19 Burst results for "Rex Mission"

"rex mission" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:42 min | 5 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know, we talk about planetary defense. It Can feel maybe a little bit like science fiction sometimes, But Mike, how seriously do scientists take this this possibility of an asteroid threat? It's sort of an interesting of natural disaster kind of question. It's in the center. The odds are Low. It has definitely happened Before that an asteroid has done horrendous damage to the well. The planet survives, but the creatures on it And so the odds the odds of something doing segment doctor small, But unlike like earthquakes and volcanoes, it's something we could specifically do something about. If we did say this asteroid has a, you know a 50% chance of hitting. We would have ways to deal with that problem and eliminate that risk right now. The two most likely objects to hit will hit in of order, 100 years and Have, like a 100,000 ish probability of hitting. And those are the asteroid of Bennu, which do Cyrus Rex mission is just returning from enough when I'm working on now, and the other one is the asteroid Apophis and both of those have order one in 1000 chance of hitting and by making these very precise measurements we can say, Oh, yes, it will, or Yes, it won't or no, it won't. And then we could do something about it s so that's how it's different from other kinds of sort of more likely events is that there's concrete ways we can address the problem. Unsolved. Um, yes. Speaking of other kinds of observing, too. I talked to Dr Ed Ribera Valentin, who is a scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. They worked at the observatory until very recently. They were going to use the telescope in September to examine the surface of Mars at its closest approach to Earth, which is this really rare opportunity that won't repeat until 2067 So power previous work without a stable and Mars was able to identify like these ancient volcanic provinces on Mars, and it was actually it was a show like this flow features connecting them. Connecting these different trains, which we did not see with the spacecraft we had already Mars. And for honesty will remains. Um, and it's operational in 2023. I can see Mars. It's gonna be Level date I'm going to get is about if you think about in terms of signal strength, it's gonna be a quarter the signal I would have gotten this year. So that leaving weakens our ability to help out Podium, Mike what other kinds of observing opportunities could we be losing out on if this observatory stays down, so I study asteroids and most of my work it ever see. But West being asteroids, and so you observe them when they come close to the Earth, right when you're using radar. Basically, you're using your own flashlight to eliminated object. Then you take a picture of it, But because the light has to travel both out and back. It has to be pretty close to you to do that. So every every few months and asteroid will come by that. Of Could present a hazard that we can't measure or actually could present an opportunity. For example, to plan a space mission to the U. S. Iris of exhibition used very heavily the out radar observations that we did in 1999 2005 to plan that mission. So a billion dollar space mission was planned using these a receiver radar data, and that's the sort of thing you won't get. So we were expecting to do a couple of different objects over the next six months. That clearly are no longer in the cards. Yeah, One of the projects that comes to mind is actually the one that my partner works on, which is looking for gravitational waves that are produced by colliding supermassive black holes in Arecibo is one of the two telescopes that they used primarily And what they're doing is they're looking at pulsars and a receiver was a fantastic instrument for pulse. Our observations. They're very dense neutron stars That's been very, very quickly, and they emit radio waves that essentially look Like a lighthouse. When they wash over Earth, their periodic, you've been time them. And if you have enough ulcers, you can look for deviations in timing that indicate that gravitational waves air passing through and stretching and contracting space time. They think they're getting actually pretty close to a detection. It'll just take longer for them to get there. Yeah, and back to Dr Rivera Valentin, who is by the way, Puerto Rican. They also had a lot to say about the value The telescope has to the people of Puerto Rico. It's comparable in its cheer, iconic nous and value to say how a New Yorker might feel about. What would happen if the statue of Liberty was broken or or had disappeared. I'm pretty sure in New Yorker would be incredibly heard They would take that personally because the Statue of Liberty is used nationwide as a symbol of New York City. So for us in Puerto Rico, we added, People observatory is the same thing. But from a cultural perspective, it goes beyond that, because it is a symbol of our ability to To go beyond our limits. It's on the symbol of look, we can do science to weaken be involved in the right. It's not motivational symbol in Spanish would say it's the meta. It's zits that reached icon. People NPR When when you tell them you work in the observatory there. Like what? They're super happy for you. Oh, you work at the observatory. You must be amazing. Okay, Let's help you out. Just a reminder that this is science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. I'm Kristie Taylor. Have to Rivera. Valentin also grew up in the city of our receiver right by the telescope, and they credit the observatory, which also offers Thies summer science programs to local youth as the big inspiration for them entering the field of astronomy. You have to understand that when you come from a majority, impoverished.

Dr Ed Ribera Valentin Mike Lunar and Planetary Institute scientist Puerto Rico People observatory Bennu Rivera Puerto Rican NPR Kristie Taylor U. S. Iris New York City Thies partner
"rex mission" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:10 min | 5 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Well. Two days after touching down on the asteroid banou neces- cyrus rex mission managers of confirmed the spacecraft collected more than enough material to me one of its main mission objectives acquiring at least sixty grams of the asteroids regular the spacecraft captured images of at sample ahead as it moved through several different positions in reviewing these images the cyrus rick's team noticed both at the head appear to be full of asteroid material. And that some of these particles appear to be slowly escaping from the sample collector. Co the touch and go sample acquisition mechanism head Bits of material floating through small gaps. Where a mylar flap they collect. His lid set speak has been lift slightly wedged open by larger rocks. The analysis shows collect ahead was flush with surface regular when it made contact and when the nitrogen gas bottle was fired to stir up surface material. It piece of also penetrated several centimeters down into the asteroid surface nasa science administrator. Tommaso bro says the leaking means mission. Managers will need to move quickly in order to safely store the samples for the return. Jerry worth images also show that any movement of the spacecraft or the sample acquisition mechanism head may lead to further the sample loss to preserve the remaining material mission managers of decided to forgo the sample mass measurement activity and they also cancelled a breaking burn to minimize any acceleration of the spacecraft for now sarah rix mission managers or focus on stowing. The sample in the sample return capsule or any loose material will be kept safe during the spacecraft's journey back to earth. This space time still to come and you study. Claims earth might not necessarily be the best place in the universe to live and europe's galileo satellite navigation system. It's the most accurate in the world. But why is it. They're all that and more still to come.

