35 Burst results for "Rhino"

Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:21 sec | 3 weeks ago

Elephants Kill Suspected Poacher at South African National Park

"Something known his karma in life, and it seems to be what caught up with a suspected rhino poacher in South Africa's Kruger National Park. The guy and two bodies apparently spooked a herd of breeding elephants, causing the stampede. Culture was trampled by the two death by the elephants Check out more on the case, including what happened. The other two suspected poachers on the front page of wi rd dot com.

Kruger National Park South Africa
Would You Ever have Plastic Surgery?

WokeNFree

05:50 min | 2 months ago

Would You Ever have Plastic Surgery?

"Question is why. Do people have plastic surgery so indeed. This is a good one to ask. Personally i feel that people want to gain acceptance by changing their outward appearance. I think they feel by getting the enhancement. Their life will be easier than keeping their current physical appearance but there are actually some legitimate use cases but for plastic surgery. But i'm actually referring to the optional cosmetic type here not the reconstructive surgery that people will often undergo okay so i came across a blog post by doctor named dr vintage. Ns i believe his is as a twenty seventeen blog post article that actually broke down different reasons why people get plastic surgery and it goes as follows so reason number one because of an injury so common reason why people decide to have cosmetic plastic surgeries to correct a deformity or defect caused by injury so that seems legit similar to what you were saying. Outside of the the the you're saying you're not referring to reconstruct this falls within that. This is like a reconstructing exact something bad happened or not ideal happened and now you're doing something to correct the situation so that makes sense reason number two because of health issues. They'll health concerns or issues. Are other common reasons why people seek out surgery. Nasal surgery or rhino plastic is a common procedure for people with health issues. And i myself definitely have a. I think we both have a deviated subject. Yeah and i was told that if that was something i wanted to pursue i could and it's like ha no shot interesting definitely not ruling it out completely but not necessarily getting it today. Another reason would be to change something they don't like so if you don't not necessarily like injury or health issue but maybe for some other reason like maybe there's something you don't like about your body people even if there's no medical reason to change people still pursue this avenue to be able to similar to what you're saying which is to create or recreate an appearance for themselves and maybe it's for acceptance or other types of reasoning behind that but that's another reason and then i love this one reason for which is to look younger. Wow this seems to be very much the The the foothold for many folks in hollywood because a lot of our celebrities definitely have this kind of frozen look in time situation going on which is interesting. Take off years off their parents and then the other reason listed in the blog post is to feel more confident and goes on to say one. Last reason people choose is surgery it can help them feel more confident and give them a boost of self esteem. Whether you're having a procedure to fix an injury correct a health problem or change something you long been unhappy with at the end of the process wants. Your results are visible. You'll likely to feel happier and more in control of your body. That sentenced to me seems really loaded. You'll feel happier I think you might enjoy the new appearance. You have in a specific time period. Ray because our emotions are not stagnant they change and hopefully that you like how the surgery turned out. Sometimes you can go for surgery and not actually like the outcome. So i think that that's just a loaded statement there but you can become happy because of the new found attention of feet psychologists to really dive deep into the emotional connection between our physical appearance in our emotional state of being. I think that that's a very. It's a like a broad stroke statement there there. You can be unhappy surgery as well exactly because you're so many ways can feel it's not a guarantee that changing your identity makes you happier true to changed circumstances for sure but remains to be seen are those. Were definitely some valla reasons. Why people get plastic surgery. But we're gonna ask. Would you ever have plastic surgery. So i growing up and today rightly so growing up. I would say vanity was definitely something that was very big and prominent in my household and unfortunately you know i wish i wish i could say you know. I have overcome being being. Not necessarily i think every time i get a pimple of a blemish how how i struggle with that and not to say that i think i'm in any way perfect or in any way ideal but it is i struggle with visible parents my own physical parents and wanting to. I don't know i guess you could be in a state where it feels like. You have perfection but you don't have perfection because my entire life. I've always struggled with weight. I've always struggled with things about my body stretch. Mark scars like things like that. so the idea of plastic. Shorty was something that i definitely romanticized. When i was younger currently at thirty four years old. I would say i wouldn't knock it out of the park is a no but being a mom to be in really excited to our sign this summer. It creates another complication. Because i would not wanna go through any procedure that could threaten my life and take me away from to be one of the most important people ever make and no in my life which will be our son. So i would say if i needed to write your and if i didn't need to probably not but i need to meaning like if if you you know you never know what can happen in life. Rights originated reconstructive. Like maybe because. I do have a lot of congestion issues. Maybe if my deviated septum that would be the only way to make my nose like allow me to breathe and have my nose then. Maybe i would go for

Dr Vintage Valla Hollywood RAY Shorty
PSG knock Barcelona out of Champions League

ESPN FC

04:45 min | 2 months ago

PSG knock Barcelona out of Champions League

"Leboeuf and julia raw small. Joe's voice thin it finished then. Psg one celona one pse advancing five two on aggregate. This will i saw was fascinating possible and obviously all over. Ps gps she would then take the lead for an invite pay penalty. Extraordinarily brilliant goal from lionel messi would see one one dan belly had a million chances he couldn't convert and then on the stroke halftime really the defining moment in the game leeann are messy having that penalty save and he just felt then boss. Lana run out belief in the second half. We didn't quite see this team. Is that fed to sally. That penalty save changed everything. Of course he did even more. So when you watch it and then you watch it again and you see mode godly encroaching and clearly encroaching and so therefore if you have a system in place that could take a look at this and say you know what this is not allowed. This is against the laws of the game so therefore the penalty should be retaken and the truth of the matter. Is that when you see this happening. You have to question how come. Vr can take a look at this and say no. That's okay it's good play on. I don't quite understand it and to your point did change the dynamic of the game because as good as barcelona were in the first half the second half years they had possession years. They seem like they were about to create something but never really would that sort of confidence that they really thought that they were going to be able to come back in this match. I just don't think that after messy and it's not only the penalties after messy misses a penalty that means for this team going into halftime. Coleman cannot get this thing going for the second half off joel's how you love var because farrah's clear the thing that amazes me right. You've got to review penalties kayla novels off his line. No he's fine. Who was made razzi. Did he encroach yes. Seeing coach retake just forgot the second aides to be fair watching on television. I saw throw variety was encroaching. And i really thought they're gonna take this one again and when they were checking. I don't think that check in just for novice. I think there must be checking for everything. I agree with you. I don't understand. Why didn't they didn't to be taken. I don't understand why they give the pse pronouncing the first place anyway. I would not have given the long lay stamp on cardiac either through there were shambles the tonight in paris it was to the advantage of psg. So i'm not gonna complain. Though the lack of consistency again showing a niece is quite dramatic. Really english officials. Frank plain english while while blamed english. I can blame mr taylor and these systems. But i can blame the the world of referees. Were doing crazy things. And and and talking about consistency. It's an consistent all the way and we can talk and debate everyday about the decision. I mean that's that's insane. I can't even discuss about the penalty in the first penalty for procedure. The first leg. Dissenting up into celona. I wanna know where in which kind of football we are going into giving penalty for crazy stuff. I mean the penalty. Cardi cannot get the ball whatsoever. Okay longley never look at e cardi. So he's not willing to make any foul on e. cardi but we still decide to give a penalty because e cardi because longley stems only cardi. Not doing it on purpose again. So what kind of football is that is not the football. I loved the football where you know something can happen. But because he's not around the area of the dangerous area we don't really care because it's what it is especially if he's not mean if he's not a on purpose. Why do you wanna give a dose of penalties. That's crazy for me. I don't understand well the encroaching stuff. It's even worse because we also that we all named it but how they don't want to see it just a question we'd have to add them and it's not because the english because i'm sure will be french. It would be the same. It would be germany would be same. So it's it's awful. The food we are we are seeing right now. We're watching rhino. He's not the kind of alike on top of what we see from the players.

Celona Julia Raw Dan Belly Leboeuf PSG Razzi Lionel Messi Leeann Lana Cardi Mr Taylor Sally JOE Farrah Barcelona Kayla Coleman Longley Football Joel
Trump, RNC clash over using his name in fundraising

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Trump, RNC clash over using his name in fundraising

"Former president Donald Trump demands the Republican National Committee stop using his name and fundraising efforts former president Donald Trump and the Republican hierarchy appear at odds over money the Republican National Committee says it has every right to use trump's name in fundraising efforts claiming he reaffirmed the use this past weekend but in a statement trump slammed the RNC demanding no more money for rhinos short for Republicans in name only instead he's insisting donor sent money to his save America back through his personal website the party is eager to tap into his popularity with the base but that runs counter to trump's push to control the party through the use of his name and image I'm timid wire

Republican National Committee Donald Trump America
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 3 months ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
FACT SMACK: Spider Edition

