35 Burst results for "Rhino"

Go out & Support Mo Brooks in Alabama

Mark Levin

00:53 sec | 1 d ago

Go out & Support Mo Brooks in Alabama

"Big election in Alabama as well as other states by the way but as you know these elections affect not just the state from which the candidate runs But the whole country we need a majority I've known mo Brooks a long time He's very very solid conservative He was solid as a prosecutor in Huntsville Alabama He's been a congressman there for a bit Solid again He's running against two individuals one individual a woman Who's being pushed by the Mitch McConnell wing of the party and she has a ton of money She's basically sort of a chamber of no commerce individual And she's trying to fool the people of Alabama the Republicans That she's a conservative She is not she's a rhino And then there is a gentleman running I have nothing negative to say about him but he's no mo Brooks That's the bottom line

Mo Brooks Alabama Huntsville Mitch Mcconnell
Pennsylvania GOP Primary Likely Headed Towards Recount

The Officer Tatum Show

00:38 sec | 6 d ago

Pennsylvania GOP Primary Likely Headed Towards Recount

"Pennsylvania GOP. I don't think they've been able to pick anybody. It was between Doctor Oz and McCormick and McCormick. Oh, it looks like they're going to have a recount. That is interesting. You know, I thought Kathy would, I think her name is Kathy. I thought that she would be a little more competitive, but it looks like she did a good run, but McCormick and Doctor Oz are going to be the two candidates. They're probably going to do a recount. It is going to be interesting to see who wins and that election. I've heard a lot of negative things about Doctor Oz, but I can't prove that to be true. I just hope the Democrats don't get in there, and I hope they don't put no rhino in there.

Doctor Oz Mccormick Kathy GOP Pennsylvania
Republican Leadership Never Took Madison Cawthorn Under Their Wing

Mark Levin

01:41 min | 6 d ago

Republican Leadership Never Took Madison Cawthorn Under Their Wing

"This young man Cawthorn who lost by really An eyelash And the Republican primary in the far west corner of North Carolina He may have had his faults It was a young man But the Republican leadership never took him under his wing You had former Republicans who were host on TV who were mouthpieces for their rhino brothers and sisters and just trashed the hell out of the guy Yet the drudge report trashing the hell out of the guy You had the Republican establishment in North Carolina trash in the hell out of the guy You had tell us the Republican senator who's a Mitch McConnell want to be trashed the hell out of the guy And just to show you what kind of a guy Donald Trump is he endorsed him in the final week or so of the campaign Even realizing it was going to be a tough race given all that had come He still endorsed him At a principle He's still endorsed him And he just conceded Unfortunately he lost So rather than take this young man who was in a terrible car accident so he lost the use of his legs from the hip down wheel wheelchair bound Rather than take him under the wing teach him the ropes and so forth and so on They went gunning for him Because that's what these bastards do

Cawthorn North Carolina Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump
Jim Hanson and Sebastian Discuss the 2022 Primaries

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | Last week

Jim Hanson and Sebastian Discuss the 2022 Primaries

"He is Jim Hansen, the author of winning the second Civil War allegedly without firing a shot. Jim, welcome to the studio. What a wonderful place, dude. I like it. Not enough guns though, right? You know, is there some rule about that? I think we'll find out. Well, we'll do some research that I know we caught smoke cigars. That's the biggest problem, but we'll find out about the Second Amendment. Welcome in studio, we have so much to discuss Russia, Ukraine, Finland, Sweden, the border. But let's talk about tomorrow. It's been a rather dirty primary season in the granite state, the Keystone state. Talk to us about so, granite's New Hampshire, the Keystone state of Pennsylvania. We've invited us Doctor Oz on the show while constantly told by his PR team that is very busy. We'll get back to you. We'll get back to you. He seems to be ducking and avoiding media of late. Kathy Barnett, who I've known for years when she first came on Fox when I was hosting the national security moms there on Fox and Friends. Came on Thursday when all the hubbub about her D two one fours and her military service erupted. I asked her some tough questions. She quitted herself quite well. So give us your take as somebody who understands Trump, maga, the swamp, the rhinos. What's your take on Pennsylvania? Anybody but the Democrats? I think all this infighting was not helpful. I think Oz doesn't want to come on your show because you're going to ask him why he's pals with Erdoğan. Why he voted in the last Turkish election why he hasn't renounced his citizenship and why he's not even vaguely a conservative in any meaningful way. I understand Trump like celebrities. Okay, I get it. And he figured name recognition matters. That's a reasonable thing to do. But the problem is now we've got not just a rhino. We've got, I don't even know what he is. He's a no. You know, he's a nothing. And if he wins, he may be able to do it, but I would prefer someone who's actually on

Jim Hansen Kathy Barnett Pennsylvania FOX Finland Ukraine JIM Sweden New Hampshire Russia Erdoğan OZ
Binnington makes 25 saves, Blues win 5-1, eliminate Wild

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Binnington makes 25 saves, Blues win 5-1, eliminate Wild

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Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan Minnesota Cam Cam Cam Cam Talbot Talbot Nick Nick Nick Nick Leddy Leddy Tyler Tyler Tyler Tyler Vladimir Vladimir Vladimir Vla St St St St Louis Louis Louis Matt Matt Matt Matt Dumba Nets Nets Mike Mike Mike Mike Reeves Ree
'2000 Mules' Has a Red-Carpet Premiere at Mar-a-Lago

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

'2000 Mules' Has a Red-Carpet Premiere at Mar-a-Lago

"Well, we couldn't be more delighted 2000 mules. I mean, it's a massive hit. And it's really changing the debate. So we thought we'd talk about it, kind of go into it a little bit, and also just describe the very remarkable events of this past week, kind of the way we rolled out and launched this movie. So honey, it kind of all began, I guess on Tuesday, when we jumped on a plane and flew to Palm Beach for the Mar-a-Lago premiere. So tell people about what that was like and, well, so your reaction to it. Well, I mean, it was, it was amazing. First of all, you know, I'm really sorry if you went to the premiere and we didn't get to chat or anything. There were so many people that we couldn't, first of all. And it just kind of took on a life of its own. It's a magical venue. It is a magical venue. That place is unbelievably nice. And I never really knew what it was. I thought, I thought it was, I personally thought it had a hotel, but I don't think it has a hotel. I think that you can only stay there if you are a member of Mar-a-Lago. Well, no, you can't say that. No, no, you can. You can eat and play golf, but the only person who stays there is Trump. It's like a club. No, but it's not a residential. I think no, I think that some people can stay there. They do. I think they have rooms for members only. Yes. I had no idea. It's not a hotel, but you know. Well, we had 500 people and of course at the last minute always having people beating the doors to get in and but everything runs through Secret Service. But it was a who's who of the conservative movement. And we even had some well, we had a few rhinos there, and it was okay because our ideas we want all everybody to know what happened in the 2020 election. We want the GOP establishment to know. And we have to speak in code, remember, because we're on YouTube. So everything, everything we say has to be done. All right, so the event was gorgeous. They had delicious food. And then Trump spoke and spoke beautifully, by the way. And he's a really funny

Palm Beach Donald Trump Golf Secret Service GOP Youtube
Fleury makes 29 saves, Wild beat Blues 5-1, take series lead

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fleury makes 29 saves, Wild beat Blues 5-1, take series lead

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Minnesota Saint Saint Saint Saint Louis Jordan Jordan Jordan Jordan Greenway Greenway Greenway Caprice Caprice Weigle Weigle Weigle Jonas Jon Mets Mets Mets Joel Joel Joel Eriksson Eriksson Eriksson Eriksson Eriksson Eriksson Nets Nets Nets Fleury Marc Marc Marc Andre Andre And Billy Billy Billy Mike Mike Mike Reeves Reeves Reeves St St St Louis Louis Lo
Why Steve Gray Is Running for Congress in New Jersey

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Steve Gray Is Running for Congress in New Jersey

"Let's go to why you took this amazing decision. You served in uniform at a local agency, then the bureau since 1999. Why are you running in New Jersey for Congress, Steve gray? That's a great question. Listen, I have been watching Chris smith's record for some time. When he voted for the $1.2 trillion infrastructure Bill and Donald Trump, the next day came out publicly and said, we need somebody good to run against this guy and primary him. I started digging in deep. I decided to retire. I should have retired on January 31st. That was my actually target date, but I had COVID. And the office would not let me come back in until January 14th to retire. So I had to wait two weeks. Since then, we have hit the ground running. We are second to Chris Smith in dollars received and cash on hand. So we are working in mentally hard to get this job done. Chris Smith is establishment rhino who's been in office since Jimmy Carter was president. He has been he's been here for 42 years. And these are the individuals that America is disgusted about. And Congress has an 18% approval rating. And yet these individuals year, every two years are still voted back into office.

