical upgrade, it is a every gaming changing of grade. Like the a video gaming as we know, it is about to change. His that are gonNA. Grow up with this concert and have no idea what the fuck we're talking about..

Rian
Thousands turn out for peaceful demonstrations on Saturday around Los Angeles

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Thousands turn out for peaceful demonstrations on Saturday around Los Angeles

"Thousands of people have been marching through Hollywood calling for racial justice and equality and demanding an end to police brutality this man who spoke with NBC forces he took a seven year old with him to the protesters matter farther for her faith what matters and it's important to always fight and stand up for its people and this never allowed anybody to treat you wrong a peace walk was held in Compton several members of the city's well known each question Rian community joined in a right to end racism with bicycles and motorcycles rode to Venice and Santa Monica peaceful protests were also held yesterday in Huntington beach Fullerton Glendale downtown LA and north Hollywood

Hollywood Compton Venice Santa Monica LA NBC Rian Huntington Beach Fullerton Gle
Apple No Longer Offers Personalized Engraving on Replacement iPods

Mac OS Ken

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Apple No Longer Offers Personalized Engraving on Replacement iPods

"If you have personalizing grieving on your ipod. Do not drop it. Macrumors says it will not be included on your replacement device. An internal memo seen by the sites has apple has discontinued personalized engraving replacement ipod devices. In other words the peace says if you have a damaged ipod touch ipod Nano ipod shuffle or ipod. Classic with an engraved message on it and an apple technician determines that the entire device needs to be replaced. Apple will simply provide customers with a non engraved replacement from its repair inventory. That is change up to now. People needing replacements could get one rian grave with the old message. Macrumors says the change does not affect replacement ipads