Short Wave

04:46 min | 3 months ago

FACT SMACK: Spider Edition

"Okay kwong here's how this is gonna work all right. Sebastian gets roughly ten minutes facts to prove that his critter of choice. Spiders are the coolest critters. Okay got it now. These are general spider facts. So sebastian gets to call on any spider. He wants which gives him a lot to choose from. There are like roughly forty five thousand species of spiders and to give you a sense of context. Think about an animal that we see all the time or type of animal mammals right there are only about six thousand or so species of mammals that covers literally everything from shrews to wales to rhinos compared to the forty five thousand as of spiders nest so many spy seen mammals. Like it's just where it's at. Now where's that okay. So here's the thing it's not just. How many of them there. It's also where they live. Spiders are out here. Along in here is pretty much everywhere. See this is one of my favorite things about Planet earth is basically. Wherever i go. I can find a spider because they are spiders living everywhere from the inter titles on right at the ocean's edge to forests to dryest desert's where they build sand tunnels under the sand up on mountains not as regular mountains all the way up to the slopes of mount everest and everything in between a hold on he just said there are spiders that live on mount everest. Oh yeah clung. There's a famous one up. There called the himalayan jumping spider. They live up to twenty two thousand feet or sixty seven hundred meters above sea level. They are the spider the animal that is arguably the highest permanent resident on earth. They're living in the penthouse on our planet incredible. I wouldn't have thought i wouldn't have thought spider. I would've thought something else. Yeah i know me neither. But i love this because even its species name omni superstars is kind of perfect for talking smack. The omni superstar means stands above everything because it is literally above us at all points of the day of the night of the year. Watching down a bunks. All be lower animals. Identify lower animal. You know about that spider. Maybe your soul mate. All right what else do you got supplier okay. So the one that sent me over the spider edge wong. Did you know that there are multiple types of spiders who live at least part-time underwater. Like i'm talking seawater freshwater. They're out there. I mean you must find that amazing because you can barely swim. Wow wow wow. Wow emily everyone else was getting to talk. Smack didn't turn honestly fair but her full fare but herve okay. Okay so anyways. There's this spider that lives underwater called the diving bell spider and they basically make a sifi like underwater dome of air. That's their air pocket. Go there when they need to breathe and the rest of the time they just go out and they bring a little like bubble of air around their lungs which on a spider on the bottom of the abdomen. Bring a bubble of air around with that and they're just walking around underwater. They are catching food under their catching fish catching small insects and their entire life every part of their lifespan from birth to reproduction to death. Okay even i. A person who doesn't think about spiders will admit this incredibly cool that spiders are really living all over. The place got range qualm. They got rained. I don't mean like as a group of species. Some spiders legit have ranged. in fact many spiders can fly. I mean technically it's called ballooning but they're flying get out what they'll do is they. Basically will just release silk into the wind and it goes up and basically turns into like a kite. But when you're a light enough to be a spider something that's like a kite is basically like an air balloon out of here and okay. Here's the thing though. It's not just them catching the wind. There's evidence that spiders can sense earth's electric fields and take advantage of that to shoot up into the sky

Kwong Sebastian Herve Okay Wales Emily
FBI Dallas office working to identify individuals involved in Washington, DC protests

WBAP Morning News

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

FBI Dallas office working to identify individuals involved in Washington, DC protests

"Is is open open more more than than 275 275 cases cases nationwide nationwide against against individuals individuals believed believed have have been been involved involved in the Capitol Hill riots. Special agent in charge of the Dallas Field office. Matthew Discern, No says the department is working to identify anyone who was involved in those protests. Just analyst have been gathering evidence sharing intelligence and working with federal prosecutors toward bringing appropriate charges, and that includes those that are high visibility like Larry Rendell, Brock Jr and Jenna Ryan. And those that are not as publicly well known like Troy Anthony smocks. Smocks has been charged with knowingly and willfully transmitting threats in interstate commerce. FBI says he's been posting on social media calls for armed Trump supporters to hunt down those he calls traitors identified by smocks. As Democrats, rhinos and tech executives. What does the

Dallas Field Office Matthew Discern Larry Rendell Brock Jr Capitol Hill Jenna Ryan Troy Anthony Smocks FBI Donald Trump
Getting Relative With the Inevitable and Catching Greenlights with Matthew McConaughey

Dose of Leadership

05:49 min | 5 months ago

Getting Relative With the Inevitable and Catching Greenlights with Matthew McConaughey

"Matthew mcconnahey on dose of leadership. I can't believe it what was show my friend good to be here. It's a great topic to talk about will never go out of style talking about this job. Yeah no can. I say i love the book i read it and i listened to it to different experiences and i'm glad i did both because the visual aspect of the book was i listened to it i because it is easier for me being on a plane and stuff but then i read it and i. It's like i got two different experiences. I got a lot out of it doing both ways. I he said that to you about a few bums. Somebody said to me. When i read it they they read it it with their own voice. Yeah in the hear me read it audio only for short hair my voice and hey heard laughed in places that they didn't laugh when they read it herbie point out certain things that maybe they'd skipped over and toast the reading same book but getting two different things out of it each. Yeah no it was just great. And i think it was. I don't know it was a great book. For the time i think for the year i mean it was profound a lot of ways in the sense and i thought well god this would be a good topic because there's so many areas of leadership and i don't know if you've ever looked at it that way but at least it's a big umbrella a lot of stuff you talk about in here and this show is about like how to kind of navigate through life and that's what the book is rate and i love the concept of the green lights but to me the i talk a lot about on the show and i used to come from the marine corps. The biggest thing i learned is like how to be a composed forcing a chaotic situation. And that's what your book was to me was like you seem to embrace this idea. That look man. It's never smooth. It's never a straight line it's jagged it's up and down and those red lights and the yellow lights that we come across. There's a that's the stuff that kind of shapes us and there's green light assets. I think is the term that you used that are inside of those things that resonates with me because i think life is about. You can lead a significant life if you can learn how to be composed force in a chaotic situation. And that's what i got out of your book. How does that resonate with you. I say i love that term to please remind me that i got to write it down now but i really like composed force in chaotic situation. Yeah i mean you know. I don't care what your i don't think it matters what someone's beliefs are whether they're a believer in another life after this or if they're sort of hey life's all about cruelty. We're just dying every day. That's all that's all fine or if you're an eternal optimist you know every day great. We've got another son rose for me. That wasn't guaranteed ever way. Jeter ever end of the spectrum anyone's from either way the more proactive the more constructive. The more the more healthy more fun choice is to go well by believe in that you know we're just dying off every day in the world's cruel and it sucks to be here that's fine shake hands that so now we might as well do it with pleasure in it with dignity. Is that bring that that that that line later in the book right. Say in those times where we feel like. It's all for nothing more. The math of the world adds up to say. Oh tall for nothing. What it's in those moments that are part and parcel with only. It's all for everything right. The alternative you know. And i'm wishing hallmark card delusion i'm trying to. I'm not a fan of that stuff. I'm not a pep rally. Cheerleader guy. i'm trying to find practical stuff. I've tried to find it my own life and of it is to pull another line for the book. If you do have an island point of view okay well then purchased this once. you know. it's a near dawn right. So if you're going to say oh. It sucks within go. Well okay gonna make the best of it however so i think that's what you what you're loading to in certain times where my red and yellow lights in the l. All having when. I bring up something as simple as sense of humor being default emotion on not within the contradictions that that i'm not i'm not i'm using bring that up. Say that doesn't deny the crisis now. It's just another tool to help you deal with it. It's more survival. And some of these things maybe thrive but at least can use to help better survive. And how little more satisfaction getting through this rodeo. We're all in right. you know. it's not. It's not even fair to say it's a a a typical book that i mean it does. It does have things that you can apply to your life. But it's not a how to book is a memoir sweat slash. These are the things that worked for me. Take it if you like it. If not i don't i don't you know this is what this is. What my life is did. You is that i guess. What was the intent when you set out to right. It wasn't to help people like myself or help other people or was it just to kinda get your authentic self out. There was a deleted legacy for your kids. it was all the above. What was it. I mean i mean somewhat all the above started off i thought it was gonna be before i opened up that big trust of journals to see what i had in them ones. I've been keeping for the last thirty six years i i. I had an idea of what i thought i was gonna find. You and i thought it would be very academic. I thought it was going to be very self help. I thought it was going to be sort of. If then if then and i like some of that but again back can start to lean into that hallmark or world and self has got. You know we've all i've got. I've got a decent relationship with with with self help. But i like i like my sort of wisdom to have little more context and allow me the individual to have the power to go rhino acting. Apply this in a different way and my position and this is i can apply in a particular way that no one else can. We each can do that.

Matthew Mcconnahey Marine Corps Jeter
Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Heart Disease?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

06:22 min | 5 months ago

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Heart Disease?

"There i'm monica rhino. And you are. Listening to the nutrition diva podcast. Welcome this week. We're talking about the latest study to throw shade on artificial sweeteners. A study published last month in the journal of the american college of cardiology found. That soda drinkers have a higher risk of heart disease than those who do not drink sweetened beverages now the association between sugar consumption and heart disease risk is not new as a person's sugar intake increases so does their risk of cardiovascular disease and this association by the way is seen regardless of the age the body weight or the exercise habits of the person even among those with otherwise healthy diets. Lots of fruits and vegetables lean meat whole grains and that sort of thing heart disease risk increases with added sugar intake. The more surprising thing about this study however was that those who drank a lot of sweden soda had the same elevated risk as people who drank a lot of sugar sweetened soda. The risk of heart disease was about one third higher among those who were high consumers of either type of soda compared to low consumers that means if ten out of one hundred low consumers developed heart disease than thirteen out of one hundred high consumer would. So let's talk a little bit about how sugar can hurt your health. Those who consume more added. Sugars are more likely to be overweight. And that certainly contributes to heart disease risk. But even when you're not overweight a diet high in sugar can raise your triglycerides levels. That's the amount of fat that is circulating in your bloodstream. It may also lead to fatty deposits in the liver and these could be some of the mechanisms that would explain the link between sugar intake and heart disease risk but none of that explains how artificial sweeteners might increase cardiovascular risk. And that's the real mystery here. There's no obvious mechanism to explain how artificial sweeteners might hurt. Your heart and this is not the first mystery regarding zero calorie sweeteners. Despite being low in sugar and calories artificial sweetener us has been linked with increasing rates of diabetes and obesity. Now early on theories were proposed to try to explain this. Maybe we thought the sweet taste somehow tricks the body into responding as if it is actually sugar or perhaps artificial sweeteners. Increase our appetite or make us crave sugar research designed to test. Those theories has so far. Come up empty handed. Well not completely empty handed but as is so often. The case research in humans fails to bear out preliminary findings in lab rats. The best theory. We have at the moment to explain. This apparent paradox is that the artificial sweeteners might change the makeup of our gut. Microbiome in ways that promote weight gain or diabetes and unlike the other hypotheses there is some human research to support this and perhaps something similar is underlying this latest finding regarding heart disease. But i think the larger point here is that the data consistently contradict the notion that artificial sweeteners are somehow healthier or perhaps less unhealthy than sugar. Both are fine in moderation of course but high consumption of either one. Either sugar or artificial sweeteners is linked to poorer health outcomes. The keyword here of course is linked as the artificial sweetener industry would very much like to remind everyone correlation is not causation and most of the data that we have on this question our observational. They come from big epidemiological studies that look at dietary patterns and health outcomes over long stretches of time and that sort of steady cannot prove that artificial sweeteners cause any of those health problems but they do often seem to be nearby when these problems occur so should we quit drinking soda. Do we need to change what we're doing based on this latest research. I think that really depends on what you're doing if you occasionally have a diet soda. I don't think you have anything to worry about for that matter if you occasionally have a regular soda. I don't think that's cause for alarm either. But if you're drinking soda whether regular or diet on a daily basis that might be more of a concern aside from whatever affects the sugar or the artificial. Sweeteners are having on your body. Sweetened foods and beverages whether they're sweetened with sugar or with artificial sweeteners. Don't contribute much nutrition to your diet and they may easily crowd more nutritious foods out of your diet. The point is that reaching pry diet soda instead of a regular soda doesn't really constitute a nutritional upgrade if you really want a healthier alternative choose water or sparkling water and by the same token if you're looking for a healthier sweet treat a piece of fresh or dried fruit is going to be a choice than an artificially sweetened brownie or ice cream. My advice is to exercise the same degree of moderation with sweeteners. As you would with added sugars now as you recall the guidelines for added sugars are to limit them to about twenty five grams per day. And remember we don't count the naturally occurring sugars in fruit or dairy products towards that total. But we do include honey molasses maple syrup and other so-called natural sweeteners. So what does that translate to in terms of artificial sweeteners. The equivalent of twenty five grams per day in a non caloric sweetener would be about three packets or one diet soda per day