Chris Smith Steve Gray Donald Trump Congress New Jersey Bill Jimmy Carter America
Preliminary Results From the Ohio Primary Election

Mark Levin

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

Preliminary Results From the Ohio Primary Election

"12% of the voting in Ohio JD Vance 25.7% Matt Dolan he's sort of the bush rhino guy 23.2% so he's two and a half points back Number three Josh mandel 22% so he's 3.7 Points back It's pretty tight The worst outcome would be if this guy Matt Dolan wins And if he wins it's going to be because Vance and mandel split it And people need to think about these things People need to think about these things when they make endorsements and so forth In my view

Matt Dolan Jd Vance Josh Mandel Ohio Bush Mandel Vance
Josh Mandel: I'm Confident I'm Going to Win in Ohio

Mark Levin

01:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Josh Mandel: I'm Confident I'm Going to Win in Ohio

"But the nastiness is when I'm talking about the attacks on you and your kids and your family the attacks on your service The claims that you're the rhino candidate and you've got connections to China Did you ever think it here's such idiocy in your life It's total idiocy I mean but it is projection It's what the Democrats do when the Democrats are guilty of something They attack you for that very thing They're guilty of It's the same thing with this JD Vance guy Everything he's guilty of being a rhino He voted for Hillary Clinton against president Trump in 2016 I don't even think he voted for Trump in 2020 and the reelect everything he's guilty of not even being a Republican let alone a conservative tries to attack me for but it's all baloney Listen if the election were held today mark in Hollywood Wall Street or D.C. I think JD Vance would run away with it But the good thing is tomorrow's election is held in Ohio And I'm confident I'm going to win it because the people of Ohio know I'm a proven fighter They know how I took on John Kasich at every turn when he was acting like a Democrat and they know I'll do the same thing to these rhino establishment Republicans and Republican Party bosses in Washington A lot of the Republican leaders when they're asked about the Ohio Senate race their answer is anyone but mandel And I wear that as a badge of honor It means I'm hovering over the target and they know I'm going to come in there to be reinforcements for Ted Cruz Mike Lee and others who believe in

Jd Vance President Trump Hillary Clinton Donald Trump China Ohio John Kasich D.C. Hollywood Ohio Senate Republican Party Mandel Washington Ted Cruz Mike Lee
Josh Mandel: Matt Dolan Is Mitt Romney 2.0, Vance Would Be Similar

Mark Levin

01:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Josh Mandel: Matt Dolan Is Mitt Romney 2.0, Vance Would Be Similar

"The polls seem to show a slight lead for Vance In other words it's so close that anybody can win You or him and then the media seemed to be pushing this guy Dolan What do you make of all this Yeah Dolan is he's a Romney He's the Romney two And obviously the media loves him And then Vance frankly would be very similar I mean I think he'd be like another Romney total establishment rhino I'm the only one in the race who would be going there to actually stand up to Republican Party bosses who are acting like Democrats and you and I have talked about this over the years This is not a shirts for skins game It's not just Republican versus Democrat What it is is it's fighting for freedom and liberty over big government and government control And I will go there to stand up for the constitution stand up for individual liberty stand up for personal freedom And if that means standing up against the Republican leaders I will do just that

Romney Dolan Vance Republican Party
J.D. Vance Represents 'The New Right'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:28 min | 3 weeks ago

J.D. Vance Represents 'The New Right'

"JD represents what we might refer to Charlie as the new right. He is young, he's 37. He's got a background in tech, which has become actually a part of a part of the storyline here. Some of the reporters I've seen from the videos you've been sending to the team, they're asking about his tech background, which I actually think is a massive plus. But he is this new right, this new kind of candidate. You say that you're hearing from the people on the ground, their reaction to a candidate like JD, and you're right, he's pulling ahead, which is phenomenal because of people like you, people like senator hawley, and of course, president Trump's endorsement. But what is the reaction? What are you hearing on the ground? What are you learning being on the ground in Ohio? Yeah, I mean, look, people are really upset about the direction of the country. They're worried about inflation. They're worried about open borders. They're worried about tech oligarchy. But you got to really give it to Ohio voters. They're starting to see through the nonsense and they're realizing that there's only one candidate that's actually going to do something about this, right? And here's the most important thing is that Republican primary voters have had this kind of angst and unease for many different cycles. But it seems as if Republican establishments are really, they're really talented at kind of camouflaging themselves when it matters. And then they go to D.C. and they just kind of become part of this kind of corporate oligarchy you could call it. And so Republican primary voters got to get the rhinos out of our party. They're enthusiastically

Senator Hawley President Trump Charlie Ohio D.C.
Josh Mandel: We Cannot Afford to Have More RINOs in Washington

Mark Levin

00:57 sec | Last month

Josh Mandel: We Cannot Afford to Have More RINOs in Washington

"Why is this race important in Ohio and to the entire nation One of the most important things for the nation is ensuring that this next generation of Republicans who are elected are constitutional conservative fighters We can not afford to have more rhinos in Washington We can not afford to have more Mitt Romney's more Adam kinzinger more Liz Cheney's more Anthony Gonzales We just can't afford and we're at a crossroads or a fork on the roads I should say in the Republican Party And I think this election here in Ohio is ground zero for that fork in the road Down one path goes these big government I hate to even call them Republicans because I don't even know what they are like Romney and Cheney and kinzinger and Gonzalez and others And that's not the path we can be

Adam Kinzinger Liz Cheney Anthony Gonzales Ohio Mitt Romney Washington Republican Party Kinzinger Romney Cheney Gonzalez
Josh Mandel: Welcoming Sen. Ted Cruz to Ohio This Weekend

Mark Levin

01:30 min | Last month

Josh Mandel: Welcoming Sen. Ted Cruz to Ohio This Weekend

"Peter Thiel is a billionaire who's going from state to state back in candidates that he wishes to purchase a Senate seat for And he's doing that in Arizona He's doing it in Ohio is doing it in another place How much money has he put into a political action committee To support JD Vance do you know It's up to $13.5 million and we have another opponent of ours who's put in I think 16 million of his own money We've got a third opponent who's put in I think over 15 million of his family money I mean Mark the amount of money that's coming in against us from all these different candidates is amazing I've got never trumpers running against me I've got pro impeachment rhinos running against me I've got people running against me who think that Mitt Romney is an example of how they should act in Washington and I'll tell you what I'm excited about This coming Friday and Saturday Mark We've got Ted Cruz coming to Ohio to barnstorm the state with me We're going to post all the events on our website Josh mandel dot com Again J O SH MAN D E L dot com and we're excited to have crews coming in We're going to be in Dayton since in addi Cleveland Columbus Toledo and other parts of the state as well And very proud of earned senator Cruz's support and I'm grateful that he's coming to Ohio to campaign for me

Jd Vance Peter Thiel Ohio Senate Ted Cruz Arizona Josh Mandel Mitt Romney Mark Washington Dayton Toledo Cleveland Columbus Cruz
Josh Mandel: The Voters of Ohio Are Smart

Mark Levin

01:35 min | Last month

Josh Mandel: The Voters of Ohio Are Smart

"And what's most important to me Josh mandel Is you have been a principled constitutional conservative A man who believes in free market capitalism a man who believes in securing our border man who believes in the most powerful military on the face they are The man who is confronted and fought the Republican establishment is entire political career that's what matters to me even more than any endorsement So what do you think when some guy gets on Twitter I'm back on Twitter as of three hours ago Some guy gets on four hours ago Twitter And accuses you of being a war mongering rhino Are you a warmongering rhino Josh mando Not at all I mean listen the voters of my state Mark they're smart And people lob false attacks against me like that The voters of Ohio see right through it because they know of all the people running for U.S. Senate here there's only one guy who has had the courage in the backbone to take on the rhinos here in Ohio I'm the only one that has the scars who's actually shed blood in the process of being John Kasich's worst nightmare When case it was doing the ObamaCare expansion when Kasich was doing the common core federal education standards when case it was trying to stop the pro life heartbeat bill when Kasich was trying to keep the state's finances in the dark Now where was JD Vance I'm just curious I'm bringing it up not you Where was JD Vance when all this was going on He was a registered Democrat living in San Francisco

Josh Mandel Twitter Ohio Kasich U.S. Senate John Kasich Jd Vance Mark San Francisco
Blaise Ingoglia Gives an Update on Florida's Stance Against Disney

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | Last month

Blaise Ingoglia Gives an Update on Florida's Stance Against Disney

"This taking it to the left be on offense all the time Give us an update on what's going on with Disney and this reedy creek business which apparently I just saw some movement on that in the state Senate Give us an update Yeah first just piggyback on what you said about this governor governor desantis He is going on offense And what we're learning from him is it's okay to attack rhino Republicans It's okay to attack the left the media And they have to be called out for their hypocrisy And that's what's so refreshing And when you see a governor do that it makes other people want to follow So you said it was a swing state I think with governor desantis leadership we are headed this state being read I think it'll be very difficult for any Democrat to win governorship in a state of Florida going forward But having said that what we're doing right now is we have a bill that is proposed to get rid of the re creek district which basically allows Disney to self govern themselves You know normally if you would want to go and pull a permit or if you call fire you'd be calling the county or the city But pre 1968 before we adopted the constitution there were 6 of these special districts And Disney is its own special district So they live in this privileged woke world where they can do anything say anything They don't have to go through the normal hoops at a normal business to corporation can do And now we're at the point and say you know what let's get rid of all these special privileges for these districts And that includes Disney corporation So now they're going to have to go when they have to pull a permit They're going to have to go to Orange County or Osceola county depending on what part of Disney and which county lies in And look we're just fed up with corporations woke corporations which are based in California dictating to floridians what we should or should not do

Governor Governor Desantis Disney Governor Desantis Reedy Creek Senate Florida Osceola County Orange County California
Josh Mandel: Candidates Attack Me Because They Know I'm Going to D.C.

Mark Levin

01:42 min | Last month

Josh Mandel: Candidates Attack Me Because They Know I'm Going to D.C.