Apple Macrumors Rian Technician
Top 10 Things If Your Kids are Under 10

Legacy-Dads Podcast

08:44 min | 2 years ago

Top 10 Things If Your Kids are Under 10

"GONNA do the next couple of podcasts. We're going to kind of Do a little top ten And so so kind of walk us through. What's his first one this first podcast? We're going to do what we can talk about. So Do's and don'ts for parents ages one to ten or thankful to some of our listeners. Out there that have really been plugging in things that they wanna hear about a little bit more focus on Dad's a little bit more focused on legacy and data and so we're going to hit you. swear smack in the forehead on a couple of these and probably in the meantime hit ourselves with them as well so number one is. Don't be quick to reprimand or punish a child from minor. Grievances do have patients intolerance forgive as God has forgiven us. Show that love and model it. Okay so one so a number one. We're talking about this don't be. Don't be quick to reprimand or punish a child from minor grievances. Now we're not talking about just giving your child free licensed to do whatever they want right. That's not what we're saying here. No yeah definitely. Want to be hands on parenting. You know as we've talked about before in previous podcasts. Not like helicopter not micromanaging. But you know it's gotta be acquainted to the Child's development you give a really good roadmap to that Lance On our page and The the roadmap for ages kids throughout all the way up to adulthood so follow that. But what we're saying here. Is You know as they have development stages of development on obviously the older they get the proverbial Lease gets looser. But you gotTA protect a child. That's warriors of old not walking out on the street and get hit by a car because mom and Dad said sure. Do whatever you WANNA do. You have to use a sermon and some wisdom in the process of what? We're talking locker odd speaking for you Dante but for me. I know this was A lot of times not flying off the handle In in the moment when maybe the child did something or there is I heard. Hey something happened at school or whatever like that. It was like okay. Let's give the child the benefit of the doubt. Let's let's hear their side of the story and and just yet again that slow to speak slow to anger Bef- before understanding really. What's going on and I know there's been times in my life where I was. I was ready to explode on a child and then it turns out you know what the child did was actually admirable or they were in the right. They were just defending a friend or defending their what they believed in. And then it's like okay. Hey that that makes sense to me I you know. Maybe I'm really glad I didn't. I listened I and didn't let my mouth you know or or You know fly off the handle or something like that so I can definitely see how this would be applicable in that. So let me. I'll jump in our hit number two here Dante. So Number two don't don't show limited emotion In by that we mean don't don't hold back affection or don't You know base our affection or that emotion based based on on a child's Efforts or or something that we may approve of Or a child's behavior support so going back to number one if the child is misbehaving or something like that that doesn't mean we withhold love and affection from our child is way of punishment so we forbid if God was with us like that and it was conditional love because God every every day. Okay not that you woke up and now I'm just GonNa you know that was the case. So this what we're talking. We're really this again. We talked about this. We hammered on this with marriage to But this is that unconditional. Love is saying that even though if the child disappoints us or or or their grades are down or whatever. It doesn't mean we stop showing them love and affection. We make that very clear you know and I I made A. I made it clear with my kids when we were disciplined him. The say listen I love you? You know I but but I have to discipline you. There's consequences for what you did But I do love you and then has nothing to do with. It doesn't change my love for you by having to do discipline you or ground you or whatever may be But I think that's what it is just letting the child know. Our love is in contingent upon their behavior. Their grades or some sort of effort based a metric does that does that make sense. Don't yeah yeah that's right. I mean you don't want your kids to grow up checking boxes because you know all of a sudden when they're eighteen nineteen and they do that. I mean one. You're going to impact the relationships they have and to. You know they're gonNA probably reject that way of living because they're gonna find you know especially if we're modeling them to biblical application that that that form of love or that conditional love does not jive or lineup scripture. So likely they would probably reject that way of life. You know another thing is something. My wife sees a lot with her Doing doing behavioral health and Counseling. With kids is kids will learn that. Okay if I'm acting up or they learned to get attention and if you're only giving them attention when they do something wrong or or you're overreacting. When they're doing something wrong. Kids learn that and it almost reinforces were Bad behavior were kids will then start saying well at least. I'm getting some reaction from dad when I do something wrong. So it can sometimes have the opposite effect where if were withholding love and affection It pushes a kid to another extreme of doing anything to get our attention or our lover approval And so can have detrimental consequences in that got daughters and wetlands. I want that to be like a loud gong in your ears. And just let it just permeate through your brain to like you have almost brain damage because the idea is like if if that's the way that you're going to be with your daughter Newsflash she's GonNa find that acceptance anywhere she can get it as Lynn likelihood be in relationships that she has no business being in. But because you know we're prideful were angry or we are. I am man. Hear Me