Cardiovascular Disease Monica Rhino Heart Disease Risk Journal Of The American Colleg Diabetes Sweden Obesity
How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

Healthcare Triage Podcast

06:13 min | 6 months ago

How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

"We have two guests today. the first is alan pal quits. He is the senior research professor of medicine and president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. Also joining us is bruce lamb. He is director of stark neuroscience institute. Welcome both of you. Thank you so we usually like to start off by asking people how they got to the position that they're in like how does one become a senior research professor of medicine allen and what is president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. So if you could tell us a bit about what you do and how you got here so thank you very much earned so I think my experience has been somewhat atypical. In terms of coming into academia. I spent twenty eight years at the leeann. Company started off as a bench level. Scientists of medicinal chemist and eventually in my last eleven years woods the vice president discovery chemistry research and technologies where oversaw small molecule drug discovery across all the areas of therapeutic interests that lily so this was a very rich experience and and after being there for quite some time. I had the opportunity to make an early retirement at the end of two thousand seventeen. And i was thinking about my next steps and i had developed long relationship with a not shaker. Who the rhinos. The key leader here at a school of medicine and asked me to come over and help with the position. Health initiative than any perspective that i could provide in and input in you know things kind of transpired in i came over as a professor of medicine and eventually met bruce and you know a lot about our work together here in the past year and really create some great synergies and then as i spent some time that you another opportunity came up in in the community and this lousy indiana bioscience research institute which is an organization that really had a ton of blossomed out of a vision to really create additional note of innovative research and capabilities. That would draw the community together and diorite been around for about five or six years. And now i'm there to really help create additional bridges and create new scientific directions that really elevate The the sciences here in the mid west. And hopefully beyond great and bruce sort of what what has been your experience. How did you get to hear. Thanks a lot erin. So i'm a phd level basic scientist by training. I was at johns hopkins At case western. Reserve university. In cleveland clinic in doing science research into alzheimer's disease actually for my entire career and then I saw this unity to come to indiana in early. Two thousand sixteen to lead out this translational neuroscience research institute Stark neurosciences research institute. And it's a really unique Place that brings together. Clinicians basic scientists translational People now drug discovery as well sort of brings everybody together into one location to really do innovative and interdisciplinary research. So we wanted to talk today about alzheimer's disease. So i'd really like to start by just for our listeners. What is alzheimer's disease. Yeah so alzheimer's. Disease is obviously a brain disease And it was first described. And i think the history is important because it sort of still sort of how we've sort of you. The disease was described by a bavarian neuropathologist us alzheimer in early nineteen hundreds And he had a patient who had dementia sort of loss of memory She had paranoia clinical features that she had and then when she died Being a neuro pathologist he looked in her brain did standard stains at the time and described this unique brain pathology which still even today sort of defines the disease and that was primarily that there were two primary major neuro-pathological hallmarks that he observed in the brain tissue one where these amyloid Sort of the sticky substances which were aggregating in the brain and the other words what we currently today called neurofibrillary tangles which is another Brain pathology and even today it still sort of those two primary brain pathologies that are pathan demonic for alzheimer's disease. However i will say that as we've gotten into the modern age and in our began to understand the complexities reprieve that alzheimer's disease is a is a complex set of probably multiple disorders which are very related to one. Another but actually. There's probably not one set of alzheimer's disease out there. So is it. Is it just sort of like a neuro degenerative. Cognitive decline is we just believe is because of a few specific reasons so there's clearly a lot of neurodegenerative cognitive decline syndromes but alzheimer's is just a group where we think we know where the pathologies right sort of defines. You know one particular type and again. There's there's many different types that this is probably the most common one and it's also very much age related so you really see sort of a doubling after about the age seventy seventy five doubling every five years of of the incident so with sort if the baby boomers reaching the age of sixty five at ten thousand. A day right. Now that's why there's the big increase in number of cases is there a typical course. Does it usually hit a certain age. And last a certain amount of time. It's pretty variable You know there is a sort of a prototypical alzheimer's disease. But if you talked to the clinicians. And i'm not a clinician. But if you talked conditions they say if you've seen one case of alzheimer's disease you've seen one case of alzheimer's disease You know that really. There's so much variation in how how people present their how it progresses within those people So it's it's pretty variable. Obviously the common underlying features certainly memory loss at least at a general level but within that you have other changes sometimes with personality disorders of all variety of other things that can come along with alzheimer's

Indiana Biosciences Research I Alzheimer Alan Pal Bruce Lamb Stark Neuroscience Institute Indiana Bioscience Research In Reserve University Stark Neurosciences Research I Bruce Allen Cleveland Clinic Brain Disease Johns Hopkins Erin Neuro Degenerative Indiana Paranoia
How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

Healthcare Triage Podcast

04:44 min | 6 months ago

How We Study Alzheimer's and Potential Treatments

"We have two guests today. the first is alan pal quits. He is the senior research professor of medicine and president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. Also joining us is bruce lamb. He is director of stark neuroscience institute. Welcome both of you. Thank you so we usually like to start off by asking people how they got to the position that they're in like how does one become a senior research professor of medicine allen and what is president and ceo of the indiana biosciences research institute. So if you could tell us a bit about what you do and how you got here so thank you very much earned so I think my experience has been somewhat atypical. In terms of coming into academia. I spent twenty eight years at the leeann. Company started off as a bench level. Scientists of medicinal chemist and eventually in my last eleven years woods the vice president discovery chemistry research and technologies where oversaw small molecule drug discovery across all the areas of therapeutic interests that lily so this was a very rich experience and and after being there for quite some time. I had the opportunity to make an early retirement at the end of two thousand seventeen. And i was thinking about my next steps and i had developed long relationship with a not shaker. Who the rhinos. The key leader here at a school of medicine and asked me to come over and help with the position. Health initiative than any perspective that i could provide in and input in you know things kind of transpired in i came over as a professor of medicine and eventually met bruce and you know a lot about our work together here in the past year and really create some great synergies and then as i spent some time that you another opportunity came up in in the community and this lousy indiana bioscience research institute which is an organization that really had a ton of blossomed out of a vision to really create additional note of innovative research and capabilities. That would draw the community together and diorite been around for about five or six years. And now i'm there to really help create additional bridges and create new scientific directions that really elevate The the sciences here in the mid west. And hopefully beyond great and bruce sort of what what has been your experience. How did you get to hear. Thanks a lot erin. So i'm a phd level basic scientist by training. I was at johns hopkins At case western. Reserve university. In cleveland clinic in doing science research into alzheimer's disease actually for my entire career and then I saw this unity to come to indiana in early. Two thousand sixteen to lead out this translational neuroscience research institute Stark neurosciences research institute. And it's a really unique Place that brings together. Clinicians basic scientists translational People now drug discovery as well sort of brings everybody together into one location to really do innovative and interdisciplinary research. So we wanted to talk today about alzheimer's disease. So i'd really like to start by just for our listeners. What is alzheimer's disease. Yeah so alzheimer's. Disease is obviously a brain disease And it was first described. And i think the history is important because it sort of still sort of how we've sort of you. The disease was described by a bavarian neuropathologist us alzheimer in early nineteen hundreds And he had a patient who had dementia sort of loss of memory She had paranoia clinical features that she had and then when she died Being a neuro pathologist he looked in her brain did standard stains at the time and described this unique brain pathology which still even today sort of defines the disease and that was primarily that there were two primary major neuro-pathological hallmarks that he observed in the brain tissue one where these amyloid Sort of the sticky substances which were aggregating in the brain and the other words what we currently today called neurofibrillary tangles which is another Brain pathology and even today it still sort of those two primary brain pathologies that are pathan demonic for alzheimer's disease. However i will say that as we've gotten into the modern age and in our began to understand the complexities reprieve that alzheimer's disease is a is a complex set of probably multiple disorders which are very related to one. Another but actually. There's probably not one set of alzheimer's disease out

Indiana Biosciences Research I Alan Pal Bruce Lamb Stark Neuroscience Institute Alzheimer's Disease Indiana Bioscience Research In Reserve University Bruce Translational Neuroscience Res Allen Johns Hopkins Erin Brain Disease Cleveland Indiana Paranoia Dementia
Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

Coronacast

07:25 min | 7 months ago

Are we just going to have to get used to dealing with outbreaks?