Tommaso bro rick sarah rix administrator europe Jerry
"rex mission" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Search for S-o-f-i S., O. F. I wherever you get your podcasts. NASA's Osiris. Rex. Punched an asteroid in the name of science here's what the mission could teach us by. Jeffrey Kluger. Absolutely nothing inherently special about the asteroid Banou a loosely packed agglomeration of dust and rock about as big across says the Empire State Building and currently three, hundred, twenty, two, million kilometers or two hundred, million miles from Earth as it orbits the Sun. It is just one of about a million asteroids that astronomers have identified and cataloged, but on Tuesday Banou became. The most famous asteroid in the solar system after NASA's OH CYRUS REX spacecraft made contact with it for a dramatic six seconds to blast loose and collect a sample I must have watched about a hundred times last night said Dante Lauretta the mission's principal investigator during a press conference yesterday while talking about a video clip recorded by the probe during its heroin maneuver. We really did make a mess on the surface of this asteroid, but it's a good mess. Asteroids are more than just space debris. They are some of the oldest most pristine samples known of the early solar system studying there little composition can yield clues to planetary formation, cosmic chemistry, and even the emergence of life on Earth. But I, you've got to get a sample of them and that's where oh cyrus rex for origins spectral interpretation resource identification security regular explorer comes in. The SUV sized Cyrus REX launched in two thousand sixteen arriving advanced two years later, it went into orbit around the asteroid studying it in search of a smooth spots with loose soil in few boulders making sample collection both easy and say, but NASA investigators almost immediately realized they were out of luck Bene- surface is almost nothing but boulders. Mission planners hoped for a target site hundreds of feet across, but they settled on one in a region near the asteroids. North Pole that they dubbed Nightingale Crater which measures just eight meters or twenty six feet. Collecting a sample from. So small a spot would require both smart technology and deft flying. Cyrus REX says a three point three meter long three jointed arm at the end of which is a circular sample collector about point three meters across dubbed Tag Sam for touch and go sample acquisition mechanism. The flight plan called for the spacecraft to extend it sample arm and then descend from orbit slowing its speed to just ten centimeters a second or point two miles per hour until the tag Sam. Assembly made contact with the surface at that point nitrogen bottles in the tag Sam would fire blasting loose soil and rocks and forcing them into a collection chamber. After just a few seconds, the spacecraft would execute the go part of the touch and go maneuver backing away with its sample secured. That's the way it was supposed to go. And that's exactly the way it did go. Tag Sam was in contact with the surface of Banou for six seconds and collected material for five. The greatest share within the first three seconds it took eighteen and a half minutes where the signal that the maneuver was a success to travel the three, hundred, twenty, two, million kilometers to Earth. Only once it arrived, did NASA Administrator Jim Breitenstein released a Triumphal Statement This amazing I for NASA. Demonstrates how an incredible team from across the country came together and persevered. He said our industry academic and international partners have made it possible to hold a piece of the most ancient solar system in our hands. The question is. How big is that piece the tax collector can accommodate up to two kilograms or four point. Four pounds of material mission leaders want at least about sixty grams or two point one ounces later today, the collector arm will move to put the tag. Sam in front of one of the spacecraft's cameras thus giving NASA engineers a better look a more accurate measurement will be taken on Saturday when the collector arm is extended and the spacecraft's thrusters nudged into a gentle at. The rate at which it spins from a given amount of thrust will be compared to the rate of spin from the same maneuver conducted before Tuesday's collection, the more material gathered the slower. The rate of spin will now be if there's enough material, the sample will be transferred to a secure reentry capsule, which will be the only part of Oh Cyrus wrecks that will ultimately return to the surface of the. Earth. We will use the combination of data from the post tag images and mass measurement to assess confidence that we have collected at least sixty grams of sample said project manager rich burns in a statement if our confidence is high. We'll make the decision to stow the sample on October thirtieth. If their confidence is not high, the team can execute another collection maneuver on. January. Twelfth at a site known as Osprey. Departure from Begnaud is set for March twenty first with the re entry captial set to parachute into the Utah Desert on September twenty, four, twenty, twenty, three. Only then will the little bit of rock and dirt from the seven year eight hundred, million dollar mission be in the hands of the scientists. And only then. Will we begin to reveal the secrets that been Oh may hold.

NASA Cyrus REX Sam Jeffrey Kluger Empire State Building NASA Administrator Bene- surface Dante Lauretta Banou Begnaud heroin principal investigator North Pole Utah Desert Nightingale Crater project manager Jim Breitenstein
"rex mission" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Israel denies this saying it investigates settler violence. International laws He's a ll settlements in the West Bank is abate Jolla Olive Tree. Land still yields laughter and hopes for Mawr next harvest. Tom Bateman reporting from the occupied West Bank. Like no other modern endeavor. The space program inspires all mankind by pushing the edge of the possible at least when it works it does. The latest mishap involves a NASA space probe, which successfully collected rock fragments. From the asteroid Bennu early this week, but is now at risk of losing its consignment. Sarah's Rex Mission team say they're victims of their own success with excess rock fragments having wedged open the collector lid. Leaving particles free to drift into space. Professor Sarah Russell is a member of the signs Team of NASA's A Sarah Rex mission shall be part of the team studying the samples from the asteroid Bennu When it returns in 2023. She worked at London's Natural History Museum, so Has the collector lid now being closed? The lid is still wedged open, and there's not much that can be done about it. Except now the job is to try to get the sampling container safely into the capsule that will eventually bring it back to Earth. So once it's in the capsule, then it will be safe and all the lovely bits of asteroid will be contained. Within it for us to be able to look at when it arrives back on Earth. There will be something for you to look at when it comes back. What in a couple of years time on, But what will you be looking for? Well, so we think that asteroids like Bennu date from the very earliest times in solar system's history. And so they can really tell us what was around before the planets existed. What the environment was like, how long ago this planet's forms so they can tell us something about our own origins. And we're hoping that this assassin droid also contains carbon and water. We think asteroids like this may have Hit the earlier some provided these ingredients for life to flourish. Quite a fine line, isn't it between success and failure on a mission like this, isn't it the chances For things going wrong a pretty high Yeah, I mean, most space missions are fairly risky, but I think that's what makes it worthwhile, right? I mean, that's that's so That's why we do it. And that's why it hasn't been done before. Because it's not an easy thing to do at all. It's a very challenging thing. But I've got a massive confidence in the mission team that it's going to. They're going to do everything they can to make it a success. Things do go wrong with missions and, for instance, is the whole history of Mars missions that haven't gone too well. Absolutely so. Mars is a very challenging target for space missions. And, yeah, you're right. That's being being a quite a history of mission failure on DH course This could be really devastating for the scientists working on it. You, Khun! Spend a decade or more of your life focused on one particular mission on then you're either you know, euphoric or completely distraught of its successful or fails, and you went through that range of emotions. I think with the of the Beagle two mission Yes. So that was quite a while ago. Now? Yeah, in the in the early two thousand's, But yeah, of course. That was one of the ones that didn't go quite as planned on DH. Yeah, Of course. It was devastating for everybody who Had put all of their hearts and souls into the mission that didn't bear fruit, but that, you know, even missions like that. That didn't work. We still learn something. Professor Sarah Russell, a member of these signs team of NASA's Cyrus Rex mission. Listening to the BBC World Service. I'm Julian Marshall. This is news are and do stay with us a lot more to come in the next 30 minutes..