Warren. We we show a different kind of love than what God calls us to. Do you know they're going to be doing these things? He's very things that we're trying to protect them from. And you need like raise your hand and say Lord that one's me because I did make my love with my child. Unconditional as as daddy issues as daddy issues. Everybody everybody knows somebody. That's got daddy issues so guys don't fall into that trap. Yeah absolutely what? What have we got next number three? Don't threaten a child if you have rules in your house you know whether it be safety or based on you know what our house rules for. The child be consistent with them based on fact not on emotion so in the case of one to ten year old. If you're telling them not to play with electricity unplugging the TV or they're doing something dangerous not only. Can they shock or electrocute themselves? But you tell them that they're gonNA LOSE TV OR THEY'RE GONNA lose the media or the IPAD as a result of that be consistent with that. Don't all of a sudden Rian reinvent the rules that you set forth in your house and I'm just using that as an example so I got a good example? You know So me you know not being the British child. I learned that the hard way. Because do you know you know at one? Ten light socket looks exactly like the place. We put your car Qian. If you WANNA drive a car so six year old lance decided. I'M GONNA put a key in the light socket and see what happens and Let me let me just say that was shocking day for me. So did you ever make that mistake again? They'll know strangely I learned in. I've never thought about that again. And right there what. Lancia said GUYS. I want you to hear this too and gals that are listening. You know sometimes like yeah were horrified or we don't want the child to have any more danger pain or hurt but instead of coming down on even more sometimes you have to assess you know if you're not sure the wisdom of the discernment the Situation Prey on it. Talk to your spouse before you put potentially overreact. And sometimes the mistake in itself is enough. You know quences. Yeah exactly I remember like one of our little kids you know was at a school and was playing with scissors just learning how to use them and accidentally was playing with another kid and cut some. Harrer you know and it was parents. Were fine everything. I'll say that nobody blew a gasket but just bringing that up with that that child not to be named You know is horrific enough and they were broken and they were. You know they're never gonNa make that mistake again with scissors you know. And that's the thing is like I could have been overbearing. Could have been like. That's it just realizing that. No lesson learned. Now what you know shape model you know. Give them guidance and all that but let the idea is not to threaten them or to make their life. You know to a point where they can't function because they're so worried about how mom or DAD's coming down on the counter to that is do develop boundaries and conditions for a child to navigate life through and so that means you know boundaries for your child relative and meaningful to the ages at their at you know one they got to have the cognitive ability to understand what those boundaries are. You know obviously a little kid. You want to protect them from burning themselves from taking a a pot of hot water over stove and knocking down on themselves. There are certain things that immediately they have to know pain so a spank to the hand or to that but you know to let them know that this is sharp pain versus you know something. That is just ridiculously over borders apparent. Just because either were prideful. Were selfish retired. Were angry you know if we give them if we're more of a guide in truth and give them boundaries and give them conditions for them to navigate. This goes to what Lance is put on the Road Map. This develops character. This develops integrity. This imbalance develops honesty and while these things so important you know to this child. Will that all relegates back to know why these boundaries why these conditions are so important especially in the formative years of these kids ages one through them. Yeah no I think I talked about this a preview podcast but we did with our kids when they were about five six years old. We actually sat down and made out this list of rules with the kids and it was real simple stuff like you know. Don't don't lie cheat or steal and then we kind of added some like fruit of the spirit of glacier five twenty five stuff in there and From there then that that was the rules and we actually typed it up and it was on the wall. I framed it. And that's what the kids knew. That was the baseline and it was like okay. If you break one of these rules you knew that there was going to be consequences. And it was pretty clear it was pretty clear cut And and there was never any questions about it at that point and if it was ever any questions we could say. Hey what what were the rules on the wall that you you helped me develop these rules. You broke the rules on now. There's the consequences so I didn't ever have to overreact or anything like that. Not Not saying that. I didn't 'cause there were times. I overreacted but I always tried to say. I didn't have to threaten the child that say okay. Hey you knew the rules. There's the rules right on the wall. you broke the rule so now here's the consequences. I think it just makes it a lot. Easier for US So long when we talked about these rules I'm GONNA get into number four here and Number four is don't overly protect your kids from failure and so what I mean by this and we talked about this in our podcast and overprotective parenting. But YOU WANNA WE WANNA encourage them to keep trying and always keep learning but they're gonNA fail and when they fail. We don't always run in and try to save them from the consequences of failure or Rescued them and make sure they never experienced failure in their life because we want them to experience failure in some of these smaller areas. Because that's how they're GONNA learn Resilience and that's all you're GONNA learn to