"So one of the things that Australia has really relied on throughout the hall coronavirus pandemic sci-fi is lockdown as a way of getting a handle on what's happening and keeping cases to a minimum. We've seen that really happening in Victoria and a few days ago a special envoy from the World Health Organization was talking about how lockdowns shouldn't be the only sort of tool. That countries used to Cape a handle on the coronavirus and I think that some people in Victoria have sort of used those comments from the WHO as a reason to sort of say, we should be lifting Victoria's lockdown now but it's a bit more nuanced than that. Isn't it? This nuanced? We went into lockdown in March largely to stop the growing pandemic but also to allow the infrastructure for contracting testing to get into place, which is what the WHO, who say. There was an outbreak in Victoria now that I break in Victoria would have killed many many more people had they not to lockdown but in part the outbreak was due to a failure in contracting and testing at that time. So in many ways, they fulfilled whol criteria for lockdown, which is time to get your contact tracing and testing into shape, and in fact, through the second wave in. Victoria that's indeed what they've done some situation where Victoria New South. Wales are pretty XY Pixie in terms of unknown cases number of cases a day. Sorry Pixie. What the hell does that mean some kind of Scottish thing I grew up with meeting. You know roughly equal fair fair enough trying to get a new phrase into the Australian dictionary from Scotland. Anyway. Back to the point the point being. That, you said whereas in Victoria roughly equal and the argument is probably quite well made that there's not a lot of reason why you shouldn't have the restrictions roughly the same in both states the problem of Victoria is you don't WanNa let the break off suddenly because people will just start turning up on masters include a beach which means crowding into trams, etc, etc. so you've got up. Do fairly slowly and carefully, but the endpoint quite soon could be a similar situation to New South. Wales. But we've got to get used to and it's not a trivial phrase a new covid normal. We promised a few days ago that we were going to stop comparing new, south Wales and Victoria, but let's just do it one more time new south. Wales does seem to have like you say. Exceed Pixie level of similar levels virus to what we're seeing in Victoria or at least the confirmed cases that are coming through, and they don't have as many restrictions on them, and we do know as well that it's probably at least a year before we're going to have any kind of vaccine available to that sort of like what we're thinking of as being a trigger for going back to what we used to have as a normal life is what's happening in New South. Wales. Perhaps, a model for what Ustralia could look like over the next year. Well, I think West Australians queenslanders south. Australians would bridal a that because they've got almost nothing happening and they're saying, well, why should we have? Wills has belichick focused on new, south Wales and Victoria for the moment. But I think it is something that queenslanders and others need to be cognizant off is this something we should get used to what we're talking about here for people who don't live in New South Wales is an outbreak from GP clinic now, getting used to is different from getting complacent. So yes I think you gotta get used to the fact that there will be small outbreaks but what we should not do tolerate them and so they're. They're not to be tolerated and our behavior needs to change in the short to medium term which is. Continuing careful social distancing. I believe in new. South. Wales. It should be mandatory mask in public transport just as an extra layer of security. You don't seem to be going that way and really getting on top of outbreaks and people being prepared to get tested if symptoms are in areas where there are outbreaks and if we can do that, then we can cope with these outbreaks but we can't just say. Another outbreak. Let's move on. It's another outbreak. Oh, this could be the moment where this could be the hotel quarantine equivalent moment that we hadn't. In Victoria, whereas if we ignore it is going to get out of control. So get used to not really be able to deal with yes. But just quickly on that, we're talking about being able to be responsive to outbreaks but we see in Shepperton in regional Victoria, they had a the little outbreak happening there people have told to go on to get tested they've gone to go and get tested. They've done what's been asked but they haven't been. Able to access testing this huge queues, how are we going to be out of style up to these? Well, that's for health departments to sort out, but they've got to be ready for particularly in rural and regional areas because this is something that you just need one truck driver to have arrived in a place in spread it and we've already seen somebody hiding away in trying to get into Queensland you just need one person and to move into our networks and off. So everywhere it's got to be ready and you to be ready for scale up and a plan for scale up so. Somebody throws a switch and people start with doing and they set up to prop up clinics, and within a few hours you've got it all going and that's what people have got to plan for and the best thing that can happen is you never have to institute your emergency response, but your emergency response has got to be really Schmidt and if he wants to know. More about how we've tooled up for contact tracing, how good it is, they listen to yesterday's Khurana cast with Ryan McIntyre where we covered a lot of these issues and that chat with Rhino was so interesting and there was stuff in there that we couldn't fit into yesterday's show. So we thought we'd bring it back again in prerecorded form to answer a question from Ingrid. Where Ingrid's ask if a person who has the virus uses a toilet does the next person inhale the virus spray in the toilet is flushed with the lead up and is the virus in urine faeces? Yum. This is just the sort of question that croquettes listeners love energy with toilets. Let's have a listen to yesterday's comments by Rhino McIntyre, which weren't in the krona cast. So this is a bonus we're talking about. And toilets on aeroplanes. We do know that there is a risk with closed transport vehicles with its planes buses. There's been a number of outbreaks already described on airplanes on buses and other vehicles including A. A navy ship whether it was a very, very high tech right? the Theodore Roosevelt in the US. The risk isn't just from Aerosol, droplets spread I mean we know that the highest risk isn't people sitting closest to the infected person and that's been born out in previous studies with diseases like to book your license and Maizels. But the toilet is also respected. There was one study where they were known infected people on board everybody was wearing a mosque and one of the people who became infected took the mosque off in the toilet. So we know that flushing the toilet can create aerosolize -ation. Probably. Less. So on an airplane toilet because of the nature of those toilets that don't have water swilling around, but they still would be rissole generation from the flushing action. So, the hall toilet is probably highly contaminated. So even if you wash your hands afterwards, you could breathe in contaminated aerosols than when you come out even just touching the door handle would be a risk. So that's that's probably one of the real hot spots on an airplane. That was Professor Rhino McIntyre who is professor of global biosecurity at Curbing University of New South Wales

Victoria Wales South Wales Victoria New South Professor Rhino Mcintyre New South New South Wales Curbing University Of New Sout World Health Organization Cape A Pixie Australia Ingrid Shepperton Scotland Theodore Roosevelt Ustralia Rhino
Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

Coronacast

04:55 min | 7 months ago

Why is the seemingly simple science of masks so complicated?

"The advice on masks has changed a lot over the course of this pandemic. Hey at the beginning, we were getting some mixed messages about where the mosques were effective at all whether perhaps they could do more harm than good and then over time and we have talked about it a lot on this show already and you acquire vocal quite early on. In the pace that mosques are fictive and that they should be made mandatory in the heavy made mandatory in Victoria. The lightest that we know about what types of face coverings provide the most protection against carbon. So let's just do a little bit of the history going back to the can remind ourselves in the beginning World Health Organization and expert groups such as ours in the study were down on what's called Aerosol Spray. They thought it was just about droplets nearby and you pick it up off of surfaces. Out of date research, it's important but not all aerosol spread we're just talking way. I'm talking if you were in the room with me and Snort well-ventilated room, you could catch it from me over a period of an hour or so even though you're socially distanced happens in restaurants, choir practices and so on. And that's made people realize around the world that mask wearing is really important and some countries of the world they already knew that. So we've drifted towards mask-wearing. What we know that works is at least a two layered cotton mask when the inner layer is quite closely woven in the outer layer is going to be the waterproofing or a surgical, an approved surgical mask or an in one thousand five masks that doesn't have one of those one way valves on the front because they'll just spray the virus sites to people just remember that you're protecting others by wearing a facemask others so. That's the story facemasks. Now, there's a couple of pieces of research which are out in the last few days, which are quite interesting on face masks because one of the negative findings on face masks are only from one of the proponents of face massacres, Rhino McIntyre, from the Kirby Institute in Sydney she and others did a randomized trial in Vietnam with the people who were homemade masks, we're more likely to transmit viruses. This is a few years ago before covet. They even had worries at the beginning. This was actually about the way these masks were being maintained and turned over and so on the. Reanalysis in the British Medical Journal and shown in fact, it was the way they were looking after these cloth masks and the masks that were just hand washed in warm water in a basin and heart to dry they continue to transmit the virus. But if you went into a hospital laundry or you wash them properly and sixty degrees in a proper cycle, then they were actually. Okay. So it's the way that these were maintained and the second one was face shields. Face shows were allowed in Victoria allowed anymore by themselves because they continue to spread the virus and a study of healthcare workers in India has shown that the addition of a face shield to face masks significantly reduces the chances of healthcare workers being infected. So facials do work as an extra device, but not instead of masks healthcare workers in do generally use face shield Sunday it's part of the PPI, and so they're pretty well sorted, but they're still being a problem in Australia with healthcare worker infection. Either because they've not been wearing p. not being provided and in many cases, we still don't know how many health care workers caught the infection sonoma's I'm going to reveal something to the audience about you and your e mailing habits is that you love to either get up very late at night early in the morning and look three research journals. It's a continuous variable by the way. Yes. And then it just like like randomly with research articles that we should talk about. So let's just rip through a whole bunch of them right now you're why should you sleep? You know exactly if you're not skin asleep, why should I be at asleep? So first of all, what's the chances that a baby could catch covid from? It's Mother's breast milk, I? Mean this is a very live topic and with meeks findings mean baby there are some reports of babies, newborn babies, catching SARS COV to, and this is a very small study looking at breast milk and really no convincing. Evidence that the breast milk trend had SARS COV to it. Maybe one sample had some doubts about it. But essentially in this small study has to be said, no evidence of transmission of sauce cartoon, the breast move what about a win we're taking a swab from someone's noise to test them from covid. Is there a best way of doing this? You know really interesting piece from an ent surgeon talking about how sometimes people who are taking swabs, and of course, this is in the American context get the anatomy. Wrong. So we think that the way into the nose is straight up. Since painful when in fact, it's actually imagine you've got your nose it's actually straight back and it's actually quite deep. So it could be centimeters back. So you've actually the swamp has got to go quite far back, and if you tell people this won't be uncomfortable. You're Aligarh it will be uncomfortable, and so he's got to go right back and quite deep to get to the. Back of the nose in the throat, the nasal ferrings. So it's not up it straight back my eyes were watering just looking at it either way it sounds

Victoria World Health Organization British Medical Journal Rhino Mcintyre Aligarh Meeks Kirby Institute Vietnam Sydney Australia India
How can we safely reopen international borders?

Coronacast

05:02 min | 8 months ago

How can we safely reopen international borders?