"Don't you You've got a woman running in the raves who's very much a rhino You've got a multi millionaire billionaire running in the race Who has said some awfully nasty things about you But he wasn't strong enough to stand behind the name of his team I don't think You've got JD Vance running Who didn't vote for Donald Trump in 2016 I mean at that point you're old enough to know better They all are targeting you And then they're leaking about your personal life that will do almost and say almost anything to take you out Why do you think that is Because they know I'm going to Washington to be reinforcements for Ted Cruz Mike Lee Jim Jordan and other constitutional conservatives And the last thing the Republican Party establishment wants is more constitutional conservative fighters and Washington They want lapdogs They want Republicans to go there to be get along go along and just vote for whatever the Republican leaders say to vote for And that's not me I'm not going there to play some shirts for skins type game I'm not going there to do whatever the Republican leaders say to do I'm going there to stand up for the constitution I'm going there to stand up for individual liberty I'm going there to stand up for personal freedom And I'm going there to stand up for the principles for which brave men in 1776 marched through the snow with blood on their feet to found in the nation in the founding of this country And in my mind Mark that is why I've got the red crosshairs on my forehead chest and back from the Republican establishment and from anyone who wants to take a knee or lay down for the

Jd Vance Ted Cruz Mike Lee Jim Jordan Donald Trump Washington Republican Party Mark
Caller: Brian Kemp Is a RINO

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | Last month

Caller: Brian Kemp Is a RINO

"We've got our governor here. It's just can't get a clue. We're wedged between KI V and Rhonda santurce and we've got rhino Brian Kemp over here trying to pull more shenanigans. Against the law of the Georgia legislature, he insulted into a, I'm sorry, I keep going. Essentially, the vote into a QR code that is indecipherable and you're supposed to believe this. Well, think about the millions and millions of mail in ballots, Chris. That is alone and we've said it over and over again. I hate to re litigate it. It's over. I get it. We're not going to undo the election. We got to focus on 2022 and beyond and make sure what they did can never happen again. And that's what K ivy, when people say to me, Republicans aren't doing anything about November 2020, here's your answer. K ivy. I mean, it's absolutely about time. That Republicans stop pushy footing around and say, no more, not going to happen any longer. We're not going to let it happen. We're not going to let it happen again.

Rhonda Santurce Brian Kemp Georgia Legislature Chris
"rhino" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

08:14 min | 8 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on Code Story

"He didn't think about going into tech and in two thousand and four two thousand five timeframe. He did what most people did or tried to. He went to work for goldman sachs to learn the financial services world. He was good at his job. He quickly realized that he didn't love it. He moved on to work for mike bloomberg when he was mayor city hall was after this that he was introduced to an fell in love with the startup world. He's married with two kids. And during the pandemic he found that of the early telltale signs that people were getting panicky. Was the line of cars backed up to get into. You guessed it costco. He loves to cook and actually he and some friends would get together occasionally to have ice cream club which had one rule you had to make the ice cream as a renter in a landlord. Parag intimately felt the pains on both sides of the equation when it comes to security deposits rather than people stuffing large amounts of cash into a system. That doesn't help either side. He knew there was a better way to help. Renters and landlords. This is the creation story of rhino rhino's company for renters. Our flagship product is a insurance policy. That replaces the need for a renter to pat. Cash security deposit when they move in. You've ever rented a home or know somebody who's rented a home. You are probably all too familiar with you. Know with donna. Angels requirement of paying a cash security deposit upfront. It's oftentimes one month or sometimes even more. So if you're renting a place for say two thousand dollars a month you have to come up with first month's rent two thousand bucks security deposit and other two thousand bucks and then oftentimes some other move in fees and expenses to to actually settle into your new home. It's extraordinarily expensive. That cash deposit is the bit that we deal with. We've essentially replaced that. Two thousand dollar deposit with security deposit insurance policy That costs a little as eight ten. Or maybe twelve dollars to the renter per month in lieu of having to over that two thousand dollar cash security deposit. So it's a way for renters and landlords to really transact in a much more modern efficient way in two thousand and twenty one versus you know just putting cash to really what is a individually segregated escrow account that sort of sit on the sidelines and does nothing for anyone really for the life of that lease challenges really lie in that both real estate and insurance. You know the other kind of vertical or industry we you know squarely Participate in are both very very long standing deep deepen complex industries that have been a little bit further behind the technology adoption curve. And so making headway into that. You know really. I think has been a complex process for for for us over the last five years where we started. You know i actually went on through some other turns to end up in real estate. Managing a couple of hundred rental homes in the new york metro area on behalf of some private investors so as really living in breathing. Not just the renter side of course which. I have been personally familiar with for many years but the landlord property managers side of the real estate rental market firsthand to me. This was one of the big challenges dealing with qualifying renters And you know the cash exchanges That are required which are just part and parcel of. I think how the business works and so it was really born out of a gap. I felt you know we could do better. On for our portfolio around know managing those risks relationships better from a landlord property manager point of view and realizing that cash was just so burdensome. Quite frankly i can go to a farmer's market and by apple's you know with my iphone right using square and whatever else whereas you know to do a very large dollar transaction you know with the renter yet you know. It was far more difficult. I'm far less tech enabled and then talking with friends and peers in the community And by the community. I mean other real estate owners and property managers around you know. Hey i experienced this challenge with deposits managing cash. What do you think and realizing that this opportunity to apply really what has been done in other industries it you know for ten years now To this space in this transaction and the and the answer was yes you know. It was something that people would be on board with and do and that's when we realized like look we didn't have the opportunity to solve what we thought was a problem. You know a mouse problem for you. Know me. And a couple of hundred homes. You know i managed But rather to build a large scale business that could really impact how people experience renting and literally save up to fifty percent for people at moving. Tell me about the mvp. tell me about that. First product you built how long it took you to build and what sort of tools you use to bring it to life. I sometimes think about it as having the kind of good fortune of starting this business You know after having seen a lot and done a lot being you know. I don't know thirty five. Roughly me and my partners were bootstrapping. The business for really the kind of first year. There was so much kind of work. I mentioned you know the kind of insurance and real estate industry complexities. That we knew we had to tackle and so we we spent almost a year. Maybe maybe a little more than a year kind of getting that stuff out of the way you know because we knew it was absolute critical path. But we could kind of focus on before we raised capital from outside investors. We kind of very much had the business set up where the early days set up as to before and after fundraise so we did as much as we could To identify insurance partners identify our first customers. Yeah you know. And all that before actually building an insurance product sort of complex regulated insurance policy that we wrote from scratch and then once we raised capital we went into a different mode of just like absolute pedal to the metal knowing that the clock was now sort of taking and there would be lots of pressures and measurements of your performance from that point forward. You know brian would sues you know one of my business partners and our cto. It's brian was one of the most talented engineers i've ever worked with. Who came a friend of mine because we both worked for this online dating startup Many years ago he was instrumental in helping us kind of think about how to build an mvp product and so we had a mad dash over ninety days from roughly. May two thousand seventeen to you know august late. August two thousand seventeen where we built a entire product experience from front to back with. Brian is our one and only fulltime engineer and cto and offshore engineering team. That was a large team of freelancers that he managed maniacally to deliver our first transactions beginning. August two thousand seventeen. We were able to do that because of you know the sort of trust and teamwork that we had for having a team with pre existing relationships but also really leveraging a lean framework to ship. Something as fast as possible in those early days. He talked about utilizing that lean framework and shipping fast. And you have to go through to make that happen. You.

mike bloomberg mayor city hall Parag rhino rhino goldman sachs costco donna pat Angels new york apple brian Brian
"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

05:39 min | 9 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"On <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my <SpeakerChange> jazz album. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And now it's time <Speech_Male> for all your wonderful <Speech_Male> wonderful feedback <Speech_Male> and brian. <Speech_Male> Roden emailed <Speech_Male> us. Show it <Speech_Male> to bantu podcast <Speech_Male> dot. Org brought <Speech_Male> an epson refillable <Speech_Male> printer several years <Speech_Male> ago when it first <Speech_Male> came out i printed <Speech_Male> five thousand <Speech_Male> six hundred and <Speech_Male> seven pages <Speech_Male> of used less than three <Speech_Male> quarters of the two <Speech_Male> sets of bottles. It <Speech_Male> came with plus <Speech_Male> when i actually need <Speech_Male> to get my third set <Speech_Male> about. Who's it will cost me about <Speech_Male> eighty dollars for <Speech_Male> another three to four thousand <Speech_Male> pages. <Speech_Male> I spent probably <Speech_Male> six hundred to seven <Speech_Male> hundred <Speech_Male> dollars on ink on <Speech_Male> my old cannon <Speech_Male> printer before it broke <Speech_Male> down on me. I'm <Speech_Male> sure it imprint. Half <Speech_Male> as many pages at <Speech_Male> this epson. I get <Speech_Male> ten times <Speech_Male> as much printing for <Speech_Male> the same price out <Speech_Male> of my epson. <Speech_Male> Well there's a renewed <Speech_Male> osman for epson <Speech_Male> printers. <Speech_Male> i believe. Yes <Speech_Male> sorry giggling. <Speech_Male> When he said <Speech_Male> how many pages but just <Speech_Male> see with some <Speech_Male> would exactly <Speech_Male> how many pages i appreciate. <Speech_Male> The principal told <Speech_Male> you this but <Speech_Male> it just makes me chuckle. <Speech_Male> Someone knows <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> how many pages exactly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that printer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> has printed. Thank you for <Speech_Male> that brian. Jason <Speech_Male> armstrong <SpeakerChange> emailed. <Speech_Male> I literally <Speech_Male> use fire <Speech_Male> fox. Because my wife <Speech_Male> uses chrome <Speech_Male> nary the two <Speech_Male> shall mix when we <Speech_Male> are using the same central <Speech_Male> computer <Speech_Male> like his and hers towels. <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> tried velvety <Speech_Male> and enjoyed the <Speech_Male> ease of teaming the <Speech_Male> built in notes taking <Speech_Male> capabilities <Speech_Male> on the sidebar <Speech_Male> and the baked didn't email <Speech_Male> client. I've <Speech_Male> never been a fan of safari. <Speech_Male> Not much <Speech_Male> luck with epiphany. <Speech_Male> Either i <Speech_Male> totally understand. Why <Speech_Male> elementary <Speech_Male> includes epiphany <Speech_Male> as default. But <Speech_Male> i always hope out for <Speech_Male> five folks. <SpeakerChange> The moment <Speech_Male> i install. <Speech_Male> I completely <Speech_Male> forgotten that <Speech_Male> the whole concept of <Speech_Male> two people using <Speech_Male> one account <Speech_Male> on one computer <Speech_Male> was pain. <Speech_Male> I just. <Speech_Male> i haven't <Speech_Male> done that ever <Speech_Male> out. <Speech_Male> Well no <Speech_Male> that's a lie. The <Speech_Male> last time <Speech_Male> to people in my <Speech_Male> house shed <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> same. Computer <Speech_Male> count was <Speech_Male> in nineteen ninety-seven <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and it was me. Wife <Speech_Male> had windows <Speech_Male> ninety eight or something <Speech_Male> on a computer <Speech_Male> ever since <Speech_Male> then. Everyone's <SpeakerChange> had <Speech_Male> their own accounts <Speech_Male> on the. I didn't really <Speech_Male> understand what i was saying. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> wow i <Speech_Male> think the point is <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> he has a browser eiko <Speech_Male> and she has a browser <Speech_Male> almost <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> different things. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wow <Speech_Male> would. Ross <Speech_Male> a mild. I'm <Speech_Male> just resigned to being <Speech_Male> part of the google matrix <Speech_Male> so use <Speech_Male> chrome everywhere <Speech_Male> however i keep five <Speech_Male> folks around for one <Speech_Male> unique feature <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Male> controlled. Click <Speech_Male>