Professor Sarah Russell NASA Jolla Olive Tree Sarah Rex Israel Tom Bateman West Bank Mawr Julian Marshall London Natural History Museum BBC World Service
"rex mission" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

04:14 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Three podcast as a collective, or you can just choose what you want to spend as you say, fit. For as little or as long as you like it's totally up to you and as I've said many times not mandatory but the benefits are good. You get an early edition and you get the bonus material which we put published recently. So if you haven't chased that up as a patron, a COUPLA more segments in there for you to listen to. Manfred. Let's move onto our next topic. That is the. Rex Mission, which as we speak has hopefully touchdowns successfully on asteroid Banu. That's right. So you rights as you mentioned earlier that. By the time our listeners listening to this podcast this happened, but we're recording beforehand really exciting stuff so. Cyrus Rex. NASA mission. Designed to explore the the content of an asteroid, the soil content of an asteroid, an explorer it literally by bringing it back home to Earth. The spacecraft has been in orbit for the last two years. An asteroid called Banu, which is actually one in a rather like, oh, it's in an orbit that. Allows Astroid Ben to to approach the earth. In distances measured in hundreds of thousands of kilometers, rather than millions of kilometers. So it's a, it's a near Earth object the the the the two years of ob thing around Banu that Cyrus Rex has been doing as allowed the spacecraft to give state out really detailed images of this strange world, which is curiously shaped is A. Bit like. Two cones. Stop Base to base. It reminds me of the spinning tops kids used to play with when I was young. Back in the dark days of the nineteen fifties and sixties. I had I had one is growing up a fun. Yeah. They were great what they remember playing with them as well. So that very much that spinning top shape and a apparently the asteroid, his arrived at knock shy because of its rotation. So. It's an object that he's a probably more like a pile of rubble than sullied asteroid but is nevertheless when the fast rotation. Tends to make the material migrate towards its Equator. So you've got this thing that from from the side looks like a diamond, but it's actually two cones base to base effectively because everything's down towards the middle, it's not very big sizes in the region of a kilometer you might even be bit less than that. Yeah half-a-kilometre Five, hundred Masons, and. I actually quite rough on the surface. The survey has revealed more than two hundred large boulders. would she was not really what people expected because? What they going to do in the future for us now, hopefully, in the past by the time, a people listen to this that going to. Take a sample of the surface, and if you've got all these large boulders. That's the last thing you need. But what they've done is they've identified a region of the surface of the asteroid. About sixteen meters across the as free of boulders and that he's where they will touch down in a maneuver that he's called a touch and go maneuver So the spacecraft has a robotic arm which will be extended as it approaches the target-area. IS EQUIPPED WITH A. Strange, it's almost like a suction device on the end of it except it's not such an it's blowing. It's got a disk which is fed by nitrogen. The nitrogen is going to..

asteroid Banu Cyrus Rex Rex Mission Manfred NASA Astroid Ben
"rex mission" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Asteroids vary in size from the enormous Siri's, which is a dwarf planets all the way down to objects that Gland on the earth as meteorites, which are the size of Iraq's or the desk size or house sized on Lee up to this hill sized asteroid. And tell me about what's going to happen. So the spacecraft is going to come down. Put this device onto the asteroid. And where? On the afternoon? How did you pick what spot you were going to go to? That was very difficult. So we used ground based in space based assets, telescopes with trauma Tres to measure the temperature change over day and night on the asteroid before he ever launched. And we use that something called from inertia to figure out the grain size of the asteroid the size of the rocks on the regular And looked like it was going to be pebbles and sand. So we designed the space craft to sample on the sandy beach some a bunch of pebbles what turns out that, unlike other objects that had been visited by spacecraft Menu is of very, very rocky. But the rocks are very probably held together. Very fragile means that probably there no meteorites that could be recovered. In her life. And so I had to redesign our maneuvers are something strategy to find the site that was the safest having trail that we could sample and was also scientifically exciting and that that science called Nightingale. And what are you hoping to learn when you get that dirt sample? What do you hope it tells you? Oh, this is a leftover piece of the origin of the solar system. It has the same chemicals minerals that went into forming planets. I went into forming the materials that that led to life on Earth, or maybe elsewhere. And so by looking at the material is in the best laboratories around the world. We can learn the history of Life, the history of the solar system. But for me the most exciting part Is that 75% of the sample is archived for the future. So therefore scientists not yet born using techniques not yet invented. And answer questions, not yet asked things I don't even I can't even think about they could look at in 50 years. On the other hand, this asteroid is more than 200 million miles away from Earth, So it's gonna be a while before you can ever get your hands on it. How's that gonna work? How will this sample get back to us? So once we collect the sample and verified the spacecraft is healthy and we have enough material. There's ah mastery Departure window, just like there is a launch window and that opens up in the spring of 2021. The spacecraft would point itself at Earth in 2023 September, 24th Eject assembly turn canister which has the sample inside of it. The spacecraft will then divert away from Earth going into orbit around the sun and the canister will to send to the atmosphere. And on the parachute land in the Utah desert. Just before 9 A.m. Mountain Daylight time on Sunday, September 24th marked on my calendar. That's Jason Dworkin, NASA project scientist for the Cyrus Rex mission, which today is going to make an approach to scoop dirt off a sample of an asteroid the size of the Empire State Building, chasing Best of lucks. He's very interesting. Thank you very much,.

Lee Jason Dworkin Iraq Siri Utah desert Empire State Building NASA project scientist
"rex mission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:21 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"I expect overnight lows in the twenties and 30 Seattle may stay warm enough Sunday morning to hit about 36 or maybe just above freezing. But I've seen some other models that push it right to 32, depending on the level of cloud cover we have Saturday night and the level of redundancy that I put in my forecasts were in serious October. The really indeed are It is a 13. That's time for real time traffic brought to you by Chevrolet of every Here's Chris Lloyd. The semi that stalled has really just become a thorn in our side this morning on South Bound I five. It's right there after the Lynwood split blocking of the two right hand lanes and seven miles with a backup behind it. And at least a 25 minute delay in that backup. Now 99 South bound is a very viable option for you to get through this. I mean, you will hit some slowing around airport Ray Road, but it's going to clear all the rest of way down. I mean, if you want to bail and then go back over at one 96th and get on I five there, you will bypass this Semite. It's an hour and five minute drive from ever to Seattle an hour. From ever to Bellevue on 405, even though there's absolutely no traffic of four or five. It's all just getting There s O. If you've got a favorite backdoor that maybe takes you down 55 to 7 down into the canyon Park area. Get on four or five. There. You will save yourself a giant headache with high five. Believe me, you don't want any part of that good news is that South found I five through the heart of downtown Seattle is getting better after this car fire. Looks like it's off to the far right hand shoulder Dearborn, which means that backup is getting better. The rest. The map is improving as well. The heaviest slowing other than the I five corridor remains on the north bound with four or five drive thru the rented areas, still about a half an hour from rented to Bellevue, still rolling at about 25 minutes from South Center into Seattle, 35 all the way from federal way. And the Tacoma drivers eased off a little bit. This report brought to you by Chevrolet of every truck month means savings up to $6000 and a great selection. That Chevrolet of effort by your truck in person with joy drive home delivery by new road Chevrolet of every dot com It is 8 15 Seattle Morning news this afternoon, far removed from politics and pandemics. A NASA spacecraft will do something. Really amazing. This is the O. Cyrus Rex Mission to the asteroid Bennu and with the details, CBS's Mark Strausman from Earth. It's a pinprick.