"So there's been a lot of talk in the last couple of days about the international border and particularly from the Prime Minister says that international rivals from safe corona virus countries could avoid Herta quarantine and instead of going into Mandatory Hotel quarantaine people from those countries could go and do it in their own home. There's been quite a few questions about this coming through it. ABC. Dot Net dot edu slash corona cast including one from Kathy who says, what does Norman think of the PM suggestion about that Safe Countries Avoiding Hotel Quarantine? So this is an a nuanced, not easy problem to deal with. So there are some countries which do have very low prevalence of the virus. There's not many of them by the way, but there are some in which case you have people quarantining at home. You probably have large numbers quarantining. Technology rights even from paces with slightly higher prevalence. You only one person to get out by the way and spread the virus and you've got a major outbreak on your hands. So there is a risk they are, but you could have ankle bracelets which people could pay for, and that would be cheaper than hotel quarantine for two weeks you could have geo location on your phone you could. Have fines for giving you a phone to somebody else. But you've got to be able to know that the police whoever's going to administer canister this at huge scale, but it's possible to do that with modern technology. So it's not a bad idea and it could loosen top and it could listen up for international students particularly if you add rapid testing to the equation, but we don't ask that. Level of imposition from the government on ankle bracelets for people who are infected domestically and I selecting at Harmon we've we've spoken about this on chronic hospital four but also kathy also makes the point that one of the countries named was Japan which had more than four hundred cases on September twenty eighth alone, and she says as a Melbourne Ian in lockdown she's furious because as as you've noted, Norman that it only. Takes one case to to start another wife Yes. So you've just got to be very, very careful and this is not something you could turn on tomorrow. This is something that's got to have an infrastructure in place to make it manageable and to be as fail safe as it possibly can be. The Abbey's reported a couple of experts saying that it actually could work one was Robert and the other was paid calling. So. Do you think it's worthwhile though like if wages taking only a few countries admittedly with low A. numbers that it would help or is it just sort of opening up this slow step towards making it back to trying to get life back to normal? One way that you could do this is open it up to lure countries, get the system, right get a working with ankle bracelets or however you're going to do it get the systems in place and do it with relatively few travelers from Lewis places while Hotel Corentin is going on in parallel you could actually compare the two and see what the rate. Of positivity is you could combine it with rapid testing before you leave when you arrive and the middle of the of the quarantine periods, you could do this at scale with international students from Laura places like China one assumes that China at the moment Israel Risco that you can't be sure. So there are ways of dealing with this, which is not. That all of a sudden on the fifteenth of October hypothetically just starting to do this you might just ease your way into it learn how to do it in a safe way, and then you could scale up quite rapidly. Having said that you got to experts saying this is a good idea not not really a problem and you go professor Rhino, McIntyre Who's been pretty accurate predictions right through this Pandemic University of new, south Wales saying well, numbers would soon overwhelm you and you be able to cope. It does seem a bit strange talking about international arrivals to Australia win still many state borders are getting better but they're still closed. I mean you couldn't come down and visit me in Tasmania at the moment. But I'd have to quarantine. You'd have to come visit me through the window. You're right. But INTERNAL BORAS WE'LL start opening up your already. See a bit of relaxation in. Western. Australia with Corentin. NEW APP which they think is going to work in terms of how are monitoring people. Technology is the answer here, which would include I think rapid testing. So moving to Victoria, the numbers have been falling in recent days the average fourteen day data graph, which we all love looking at every single day continues to fall, but it does seem like healthcare workers are still getting infected. Yes and just today the updated healthcare worker numbers, and so the last week there have been twenty four H. Care Workers Nurses one doctor one, paramedic one allied health professional infected. So they're still comprising a fairly significant percentage of the. Total cases in Victoria and shows that there are still problems there and the thing is that there are catching up with numbers. So the numbers coming through very orgy complex cases you've got healthcare workers suddenly increasing you don't win there were infected the numbers from Victoria I'm sure they are trending down, but they are not as said this again and again they're not as transparent as they luke. Okay.

Kathy Norman Australia Victoria Mandatory Hotel China Hotel Corentin ABC Prime Minister H. Care Workers Nurses Government Abbey Israel Risco Tasmania Wales Harmon Pandemic University Of New Corentin
Dozens arrested as protests turn violent in Portland

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:01 min | 8 months ago

Dozens arrested as protests turn violent in Portland

"Turning now to the growing violence in Portland Oregon, where during its one hundred first night of demonstrations, protesters, lobbed fireworks, and then homemade firebombs at police. One protester caught on fire after running through the flames. Police made dozens of arrests and confiscated weapons in the city is now bracing for more protests tomorrow when several pro trump rallies plant ABC's Matt Guffman is on the ground for us in Portland. Tonight. Spiraling to. The hundred and first night of protests open he spasm of violence. Gasoline bombs tossed it right police and fire crackers rocketing officers at point blank range. Protests engulfed in one of those gasoline fires demonstrators struggling to put him out as you rolled on the pavement overnight those demonstrations targeting a police precinct. It was immediately declared a riot. Police with that bull rush. Up in the stampede on T. knocked over. Police then drowning street and tear gas to try to clear the crown the pop enough tear gas like Whoa could see the arcs of tear gas in the air that's going to be really bad at about five seconds we're going to get out of here. See that cloud of yellow mustard smoke? The entire quarter here was lit up men extending to those hit with gas. This morning police announcing more than fifty arrests. It's one of the highest numbers since protests began and they released pictures of knives, rocks, explosive devices in body armor. They say they seized from protesters. Portland remains a tinderbox right wing protesters many heavily armed holding a memorial for Aaron. J Danielson allegedly gunned down by anti-fascist Michael Rhino during protests last week right himself was killed by police on Thursday when police tried to arrest him for murder.

Portland Matt Guffman Michael Rhino Oregon ABC J Danielson Murder Aaron
Suspect in Portland shooting killed by law enforcement

The Ben Shapiro Show

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Suspect in Portland shooting killed by law enforcement

"Suspect in fatal Portland shooting is killed by officers during arrest law enforcement agents killed Michael Forest reinold while trying to arrest him for officials said, he was being investigated in the fatal shooting of a supporter of a far right group. So. Just to be straight in the SUB head. There's no mention of ANTIFA. There's no mention of black lives matter. The only political affiliation is the victim. Right the only person who's politics than your times cares about apparently is the victim. It's amazing. Here's the first. Here's the first paragraph law enforcement agents shot and killed an supporter on Thursday as they moved to arrest him in the fatal shooting of a right wing activist who is part of approach from Caravan in Portland Oregon officials said the suspect Michael Forest Rhino Forty eight was shot by officers from Federally Lead Fugitive Task Force during the encounter in Washington state.

Michael Forest Portland SUB Oregon Washington
Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

NPR News Now

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Suspect sought in connection of Portland shooting killed by authorities

"According to the US marshals service a suspect in the weekend killing of Aaron Danielson as reportedly been killed near. Seattle self-described teeth supporter Michael Rheinau, died hours after telling vice news that he killed Danielson in self defense as Oregon Public Broadcasting Conrad Wilson reports authorities say Rhino, was killed during efforts to take him into custody last night but wealth authorities attempted to contact right now and Thurston County. Washington. There were reports of shots fired and right now was killed according to a law enforcement source was wanted in connection with killing it far-right supporter, Aaron J Danielson as a pro-trump caravan of hundreds of vehicles while and through the city Conrad Wilson in Portland.

Aaron J Danielson Conrad Wilson Michael Rheinau United States Thurston County Seattle Oregon Washington Portland
The Wylderwood

Stories Podcast

05:04 min | 9 months ago

The Wylderwood

"Skittered all over the GLADE. They're dead wood limbs rasping on every branch and stone. Nancy was afraid but she felt strong in the woods and surprised herself by screaming at the dross in defiance. These horrible little creatures were made of dead plants and dark sorcery and she had spent her whole life learning about. She focused on the nearest dross pointing her hand and bearing down with her mind when she tilted her fingers down Whitish Green routes burst from the bottom of the tangled body and burrowed into the dirt below another started to move forward even as leave sprouted from its shoulders and swallowed it up the other dross paused but more were coming out of the brush along the edge of the glade and then suddenly they stopped. Nessie felt a moment of relief and then a figure rose up out of the dirt. It was the young monk the same one who had battled the massive rhino tour kerosene. He strode forward his muscled arms forming into large pillars of earth and rock. GotTa. Bring you in he said casually. Just come easy now druid magic is strong but I'm it or arms and I'm the best there is. The monk lashed his long earth arms against the ground and Nessie stumbled as an earthquake rocked the area, a narrow crack zig-zagged across the glade reaching out and pulling the land apart the shaking threw her off her feet and adult brain. But he managed to lash out with a handful of brambles or arms blocked them with a pillar of mud, and then he thrust his hands down at the Earth directly beside him with a deep roar like some titanic beast, a wall of earth ripped itself free of the ground it rose and A. Giant. Rippling swell and crashed down towards Nessie like a tidal wave. She knew a half dozen spells that would help but it felt like she was moving through tree sap. The monk was so fast and she was just too slow the wave loomed above her roaring and raining gravel and then crashed down over her nasty thought she'd be crushed but the monk had better control than that. Instead she was gently buried trapped in Earth from the neck down, she tried to cast a spell and the earth only rumbled tighter squeezing out her breath. All right. Then Robert Said are you done? The earth grumbled and roared and started to swallow her up, and then there was a crack and a blast of heat and suddenly nasty was free a strong hand hers and then she was pulled out of the rubble and back to her feet. Heads up mud man said harks turning back to the monk we're just getting started. She shrugged her shoulders and her arms burst into blue flames from the shoulder down searing away her sleeves the air around her rippled with heat and or arms took a step back harks leaned forward and a lance of fire shot from her fists looking at the air like a serpent's tons. The monk was forced to throw up a wall of Earth to block it before dancing gracefully back. harks snarled and another and another. He tried to think of a spell to help her friend, but then another figure burst into the glade, it was that wicked pirate a razor sharp throwing acts already flying from her hand it spun and over end a blur of black and silver. In the Moonlight Nancy watched helplessly as it flew towards Harks who was throwing fire at the monk completely blind to the deadly act swirling towards her back nasty shut her eyes and heard the dull thunk then harks cried out Lachlan. Nessie, he opened her eyes again the squire was there. He had his back to harks the throwing axe buried deep in the wood of his shield or arms cartwheeled over to phyllis the pirate already throwing another acts this time. As she let it fly Nessie managed to grow some roots and trip her up and throw went wild. Nice. One said harks throwing a handful of members into the air over Lachlan Shoulder. Right. But we need to retreat said Lachlan and Nessie agreed they could hold them off if they work together but they lose in the end. And then the dross came swarming back. Hark screamed and waved a loose arc afire some of the draw scorched and shriveled, but more kept coming Lachlan added them away with his shield but then the monk knocked him sprawling with a fist of earth and failures grabbed him by the hair.