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

05:37 min | 9 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"On <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my <SpeakerChange> jazz album. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And now it's time <Speech_Male> for all your wonderful <Speech_Male> wonderful feedback <Speech_Male> and brian. <Speech_Male> Roden emailed <Speech_Male> us. Show it <Speech_Male> to bantu podcast <Speech_Male> dot. Org brought <Speech_Male> an epson refillable <Speech_Male> printer several years <Speech_Male> ago when it first <Speech_Male> came out i printed <Speech_Male> five thousand <Speech_Male> six hundred and <Speech_Male> seven pages <Speech_Male> of used less than three <Speech_Male> quarters of the two <Speech_Male> sets of bottles. It <Speech_Male> came with plus <Speech_Male> when i actually need <Speech_Male> to get my third set <Speech_Male> about. Who's it will cost me about <Speech_Male> eighty dollars for <Speech_Male> another three to four thousand <Speech_Male> pages. <Speech_Male> I spent probably <Speech_Male> six hundred to seven <Speech_Male> hundred <Speech_Male> dollars on ink on <Speech_Male> my old cannon <Speech_Male> printer before it broke <Speech_Male> down on me. I'm <Speech_Male> sure it imprint. Half <Speech_Male> as many pages at <Speech_Male> this epson. I get <Speech_Male> ten times <Speech_Male> as much printing for <Speech_Male> the same price out <Speech_Male> of my epson. <Speech_Male> Well there's a renewed <Speech_Male> osman for epson <Speech_Male> printers. <Speech_Male> I believe yes. <Speech_Male> Sorry giggling <Speech_Male> women. He said <Speech_Male> how many pages but just <Speech_Male> see with some <Speech_Male> would exactly <Speech_Male> how many pages i appreciate. <Speech_Male> The principal told <Speech_Male> you this but <Speech_Male> it just makes me chuckle. <Speech_Male> Someone knows <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> how many pages exactly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that printer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> has printed. Thank you for <Speech_Male> that brian. Jason <Speech_Male> armstrong <SpeakerChange> emailed. <Speech_Male> I literally <Speech_Male> use fire <Speech_Male> fox. Because my wife <Speech_Male> uses chrome <Speech_Male> nary the two <Speech_Male> shall mix when we <Speech_Male> are using the same central <Speech_Male> computer <Speech_Male> like his and hers towels. <Speech_Male> I've <Speech_Male> tried velvety <Speech_Male> and enjoyed the <Speech_Male> ease of teaming the <Speech_Male> built in notes taking <Speech_Male> capabilities <Speech_Male> on the side by <Speech_Male> the baked. Didn't email <Speech_Male> client. I've <Speech_Male> never been a fan of safari. <Speech_Male> Not much <Speech_Male> luck with epiphany. <Speech_Male> Either i <Speech_Male> totally understand. Why <Speech_Male> elementary <Speech_Male> includes epiphany <Speech_Male> as default. But <Speech_Male> i always hope it out for <Speech_Male> five folks. <SpeakerChange> The moment <Speech_Male> i install. <Speech_Male> I completely <Speech_Male> forgotten that <Speech_Male> the whole concept of <Speech_Male> two people using <Speech_Male> one account <Speech_Male> on one computer <Speech_Male> was pain <Speech_Male> i just. <Speech_Male> I haven't <Speech_Male> done that ever <Speech_Male> out. <Speech_Male> Well no <Speech_Male> that's a lie. The <Speech_Male> last time <Speech_Male> to people in my <Speech_Male> house shed <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> same computer. <Speech_Male> Count was <Speech_Male> in nineteen ninety-seven <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> at it was my <Speech_Male> wife. Had windows <Speech_Male> ninety eight or something <Speech_Male> on a computer <Speech_Male> ever since <Speech_Male> then. Everyone's <SpeakerChange> had <Speech_Male> their own accounts <Speech_Male> on the. I didn't really <Speech_Male> understand what i was saying. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> wow i <Speech_Male> think the point is <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> he has a browser. I <Speech_Male> and she has a browser <Speech_Male> almost <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> different things. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wow <Speech_Male> would. Ross <Speech_Male> a mild. I'm <Speech_Male> just resigned to being <Speech_Male> part of the google matrix <Speech_Male> so use <Speech_Male> chrome everywhere <Speech_Male> however i keep five <Speech_Male> folks around for one <Speech_Male> unique feature <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Male> controlled.

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"Right. So it's in need of a reboot but it's also need in need of a bit of a switch which is Which is sort of our end goal as a team myself. A monica which is to make whatever small progress remake on the community for the community and make it sustainable so even if the team does disappear that there are processes in place. I don't know say well. There are oppressive in place to make sure that things persist awesome. And he said you're hiring for a new team lead. Is that right. Is that public on the careers page. If people are interested in any of the community team related roles correct that is a director of community role open on the economical careers. Page canonical dot com slash careers. It'll be someone and if it's not up yet it should be so i'm going to say it anyway. There's also should be a role free developer operations role at to join myself monica. It's a little bit different. It's sort of a cross between advocate and community representative. But the idea is we want some with a bit of a technical know-how bit of operational know how to come in and help us and help the community get things done in a more process oriented tuning way while abiding by this culture so if for example and a wonderful thread about a membership application comes up again not only would we be able to respond to it and get things done in this kind of way. But we'll have someone that can support that initiative in a more hands-on prototype sense because the problem with stuff like that is at the end of the day. someone actually needs to do some work to. Yes all cases. If if you want to a new process someone has to actually write some code and do some configuration of services. And it's really.

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

Ubuntu Podcast

04:57 min | 9 months ago

"rhino" Discussed on Ubuntu Podcast

"As we've go reese on the show. We thought we'd have a chat to him about the community. So reese your job title is developer advocate. Is that correct. That is quite correct. Yes so let's start there. What does develop advocate do a lot of times it depends on the company you work for. But the general rule of thumb is that a developer advocate is someone who represents develop his interests. And how's the muse tools and products sort of more efficiently. Your or in a nicer way in canonical for been to that manifests itself and generic in two senses. In talking to people about have been too but a lot of two uses developers are very matures very mature product platform. And so for me. It manifests in working with community developers working with partners and organizations who have other communities with developers who want to work with canonical or work with two as an organization. I do you recently. Started working as part of the relatively. Recently i should probably say style working part of the up into community team is that right. That's right yes so what does that. What does the community team do so a the community is almost an extension of what i just said. There are two and a half of us now does myself as monica. Who's the community representative and the half. Is ken fantine. Who's our sort of interim community manager while we find what we look for someone new to lead it fulltime. We have split our roles into sort of three different types of things as interfacing with the community which is a lot of monaco's doing there's interfacing with organizations and partners which is a lot of my doing and this would have community operations and working in discourse and working on how teams inside canonical is whether it's projects they've been do community work which we sort of share. So it's it's to say this is a little bit of a reboot in the last year. Also i think. Did you know you are doing other things that canonical before you worked on the community team. Was it your idea that you would move across some work on community. What was attracted you to it. Why why did you want to do this than whatever else you would. I did a little blog post about this some six months or something ago now a little bit more than i guess when i moved from a product management position at chronicle to develop advocate position uncle. And what attracted me. That was what attracted me. There was while i was doing product management stuff. I did a lot of work with the advocacy team. I did a lot of work with at sort of touching community work with a lot of different products. And i found one of the things that i was good at one of the things that i enjoyed more importantly was that kind of interface working with people uses of been to and under partners that we we sort of have this collaborative relationship with folks. Like i say we. I mean canonical folks like dell lenovo flutter from google raspberry pi those kinds of folks and so when i got tired of the management thing..

reese ken fantine monica monaco lenovo dell google
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"That..