Seattle Chevrolet Bellevue Chris Lloyd Lynwood O. Cyrus Rex Mission NASA Tacoma canyon Park South Center Mark Strausman CBS
Touch-and-go: US spacecraft sampling asteroid for return

Leo Laporte

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Touch-and-go: US spacecraft sampling asteroid for return

"An ancient asteroid hundreds of millions of miles away, a NASA spacecraft this week will attempt to descend to the treacherous surface and grab a handful of rubble It will take place on Tuesday is the U. S. Makes its first attempt at collecting asteroid samples for returned to Earth. Feat accomplished so far only by Japan Cyrus Rex missions looking to bring back at least two ounces of asteroid material, a new TV.

Nasa Japan
"rex mission" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The plot against Governor Gretchen Whitmer was more than wishful thinking. Video and images from the U. S attorney's office appear to show suspects conducting training exercises and discussing plans of police try to stop them. You better not give them a chance. You either tell them to go right now. We're also going to die period. The evidence obtained by Fox TV Station W. X M and Grand Rapids, also includes crudely drawn maps and text messages. Despite the plot against her, the Democratic governor on NBC's Meet the Press says President Trump continues to incite what she calls domestic terrorism. It is wrong. It's got to end Steve Rappaport. Fox News After almost two years circling an ancient asteroid hundreds of millions of miles away, a NASA spacecraft this week will attempt to descend to the treacherous surface and grab a handful of rubble It will take place on Tuesday is the U. S. Makes its first attempt a collecting asteroid samples for return to Earth. Feat accomplished so far only by Japan Cyrus Rex missions looking to bring back at least two ounces of asteroid material. A new TV. Siri's takes a deep dive into the cult known as Nexium. My name is India. I was a cult for seven years, Stars is offering another journey into one of the most bizarre tails out of Hollywood with seduced inside the next team, called The Siri's revolves around one of the women in the cult. India Oxenberg, the daughter of eighties Dionisi actress Catherine Oxenberg, who was also Part of HBO's The vow the other Siri's on the cult that was led by self Help guru Keith Ran faster.

Siri Gretchen Whitmer President Trump Catherine Oxenberg India Oxenberg India Fox News Steve Rappaport Grand Rapids U. S attorney NBC HBO NASA Hollywood Japan Keith
"rex mission" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

08:14 min | 6 months ago

"rex mission" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcome to the science podcasts for October two thousand twenty. I'm Sarah Crosby. Weekly feature the most interesting news and research published in science and the sister journals. First Up, we have staff writer, Paul Ryan, he talks about the. Rex Mission to. The asteroid venue. was has been there since two thousand eighteen and will finally a sample on October twentieth few weeks away. What have we learned so far? We also hear from researcher Hubert Lamb about a new treatment for Tinnitus. What used to be called ringing in the ears the team uses by modal stimulation, laying sounds in the ear and buzzes on the ton to change the brain and turn down the Tinnitus. Now, we have staff writer Paul Loosen. He wrote a story this week on a stack of papers published in science and science advances on the OH. Cyrus Rex Mission to the asteroid Banu Hi Paul Hello Okay on the podcast we last checked in omnia Cyrus Rex Mission in December twenty nineteen, the craft had been orbiting and surveying this asteroid for quite a while and some surprising things that popped out. For example, there are small ejection events, tiny rocks, jumping off the asteroid and surprisingly big boulders littering its surface, and that's meant a change to plans for a sampling from asteroid. What's changed about that? Paul before the spacecraft reached do they had thought it would look like this kind of. Plane like a beach was kind of the infamous term that Dante Lauretta. used. Had all these boulders kind of shocking. These polders are safety hazard and there's no spot that reached the criteria for a safe approach from the original plans. So they've had to reduce the area that they will sample by ten times. So much smaller sample area they had to pick a site they had to figure out if the crash could actually land there, but it hasn't happened yet. We're not there sampling is coming up in a few weeks October twentieth. In the meantime, we have this package of six papers. They tell them more detailed story of the asteroid surface. It's gravity or about these boulders what did you find particularly interesting in this in this new information about the asteroid one big question with sampling asteroid and bring it back to Earth is why are you spending one hundred million dollars to get a sample when we have all the stuff on earth we have tons of meteorites on earth kind of the volunteer sample return. These papers really show examples of several things that could be caught these samples that you just wouldn't be able to learn from a meteorite thing that really stands out to me the mess of carbonate veins in these boulders. At the parent body, the kind of planet testimony that venue Brokaw from once this major water system, Moeen through it as an ancient water world. When you save veins, you mean, there's just like you know what does that mean? Exactly this bright slash linear slash of mineral that deferring from the rest of the rock it's different than Iraq and you think it's made of something that indicates water y. so these carbonates are known to perform from water from hot water in precipitate out that water, you just don't get them. So the same things are evidence of water on Mars as well, and it's not just a little rock in of water it's like a little river of water. Yeah, so the ideas from meteorites they'd always, yeah, there's on these asteroids, but there's only little tiny pockets that don't around you know a couple of millimeters or something like that. But this is kind of showing that these. Mike had at least the parent body of Ben New had water flow in throughout the whole asteroid and probably a lot more water than once thought this definitely connects to the main this mission. What can we learn from asteroids that we can't learn for meteorites, but it also tells us something about the formation of the solar system. Then like what was going on way back when when we had has mills running around the have there's there's also the story of the Solar System? Merged even as Cyrus rex was launching, they realize that asteroids like Ben New Form Beyond Jupiter and migrate all the way in this is something only emerged meteoroid stays in the past decade realizing they have these two separate pools of asteroids and the samples from Ben you might be able to actually say if that's true does finding this carbonate, these veins of carbonate support the idea that asteroids delivered water to Earth definitely in this is a fairly well accepted ideal already with this further bolsters that claim provides institute remote-sensing evidence of Hey these probably had a lot of water. So maybe this was one source of the water it's not. Definitively rule something out because who knows. Yeah, it's definitely a major support for that one. Sad. But here is the boulders aren't the exact target for sampling was ours rex is not going to land on a boulder if it's just not possible, but we'll still be able to tell us more about these veins more about water content more about carbonates from the sampling that a new. Yes. So the this instrument that they used to detect this carbonate I that came from a close fly over the sampling site earlier surveys have shown that it's covered in carbonates. Or carbon burying molecule. So that could be like organic compounds like amino acids, other stuff stuff that they expected to see but there are signatures of that throughout the asteroid. So even the pebbles will have some stuff we mentioned earlier that the parameters for where the sampling can happen changed. Once the crafts had reached asteroid what are the risks here as we get closer to the date? Is there still big questions about whether this would be successful or or how much you can get the definitely they've created this hazard map. Of, the sampling sites, this kind of pure circle of green there's a chance they come in to this red area that is hazardous, and then the spacecraft students. Autonomous Louis will waive itself off and kind of retreat back testing that five meters away, or there's the chance says, hit a boulder a little bit and skews needs to press flat against the surface to be able to suck stuff up. So there's a chance that doesn't happen. They've the ability to says, and then try again at a backup site in January. If it doesn't work out. There is a chance that these boulders are very soft, but we don't want to find that out by landing something on them. You know they're really curious why they got what Ben will look like. So wrong what the surface would look like one of these papers try and figure that out and it finds that a lot of these boulders are so porous that they're kind of fluffy. So they always look like what a beach might look like in the radar or infrared signal that they got. Of Ben who explains why they had this kind of signal suggesting a beach the spacecraft could probably crush these borders if rammed into them, but they don't WanNa do that. That makes sense. So l know how much they got, but we're GONNA have to wait for the analysis for quite a bit. It's due to arrive in twenty, twenty three in Utah. We should mention why it's autonomously sampling to near Earth asteroid but right now it's not near Earth and it's much farther than Mars from Earth right now, there's a about an eighteen minute lag between what happens there and wheel here. So all has to be done a ton misleading because of that is there anything else you think we could learn from the sampling? There's the question of these one of the sources of life, this kind of chemistry and that was going on in the. Early Solar System for these organic molecules that men were delivered to Earth. Maybe there's some way of teasing out what this looks like for the altered on impact with Earth could be something that holy surprising when you get those samples back. All right thank you so much Paul. Thank you haul in as a staff writer for science you can find a link to his story and the related papers and science and science advances at science mag dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned for an.