Nessie Nancy Lachlan Lachlan Shoulder A. Giant Robert Said Hark
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

01:49 min | 10 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Welcome back to the Rhino podcast friends if you haven't been to Rhino Dot com this week, you really need to go check things out lots of exciting release announcements including. And get ready for this one, Lou? Reed. New York deluxe edition a three CD DVD to l. p. and cassette bundle that includes unreleased studio and live tracks plus the DVD debut of the New York album concert video. This is one of my favorite albums I'm really looking forward to this one. And how about this replacements pleased to meet me deluxe edition there's a limited bundle for those of you who preorder, which includes replication of original promo items, including shirts, stickers, totes, and there's also a cassette tape. There's a ton of previously unreleased music on this set, which on a somber note includes the last of Bob Stinson recordings with the band fleetwood Mac Nineteen, seventy, three to seventy four, four. L. P. colored vinyl set featuring the album's penguin. Heroes, and live at the record plant and a seven inch single with unreleased music. This set is exclusive to Rhino Dot com only place you can get it. and. It's what you need to fill the gaps between Peter Green and the Stevie and Lindsey periods in your collection. It's all happening over Rhino. Dot Com. Well on today's episode, we talk with Mike D from kill switch engage about their two thousand, six album as daylight dies it's getting its first worldwide release on vinyl, and it's about to reach platinum mark, which is no mean feat these days the to L. P. Vinyl release of as daylight dies is available at run out GROOVE VINYL DOT COM until August twenty sixth grab one while you can..

Rhino Dot Lou New York Bob Stinson Reed Mike D Peter Green L. P. Lindsey Stevie
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

06:08 min | 11 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Henry Rollins Jason Jones welcome to the Rhino podcast. Cool, thank you so glad to have you guys here today to talk about the fiftieth anniversary of one of the greatest rock albums ever recorded funhouse, you put this reissue together, which is massive in size physically and I can only imagine it was massive in the undertaking as well. It's Jason. Who did all the heavy lifting? And it's it's a suitcase of records I mean it's this big box. And I think that's a lot in this day and age to say to a label. Hey, put out a fifty year old record. That is a a suitcase of vinyl without any real guarantee on how well it's going to sell, but it sure is good and to their credit. Rhino did it. I was amazed. When I met up with Jason that this thing was going through. This is a fans record. Yeah, and it's the kind of thing where I wanted it as soon as I heard this CD box set. I wanted the vinyl many years ago. And I used to write about it. Someone should do this and then when I met Jason, he said well. It's being done. Like. Wow, that's gutsy. It was a very large undertaking to try and get it over the line. You know for me just as a fan. To me, it's the most. It's the most obvious thing to do whenever you're trying to celebrate such a key important landmark anniversary around. As you said rich. One of the greatest albums ever made. You know and I think that. We had the good fortune that all the. Survived, which is not the case with a lot of really great albums? Because you're really, you're taking the journey with the band. Throughout the creative process of recording? This record. You know you would think that. The way that funhouse sounds initially. You would think Oh, this was you know one or two takes it's real loose Rau-, but it's it's all there. It's all very studied. Considered. There's a looseness to it, but it's very very intentional. On this record like you really are earing lightning. Captured on tape. And I think it's it's worth mentioning because a lot of people might not know. That tape gets purged when there is a shelf of out sitting somewhere after a few decades at some point, they just clean house. And it becomes one of those things you read about in a biography. Oh, there was outtakes and we tried to find them, and no one knows where they are so. It's very lucky and I. Think in the liner notes. We describe this as. Like tuten moons site because the only reason, the grave robbers didn't get to it an empty. It was the didn't know it was there and the fact that the tape was in great condition. Kudos to billing lot back in nine, hundred, nine or having the. Four thought to try and put the original box together on the original CD box. You know fortunately the had rhino handmade ready to go, you know they had kind of a rhino had a surefire avenue to get people to order this thing end to ensure that they. You know would be financially successful because it was limited edition. You know we're. We're kind of doing the same thing, but this box. Just you know that CD d-box weighs. Two pounds. In, this one weighs, let's add a couple of you know twenty or thirty pounds on top about I've like Henry always. Wanted to experience it on vinyl and believe me listening to the test pressings, it's an entirely different experience. Yes, I can tell you from sitting on my couch every night, doing one or two LP's night I mean there was a one point where I'm in my whatever take of one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy and I was almost tearing up. It's like almost like a meditation. When you hear the songs over and over again it's not boring. 'cause you can hear the differences you can hear the band quitting that song under the microscope, and they're just making these tiny changes rhythm session, shifting a little aggies moving on different lyrics. Ron's trying different stuff at like three or four takes in just becomes like this one long mantra and I found myself kind of rocking back and forth. In this kind of like just still amazement as to what I was hearing with this momentum to it like you think you're on a fast moving train is incredible. You get to hear them fine. Tune the arrangements. Oh, absolutely and it's. Thing, the stooges had a musical ability that you can't learn in school. You show up with it like when you hear a drummer. WHO's a natural with his pickup? Their friends sticks like certainly. Oh, like this. Wow I took two years of lessons to sound like. After twenty minutes stooges in their own way, all had that remember Ron Ashton I believe it was twenty one. When he made that record, he would be twenty two soon. Think about that and then listen to the song dirt. Wonder. How A guy that young! Gets a feel like that.

Jason Jones Ron Ashton Henry Rollins Rhino Rau
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"We were we were friends that it would never then had so then we were stars shining bright. The world was watching every thing and I'm not even sure what's that took such. It's such a remember was shown before we couldn't take it in some happens For AWHILE TAX. Bill we we we could of course just would it's such a bit this one you Thanks very much for tuning in. Don't forget to listen and subscribe on I tunes so you don't miss the next Rhino podcast producer for Rhino Entertainment. John Hughes Produce for Rhino Entertainment. By rich mayhem promotions. All rights reserved..

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Hey Friends I'm sure that most of you have heard US talk about Rhino insider by now. And maybe some of you haven't maybe some you haven't signed up yet but. Rhino insider is our loyalty program for music fans the United States. If you're eighteen or over you can sign up for free. You can earn points by participating in activities and connecting with US online. You can then use your points to redeem for rewards and you can get all kinds of great stuff including turntables. Vinyl box sets cool reinisch wagon apparel exclusive content discounts on music and so much more. It's easy sign up. At RHINO INSIDER DOT COM. You'll get an email asking you to confirm once that's done you can start earning points and you can engage with Rhino on social media. Tells what kind of music you love. Read ARTICLES ON RHINO DOT COM. Listen to Rhino podcast. Like this one watch videos and or if you just going to buy something you get points for that too so anyway. Get the points for the time. You're already spending with us. Get the credit. You deserve. Sign UP AT RHINO INSIDER DOT COM. Well friends as I mentioned before earlier on this episode of the Rhino podcast. We have Robert deleo and vocalist Jeff. Good from Stone Temple pilots talking about their new album per data per data is a collection of ten new songs. It's mostly acoustic and its subject. Matter is all too poignant. Given the current circumstances we all find ourselves in the pandemic hit after this interview. And so the talk about touring now seems a little bit out of place in fanciful. But as you'll hear even before we all went on lockdown the band was faced. With having to amend their touring plans for this new album for other reasons be approached. The band took to recording per dida presents. Unique songwriting styles in a different light. That lets these ten songs sink in a softer more. Subtle way on data gone is the sledgehammer heavy rock that we love about so many. Sdp anthems and instead it's replaced by more conversational approach that allows the songs on per data to worm their way into your head so as the youtubers say without further. Ado. Let's get right to it..

Rhino US Stone Temple Robert deleo Sdp Jeff
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"This is. This is three year journey to get to these eleven tracks regret in an Rhino Great Brunswick and rhinos sent sent the tapes to Aaron. And I you know the with with an idea of releasing it so Aaron and I listen we talked and we listen and we talked and we gotta say this we we get along and I learned a lot from my cousin. Because he he's he's. He listens to a lot of different music too but we collaborate air. Who's at and then he'll call me. Smells says on you know what I mean so we go back and forth and I trust his ears. You trust mine so we were like man. Let's let's try to. We both agreed to try to bring it up to two thousand eighteen thousand nineteen and all it. Because that's we think that's what she would have wanted instead of the Eighties Simmons drums and drum machines. Try to try to fuse. The two and then we we we. We bounced ideas off each other. We said we should include the original producers of course of course Sandy Hall Saint Giles and then be sent them to track Sunday. We started to to collaborate and have the rubber band project of now which is very haunches which had very much is man and like Gary Bartz Wallace Roney. Those cats were like man. This is cool. This is cool. You know so so you have to be a net. Maybe not for the gestures. They dug it but they never done mouth is gone. You know we. We wasn't made for them. You know and the fact that that Ryan and I'm saying this because Greg is the fact that Ryan Greg Brunswick in fact that Ryan Shout Out. Yes and no. I'm serious serious. The guy's got behind it. You know what I mean. They never said no to Erin I they were like okay. Cool make the next move. Make it so as you're sitting there and you're trying to make decisions of what to keep and what not to keep. GimMe Gimme as it was laughing. The chief was there he was there you know he was there with us. He had to obey. He was there with an. Aaron has a Studio. I have a studio saying and randy have recording studios. So it was it was. We'd know our way around recording studio and we know it sounds so not to pat ourselves on the back but we kind of knew complicate for anybody else other humor but if you around chief you know you you kind of know if you just like just coming in on a project uses the Harvard and you know we bounced it off. It was a collaborative project steered by the chief with Aaron. You know myself and Zane and and ready and then anybody that came in was like that was it that was like sprinkles you know we went to air. It had a room the village to Jeff Greenburg village recording studios we comfortable wherever we worked Aaron and talk three or four times a day. Then ran in Zambia. Conference calls and Greg We. I mean it's it's it wasn't it was just it was it was it was it was like butter. It just it came into play ready dosier original and yes the MOMS we. God bless them. We would run things off him. And Steve Howe Chris. Another engineer I talked to Ray Ray lives ten minutes from us right for me and and and Ray put his input in and then randy had some great. It was great. You know let's talk about Carnival Time Carlton was great is great but for me. It makes my stomach drops because when I played in the band played electric percussion which is basically playing occupied pad of samples of percussion. And I had to take a solo on there. I had to take to if we played carnival time than I had to play one in that too and I just I hated it. I just didn't WanNa play Solo on that thing. As soon as the to solve great. He loved playing crowd loved it. It was good. It was a good good live track. Now this is I was in the band in one thousand nine hundred ninety. We were still playing it. Wow back then wow. He didn't go with the song ever came out on a record. He's good. I'm planning we would do a rubber band before we were doing rep before he was even released and the audience is just going to. I mean because before it doesn't matter because it's mile so the audience he could he could be playing doe ray me and the audience is going to be there when the when the beginning of rubber band people did do. We did as an encore. You know using eating didn't know what they want to move. You got to think about. You're going for the experience..