Lance DAD BEF Dante Me Warren Pain Lancia Lynn Road Map
Timecard Capitalists

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:37 min | 2 years ago

Timecard Capitalists

"Okay so Bronco Mulanovich. Thanks for being here. First of all what has happened in the last few decades. That has led to this kind of convergence between the people who make the most money from capital income and the people who make the most money from their work from. Labor income increasingly overlapping with each other. Essentially you had more and more people who are in Labor professions. That are actually very well. Bait. So you don't have like in the past. We talk about classical capitalism. We'RE BASICALLY WORKERS ESSENTIALLY INDUSTRIAL WAR. Gird Soloviev farmer solders the number of jobs where you would actually make. Large Labor income was limited. Well we'd lost half a century may be longer you had more and more jobs. I mean the bust. It used to be Dr Sanjay. Nears highly skilled professionals and then he became financial sector web designers many jobs now that they're really being very high salaries academic jobs as well and then you over time. These people make a lot of money. They are able to save a lot and they invest. But I think it's also driven by a difference. Andy Ideology of the upper class in the sense that the upper class few use itself to be generally hardworking upper-class and upper closet actually get into the system where you are a worker when I say worker. You obviously not going to work for minimum wage. But you're going to be within a system where we actually still called that. Labor income that laboring could be a CEO income which can run into several million dollars. But it's still laboring and I think that's what's changed. Because they think in the past. There was a certain level of a stigma and lack of desire from the traditional top-class to basically double up as wage labour quote unquote. Yeah also was led to wonder whether this has something to do with the changing nature of work itself Now you know. High income. Labor is very physically comfortable. It's very intellectually stimulating in many cases. The kind of thing. We're we're having this conversation. It's very intellectually interesting. Count his work. A lot of the very highest paying jobs. Also have some element of that whereas before that would have been done. Essentially for free by rich capitalist types because the workers would have the people in the factories. I agree because I think that actually the the type of jobs that people can have today is really improved tremendously To simplify later basically industrial. Why was worker was actually having either very hard work? Which was oftentimes you know. Manufacturing jobs mining and address or very routine and boring jobs And relatively few people would be lucky enough to have really fun jobs that we are having which actually as you said. Count like jobs but in reality to be quite honest I will be doing this for free because it I mean I need somebody to pay for food and and My apartment and stuff but basically. It's something that we do because we like it so I think that the range of these jobs we service economy has expanded now still agree. I'm not blind to the number of manage opposite the routine jobs in the people essentially. Don't lie however I think objectively number of jobs that they're even extremely difficult physically or the very rudeina boring has shrunk compared to what it was one hundred years ago It's also kind of easy to see how this increasing trend of Homo plutot could lead to further Rian trenching inequality in the US and other countries where it's taking place the idea being that now essentially you're looking at two different sources of income And if the people are very top are increasingly the people who have those two sources of income those two very high income sources? Then it's going to reintroduce sh inequality what exactly does that mean for the economy. And what does it mean for things? Like the ability of somebody tax enter that upper stratosphere does have some good and some not good applications. It'd be the good applications are a society where you have people who are rich. And we're actually working in order to be rich and we know that many of the people who are the top income groups they even worked a greater number of hours than people in the middle so that society in some which is better than a society were rich people practically do nothing so. I think this is the good part of this. Hama Blow Dea. The bad part is that it becomes difficult to kind of control inequality which stems from that The danger is then you're essentially might end up with a with a class that is really basically very stable and very strong and maintain sips economy. Political power defected for example that your parents are quoting quote strong. Both on the capital side labored side Gibson at a huge advantage to the children that are born such family from a capital. Sido all busy. You can get inheritance. You can get a nice apartment or a house or other advantages but from the Labor side you will get of course the knowledge that this would have acquired through working dean the sort of real world what this called your human capital. These are people who actually would know how the real world operates. They are people who have huge amount of contacts in school and after school. And you know I'm bad internships and friends in high places so you really. If you're a child of this you know such parents. You really have an incredible array of advantages

Labor Bronco Mulanovich Dr Sanjay Andy Ideology CEO United States Rian Gibson
Love Sounds With Martha Saunders: How I Learned To Love Valentines Day After A Nude Man In A Diaper Killed My Father With A Bow And Arrow