Ben New Banu Hi Paul staff writer Rex Mission Tinnitus Cyrus rex Sarah Crosby Paul Ryan Paul Loosen Hubert Lamb Dante Lauretta. researcher Iraq Brokaw Moeen Mike Utah Louis
"rex mission" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"rex mission" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Our team coverage is speaking of debates in the next several weeks the democratic presidential hopefuls will have a number of chances to face off the DNC has announced four debates in the first two months of twenty twenty targeting early voting states including Iowa qualification criteria for the debate has not been announced and neither has the formats investigators are trying to find out what started a fire the chase the man out of his seminal county home the back of the condo on new field circle near how branch road was burning like last night firefighters got the call around just before midnight they were able to keep the fire from spreading to other nearby units the man living in the condo was able to get out in time now today in NASA news it's been announced that a landing spot has finally been found for the twenty sixteen Osiris rex mission approve has been orbiting an asteroid named Ben who for the last year as nice as work with UCF researchers to take the final step in finally landed professor on there to campaigns it says that the new is a potentially hazardous asteroid and could be on a collision course with earth by the year twenty one thirty five the one thing is to look at something far away another completely is to arrive there find that nature has the prices for you and that's one of the reasons why we're going to understand it better and while the idea of intercepting an incoming asteroid sounds like science fiction that's exactly why Osiris rex made the four hundred million mile journey to study by new expected the probe will make its landing next year Boeing's starliner spacecraft is a go for launch next week after passing its flight readiness review the starlings first on crude flight to the international space station is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force station on December twentieth at six thirty six AM a successful trip will show that the spacecraft is ready for a test flight with crew both Boeing and SpaceX are working toward ferrying astronauts to the station as a part of NASA's commercial crew program and just getting reports that we have a amber alert out of Kissimmee Florida we're gonna keep an eye on that looking for someone who was last seen wearing black jeans black should in indigo jacket we'll have a report on that at the bottom of the hour but for now it is nine oh four eight news ninety six point five W. DDO buckle up.

DNC Ben professor Boeing NASA Kissimmee Florida Iowa UCF Cape Canaveral Air Force SpaceX
"rex mission" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