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Several, other major labels pass in fact, all of them every single one around which in New York with some labels in December now in November. It was a pass. There was one person in New York Steve Greenberg, who wanted to Atlantic records who call me up in November of nineteen, ninety four, and he said this is the best demo I've ever gotten I want to sign it. I went. God I've been waiting for this call. Yet right I got a call a week later. He said I can't people above me. Don't want it. They won't let me sign it. And he ended up. Leaving started his own record. Company called s curve records when he did Really Waleed. Man Saturday but that state Greenberg is the only other record executive who believed in it. It January. February of Nineteen, ninety five. We got a call Kinney hurts. WHO's in the law firm where she live I have a client name guy series working at Madonna's label. Maverick records just take a meeting with them. Atlantis and our in the studio in my studio. We said okay. Set up the minute. You say if you go there right now, you can meet with you, I through my guitar in the car, we drove to eight thousand Beverly Boulevard Maverick records. We walked in I had my guitar. We had a dat with the song perfect, two or three of the demos. We'd done first office on the right guy. You met US. He didn't have much to say. He just pointed to the Dat player, so I just went over and put the data in spur song was perfect, played for like a minute, and like I could see him sit up his chair, and at the end of the song he was in I've never had a. that's so cool. I've never thought saying like that happen. You know you should people. It was just an unvarnished positive reaction from record company executive after literally everyone hit said. Now Nio series! I get it. Will blown out of the water. We'll blown out from that moment on. I. Fortunate Change and he's oldest to label we meeting with Donna. She loved it and so with Madonna in Syria behind his we widely into the marketplace with this little sorta handmade record with a bunch of Demos. You know it had to have been the biggest signing for maverick. was there a bigger record for them? Guy Had recalled candlebox, which had done well I think they had platinum record, but that's yeah, exactly my. So when the album was released. What started things what caught fire I you remember like following it and saying Oh man I think something's happening here. K., Arlo Q.. Was the most influential. Alternative Rock Station in the world at that moment. The program director Kevin Weatherly, the most powerful program director for Rod Music Period and. Literally just got a record and loved it. It was simply someone loving record. WHO's in a position of influence so? Kevin wealthy flayed you OUGHTA now on Iraq and it literally. Play. Everything changed lift. Wow, after one play. People were pulling over on the side of the road. Phoning in who the hell is that? Because the phones went off the chart for Tehran why very first time they spun it and it never stopped. You know it came right like wildfire right from the various downbeat. At that point, there were literally no female artists on alternative radio, so it was a huge thing for Kevin. To, a female artist in the sort of male dominated. Rock music in. We shot straight to number one. You know, and then then he added. Hand in my pocket. Before you ought to. He becoming off that we didn't even think that would be our next single. It just added it in today's terminology. It was trending from the downbeat. It really was and the first little to is she did I? Remember going out to Chicago and Milwaukee I remember the show in Milwaukee was at a bar. And showed up about seven o'clock at night, and there was like a thousand people lined up around this place, waiting to get in, and we thought Oh my God. Ah Power Radio. Because, people wanted to see her. Just from hearing it, it happened very quickly. I mean the the first two shows. She played in La before the record ever came out. Had the same kind of energy and nobody knew who she was. First show was at a place on Santa. Monica Boulevard Call dragonfly. The next one was at a place called Luna Park. On Robertson, Boulevard! and. You couldn't get in the room and I just. I still never know how people trying to hurt about it. But. It was phenomenal from the very first performance she did. There was some kind of magic around it and I actually I mean we had picked the band. We found Taylor Hawkins in an audition out in the valley. Reset my God. Like as a star, okay, wait a minute. He was playing drums with Alanis would he did the first tour with her? Get outta here. It was an open casting call I saw hundred hundred guitar and Taylor Hawkins was like Holy Shit. Yeah, no kidding. Just tell guy to league because he's in the. I? Don't let them get away. Cap It. This is before it ever gone to radio, so we thought you know. We gotta go out and play some live shows. I never really seen her. Perform other than it just for the auditions. She dragonfly I'd never seen it performed live, and it was like mind blowing the amount of energy she is. She had as a rely performer. I thought Oh my God. All the years that she spent. Learning how to be a performer as is paying off at this moment, because now what she wants to do, but she actually knows how to do it the time she spent learning to be an entertainer is now informed the artist. It all came together for me. It's like Oh. Yeah, she's actually ready for this moment. Were you surprised how well it sold, even though you knew it was taking off because it became a massive massive record, I mean I. Think it would be an act of hoover's to ever think that anything you do is going to sell thirty three million records. I mean I I. Don't think that way. Yeah I mean I I've been involved on some big Michael Jackson records, but Now I just I. Just hope that people would hear it, you know. Proud of it, I was proud of her courage. I just thought she was amazing. But I had no clue. No concept that it would be now. I don't think he'd want to. Because we made the record without any record company supervision, we made the record. Without any adult supervision we take. The lesson I got out of that was like. Trusted, instinct She told me that. This album was in the top twenty on the billboard, two hundred for over a year six single six singles, each one of them went to number one in different formats female artists. That's that was. It remains unprecedented. You know yeah, because she could rock with the best seven man. It was an eye opener. You know my dear friend Steven Tyler was so enamored. Of Her. Is just couldn't believe that she could.

Steve Greenberg executive Madonna New York Taylor Hawkins program director Milwaukee US Tehran Steven Tyler Kevin wealthy Arlo Q Kinney Luna Park Guy Syria Kevin La
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"So then she went back to Canada and. The publishable going. We kind of like what you guys are up to. Would you like dude? She'd bring him back here. Right with again, and that's essentially what happened. They brought it back. I think June and we just kept writing so I think I got with a twenty times. We about twenty songs. That's what we did. We will twenty songs and recorded them all on this day. We wrote them. Vocals recorded that day all the stuff. I played screw that day. And so what it just be you on guitar, or would there be various different instrumentation that you added I? Would play all of it I was working on a debt format. Call Eight, at which was one of the. Digital formats you put it on s vhs tape, so had these eight ATM machines. I had a lend nine thousand beat box that also you could put your music in there, so it was one of the first ways that you could play music with yourself. Yeah, pardon the PUN and so. Really have to playing with myself, so this was easy. That's how we did every single. Song Jagger Pill, so she didn't come with any songs or anything. You guys just several notebooks full of because she's such a inveterate league. Time, she's not right. We had huge amounts of DNA, but Started with conversations. And occasionally she would find stuff in there, but you started based on what we wanted to write about in. oftentimes, she already had the idea, but the interesting thing is, is that the way we wrote all of out? Almost a hundred percent guitar on all, and I usually composed on the piano, but I decided to play Electric Guitar on, so get a beaten to lend nine thousand. Get a phrase going on guitar. She would sit on the floor of my studio. It was just the two of us there every single time and I'm recording it and she would start singing. This was the greatest gift of all is that she would sing her way through it first of all, her voice is so incredibly expressive. I'm sitting there playing. Making the track. She's auditioning lines. Phrases lyrics right literally we would do about eight hours of that and at the end of it, we would have a track. Finished lyric she would go in and sing. It wants is usually about eleven at night and she would go home, and that's the way we did. Every single one while sang. You ought to know one time. One time. That's the vocal on the record. I recorded it. It's couple of places is so hot that it's actually distorted, but we didn't change it. Upped. Dude. Well. It's just like aretha Franklin records right. You hear when she really leans into a phrase, it's peaking, but like the emotion is there who gives man is easy to make a perfect record. Now that's saying the world just hit auto to quantifies. It's perfect. It's perfect. It's glory you know. Absolutely you want the emotion you want that excitement, and so that's so fantastic that you were able to keep the vocal tracks from these demos. Look the how much of the music that you record a demo recorded in your home studios. How much of this music that was in the demos made it onto the final rack. Anything did I play. Is that's it and we added real drums on five or six things? We added couple of guitar players base players had been my play. Organ on six of the tracks existed already. Those were all over dubs. Literally, everything was an overdubbed. Wow, that's crazy now. Did you go in and take those in and add more stuff to him because he thought? Maybe these songs are the ones that I'm thinking are the best of the bunch, and they could be singles, and you really wanted to polish him or did they just needed more instrumentation to realize the completeness of their I was operating from the standpoint. That these which is Demos? Okay, we should fact. They were Atlanta's taught me. Is that hour is a record? Good about it. Why is it a demo? Right right and so there was some talk at Maverick. Not from Jerry, but from other people that we should record Let's go in and really record days. In Atlanta's was like hell now this is it Guile Sarah? Hell now this. Is it I mean he did suggest we add some musicians and he got. To play on it and Dave Navarro. That was all guy in no way. Did he want us to start over and re recorded? It was a Lantis that was behind saying now. We're putting it out like this I'm not GonNa Redo these vocals. You're not GonNa Replay Your Guitar, the whole thing cost less than two thousand dollars from mastering. Our engineer got paid a couple of session payments. That was it I mean there were demos, man and so. Thanks to Atlanta's. She said this is the thing that I want people to hear when you started. She didn't have deal right like her to album. Deal up in Canada was up and so you were doing all of this. I think that speaks volumes about your belief in her abilities. At what point did you finally get that deal with maverick? When we did the last song? All I really wants the last thing we did and I think we was signed the deal like the next week..