The Topical

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Love Sounds With Martha Saunders: How I Learned To Love Valentines Day After A Nude Man In A Diaper Killed My Father With A Bow And Arrow

"They'd rather not relive but within that pain. We can often find a glimmer of hope. Sparkling like a diamond ring. Hope is what happened to Aaron Mercer. Who will be reading a heartfelt first person essay titled the Child's? We hope it will make you cry. There have been times in my life that I thought I can't make it through another Valentine's Day it's too hard being reminded of what I lost year after year. With a little help I did it. I managed to love Valentine's Day again years after a nude man in a diaper killed. My father with a bow and Arrow. Don't think people understand what it feels like to walk around on Valentine's Day in my shoes. Images of Cupid are everywhere. The chair wearing a diaper launching his arrows and making couples fall in love. People think it's sweet but when I see the god of love all I can picture. Is My father bleeding out on the sidewalk. Years ago after the man wearing only an adult diaper and filthy running. She was fired an Arrow right through his chest. Every Valentine's Day was like watching him get murdered by that diaper man. All over again happened when I was just a little girl. It was outside a restaurant of course so the fact that Valentine's dinners are usually in restaurants has been another problem for me and the naked man came out of nowhere wielding his bow running down the street screaming. And I'll never forget it. I will always love you. I had a date wants who played that song and Rian from his apartment in tears every year by mid January I would start to get a glimpse of the horrors awaiting it would be in the convenience store looking for rubber bands or sponges. In theor- They'd be lining the greeting card. I'll pictures of my father's killer smiling at me. Taunting me the way that man with the blood-stained adult diaper and filthy new balance. Running shoes did that day. Leering at me as mayhem urging father bag that man not to shoot anyone else. I would get so upset. I'd find myself shaking in the hallmark dialing nine one one about to call the police. Unavailing Teens Day card may relationships have suffered for a long time. I would avoid even being in a relationship on Valentine's Day or I'd say let's have a quiet night in but my date would bring over a box of chocolates. And they're that type were wearing chair would be waiting to ruin my day. Just like the diaper man ruined my life. One year I had gone on a few dates with a guy and things were going well but then Valentine's Day rolled around. I hadn't told him yet about what had happened to my father. I didn't want to. I really liked him and I thought I would be okay. He had a sense of humor and like to do these little stunts so when he came to pick me up he opened up his jacket and said surprise he had dressed up as cupid. I still get waves of sadness when I remember how I felt. In that moment he just meant it as a bit of fun but I got so distraught. I basically blacked out when I came to. I was screaming and smacking him with a dozen roses. Things were never the same after that. How could I make people understand that? All Valentine's Day meant to me was holding my father's hand at the hospital as the life drained from his is then being informed that the man in the diaper had gotten away his bow and Arrow nowhere to be found but in time I persevered. I learned to cope with the help of my therapist. I eventually

Valentine Aaron Mercer Rian
What Is Balut, and How Do You Eat It?

BrainStuff

04:31 min | 2 years ago

What Is Balut, and How Do You Eat It?

"Around the World World Street. Food provides nutrition sometimes entertainment usually and instagram opportunities increasingly on the go from fresh cut fruit to dirty water dogs to Rhody to stir fried noodles too deep fried everything to pretzels to Kebab of all kinds. But nothing is quite like Balut. Translating to wrap in Tagalog and Malay Balut is a partially developed bird. Embryo typically a duck. It's incubated for anywhere from fourteen to twenty one days before it's boiled old or steamed and eaten at around one hundred eighty eight calories each with approximately fourteen grams of protein. This delicacy is a staple it roadside markets in Southeast Asia. Although many of us around the world eat unfertilized eggs the idea of eating one. That's been fertilized and this contains and albeit very early stage. Developing duck inside side can seem a bit well odd but Balut is widely considered a celebrated staple in countries like Vietnam and the Philippines. It's also purported to be an aphrodisiac though. Historically speaking pretty much everything has been at some point seriously. My other show is a food show and the only thing we found that it's definitely not has been lettuce but anyway Balut how and where did Balut get it start it. All begins in China. Blue was first introduced from China to the Philippines in eighteen. Eighty five where it quickly became a cheap and easy stock for laborers from their Filipino. Immigrants took Balut with them wherever they emigrated and call on in countries entries like Laos Cambodia Vietnam and Thailand in the Philippines ballot is everywhere. It's often eaten as a late night. Snack Street vendors hawking. The dish open even as the sun goes down and it's common to hear them shouting out ballot. Two people walking by the dish comes with some controversy. It's forbidden by some religious practices offices like Islam and Judaism that restrictions on what animals can be eaten and how they can be slaughtered. Additionally some countries like Canada Count Balut as a health. Risk as quote. Incubators are conducive to the potential growth of Salmonella. Though the same thing can be said about eating raw cookie dough where even expanded it however alike like most controversial foods. The stigma surrounding Balut is one that should be taken with a grain of salt. We spoke via email with food and travel host and journalist Christie Hung mm-hmm she's self-described Pollute Fan who's eaten the fertilized dug at home and on the side of the road in various places all over Asia. She said I mean. The dish can be daunting to try. But every culture has their own so-called weird dish that's an acquired taste for many scots have haggas. Swedes have stir strumming the Chinese have Durian Rian and Japanese have not though it's an excellent point so how does one eight ballot and more importantly what the heck does it taste like hung Hung suggests that all you really need is a pinch of salt and a couple of Herbs Belot is prepared sort of like a hardboiled egg fertilized. Egg is cooked in boiling water for about twenty to thirty minutes. And you eat it while. It's still warm if you want to consume it the typical Filipino way. You crack the shell of the egg and peel a small hole in the inner membrane. I'm Ben SIP. The warm fluid inside finally season the solid goods remaining with salt and vinegar then peel and eat but hung explains that. There's really no right or wrong way to get loot. And she says she knows plenty of people who eat it with Chile store. Vinegar the only thing you really want to avoid is Balut. That's too old as in the embryo inside is too old. So it's basically a duck that she says can taste and I quote life ruining hung said if you find find a proper place that prepares it then it should taste like a moose. The balloon itself should be mild. The yoke portion should taste rich and creamy. The broth portion should taste like an extremely dreamily rich chicken. Or Duck. Soup if it's undercooked or if the Balut is too old that it contained fishy or crunchy. That's not what you want. Incubation debated timing is indeed key for Balut and seventeen days of incubation. Is the sweet spot. Eggs aged just to that point should be boneless taste bike poultry and have a smooth texture like Moose Hung said Balut that age longer could have beaks bones and even feathers which are all still edible. But maybe not what you're looking for. And if you're not in Southeast Asia never fear. You don't have to travel too far to try this dish. Cities across the United States now boast any number of spots serving serving it.