15:22 min | 1 year ago

"rex mission" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Week in Science Dante Loretta and colleagues published observations from the Cyrus Rex mission go to the asteroid. Benue Dante is here to tell us about the mission and some of its findings. Hi Dante below hi. What did you know about this asteroid astroid before the start of the Cyrus Rex mission the asteroid? Benny was selected as the target for Cyrus REX based on a couple of factors primarily on its orbit and the key aspect of it is that it's an earth crossing asteroid what we would call a potentially hazardous asteroid so earth-crossing means that it it could at some point intercept earth in its orbit. That's correct. Oh and so that is kind of required for sample return because we are leaving the earth for rendezvous with an object collecting collecting a sample and returning the closer. The object's orbit is to the Earth's orbit the less energy is required to execute that mission. And we probably want to know more about birth intersecting orbits of things we do so you know. The primary mission objective is related to origins investigations. Were looking for an asteroid that dates from the early solar system and particularly one that was likely to have water and organic material that would provide important information about y earth is a habitable planet and how the origin of life took hold here but because of its orbit and a in the fact that it does cross the earth which enables the sample return it is also a potentially hazardous asteroid and that's of interest in and of it's own How big is this asteroid Ben who has an average diameter of approximately approximately five hundred meters? It's pretty it's roughly spherical. I would say looking at these pictures here. The shape of Banu is really interesting and it has what is turning out out to be a fairly common shape among these small near Earth Asteroids. We call it a spinning top. It has this really pronounced bulge at the equator. It's almost more often or diamond shaped so. What did you know about its composition before the mission launched when we were trying to assess the best asteroid for our target cricket? We were looking for spectral signatures of organic or carbon rich material on its surface or hydrated material right one of the signs of hydration that we see in the asteroid population is this very small number of objects that we call active asteroids and these are sometimes referred to as main belt comments especially when when they were first discovered so they activate when they're at the position in their orbit that's closest to the sun that we call its perihelion like a comet and so we suspected that these objects these active asteroids had maybe icy material or water bearing material on their surface. That was sublimating. Mating and creating this activity and Banu Spectra looks very much like those active asteroids so it was selected based on its similarity early to these objects in the hope that that would lead us to a water bearing own organic rich asteroid right and when when the spacecraft got to Banu anew and started its orbit. What did you see right away? You got to see some of his activity. Yeah I would say. The biggest surprise of my career indefinitely of the asteroid encounter within a week of going into orbit around this asteroid. We were taking routine optical navigation images and our astronomy lead. He'd Carl Sagan Roster who was joint author with me on this manuscript pulled me over and showed me an image from January six. That looked a lot like the asteroid. Freud was exploding. I I mean I buy jaw was just hanging. I was processing what I was looking at in in trying to make sense of what was going on and of course your immediate thought is for safety of the spacecraft. It's like okay we need to fire thrusters and get out of here or is it okay to continue with the mission and what we do with this amazing discovery. Yeah so what exactly does an exploding asteroid luck like in the photograph that you took the image that came to mind immediately really were the plumes that come. Out of Saturn's moon enceladus Cassini spacecraft captured these gorgeous images of fine particles spewing out of the South Polar region of that moon looking like geysers us which is in fact. Exactly what they are in. Our pictures looked a lot like that. I didn't have a sense of scale when I first saw the images so as far as I knew we were looking at large scale eruption material from the asteroid and once you determine determine that it was safe to stick around you were able to capture a few more instances of this happening what it repeated exposure to this leads you to believe about what is is actually going on. We monitored the asteroid activity for the next two months around the asteroid and in every image we see particles in the Benue a new environment and then onto other dates. We saw additional large events like the one on January. Six is behavior similar to what happens with a comment. I mean it doesn't sound quite the same. That's a great question in terms of what is causing this activity on Banu and we go through a whole series of hypotheses he's including comet like subornation in the manuscript and we're pretty convinced that it is not commentary like activity. There is no signature of ice anywhere on this asteroid. And we've done a very thorough job mapping at spectrum and IT services really hot. You know we're talking almost four four hundred Kelvin Isis not stable under those conditions for even very short periods of time but we do have very water rich surface. The water water is not in the form of ice or liquid water but it's bound up in clay minerals and those may be linked to this activity. We do know that if you stress arrests those kinds of materials you can move some of the water out of the crystal structure in effect gets warmed up the gas could expand and 'cause rock fragmentation. Like like. We're seeing well. What would make it stressed at? What would stress it? What would heat it up? What would what might be causing those things to happen on the asteroid? Another characteristic of Ben knew that is contributing contributing to the phenomenon we think is relatively rapid rotation rate so it spins once every four point three hours and its surfaces getting very hot. I am very cold within that timeframe. So you have this thermal stress every four point three hours. You're swinging two hundred degrees in temperature from daytime to nighttime and the Rock and expand and contract and expand and contract in you can build up mechanical stresses and ultimately released that material in a catastrophic event. We were talking about the material. That's being ejected from the surface. How big are those particles and how much of it? How much of it was released so we saw? Aw three distinct ejection. Events from Benue over the period of January and February of Twenty nineteen and they each released dozens to hundreds of particles us. They were moving sometimes with very low velocities on the order of ten centimeters per second which is too slow to escape the asteroid gravity feel back down. Yeah Yeah and and up to three meters per second which is on a hyperbolic trajectory on its way to becoming an interplanetary dust particle so we're able to use a whole series as of observations especially of the ones that were bound in the Benue Environment. Not only did they leave. The service with low velocity but some of them had just the right velocity CD to actually go into orbit around and this is an exciting occurrence for us because we were struggling to get the gravity field information that we wanted you too on this program because we had to get the spacecraft closer to the surface than we thought the risk was starting to look unacceptable and then all of a sudden we've got these hundreds of particles also in the Benue Environment in orbit there free gravity field probes so once you've got an orbital solution you first of all get the gravity field of the asteroid but more importantly you can start to characterize the properties of the particles. You can understand their area mass ratio. You can understand their Albedo or how bright they are and you can understand from that the mass in their diameter. So we're probably looking at particles as high as ten centimeters across Rosso softball size kind of object down two things on the centimeter size scale so smaller than a golf ball. There's one other theory for what might be happening happening here. With these ejection events when we first saw the images of these particles coming off the surface a lot of the team members would right away to an impact event event. Maybe we were looking at an impact from another object meteoroid in near space that hit this asteroid and injected these particles and then we kind of abandoned a an idea that would be such a rare event that it's unlikely that we would have captured that In our camera system we gotta start thinking of all these other ideas and then I sat sat down and I did the math and we have a pretty good model for meteoroid flux in Europe space because it's important for spacecraft safety especially the earth orbiting satellites. By that time we got mature enough understanding that I was getting the energies of the ejection events to be on the order of Miller Gills to a few hundred Miller Gills very very low energies. Even small particle coming in and hitting. Benny surface is going to have a hundred times at energy deposited there and so it it was a good example of our bias. We didn't think about the implications of the micro gravity environment. It doesn't take a lot of energy to object something off the surface so the asteroid so the meteoroid hypothesis went from one that was kind of rejected out of hand at first suggestion to being one of the leading candidates. For what we might be seeing right now another important aspect of this mission besides observing it in its orbit and Looking at the surface is sample return. But when you've got there you've found that the surface was unexpectedly rocky. As we were designing the mission we were relying on interpretation of astronomical data to understand the nature of the asteroid right surface. And I think I literally told the the design team a beach kind of material. He's data and we have a very rocky and rugged environment that we're dealing with right now on this mission. None of each yeah discreet field but just boulders for days right just boulders meter scale L. up to one hundred meter scale. Boulders are just littered across the service of this asteroid. Wow so what does that mean for the sample return mission if the surface is very different than expected. Did you have to make some changes. Yeah we had to redesign the flight software to accommodate the rocky and rugged surface of Banu in in particular we have an onboard guidance system. And we were going to use that for closure as we went in to get the sample because we weren't expecting a Lotta hazards so it was really you just. Are you coming in at the right speed and the right direction. We had to abandon that system completely and repurpose the navigation cameras to develop up a new system. We call natural feature tracking where we are creating a catalog of hundreds of different boulder areas or craters or bridges or anything that's distinctive on the asteroid surface and we're uploading that catalog to the spacecraft as it's going to get the sample it will be taking images and comparing comparing him to that catalog and doing calculation determine where it is and what its velocity vector is and how likely is it to touch a safe spot on the asteroid surface kind. Don't like a self driving car. That has a map already in the city. That's right yeah. We have a self guiding spacecraft already had a number of surprises. But can you talk a little bit about. Oh how this mission compares to other sample return missions from asteroids that have happened in recent decades though Cyrus Rex will be the third mission to return a sample from asteroid. The first two were led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency or JAKSA. They're higher BUSA and high boost to missions the first high boost mission and went to a very different kind of asteroid what we call a stony asteroid so not this water in organic rich material that we're looking for and they had a lot of challenges operationally a including failure of the sampling mechanism when they make contact with the asteroid surface and then I'll extensive damage to the spacecraft. But they made it back to the earth with their her return capsule and sure enough. They had a few small grains of asteroid particles that were adhering to the walls and a lot of science was achieved with that mission. But we're talking much less than a milligram of material was returned high Busa to which is a team that were very friendly with and collaborate quite a bit just left their the target asteroid Ugo with similar objective of going to something that was vol and carbon rich and they had two successful contacts and sample collection..