Atlanta Canada Jerry aretha Franklin Dave Navarro engineer Sarah
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Those tracks are just. Oh, my gosh to this new songbook of Jesse Jones that we have you now, we just. They felt it. Well, the the music is fantastic. It is so authentic and I think that leads me to my next. Thought is one thing that amazes me about your musicality. Is You have this ability to effortlessly segue between completely different genres, not only write and produce successfully, but then score massive hits. Each of these genres is just second nature to you or do you have to like mentally switch gears to say okay now. I'm going to do pop now. I'm going to do jazz, or is it just like putting on your shoes? It's like put on. Cheers, because for me. Music is music and I think. Growing up where I did. A lot to do with it. Around authentic real jazz surround people playing music lot. Just on the street. That I lived in Nashes Mississippi. There were two brothers who lived across the street from me. Deadly brothers, and they play all these instruments, and they were jazz is one almost a trumpet player. The other guitar player and so. It was like playing music was something that you did like you would play sports or something? Which I also sure so for me. I always went to write my own songs. I had abandoned the fifth grade. What'd you play? Tomorrow. And the lead singer and the writer, and about eighty percent of our set was original material so throughout my entire career, even as a cover bed I usually didn't do covers, and I worked all through junior high school. We played probably two hundred gigs mostly. My own shit so I've had a longtime foisting I new songs on people. And begging them to like listen to this new song. You know so plenty of practice as a songwriter and I was growing up around. But but then I was hearing Beatles records and hearing incredible James I had every single James Brown single that he ever put out in sixties. Literally had over one, hundred, forty, five. RPM changed a because, while just blew me away. Actually saw James Brown in the sixties. I've never seen anything that good you know. and his band was so good, but I also go home and listen to Jimi Hendrix. And then listened Listen to some jazz across the street, so I screw up. Music wasn't segregated. It was just this disgrace potpourri of all kinds of influence, and and that's sort of the way approached it when I came to Hollywood to be a songwriter. I would have many more opportunities if I could write different genres so just as. A Staff Songwriter at MCA music in nineteen, eighty four. I was able to write for a lot of artists looking from cereal, just because I could go to that that style of music, and I never put that sort of barrier on my stealth. I just what I like and just like a lot of stuff you know, so. How did you? Meet Alanis Morissette. I met last more set in one, thousand, nine, hundred four. February of Nineteen Ninety Four. I got a call from my publishers now universal, but they used to be MCA. Okay I had been a staff songwriter there in the eighties I got a call from the publishers, and they said we have a Canadian. Songwriter in town. She had a record deal on MCA Canada. She's no longer has that deal, but we still have her publishing deal on we would you write a song whether to name is Lance? Morissette I pretty much always say yes. Yeah I'm open to the idea of. Walking into my world is going to give me something that I don't have you know so. Of that thing that I don't have in you. So. That's just my whole thing. I'M GONNA. You're rummaging through your creativity. Might something that we can make something out you know and yet that's my dude, or she came in and right away. I realize just how intelligent she was and how much I liked her. We had a cup of tea. And then we said let's let's write a song and I. had never heard anything she'd ever done. She really didn't know who the hell I was. So we just kind of like strangers on a train and we seem like we liked each other was to write a song. I said there was a club in New York City called the bottom line I said. Let's write a song about that. I mean just throwing out ideas, and let's meet at the bottom line and. The bottom line could be a double entendre about the bump. Yeah, you love those physical place and the bottom line of are we in love or not man? I'm telling you. We had that conversation and she wrote the lyric I was playing Acoustic Guitar. We just made a demo of it right there on the spot..

James Brown Alanis Morissette Jesse Jones Jimi Hendrix MCA Canada New York City Lance Nashes Mississippi Hollywood Beatles writer RPM junior high school James I
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Episode and I just love the way they work together. And at first the vocalist was kind of yeah another song, but as soon as she hears it, she instantly that musician and artist takes over, and she's one hundred percent there and all of sudden coming up with lyrics for the song. Yeah, I mean that's exactly. Thank you for feeling. That is exactly right I mean. We have to characters who are having a personal issue, but the. Transcends that is like. I. Don't want to hear any place. Oh, wait yeah I do WanNa, hear it yeah right. Later. Let's talk about the stew. Yeah, exactly, this is more important than yeah. Wins the argument I absolutely and I think it only serves to highlight how important music is to those characters it's it's actually everything. For any serious musician quite honestly, sacrifices aren't worth the reward probably. But try telling somebody not too, you know. And so it's sort of like a curse if you're if you musically inclined especially now it's hard to find people play music with. You GotTa play with your computer mostly at the. While especially today which I do every day you know. When I get to play with other people. It's like the most fun ever is like vacation. Especially now sits after four I haven't played music with anyway so exactly the pandemic it is. It is Amas Home Demos City here. Well that same title track the Eddie which we talked about the two characters writing. There's a recording that features Saint Vincent on vocals. And she's a fantastic guitar player net I'm in great musician, right? And I think a lot of people are familiar with her from her collaboration with David Byrne exactly. How did she become involved in this? That was strictly through our record company, Aerostar Records Sony mastered I mean we knew we wanted to put out. All the music from a lot of the music from the show, since was all live so basically. I. Fourteen songs on the soundtrack are live recordings from the soundtrack and our record company said we love the song to. We have a few artists that might WanNa do covers just as Roma's to your show, so we said Yeah just give it a shot..

Sony David Byrne Roma Saint Vincent Eddie
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"People have an idea of Pairs Anna. Jazz is being this kind of thing from the thirties or from the fifties Perez is a different place. Now it's still incredibly vivid in in. Has This great history? But what's the new jazz and you find that? Like you say on the fringes of Paris outside beyond the ring road in some of the errands dismounts that people don't know about unless you live in Paris. But they're still music being played in those places. And a lot of young people who go in there and listen so how what's the? Like in Paris are there. A lot of clubs is really pretty popular thirteen places where you can go hear jazz on any given night. Usually it's not anybody famous, but it's just people in. They're playing chasing. This thing called Jazz. And young people in an listening paying attention drinking smoking having fun. I just thought. This jazz is still alive. As intimate. Jazz belong concert stage. It's intimate. It's like Frank Sinatra said. I'm the greatest saloon singer who ever lived. Yeah and I love that idea of like music is personal. It's close. You're close to it and it. It has a a transcendent quality. If you around the real thing, and I just think for twenty years, we've been around music. It's all digital. It's all driven by computers in all interesting and. Quite vivid, but there's something missing from four or five people playing together at a really really high level. So that was what the Eddie was supposed to be. And and somehow I pulled it off. You got got the greatest bad wrote. All these songs got a great singer and we made this incredible show. Yeah I think that's one of the first things as I was watching it. That struck me. I'm like Oh. These guys are really plan. It wasn't a bunch of actors up there like you know I think all of us in the Music World Week, look at the attempts to show music being made in TV and music and movies in. It's always kinda phony. Yeah. It's just a little bit. You know just kind of throws it off. Yeah, anybody who's a real music. Person feels a little bit of that disconnected. It's not quite Rio. So. Damian and Allen and Jack Thorne I writer, an I in Randy Kerber gambler co composer. We just said. We're GonNa do this live. And so Netflix said what does that entail, and we said it's entails a hell of a lot more. I should do it. So I am just grateful to everybody that they would embrace the idea that we would do each eight episodes and recorded all live in not having any score. which there is none. It's all digest so the music that you hear you see people playing. Sometimes it will play over the next scene, but it's always our band playing so I'm just out of that. It's there's never been a show like this well. It definitely adds to the authenticity the experience. I think that it wouldn't be anywhere near as impactful if they weren't actually playing it I'm not sure the show would work to be honest if Think we all agreed that there was just? That was the product the whole show it had to be behind and it had to be. That level of reality. Because we were trying to show portrait of people who do something they do it not for money, and they do it not for fame, but they still have to be like the best in the world to get even considered. Yeah so I. Just thought is a beautiful way of showing again. Mostly young people sacrifice that goes into doing something great that you do for the love of it, and you don't do it for the money of it. And I like that you mentioned the vocal jazz part of it. I'm sure that Quincy must. You must learn so much from him about that. Because of course he produced what many considered to be the definitive live Frank Sinatra record live at the sands, and I can only imagine that you learn so much from quincy about vocal jazz every day. Every day I spent with Quincy was like a year with someone else because he's so wise. Wow, a so giving of his information any so much fun so. He's like a father figure to me and as a teacher. I couldn't have had a better teacher. Body, whose knowledge of music you know. He's got the PhD in all forms of music. He knows the history of African music like no one any relationship between African music and jazz. And it's something I'm intimately deeply involved with so the added for me on so many levels. Is kind of a homecoming for me of jazz could be what it was. What it could be is minute. Louisiana route sincere. You know it was a love. Letter you now. Since a lot of these songs in here are vocal pieces vocal jazz. And you wrote the songs I before the show came. Did the Writers Reference Your lyrics to build the storyline lutely? Wow. That's cool. Jack unwanted wrote the outline for eight of the episodes, and he wrote I think six of them himself. We gave him. The songs that we had recorded their demos of the Eddie and he went and wrote eight episodes, and he put Eddie songs exactly where he wanted them, but they were. The songs were already written so the lyrics. I mean so. It was like a musical, but we started with the music. and He created all this whole narrative around. This music was given so of course Jack Dawn. Is A song writers. Blessing. And plus he's. He's a real jazz freak, so it in in every way and is a francophile. Even though British out on every level, I got lucky. That we took this Satchel full of jazz songs that we found all these people who responded to it in the most remarkable way. It sounds like you got the dream. Team. You couldn't have you know now. Kind of come together any better. We we spent a year in Paris shooting, eight episodes, and of course every day was a was just an incredible gift Jimmy, I mean come on. That must be so awesome. I can't imagine I can't even stream time although we. We stayed up all night because. We shot mostly at night, so we would get home at four o'clock in the morning and I'll be back in studio at nine, but. I'm not complaining everything about it's authentic, so that's just leads to the automaticity. Stay out late club like that. I think one of the things about the show that I liked it. It doesn't try too hard to capture your attention. It's like it's doing its thing. But by employing that approach, it totally succeeds in capturing here attention God. You feel that way I mean! I agree there's there's a certain sense of that you. That you just kind of ended up in a place, you just observing? This Very Complicated Thing Cola Jazz Ensemble and how they sort of have figured out. You know even the way they figured out the music and I mean Damian wanted a lot of that interaction of like working music, writing a song or additioning changing keys. And so might decisions were in there like working ten hours a day like really play a tough. Yeah, but we all loved it. You Know Oh, I'm sure I'm sure. There's one scene in the first episode where the main character and the focus from the house band. Are Working on the song that becomes the piece that is the final song of the first.