Balut Christie Hung Southeast Asia Philippines Instagram China Asia Rhody Laos Cambodia Vietnam Snack Street United States Chile Durian Rian Vietnam Ben Sip Blue Thailand Herbs Belot
"rian" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

The Basement Diaries

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"rian" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

"Yeah and learn watching like professional actors work and see how they work and I think like having that kind of Experience when you're really young Can help form and shape. How you can you work? Yeah as you get older home but so if but if it's something like that you've already been to college or whatever I would I think it would definitely be trying to figure out like who who are the coveted acting teachers in town. Like how do I meet. People classes can can be expensive but there are a great way to meet people and get to know like some of the people in the industry whether they're casting or directors And I and you know I think I think something. That's hard and it's hard for every day actress to do it to that have been city for years. Is that you know if this is what you WANNA do. Every day that you're every day is an opportunity for you to go about doing that. Yeah so whether it's like working on your monologues or taking a class war reading plays or or watching your television television show Well however you WanNa do it yeah is that it takes a lot of time and dedication and the detail sometimes are the most important things and not forget about any of that stuff and You know I think like an probably. Just don't beat it yourself up too much when you are struggling to bookwork. Yeah Try Not to Judge yourself on other other people successes facebook although is great because you get to see all these people and all these pictures of people looking like you're having a great time or they're beautiful or or whatever. Sometimes you'll see people that you know like oh I'm going to be on this show tonight on CBS. Or I'm doing this thing sometimes and if you're not necessarily in a positive plays like why am I not. Yeah why don't want to look at that or like I l list or whatever and I think it's just you know. Try to be happy for the people that are in your life that are booking work and just know that I think hard work does pay off I I I it is a really tough business. Because it's they don't I don't really care about. It is very personal to you but I don't think you know people don't really care about your feelings. Yeah so you've gotta find a way to kind of build your shell up or your skin in a little bit And you know like it's not always going to be fun. Yeah but in. That might be a real big test about whether so you want to continue doing that or not because life is short. And you'RE GONNA WANNA be happy at some point. Yeah isn't that the ultimate goal. Yeah yeah so I mean I feel like there's Times where I'll take your show and we'll be doing a show and I'm like Humphrey Happy Right now. It's like well. Why did you take the show? Yeah then you go home and you tell your girlfriend that you're quitting and then the next day I'm like I figured it out. I loved it. I love this show. It's like who are you well. I think that's some great advice. Okay good yeah. It's not. It's not easy but it can't be rewarding. Yeah but if it's what you really want you obviously go after it but try to put yourself in a position where you can succeed a little bit easier for yourself. Yeah exactly like build a life for yourself. That's like outside. You're going to need that absolutely absolutely something whether it's your yoga or painting or drawing or something where you can use your brain in a different way. Yeah to help create become more well rounded person like I want to be like a renaissance man when I get when I'm like sixty or whatever like yeah but I like poetry and painting and acting and whatever. I don't know if that'll ever happen but I look at it's it yeah look at people who are like that and I'm like I wanna be like that. Yeah like I don't WanNa be a tormented actor who's just like pulling my hair out and like sitting at the the bar yeah like. I don't need that. Yeah I spent too much in my twenties worrying about stuff I couldn't control. Yeah we're thinking there was something wrong with me like like we talked about earlier. But that's not really good for your psyche. It's not really good for your You just your overall wellbeing like we. Everyone's really a unique. And you have a if you can figure out a way to convey that to an audience the convey that stuff. It's really special so it's really got well. Well I guess first of all you just gotTa believe in what you're doing. Yeah leaving who you are and do it with conviction definitely. Yeah that's a great place to end Kuan then well thanks so much much for coming up. Yeah and you were a delight forever. Yeah of course..