Banu Spectra Cyrus REX Benue Dante Benue Benny Ben Benue Environment Dante Loretta Japan Aerospace Exploration Ag Carl Sagan Miller Gills Europe Freud softball South Polar Ugo golf
"rex mission" Discussed on On a Mission

On a Mission

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"rex mission" Discussed on On a Mission

"When an asteroid passes a spy. We can't just breathe a sigh of relief if they often come back there orbiting the sun just like we are but at different speeds and on different paths so when astronomers determined and asteroids is odds of hitting us they have to not only consider this loop around the sun but all of its future loops as well. JPL Scientists Steve Chancellor eslake keeps tabs on where asteroids going for tracking asteroids data source are these telescopes bitter constantly plowing the skies looking in for objects a whenever they find something they send it in and we update the orbit so we don't update the orbits necessarily when we want to we. We do that when we get more. Data sometimes objects are so interesting that we'd say. Hey we need to know where this is. Maybe because it's threatening the earth or maybe because of space mission wants to go there so then they will point to telescope where it's supposed to be now if those predictions for were supposed to be are. You're very approximate. They might have a lot of work to recover. The asteroid the fun thing and asteroids. Is You can do that in the past you can kind of do time travel. Because everybody we saving their images and even film from the Nineteen fifties all been digitized dope if you have an asteroid you wanted to where it was sometime in the past you can go to those files and update the that way. It's not as simple. Connect the dots exercise though because asteroids. Don't follow straight lines. Through the solar system sunlight that warms the surface of asteroids can steer them in unexpected directions. This is known as the are Kofsky. Effect Rusi see your Kofsky. Effect is very cool on a NASA web series. The robot astronomy talk show that actress Cameron Diaz schooled the robot host post about the your Kofsky effect. So you're saying that when an asteroid absorbs sunlight on one side that side in its infrared energy that pushes it out pitch normal orbit the exactly the more sunlight it's able to absorb the more infrared energy. It emits and the further it gets pushed asteroids all experience this effect in fact a different degrees in Steve says figuring out how it changes and asteroids orbit around the Sun can be difficult when asteroids. I discovered we really don't know even which way the asteroid is being pushed. Could push ahead or behind in its orbit. That can be a very complicated effect on Earth Hazard prediction for many the asteroids and now we have on the order of one hundred near Earth Asteroids for which we can see an estimate the amount of the aircraft offs key affect. But they're still twenty thousand more your asteroids for which we have no insight of what the Husky effect is doing to that buddy. Radar measurements can help narrow down. How an ashtray? Deviating from its expected path but such measurements can only be made when an asteroid asteroid is relatively close to us. Radar also can provide better details on an asteroid size and shape. which is good to know if you're trying to figure out house? Sunlight is heating their surfaces in asteroids. Come in a medley of forms. Some look like dog bones or walnut shells others are irregular jagged. Give Mishmash one Halloween. An asteroid with features like a human skull flew past us a wicked cosmic joke. Some Asteroids Zor enormous and some are very small they come in different colors and flavors metallic stony icy but why are the asteroids also different. Why are they even out there in the first place to answer such questions? NASA has sent missions to investigate them. The Galileo Mission to Jupiter was the first to fly by An asteroid back in nineteen ninety one. The first mission to orbit and land on an asteroid happened seven years later with the near Shoemaker spacecraft's visit to asteroid right arrows at nearly seventeen kilometers in length eros is the second largest near Earth object six kilometers bigger than the asteroid that led to the dinosaur extinction extinction luckily for us. Eros is not heading our way the asteroid Benue is another story. Benders orbit around the Sun. Brings it close close to Earth every six years and there's a small chance it could hit us in the year. Twenty one ninety. Six Banu is five hundred meters in diameter taller than the Empire Empire State Building. If it hit us the impact would unleash eighty thousand times energy an atomic bomb. This threat is enough to have motivated a recent study. Study about the best way to steer Ben off course hammer an acronym for hyper velocity mitigation. Mission would be a battering Ram of spacecraft. We have to throw a lot of hammers banner to move it between a dozen to eighty depending on the amount of time we have before it hit. But Ben you might not respond spawned the way we think it will. We need to learn more about it with that in mind. Nastase Osiris Rex mission is currently orbiting Banu and sending US images ages of it's rough craggy surface. Astronomers Think Banu is shattered fragment a remnant from a collision between two larger asteroids that impact Banu off and tossed it out of the asteroid belt the region of space between Mars and Jupiter that contains millions of asteroids. Ben Who still bears the marks of being being a crash survivor. It's a rubble pile of rocks. Loosely bound together by gravity. The lead scientist of the Cyrus rex mission. Dante Lauretta the university diversity of Arizona says they hadn't realized just how loosely bound some of those rocks are so yeah. The asteroid is regularly tossing material off into space. This certainly was unexpected. By surprise a lot of them are falling right back down and landing on the asteroid surface. Some of them are actually getting trapped in orbits around the asteroid which is really exciting because it allows us to track them over many days and even weeks and then start to learn something about the detail. Gravity field the asteroid and then some of them are at high enough philosophies above what we would call the escape velocity of the asteroid. And they're leaving Benny going into interplanetary space. There is no concern for spacecraft safety. It's a small enough amount of material and overall moving relatively slowly so even if one of these were to hit the space craft it. It wouldn't cause any damage that would impact our ability to achieve the mission the dance of rock particles around Bhanu is just one more challenge for the spacecraft were navigating in in a microgravity environment and that has a lot of unexpected in small forces that act on the spacecraft so in addition to the gravity of the asteroid Royd. We're also getting pushed around by the solar wind material outgassing from the spacecraft heat radiating off from the asteroid all of those have a substantial impact on the trajectory victory the spacecraft so we're constantly taking images and updating the position and figuring out where we're going to be in the future and that drives a very intense operational final timeline for the team basically within twenty four hours of making a science observation. We have to do a navigation. Solution determined the position and velocity of the spacecraft relative to the asteroid and then get that up on the spacecraft so that it can accommodate the differences in where we're actually going to be versus where we thought we would be when we first meet the design. Uh the difficulty of navigating spacecraft around and asteroids suggests that moving one could be a tough task but of Cyrus. REX is not there to move. It's goal is to gather a sample from it. Even though rock particles are drifting off. Banu your Cyrus. REX mission wasn't designed to capture them like the stardust mission. Did for comment built to instead a device at the end of a long arm extending from the underside of the space craft will collect material from the asteroid surface surface. After the device touchdown for five seconds springs will bounce the spacecraft. Backup kind of like a pogo stick. In those five seconds the device will gather asteroid dirt in a unique way touch and go sample acquisition mechanism or tag sandwiches device that we place on the surface is basically A vacuum cleaner working in reverse so with a vacuum cleaner. You create an area of low pressure and it pulls the air and the dirt through a filter with tag Sam and we actually bring our own air because the asteroid is an airless body and we blow it down into the regular or the soil on the asteroid creating region of high pressure Asher underneath a filter and then it grabs the gravel and rocky material and pushes it up into an air filter. The TAG SAM is designed to pick up a minimum of one hundred fifty fifty grams of material and its capacity is over two kilograms. One hundred and fifty grams is like a `Grande starbucks Coffee Cup. The samples styris. Rex will bring to Earth will reveal more about Banu and they could help us better understand the history of our solar system asteroids or leftovers from all the material swirled around our young son and came together to form the planets so we're really interested in the earliest stages of solar system formation. And there's no geologic nick record of that period on the Earth or on the moon or on Mars if you want to understand how planets formed then you need to go back to the small bodies the asteroids and comets.