Paris Eddie Frank Sinatra Cola Jazz Ensemble Quincy Damian Perez Netflix Jack Dawn Rio Louisiana Jack Jack Thorne Randy Kerber writer Jimmy Allen
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Glenn Ballard Welcome to the Rhino. PODCAST real to be here. It is the twenty-fifth anniversary of jagged little pill, maybe the biggest record of the nineties. Certainly it's in. That rarefied air there aren't that many diamond records out there. This record sold thirty three million copies to date amazing. It's a remarkable fact one that I'm still astonished by especially in. In the way media is now. It'd be hard to do that now. Exactly it was. At a point in time where everything just must have come together for you beautifully, it was so symbiotic. I'm sure. I think if you're patient and work hard every day eventually you get lucky and certainly I feel very very lucky to have been involved with this project without any question. You have to show up every day to collaborate with your destiny. So that's my mantra is. Be Ready to go to work in. Is something good may or may not come out of it. But if you don't go it, nothing will come out of it, so you know yeah. I love that to collaborate with your destiny. I've never heard that before. No loved that that's fantastic. Yeah, they say luck favors the prepared right. Yes. You GotTa Show Up, you know. Yeah, yeah exactly well, we will absolutely get into the meat and potatoes of that record, but it's fresh on my mind because I, just watched the first episode of the Eddie last night. And I want to talk about that for a little bit. Because this really is not your average Netflix series. The vibe of it is a complete one eighty of anything else. They have yeah right now in their content. And I watched it with my fifteen year old son and he was. You know engrossed in something in his hands as kids are these days, but when it was over I didn't even ask him what he thought. He just offered up man. The music really set the tone of that show, that's. Exactly what I hoped would happen. It takes place in Modern Day Paris. The main character is a jazz pianist. Who is a co? Owner of jazz club called the kind of in a little CD or neighborhood in Paris. I'm taking it just by the vibe and the things that happened in the show. But how did you get involved with this show? And because you have written the music for it? Including the main song, the which is at the end of the first episode and I WANNA. Say the place that it serves the episode because I don't want to throw out any spoilers for anybody who hasn't seen it yet, but. Man Just fits so so well. How did you get involved in this? How did it come around? Well? I got involved by coming up with the idea for a part-time Parisian about thirty seven percent French according to my DNA. My father's from Louisiana so I have some French Louisiana and May and Growing up around New Orleans, around jazz, my whole life and yeah, always enamored of. The musicianship involved with playing jazz. So for May I. In my long. Career started off working with Quincy Jones. Who is himself? She has refugee. And you know. One of the first songs I had recorded was by George Benson another great jazz artists who was actually doing kind of pop crossover because. George Benson started singing. He got ten times more popular than just playing guitar. His right right is guitars ever so I think what I learned from from that, is it pop music has a certain dominance, but quincy I in the ten years that I worked with him very closely. We always lamented like what happened to jazz. Of course quincy. Made incredible connections between hip hop jazz is one of the rate authors folks sort of launching this new sound that in in many ways grows out of jazz grows out of blues, gross out of rap. But for probably mile career wanted to find a meaningful way to do use the jazz vocabulary as a songwriter, and so it took me a while to figure out how to do that. If you could write a bunch of jazz song right now, give them to a contemporary artists. It's the likelihood that that would be heard is very low. Right basically because people like you a fifteen year old son. Actually don't know what jazz is they they as something that people did. Time before them or they look back at the great black and white photographs of Miles Davis. And that's to them. What jazz is and so? It's not alive anymore. You know so. It was for me, I. I had this dream that I wanted to have my own jazz. Bad right the songs for it have a great singer and has store to go with it. That was the way I wanted to approach the whole idea of me involve. Seriously with Jazz. In two thousand and seven I. was working with a jazz trumpeter named Christian Scott One of the great young jazz artists in the world. He's from New Orleans and I literally got inspired in two thousand seven to create a project that would allow me to have my band. Allow me to write jazz songs and have a story to go with it, so I start writing songs in two thousand seven. I wrote a bunch of songs with Christian. Ended up writing A, I don't know about sixty jazz new jazz songs while because I'm a pop songwriter I guess I wanted to make sure that they were songs that you could remember that had hooks, and that had a singer because I think that's what was missing from a lot of what people's perception of jazz with. It's become a self indulgent. Kinda closed off cul de sac sort of us against the world and for me. That's not which as I wanted to be something that. Celebrated being close to great -sition, playing music and people who do that Jazz, ensemble, or typically highly gifted musicians. In fact, you can't even sit in that circle if you can't really play so. I wanted to write a letter to all the musicians that I've grown up with and working in Hollywood was long as I have around some of the greatest greatest musicians ever. I wanted to find a way for them to use all of their Jews. And so for me, that was jazz, so rewrote all these songs. Two, thousand fourteen, I brought to friend of mine named Ellen Pool WHO's a great director producer. And he said I get it, and that's when he connected us with Damian. Chazelle, before La la land before I man. So you know Damian was involved with this project about seven years ago and said let's do this thing about jazz band living in Paris contemporary parents. Damian's got French background. I lived in and out of Paris in all. My life spent a Lotta time. They are in a lot of time. The Jessica was like look..

Paris Damian New Orleans George Benson Louisiana Glenn Ballard Quincy Jones Modern Day Paris Netflix quincy Miles Davis Eddie cul de sac Chazelle Christian Scott One Hollywood Jessica Ellen Pool
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Welcome to the Rhino podcast brought to you by Rhino records interviews with your favorite artists and bands of the songs and albums you love. Here's your host rich mayhem. On this episode of the Rhino Podcast, we speak with six time Grammy Award winning producer and Songwriter Glen Ballard. CH-. Say? Hello friends looking for some new music to add to your collection head on over Toronto Dot Com. Check out these titles several Torah beneath the remains to LP deluxe edition on Orange Vinyl Miles Davis rubberband to LP's and one seven inch from the one thousand nine hundred five Warner Brothers sessions never released until now and the replacements deadman's pop four CD ONE LP deluxe edition set from the don't tell a soul sessions featuring the album mixed as it was originally intended along with a collection of previously unreleased material. Make sure you sign up to be a rhino insiders, so you can get credit for your purchases and earn points for Ranault rewards. Well our guest on the Rhino podcast. Today is six time grammy..

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Which so different from a rolling stone not only in the way they presented music and presented artist and presented that part of the culture but cream was a rock and roll band unto itself and when they said they were america's only rock and roll magazine it's kind of a desta rolling stone but at the same time saying like no we are rock and roll they're every bit as much about ascetic as the drunk rock star on the lear jet absolutely they didn't just write about it they absolutely one hundred percent lifted the good the bad ass an ugly one of the former editors credit card power former contributing writers i should say has this beautiful thing he says in the film it was not a rock and roll magazine it was a rock and roll band that was pointing out magazine it's sort ties back to what you said it's they were so passionate about the music that they embraced it in every way shape or form they studied it they talked about it they fought about it they went to shows together all the time they hung out with the band's they learn about the band's you know those were back in the days where you actually had access to these artists it wasn't like a publicist saying you've got ten minutes or a half an hour to talk to this artist they would be with them for two weeks three weeks at a time they began to her and they connected with the music and the artist in a much different way then exist today and i think that's what you see when you when you flip to the pages dave mars had this quote dave said you bleed forward if you had to because some other kid would agree that and be freed buy it you think i could still happen in today's climate i think it can still happen but some things need to change i think what we see out there is a lot of stuff that's like really productized and really sanitized ties and i think if that's the type of editorial and the type of content that's out there it's gonna be really tough for someone to connect with it in a meaningful way back in the day i think there was this really cool ecosystem between these artists the writers in the fans and they were all interconnected and they each held accountable in in many ways and that allowed for accountability within the music where it made the music better an it connected fans to the music in a more meaningful way end i think that today it's difficult to make that connection because the ecosystem has been disrupted an they are holding each other accountable and i think the music has suffered in a lotta ways a because of that and i because the music is suffering because editorial suffered people can't necessarily connect with it in the same way and i'm not saying that people don't love music or love certain bands but i think it's very different potential question yeah i think i think it's possible someone's just gotta step out of break that current cycle right now and not be afraid to maybe say something that's gonna offend certain people i'm not saying of going out there and being asked for the sake of being an ass and obviously it's twenty nineteen are very different filters now then there in the seventies but there is plenty of room to have an actual point of view an i think that's the first step is being unafraid to have a point of view that some people might disagree with and that's okay factor a one down ball rabble rabble don't both lester bangs he lives the rock and roll life and i mean he was gone too soon at the age of thirty one you were four and a half i believe when when you lost your dad and i heard you say at south by southwest at the making of this documentary was his closest you could come to having a cup of coffee with him do you feel like you know him better now i do i feel like this this whole process for me was trying to learn about my dad in connect with him in a different way than i had before i've obviously asked my mom a number of questions over the years but there's certain things that i either was not necessarily comfortable asking her or things that only other people could tell me based on their interactions with him you know took about four years to make this film and just hearing stories everybody had a very kramer story a similar good similar bad similar crazy it really let me know about the actual person he was he was just like incredibly complex flawed genius who had these crazy powerful in many times volatile relationships which is almost everybody came in contact with what i really found so profound was unique and see this in the film there's a number of folks that are still very like emotional about the relationship that they had with my dad a lot of folks didn't necessarily leave on good terms with him and then he died an and they felt like i think in many ways they didn't get to get the last word is pretty incredible my is like throughout the course of making the duck there were there were folks that wouldn't participate because they were still mad at my dad i'm like all right i mean i've been hold a grudge but you know thirty five years you know maybe maybe it's time to let it go but but the good news is that over the course of you know whether it's a matter of months or years we got those people to sit for interviews in in a lotta ways like really therapeutic really cathartic for them i think it brought them some closure in allowed them to say whatever they they needed to say pretty incredible how powerful those relationships where so yeah i got to know so much more about him and it was it it's very much like both the good the bad the ugly in the crazy which is eighth grade segway to the fact there is now eight cream dot com and were not gonna spreading rumors here but i'll just say that are world needs this and we need it because today's blog writing is so damn area diet and self important soaking we bring back a us not knows torn pants can of beer someone likes to say yes well i i were very happy to have cream mag dot com up and running now right now where essentially using it to provide information on the documentary additional screenings is we also have are merch store up there if anybody's lack and some boy howdy in their closet there's a lot of cool stuff there in the good news is we have a lot of other content that is in the works in what have been telling folks at the screenings when they're asking well what's next is that this documentary is not being by any means it's it's the beginning this is by no means he ended the cream story especially without it being the fiftieth anniversary we wanna do the celebration and right and there's lots more fun stuff in the.