facebook CBS Kuan Humphrey
"rian" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

The Basement Diaries

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"rian" Discussed on The Basement Diaries

"Yeah people get something out of it. Yeah so where. Where is this Production being done so it's at metropolis. Oh great art center which is out in Arlington Heights. We open the beginning of February. But yeah the so like it's like I just kind of bounce around like so in the fall I did equis. That's where I met Bethany. Yeah and that was really intense and and then equis closed and then two weeks later after that I booked a guest starring role on a new show on Fox called next where I've heard of that. Yeah I'm not And so I I got this great role of a guy who's being influenced by this kind of computer like an Alexa kind of thing. Yep Up to Kinda create to create likes. His actually plugged in right. Yeah careful careful. They think premises like this guy. John slattery from Madman. Oh yes he's the lead. Oh Yeah Yeah. And I think he's created like this kind of supercomputer like how Alexa thing. Yeah and it's not like wants to kill it starting to go bad and so they're trying to stop it. They're trying to stop it. And and a half hackers and all these people trying to stop it and and then my angle is like I'm being influenced do some bad stuff. I'm like ex-military recently. Divorced live with my sister's basement so So that was like two weeks basically on set for that. Yeah so that was pretty wild eld. There's a lot of fun I got like to shoot a gun and Mike. Had you shot a gun before I had never I have Hab yes. I did a film years ago where I gotta shoot a rifle and a pistol but this was like a forty five and it was like they used like a a half load of the blank that they put in there but it's still like created so much noise and like We had to be really careful because I was aiming it pretty close to the camera said to be really careful where I was pointing it. Yeah but you could still really feel that in your hand like it felt. Did you have like a lot of training before that. Well no I didn't I mean I've shotguns here and there in my life I'm not a gun guy. Yeah so basically basically we shot a lot with replicas okay but then when it got time to actually do the shooting they had they had a specific guy there and he. I think he's only there when it comes comes to firearms or any kind of like weapon. Okay and so All all of the crew were briefed that earlier that morning and then when he kind of gave me the gun and we talked about like my hand placement you know where to put my fingers because basically at a dude like a two shots like yeah pop pop and so I was like well do I got to cock it. You know like do I cock it dry. Just pull the trigger. And he's just like it's all ready for you to go just going to hand it to you just to show you just click you just you just pull trigger. Pull it and so the first time I did it it was like and then they gave me out there like we need. We wanted to go. You'll pop like really fast. Like boop boop yeah so then I did that and it was pretty cool but I had to wear like earplugs and we were in this lady's basement like on the west side or was Her House we were in there all day. Shooting these scenes in the basement So I think one time one of the shells hit me in the Chaz like at bounced off the ceiling. So it's like it was like there's actual danger danger. Yeah you have to be careful. Everyone had to wear glasses and stuff. Yeah but so I gotta do some really cool things as a great experience and so I'll be interested to see what it looks like when it come. When does that show come out? Well I don't know I mean I. It's a mid season replacement for Fox Fox. Yeah I if that was filmed the fourth episode. So I don't know maybe like February. I'll cool kind of every couple every couple of weeks. I kind of check in on on Fox website. Check out next and see if they have an air but as of now. I don't believe they have an air date yet. Yeah and I think there's like more and more there's a lot great productions that are filmed in Chicago now too. Yeah well you have your old vic you can have your your Dick Wolf stuff but there are or other things that are filmed here There's some I'm really hoping that that just keeps growing. I mean they building that the sound stages news and stuff on the south side where since basins base. Yeah Yeah it's really growing and I think there may be some other locations where they want to try to you know make make other sound stages hopefully keeps moving they just they just filmed the new season of Fargo. Here that's right. Yeah Yeah I just saw the trailer for and I'm really really pumped for. Yeah you watch that show. I saw the first season. Yeah and I loved it. I seasons great. But I haven't watched since because I just I didn't have the TV capabilities for awhile. Right now. I have them. I've got to go back but I loved the first season. I thought it was fantastic. Yeah and I mean the great thing about that show is that you can kind of watch it out of order if you want. Because they're all like different season. It's kind of like American horror story. Yeah they're they're When I went to get my fitting done for next it was right next to the Fargo? Yeah people I was actually a background on that because I was just like I want to be in that show. Oh yes I'm capacity but yeah yeah it was cool. Because there's in the nineteen fifties so all this nineteen fifties garb cool. Yeah Awesome. Well where do you see yourself like going in the future. Like what's what's next for you. Well all I know next next next for me I think like I've been slowly building my like kind of. There's there's a couple of casting directors in town where I'm getting called in more for some some shows and and getting called in for some some some little bit bigger parts and getting eating move getting called in to call back as opposed to doing a pre read initial audition and then getting called back so I feel like I've kind of made a little headway. Yeah like with my agent and with a few casting people in town so like. I'm really hoping that that I do that. They keep moving forward. And I don't know I think I think like I've been really busy since the summer. So noises awful close in March and and I think I think I don't know I think I might want to take a little break from theater for awhile. Yeah I have a lot of projects that I WANNA right. So so you're a writer too well at times but I have some I have A. I have a play that that I'm in the course of I have a bunch career rights to do. I have a story that I wanNA tell trying to figure out the best way to like put it together like the best medium to do it in so I have a lot of paint as well. Oh cool so I feel like maybe I think maybe a goal in the next couple of years would be for me to kind of like kind of bring some of those projects to fruition and see if I could do something with them Obviously if an acting gig comes up you know I'll do deal with that as I as I can and but I think I think it'll be good to take a little break from theater acting for a while. Yeah it's so time consuming. Sometimes you don't get paid very much. Yeah and you're giving so much and you're giving so much of your time. Yeah so yeah I know I'm uh-huh where do I I am. The seeing myself is probably pretty much doing what I do now. Only I'm better at it. I'm being able to kind of like you know maybe I'll do a little directing I think like I've been so secular focused for so long with acting. Always been that way and because you were kind of like this is what I want to. I'm going to do and so then I I just remember I I. I think I mentioned you know it was for. I looked around had been four years and I was like I've been pretty much. Just been working this whole time and then I remember I ran into a period where it was like my first. I didn't have anything for over six months. Yeah no-shows auditions editions. Here and there but like I was going crazy. Did you have to work a day job during that period. Yeah I usually do work a day job regardless I just don't and have the funds to not but yeah but I I was going crazy and I just I felt I went through a series of like confidence issues. I think in the sensitive sort of like you know you know trying to figure out why this was happening as well as you get older you realize that that kind of stuff just happens happens. I mean it things ebb and flow. And you know it's it's it's it's easy to take things personally because it's so personal what you do exactly. It's it is you. You like going into a room right so then you don't get you. Don't get it you don't get the job. You don't get the callback. Yeah and it's like well. What the hell? What did I do wrong? What's wrong with me? Yeah like why AM I. Maybe it's because you're too short like you don't you know it's like you're you're you're not you're not big enough for you. Don't look enough like this person or you looked too. Who Much like yeah? There are so many things out of your control. It's like just focus on the things you can. Yeah I mean that's pretty much all you can do but it's hard. It's it's really hard. I thought it was to get my mind around that concept. Yeah I took really. It took me a long time before I started realizing I was like. Oh and so. I think it's still feel like I'm. I'm still trying to wrap my head. Yeah it's it's tough. I feel like more it's easier. Yeah as opposed to like you go in. Let's say once a month I mean you're going to be nervous because you're only in once a month as opposed to three times. Yeah you know. I had a spell this a couple of months ago where I was like I'm I'm just GONNA try to make sure I auditioned like every day this month. Almost I did like fifteen sixteen auditions that month but I was like by the end of it I was like I don't I don't care which this is. Just you know what I'm doing and you'll probably actually do better work that way. Yeah which is a weird. Yeah Yeah it's it's like I'm going in and I'm so focused and intense and stuff and he's probably really obvious that you're trying so hard. Yeah I I've noticed that a few. I've had had some additions recently. Where I've been like you know I was like my? They were about to cut my arm off because it was dying..