Aaron Greg We Rhino Great Brunswick Ryan Greg Brunswick Gary Bartz Wallace Roney Ray Ray randy Sandy Hall Saint Giles Zambia Jeff Greenburg Harvard Erin Steve Howe Carlton engineer Greg
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Lemieux. Thank you for joining us here on the Rhino podcast. It's a pleasure. I've worked with Rhino for twenty years and so to be on a podcast It feels really good. Thank you so today. We're talking about a new grateful dead box coming out. Why don't you tell the folks what's titles? Well we are doing a June. Nineteen seventy six grateful. Dead Box said it's five complete shows on fifteen CDs and it is a really unique era and grateful that history. So it's a it's a really terrific package. These five shows. These are barn burners every single one of them. The band sounds fantastic on these shows. These are the first shows is the first tour after their hiatus that started at the end of nineteen seventy four and these sound so excited to be back they do. It's a it's a very fresh sounding. Grateful dead and there are few errors in the grateful dead and it usually predicated on something where they come back very fresh and that happened on this tour and it happened on the spring tour of nineteen eighty-seven after jerry had had his coma in eighty six So there are certain eras and grateful that history where they come back with a certain freshness and this is to me. This is one of the most unique distinct eras and grateful dead history and frankly one of the very best and I think these recordings are special. Not only for that reason. But these are referred to as Betty Boards Betty Cantor Jackson was the engineer that recorded these live to two track tape. And I don't know that I've heard recordings from betty that sound this good from note one at the beginning of the show where everything is so perfectly balanced and well he queued. I feel the same way and this is the first show on our box is really the the second show of the tour they open while they they started in Portland Oregon with a couple of shows before heading to Boston for the four nights of which we've included the Middle. Two nights we previously released the first night and chunks of the fourth night. So it's it's the second but it is. It is remarkable. How in perfect balance and what terrific mixes that? Betty has from the very very beginning. And like you say of the very first show. And you know it's a it's a pretty big misnomer to call these soundboard recordings because they most certainly are not soundboard recordings which refers to the same mix that would have gone through the PA that would have gone through the the soundboard road to the left and right channel Betty was taking a full array of inputs which is to say every single instrument and every drum and every vocal and doing a live mixed directly to tape so she was doing a completely separate mix than what came through the PA her mixes were specifically for the listening purpose and so her mixes sound incredible. And as much as I love her thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven mixes the spring seventy seven shows like cornell which she was using deep. Snow Noise reduction. She was using no noise reduction on these. No dolby no. Db EX and there's clarity to each instrument and to the whole that is I think it's unmatched in the grateful. Dead's recorded history for two track tapes. There's nothing like these. And you listen to seventy seven seventy eight. The other tours that she was recording quite heavily quite prominently and they don't sound like this. They sound phenomenal. But they sound different. And these ones are to me. Some of the most pleasurable recordings I think in one of our promotional things. We talked about them being almost studio quality and that to me what it sounds like. It's it's remarkable. How good they sound. Yeah there's detail in these recordings that I'm hearing that I don't normally here in in. Live dead recordings professionally. Released live recordings. Like subtle tings on the bells of symbols. The cowbell sits so perfectly in the mix. You can hear everything without straining to hear anything. Well that's it and that's what I find so remarkable that in the live setting. It's one thing to do it in the studio I've been in enough studios and watched mixes go down where you get unlimited opportunities to fix that and so like you say if the cowbells not sitting in the right place you just bring it up or down and go back a minute and re mix that little portion and it all works out in the end and you've got flying failures and you've got you know the ability to do that. She was doing it. Live on the fly and there's literally not a thing I would change in these mixes I would never say well. We need more. You know we are guitar or Jerry's guitar on this or more base. Everything is perfect on these. Ed I mean I think it's a testament to betty skill and talent and the band playing so well. I think made her job very enjoyable. Because she's mixing this band at the height of a new power because so much had changed in the previous eighteen months since they'd last more than eighteen months since they last toured It's quite remarkable. What the band was doing at this time. It's interesting you bring up the point about the the band playing so well kind of taking a little bit of a sidestep here but you know one of the Credos at Olympic was leading the band mixed itself so they kind of self leveled so every nobody would step on anybody else's toes sonically so to speak. It seems to me like some of that is definitely in play on these shows. Well I think you you really nailed it that nobody is stepping on anyone and it's not like well it's Jerry is time for a solo so he comes way up in the mix. He's just always in the right spot as everybody on these and I find that everybody is listening to one another remarkably well and I don't know if it was the new sound system they were using and seventy-six as opposed to the wall of sound which is quite a contrast to new monitor system but there's a certain delicacy to the music that the wall of sound with all of the great things about it. I you know delicate is not something I think about what I think of the Wallace out. I think of power and I think of heaviness and I think of though they did have the the dynamics of a typical grateful. Dead Song where Asong like Stella Blue or China doll in the wall of sound era could start very quietly and then build up to something huge. But there's something about the one thousand nine hundred seventy six sound that there's this incredible sense that they are truly listening to one another and hearing each other. That's the other part is a really hearing each other. And this was you know a rap you hear about Let's say dawn gene during the wall of sound or she just couldn't hear herself whereas I mean Donna never sounded better than she does. On this tour. She sounded great on the fall. Tour of seventy six. She sounded great and seventy seven but once again her harmonies with particular on songs. Like looks like rain and Cassidy. I think these are the best they ever sound.

Betty Boards Betty Cantor Jack jerry Dead Rhino Lemieux. dolby Portland Oregon Boston engineer cornell Donna Cassidy Wallace China Asong Stella Blue
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"A Rich Dennis. Have you become an insider yet? Absolutely and folks you can become an insider to and we're talking about the new. Rhino insider program is rhinos. Loyalty Program for Music Fans in the United States and District of Columbia ages eighteen and over. It's free to join and you can earn points by partaking activities and connecting with Rhino. And then use those points to redeem them for rewards and there's a lot of cool stuff you can get dentist. Check this out. You can redeem your points for turntables. Vinyl box sets cool rhino. Close other Rhino's swag exclusive content discounts on music so you engage with Rhino on social media till Rhino. What kind of music you love. Read articles and Rhino Dot Com listened to Rhino podcast low. You're already listening now. Watch VIDEOS MAKE PURCHASES? All of that can get you points on Rhino insider and it's a rewards program and it just makes sense. You're already here. So you know. Get Credit for the time. You're spending on Rhino and get some free stuff because we all like free stuff go to the Rhino insider page on Rhino Dot Com. Click become a rhino insider. You'll get an email asking you to confirm your email address. Once that's done. You can start earning points so again. Sign up today at Rhino insider DOT COM so Dennis. Tell the folks. What's on the Rhino podcast today? Well this is going to be a surprise for everyone because Debbie Gibson I mean you think pop artists right but you know. She is so much more than that. She's a songwriter. She's a record producer. She's an actress she's on. She's on current television. Shows Making guest appearances and what I learned is the level of her talent and her musicianship when you think pop artists you just think well she goes in the studio she sings but there is so much more depth to Debbie Gibson and this is a two parter because we talked for a long time and it's myself and executive producer John Hughes at Rhino headquarters with Debbie Gibson. How was it hanging out with her? What was she like to hang out with? She's bubbly. She's fun and well. I felt pretty good because she is a born and bred New Yorker. Oh you guys must have hit it right off. Yeah we did and John just of course added the spice that he always does because he he was there listening to her music in the clubs very much at the same time that I was playing their music in the clubs. We'll all right. How about we get into that conversation that you had with Debbie Gibson along with executive producer. John Hughes..

Rhino Rhino Dot Com Debbie Gibson Rhino insider John Hughes executive producer Rich Dennis United States District of Columbia
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Aptly titled Christmas and Los Lobos has their first ever Christmas album entitled Yego Navidad and it is awesome. Los Lobos fans. You'RE GONNA love this one. It sounds so cool but Dennis. Why don't you tell the folks we have in store for them on this episode of the Rhino podcast? Well part two of the replacements deadman's pop up which was basically the way to get the original. Don't tell a soul out there in its original form with and this is Rhino of course all sorts of extra goodies. Yeah you got eleven anytime. There's a deluxe edition from Rhino. You know you're going to be getting all kinds of behind the scenes unreleased unreleased material and this set deadman's pop is no exception. It sounds amazing. The Matt Wallace mixes the way the album was supposed has to be. which if you listen to Tommy Stinson episode or you? Didn't you have to hear how he talks about how that all went down. Today's episode food is really cool to listen to you matt's fans you're going to get the inside history about the making of this record why. The band ended up not really liking it and why a lot of fans think it doesn't represent the band's kind of ethos and what they did to correct it for this new release. Today we have boxed set producers Sir Bob Maher and Rhinos Jason Jones. Anr who produced deadman's pop. which is this new deluxe edition and they speak with Tony? Edberg and Matt Wallace. who were the original to producers of? Don't tell us all to quote a track. It is a major talent show. They rundown for us. Exactly what happened. Tell some of these outrageous stories about you know the the replacements behavior in and out of the studios notorious for good reason. Listen and we get all the fun stuff in this one for sure without further ado. Let's get into this deep discussion about deadman's pop.