america one hundred percent thirty five years ten minutes three weeks four years two weeks
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

06:46 min | 3 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"And how did the culture at the magazine change when the officers moved from inner city detroit after the farmhouse and then later to downtown birmingham michigan i think that those three chapters of cream kind of take it from where it started as this underground around newspaper right and then when they moved to walled lake they started to get their legs get their traction it became went from underground newspaper to regional taste maker and then by the time it got to birmingham it was a national national powerhouse it was edits pinnacle it was second in circulation to rolling stone and so you know whereas when they start in the cast court or you know the office was obviously a disaster skill is organized chaos and he's organized lightly with a crash pad people would sleep there at that time my dad was actually managing mitch ryder in detroit and the thee these offices creams headquarters also doubled as a rehearsal space for mentioned detroit how an so just imagine china put out a magazine wiz mentioned detroit rehearsing one floor above you so it was like it went from that kind of chaos to by the time they got some birmingham it was like this you know real magazine where desks an job titles in bottom line said they had to hit an asset they sell so it became more of a an actual business by the time i got the birmingham but one of the things that really is amazing is cream didn't play favorites when it again i'm gonna do the quotes when it came to john rose and even though it start in detroit with with alice cooper and grand funk and stooges it also really became the goto from punk make an new wave lester bangs obviously enamored with lou reed but i mean david bowie roxy music captain beef heart blondie brian you know the new york dolls how did they you know in detroit right get the buzz on all of these genres that were nowhere near the mid west and in fact you know nowhere near the heart of motown yeah that's a that's a great question i think it was the cause creams writers a an editor's weren't afraid to go out and you know lift up rocks and see what was under i'm sort of speak so 'em just you know they were of course located in detroit but but they traveled well they traveled to new york they traveled throughout midwest they travelled out at west as well and that allowed them to connect with different scenes which you know if we take punter instance that cream was open to exploring whereas other publications at the time like rolling stone or necessarily ready for punk but cream being what it was was kind of this like blank canvas for covering things in the margins so to speak that were a little bit edgy earn a little bit racier and i think that earn them you know a lot of street credits and a lot of respect a among not only the fans but but the artist themselves i think it was it all kind of came back to their openness in their willingness to to go a different direction that maybe not everybody would be on board ways but they were so passionate about the music and exploring new things that's really what you wrote that i think one of the most interesting pieces in the film is how i com grumpy pants how grumpy bands dave marsh approaches leak concept that he came up with the term punk rock yeah so so there isn't article in nineteen seventy one about question mark and the syrians experience where dave does indeed used the phrase punk rock an i believe that prior to that it had not been used in print an webster's dictionary actually credits dave wiz cleaning that term well before punk rock actually even became a scene but it's really a in amazing scene in the film where they've kind of talk us through how we came up with punk in in how he used it and then we we cut to a pill legs mcneil blowing up dave's so i fucking day yeah yeah exactly i wanna give away too much because it's one of my favorite parts in the film it's incredibly but needless to say that legs has a very different view of the inception of punk rock then dave does and as i said no no no no i realized.

detroit
"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

06:54 min | 3 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"And you don't know the music history there everybody thinks of either elway or san francisco or new york is big music cities but this documentary really highlights what an important port music town detroit was an continues to be yeah it really does and that was important to us in crafting the story it's it's sort of from my perspective this is a documentary about three things it's about a city a magazine seen an a group of good rock writers gone bad right so making it about detroit an incredible musical influences whether it's like the early motown influences temps supreme stevie wonder marvin gaye you know all those guys and then you have groups like dmc five in the stooges in you have you know ted nugent now is cooper coming out of there so it was this this incredible musical sort of fabric in detroit that a lot people don't know about unnecessarily appreciate and one of the things i learned making the doc was there is this like really cool relationship between all of the artists like this really cool story the gun laws tells in the documentary about how sarah sanders was in town an some guys from his band reached out to dmc five to see if they wanna jammed together an they just had this crazy jam session in don says he never had heard music like that before or since and i thought that was really well in in alice cooper even says how like the motown axe would go listen to you know they emcee five in other bands in vice versa so there were like the support going on between the rock acts in the motown axe which is just so cool to think about you know to have been there must have been absolutely incredible so let's talk about some of the features that people look forward to what i know why did you know every time i got an issue of cream in one of my favorites has gotta be stars in their cars it's hard to believe some of the vehicles and i imagine that you have at least one of your favorites talk about this one here is a this is the ramones and i believe this is this must be you know late seventies here and they're posing in front of eighty a what looks like it might have been a pin to that exploded a of course sold tongue yeah so you know the the funny thing about stars cars is you had this mixture of are these there railcars or are they not cause some of them is this a joke is this a joke you know you have ones where like you have depot getting onto a bus or you have you know there's another one that bob grill in talks about in the film where it's a joe perry posing in front of like i think it's like a corvette or like a really fancy sports sports car that he wrapped around a parking barrier and he just pose in front of it so it's great those were you know a lot of fun you know just hearing somebody artist talk about that and hearing the photographers talk about what it was like shoot them is really cool and one of one of the one of the editors dave de martino talks about you know when they would go to duty shoots an if they couldn't tell if like you know this was the actual artist car they didn't wanna necessarily make too much fun of it you know because they're like you know i i dunno an interim michigan ease you know a lot of people believe you are you're car so you know they want it to be gentle around you know how how they framed up some of these stars cars things but i mean some were so great there's there's one in the film that we show where it's ace freely sitting on this like a i think it's like this baby blue cadillac seville things bad ass a lot of fun yeah which we think that car that'd be something that his mom drovers right right it does make it just makes for a great profile longer and nobody ever live live live live rolling stone always came off as this very intellectual you know kind of magazine in what whack that cream had in droves what's humor but yet that humor where you were just describing coming up with these ideas and doing the parodies and all of that that's very intellectual i mean that that's right out of mad magazine at harvard lampoon an end these were all done by very very smart people and that leads to v a the profile based on the doers profile end the photographs of and i do this in quotes i'm holding the quote marks up you know behind the microphone v boy howdy beer how many rock and rollers roost into believing that was the thing they showed up their their boy howdy beer in their profile here's the harsh truth i'm holding up a label right now which is a it's just a essentially a bumper sticker that was wrapped around and raptors hands to create howdy beer but a lot of artists you know did end readers for that matter believe that it was like this secret craft brew that was only for like the really big star right 'em but you know what what i really loved about it getting back to your point is most of the artists were like you're in on the joke right like you know that this is for fun you know it's the take down of the doers profile a where do where he was is you know this aspiration all scotch you know very prestigious high class boy howdy was the exact opposite of that right it was like you know you're you're cheap beer in your path to downward mobility an you know when artists were kind of in on the joke with it they had a lot of fun and that was sort of the time back to creams sense of humor it was this cross between mad magazine in esquire and so you know the these features cheers this this stars cars the kuhn's profiles they were really well thought out there were a lot of work that went behind that but when they executed it it was like you want it to be talking like a us not knows kid and so it's not easy to pull that off.

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"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

The Rhino Podcast

14:16 min | 3 years ago

"rhino" Discussed on The Rhino Podcast

"Contests <Speech_Male> any kind <Speech_Male> of cool <Speech_Male> classic <Speech_Male> information that you <Speech_Male> need you could get it there <Speech_Male> get out of my head <Speech_Male> rich <Speech_Male> don't forget <Speech_Male> to sign up for <Speech_Male> these rhino email <Speech_Male> list to because <Speech_Male> you great <Speech_Male> information about <Speech_Male> upcoming release <Speech_Male> is an contests <Speech_Male> so take <Speech_Male> care of yourself <Speech_Male> and subscribe today <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> is another one <Speech_Male> i we we say this <Speech_Male> every time <Speech_Male> but this rhino <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> this podcast <Speech_Male> is gonna take the listeners <Speech_Male> back to eight <Speech_Male> special moment in time <Speech_Male> at a very <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> special magazine <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it's a <Speech_Male> special renault <Speech_Male> podcast the <Speech_Male> let's overuse the word <Speech_Male> special <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> this is <Speech_Male> not about a runner <Speech_Male> release it's about <Speech_Male> something that was <Speech_Male> so important important to <Speech_Male> the music community <Speech_Male> across <Speech_Male> the whole country <Speech_Male> from the sixties <Speech_Male> through the seventies into <Speech_Male> the eighties <Speech_Male> andy cream <Speech_Male> magazine <Speech_Male> where heavily <SpeakerChange> into rock <Speech_Male> culture here <Speech_Male> at this <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> at cream <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> kind of the polar <Speech_Male> opposite of rolling <Speech_Male> stone <Speech_Male> i mean the <Speech_Male> journalist alone <Speech_Male> lester bangs <Speech_Male> end dave mars <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> so many other <Speech_Male> people thrown into the <Speech_Male> mix and we have <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> son of the <Speech_Male> founder of <Speech_Male> cream magazine <Speech_Male> i should say the cofounder <Speech_Male> jj <Speech_Male> kramer <Silence> judge you is kind enough <Speech_Male> to sit with us and <Speech_Male> tell us about the behind <Speech_Male> the scenes happenings <Speech_Male> at cream <Speech_Male> and also tell us <Speech_Male> about the new documentary <Speech_Male> boy howdy <Speech_Male> the story of <Speech_Male> cream magazine <Speech_Male> so i don't think <Speech_Male> there's any <Advertisement> time to <Speech_Male> lose here <Advertisement> because <Speech_Male> there is a lot <Speech_Male> of listen to in <Speech_Male> this conversation <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> well

founder cream magazine