Fox Fox Alexa John slattery Arlington Heights Bethany Dick Wolf Fox Mike Chaz writer Chicago
"rian" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"rian" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

"The actors here the English actor Daniel Craig. He might seem at first to be an odd choice to play the southern Gent. Who just happens to be one of the country's most well-known detectives he's done southern accents before most most notably in Steven soderbergh's Logan Lucky recently? He he seemed to enjoy spreading out his acting wings. Still here. Craig is entirely in his element as a character actor her instead of a hunky leading man but few people saw Logan Lucky in the theater. So this is kind of his second chance to show the world that he is an outstanding actor with a lot of rage to play character character based comedy when he wants to the southern drawl does give him contrast to the family makes them a fish out of water instantly but one who can observe them with an outsider decide that is critical in to trying to figure out who might be in the right or wrong you gather that he might enjoy playing this particular role another time or two on the big screen now that he's grown weary very of playing James Bond into his fifties although he has one more James Bond coming out now once Ryan Johnson secured Daniel Craig for the role of the rest of the cast. kind of fell into place. Many other actors wanted to work with Craig especially with this juicy premise and a capable director in Ryan Johnson at the helm Johnson wanted not only known actors for the roles but ones that are so good at characters that you are instantly engaged and intrigued by them despite none of them getting a lot of screen time the one giving less of a caricature pitcher is the main protagonist and the last person to see Harlan alive. Marta on Dharma playing things mostly straight with normalcy to contrast these snooty well-to-do due eccentric types around here although inside the House and embraced somewhat by the family. Marta is like been wa a fish out of water. She may be physically present among the family but there remains that social barrier between them that keeps her also on the outside looking in even when she's inside the house among them after a slow. Start Ryan Johnson's film. It does grow increasingly absorbing once you get introductions to the family out of the way and people do begin to get implicated in the potential murder in it ups. The intrigue the generate attention is definitely enough to be forgiving the somewhat lengthy narrative and a climax reveals. That seems to go on quite a bit longer than you may be accustomed to seeing in a murder mystery especially one that actually does not hinge on you solving the mystery before the end. You're probably not gonna be able to do that. I guess it's ironic that as a who done it. It's not going to offer much in terms of surprises but as a suspense vehicle. There's more than enough off to keep eyes riveted into how things are going to unravel for this Kooky cast of characters. They're all played with impeccable. Gusto by terrific ensemble of actors actors. If this sounds like it might be up your alley. I think you should take a stab at seeing knives out so close call for me. I could give it three or three and a half stars but my rule of thumb when it comes to films on that border line is to give it the lowest of the two grades on a first time watch so I will give it three stars out of four if I see it again then I I like it as much or more if I notice a little bit more than I might have the first time out I might kick it up to that three and a half but for now three stars is why give it three stars on my skill means that I. I do think that this is a worthwhile entertainment for those people who like this kind of movie if you're a big fan of old fashioned type murder mysteries and you're a big fan of the actors in in this film. I think it gives them a lot of fun and memorable scenes to be able to make fun for you in the audience. It is a fun diversion and definitely one and I would recommend for people who like this genre of film so three stars out of four four knives out if you have your own thoughts on knives out and you want to impart them to me. You can find my contact contact information on my website. That's a quick dot net. You can also go there for links to my twitter. Feed my facebook page my instagram. All of those are also adequate ways of getting in touch with me. That's I quits dot net key W. I s. t. e. r. Dot net until next time. Thanks everyone please Joe your time anytime.

Daniel Craig Logan Lucky Ryan Johnson murder Gent James Bond Steven soderbergh twitter Joe Harlan
"rian" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"rian" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"No. You're on the line now for an impression. I'll do a There's little story with it. I'll do Michael Shannon impression when we were sitting move sitting around. And you know you're sitting in this room basement and you're doing like parlor games because something's taken an extra ten minutes and you're going around and maybe your plan a game where you talk about some of the the less prominent don't movies you've been in jobs you've had and you're kind of going around and eventually you get to to Michael Shannon and he gets up and he walks to another room room and you go. I guess you're not playing man and somebody else and then a few minutes later from the other room you here. Have you guys seen kangaroo. Jack hear the door slam all right. I can't verify if that's a good impression or not but it is. It is a great story. I don't even know is he. I don't even know if he's in Kangaroo Jack thing I'd ever even research whether that that is a good point it'd be amazing. If he wasn't our key was not. I mean it was was like Anthony Anderson and Chris O'CONNELL right Jerry. Sorry Jerry Gary Sorry Gay Oh okay. So Great Great job on the impression. Now say turn it off. Burt let the Games. ooh sorry. My microphone can't Cope it like usual. People brought really fun and bright creative name tags on figuring out. WHO IS GONNA be here because I kept saying people from knives our? It'd be here so everybody. Just go and pick the name tag. You liked the best and bring it back to you. See Oh no shit we gwan yeah just take time. Don't have to rush it because I want you to pick a good one. That is a good one. Rookie pitcher Goodwin. While you guys figure it out we'll go to brief commercial message. We'll be right back. Barbara Fads check it out. We'll just released a new podcast about the fantastic four called Marvel's based on the graphic graphic novel by Kurt. Busch and Alex. Ross Hope. I'm pronouncing that right Alex. Ross this show is Senator York City at. It doesn't incredible job of immersing you in the real world of the Marvel Universe and the lives of the people who inhabited the story takes place as the city braces for. It's first encounter with galactic.

Michael Shannon Jack Jerry Gary Marvel Ross Hope Alex Anthony Anderson Barbara Fads Burt Chris O'CONNELL Kurt Busch
"rian" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"rian" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"See Hollywood's biggest stars. Leonardo di Caprio Brad Pitt and Margot Robbie in Quentin Tarantino's once upon a time. I'm in Hollywood. Tie Magazine says DiCaprio and pit are marvelous together now with over twenty minutes of additional scenes an exclusive missive access to the set once upon a time in Hollywood watch it now on digital rated R Screen eh they fairly promptly except the fallback. If I don't walk out. He's playing the theme again. Hey Hey hey everybody. Sorry my name is Doug and I love movies. Come to you once again for on Franklin Avenue in Los Angeles Tuesday November twenty only six twenty.

Hollywood Leonardo di Caprio Quentin Tarantino Margot Robbie Brad Pitt Tie Magazine Doug Los Angeles DiCaprio