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

17:48 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"And now your host with the most which may have and Dennis the menace on this episode of the Rhino Podcast we talk with the replacements Tommy Stinson along it making a great record with Ted Hawkins she was later that I that I really respected but I think in general you know this was a record that we made this him being a songwriter I think kind of he he can better as a songwriter than we became as abandoned a lot of ways I bet he we're sitting right here right now you've probably says and things you know polls got a drum machine baseman you know he's living in South Minneapolis with his wife time and also has gone is getting in I like specific for these cutting edge bands but we still need to get them on the radio yeah yeah yeah yeah cutting edge bands sired already had like the pretender can you know go down the the laundry list of banned soccer at that plenty I guess we were I guess we're not quite as polishes chrissie Hi uh the only my you know to twin tone through them in the river and at the time slim said that never made any sense to me I was like if you're gonNA steal them at least steel him and hide them in the basement of course when he was tell me that I didn't know that he had his feet away so he was smarter than the rest of us.

Dennis Tommy Stinson Ted Hawkins Minneapolis soccer
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Tommy's and welcome to the Rhino podcast thank him but what do you guys saw me tell me what do you what are you thinking patio I'll tell you what I'm thinking I'm thinking we're here to talk about that dead band op box set with who came up with the name of that but that was that was Paul's original idea that was the original album title is those to be infected was reported as such back in Spin magazine's in the day why you read that sort of the things you learn when you watch tv but you know he also told he told me you told me he told me that there was other a couple of different names for that it was at one point you're GONNA call it festival which was festival and the Co with the other the other the other album name that that he told me it was like you guys were hanging with the young fresh fellows a lot and you guys like Adam the band yeah so you're going to call the album tit for tat shoes cooler heads prevailed I guess I could tell them never gonna get any questions bring us do you remember by any chance what you and the gang were thinking about going in to recording this record do you remember anything at all it goes back to the nineteen hundreds no no no I mean you know we we're going to go make a record we made all the previous records and the only differentiating bit was is that we started that record in woodstock with Tony Berg and we're going to get the Burnsville that's that's for sure and and what they did was I think it was a good plan in someone's mind signed went south real quick was putting the replacements in in little huts in the middle of Woodstock and was playing a dry county rookie counterproductive knee and I think I think I think the obvious kind of written on the wall there but as I say this I mean when you're playing dodge knife you know an hour and in a cabin in Woodstock New York it's things tend to get a little screwed up quick and as does your other recording sessions exactly well we're city boys so yes leading us in the country not so smart I mean up to that basically you're done records in Minneapolis and then had gone and done please to meet me in Memphis so this was I mean Memphis at least bob going on there I said there were things going on there I've made two records in Memphis we'll talk about that later Yes now so I mean it got pretty goofed up Nick I think we lasted all about three weeks not weeks not not even studio two weeks thanks Bob filling in the facts No I mean I it was it was rough and and if you really have any insight into the west coast I can call James Hatfield they'll give you the the four one one on that completely because he likes to tell the story actually a little bit whenever he sees it's funny bit as good I like him a whole lot but we were making the same we're making records same time in that Woodstock Bear's loss and they were totally freaked out by you guys need yeah well they sauce you know throw gallon bottles of liquor through the windows studio and freak out in the communal lodge where everyone kind of got together and had food and stuff like that it was funny watching him Actual Rosette story this guy this Guy.

Tommy Rhino three weeks two weeks
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Hey dennis hey rich what are you up to I was about to ask you what you are up to what do you think I've got on my laptop screen right now knowing you it's Ronald Dot com you Gotcha why are you tell well because it has everything that anybody who listens to this podcast could want the place to go in fact you're going to tell me what I should look for one of my favorite things you can do is sign up for the album of the day email rhino sends you do a new album every day it has a short essay laying out why you should listen to this album why it's worth your time there's links to listen on your favorite streaming platforms and then right there on that same page. There's all kinds of other albums of the day that you can check out it's a great way to find something new to listen to if you're like me Jim today I need something new to listen to what I do Bam album of the day done deal and then of course we have all the new releases coming up it's fall there are so many all new releases coming out on RHINO AND RHINO DOT COM I'll you rap fans out there the notorious B I g ready to die twenty fifth anniversary seven inch no box set it's limited edition you gotta go grab it before it disappears about are you rock we got the white snake slip of the tongue deluxe edition which includes ads for a limited time only the Donnington lithograph you're GonNa WanNa grab that one the Doors Soft Parade Fiftieth Anniversary Deluxe edition there's so much cool stuff coming speaking of cool stuff coming Dennis tell people who's on the podcast today okay get ready boys and girls it's the one and only time he's Stinson this is the first of two parter on the replacements and I will just tell you a little clue that my first question his response to it involves a bodily part well you know if you've seen any of the classic interviews that the guys did you never know what you're going to get you never know what they're gonNA throw at you I can't wait to hear this conversation you have with of course the reason that Tommy is but ending time with us on the Rhino podcast is because of the new replacements released deadman's pop it's a Force One L. P. deluxe edition set and it's based around the don't tell a soul release it ultimately back when it was released became the group's best selling album but they were unsatisfied with the sound of the record they didn't you like the mix is so what deadman's pop does is they've gone back in an created a four CD ONE LP set that remixes the album as band originally intended to sound so all you replacements fans they're Kinda like out at record I don't know it's like I didn't really dig it as much you're going to dig it now because it's exactly the way the band wanted it to be there's all kinds of unreleased tracks and a classic concert from nineteen eighty nine and also on the podcast today are Bob Mayer author of replacements biography trouble boys and Jason Jones from Rhino in our co producers of did man's PA.

Ronald Dot Bob Mayer Dennis Stinson Jim Jason Jones Tommy twenty fifth seven inch One L
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"And now your host with the most which may have and Dennis the menace on this episode of the Rhino podcast executive producer John Hughes so emotionally destroyed again you know I think that's what the softball they're saying it's like what do I do Who would they Friedman Stephen All of us navigating this funny little feeling you know it's not like Oh man I went through something heavy.

Dennis John Hughes Friedman Stephen All executive producer
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"And we want to welcome Wayne to the Rhino podcast we're here to talk about the twentieth anniversary of the Soft Bulletin yes indeed yes or mental record and then you have this really layered intricately arranged album that's kind of changed did you feel it was a conscious change as It's just where you guys were going well you say that the record is an experimental record and that's you know that's kind of an understatement in a way you know like ah you know for people that don't know what that record is but it came out at the time when most records came out on CD the format we put Zarifa out in was four CDs that were meant to be not like four CDs like the Clash Does Sandinista. Where's the three three album threes CD set this is four CDs that share eight tracks and it's meant to be played on force separate CD players all at the same time it's even hard for me to imagine how we convinced ourselves that we should do this but you do that's what that's what you do and and so coming also zyu- Rica we were sort of controlling songs in pile that didn't work for desired the thing that weren't working for the four CD thing and these would end up being like the race for the prize the first song of softball in and spoonful as a ton the second song you know all these were rejects from our higher higher concept but when we put it out when we put this off Bolton how it felt to us like just another weird experimental record we just happened to change sounds and we were using you know sort of digital orchestration as our new experiment our new emotional format which tests felt like a new frontier but now I don't see it as an experimental record I see it as really like a song oriented it doesn't go off the rails into a six hour noise fest light some flaming lips music you know so by our own standards you're exactly right there's one of the cray's experimental things that we've ever done then right next to something that feels like somewhat normal classic music chain reaction.

Zarifa Soft Bulletin zyu- Rica Wayne cray Bolton six hour
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"The eighties whatever the producer says and he knew you know their number one songs. He wasn't a stupid super producers round medicine. He's very good and he has almost perfect pitch. If you sang slightly flat on one word half the word was flat he could say do it again and punch. You in a guy was just amazing. I don't know what he's doing now. He's amazing producer and he knew the number one songs so he's made a lot of money for songwriters. The artists don't get money for that stuff. We just have to get up and look stupid singing hanging it so this group of Solo albums which Rhino now has you know is is making available to everybody you know why Hedley for the first time but it's such a mix I went back and I listened and oh my gosh software was right of the Times. It was new wave David since sounds it fit right in with you know with with with the bands of the time I know so I will defend all the machines a song you wrote on record well. That's real though I very real I had had a physical and it's a echocardiogram echocardiogram echo all those and they all said Oh. She's okay so all the machines say on okay but it's interesting how you predicted automation mation back in Nineteen eighty-four predicted. They already had happening right. They already had it was already gone. It's just most people don't sing about their medical checkups cups..

producer Rhino Hedley David
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Rich. I'M ON RHINO DOT com right now because I am checking out the album of the day which happens today the day were recording this to be todd rundgren Utopia. Pia Todd is God. He's awesome. I watched a documentary on him recently lot of interviews. I don't think people realize how many albums he produced anyway. I DIGRESS RHINO DOT COM. I'm has so much amazing information. I love learning about music. I signed up for the Rhino Album of the day. It comes into my inbox every day. There's links on aside. I can stream it right from my computer while working and listen gives me something new to listen to you every day and then there's a little bit of Info to read about with it. It's great. I love it besides that on Rhino Dot dot com of course you can listen to all of our past podcast episodes and their other great new releases that are announced for instance. The replacements deadman's pop up the four CD one L. P. Deluxe is coming. This fall and replacements fans are GONNA love. This one not to mention hint hint two part podcast coming coming up on that release but this podcast episode we have something very special you Dennis and the executive producer of the Rhino Dino podcast. John Hughes got to visit Grace Slick at her home. In Malibu digital eighty years old just turned eighty and she is still a pistol stolen then some and I'm told that the conversation went so well that we have enough for two podcasts on this indeed part one deep history Jefferson Airplane and a little bit politics. Let's get to the conversation that you and executive producer. John Hughes had with Grace Slick..

Pia Todd Grace Slick todd rundgren executive producer John Hughes Dennis eighty years one L
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"The kiddies and now your hosts with the most which may have and Dennis the minutes on this episode of the Rhino Podcast we speak with Michael How archivist archivist for the Princess State about the new prince release originals. Hey Rich Hey.

Dennis Michael
"rhino" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"With rhino safe dot com today. That's rhino safe dot com. Rhino safe dot com..

Rhino