Banu Ben Who NASA Shoemaker spacecraft Steve Chancellor Kofsky JPL Cameron Diaz Dante Lauretta US Rex Arizona Asher Empire Empire State Building Bhanu
The Holy Cosmos: The New Religion of Space Exploration

John Bachelor

04:58 min | 2 years ago

The Holy Cosmos: The New Religion of Space Exploration

"Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black looking at the exploring of the cosmos after we do the space engineering this particular kind of exploring requires cosmological thinking, Bob what is the gravitational wave that we keep chasing? Well this. Had been for decades that when when very very heavy massive objects merge or collides just two neutron stars or two black holes or a black hole. Ethane neutron star. The process will call cause a ripple in space time literally like you drop a pebble into his into a pod. And you see ripples move away. From it case. The the merger would be of that pebble hitting the water, and it causes ripples to radiate out actual space time, and those reputational wage and get an instrument sensitive enough, we could actually detect those those ripples is they they sweep past the solar system in the earth. And if we could do that, then actually get evidence of those kind of mergers going on somewhere else and get some information about them. This astronaut Nicole research, it would be a whole different way the universe. And so they built. Two different detectors that work together in Virgo, and they've made some detections in the last few years this this week. They announced the two more detections that occurred in April of this year, and they appear to be emerges of a binary Staw to binary stores come together. And the other detection could be the first collision of a neutral style with a black hole. That a lot of there's a lot of sumptious based on what these collisions off because we always see the gravitational wave. So imagine, you're you're you're, you know, you're little lily pad in a in a pond and a wave goes by you now from that weight have to speculate where the event occurred, and what caused it. And of course, you CV event. And so with speculating strana murs using telescopes trying to see if using the wave that they can trace back and detect the actual event, but there was. Good. So you have to look a lot of the sky. And so they haven't been able to do that yet. Eventually they will. And that'll be a big deal when that happens, but right now, it's just cool science which is getting another way to look at the first to tone down the concern about puffing. This is a near earth object. It's watched very carefully you can calculate its orbit's. It's revolutions and within these last days in a from a came. We're told within nineteen thousand miles verse oppo fice is a very large near earth object. It would make a very bad day in Paris and the rest of the planet should have hit us. Bob, nineteen thousand miles. That's close. Right. That's within the high orbit satellite. Yes. Except I have to correct something John the close approach of office nineteen thousand miles is year away. And they beginning to prepare for that right now. Scientists want. They know it's coming they schedule that for several years. They know that they can't get that. How it passes the earth could will change the pulses, and there is a one hundred thousand chance that when that Alba changes it will send poll into a collision course with the earth into the future. But there's a small chance of that the more likely thing is that the Albano fly by will will send father away. So it's it's, you know, understanding how near earth objects like this function. And and can be made of is critical understand how we can prevent them from hitting us. It's one of the reasons why both the mission and the affairs Rex missions to Ragu and Ben new assault important because those are the same kind of near earth objects, and they're over piles figure out how we can move them as well just one more detail about puffs, Bob when it passes. I read will be able to watch it like a shooting star. Correct. It's that close. Yeah. This is. Thinking all distances. And it's large enough that yes, it will be something that's going to be. It's going to be one of these things for this. You know, go go go out night, depending on what you are. Sometimes it'll be daytime some people see it at night. It depends on what you be on. But yeah, it's going to be an is there any plan for a mission to to watch the fly by no not at this moment too soon. We're not ready for it. I mean, they can't put emission together that quickly at this point at home. Of course, someday they might have

Bob Zimmerman BOB Albano Fly Nicole Research Paris Affairs Rex Missions Alba John Ragu Assault
"rex mission" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"rex mission" Discussed on KPCC

"But first this week space researchers made in Houston for the lunar and planetary science conference. And one of the big topics was asteroids researchers from NASA so Cyrus Rex mission talked about its trip to asteroid Benue and members of the Japanese Busa to mission gave the first science results from their encounter with asteroid you here to talk about that. And other select your subjects in science as aniline new. It's a science journalist and author based in. In San Francisco. Welcome back. Hey, thanks for having me. Let's let's start off with Ray Yuga. What what is it? Where is it? Why are people so interested in it? So this is an asteroid that is shaped like a spinning top which means it's kind of wider in the middle and comes to two points on the top and the bottom and Japanese researchers were interested in visiting because it seems to have a high amount of carbon on its surface, which suggests that it might have some of the molecular precursors to life to life on earth because that's all we care about his life on earth. And it might also have a water. So they went and they found a couple of surprises like what? So first of all, sadly, it did not have very much water content or so it appears at this point. But it also appears to not be a solid asteroid. It's actually more like a bag of rubble being held together by gravity. So essentially, this is a ball of rocks that came together from an ancient collision probably very early. In the solar systems formation. And it created this spinning top shape at some point earlier in its history when it was spinning a lot faster than it is now, so basically it's a bag of rocks and the NASA mission, which is visiting a different asteroid Benue is actually visiting a very similar kind of asteroid. It's also a top shape asteroid. It's also probably a bag of rocks. And it also suggests that the carbon content suggests there might be water, and there's already early signs that they may have discovered water there. So one of the big questions. Now, why are they so similar yet one has virtually no water and the other one does. And also both asteroids have had our probes land on them and are bringing back little pieces of asteroids star some of the Bank of rocks coming back that hopefully yes, so in twenty twenty lookout for that little tiny bag rocks. From Ray GU I will quote you on man. Okay. Let's move on to other kinds of debris. There's there's new research into the things left behind by otters. That's right. So one of the many adorable things that others do is. They are the only seem animal that we know of that uses rocks to get their food. And what they do is they use rocks like an villes they smash them against shellfish to or smash them means abalone is to get them off of rocks and to get the yummy food inside. And this leaves behind a very characteristic wear pattern on the rocks because otters tend to keep the rocks that they use they find an anvil rock that they like, and they kind of keep it in their pocket. They actually do have a little otter pocket on their bodies. And so as they use it over time, these rocks kind of take on dings and bangs on them that are that are characteristic of breaking open shellfish. And this gave zoologists an idea about how they might. Study otter populations using tools taken from archaeology, which I like because I like archaeology. And so what they did was they spent ten years on the California coast observing a group of authors. I looking at their behavior with breaking open, those rocks, and then looking at the rocks themselves and found that just as when we study ancient humans from one hundred thousand years ago or five hundred thousand years ago, we know certain kinds of rocks have characteristic where on them that show. They were used as tools versus being regular old rocks. That have been banged around. They can do the same thing for otters. So they're using this technique to discover tool rocks as opposed to just regular rocks. And what this lets them do is. Actually, quite amazing lets them recreate what historic otter populations might have been in the coastal areas because otter populations are disappearing. So we'd like to know how many there were one hundred years ago a thousand years ago, but it also can add data to our understanding of how big. Otter populations are today if we can find a number of rocks. That can help us understand know, they're twenty otters. Are there? A million dollars be nice. If there were a million dollars. Maybe not maybe not a million. Miss. This is just a great example of how you can import tools from one science to another and learn a lot interesting interesting. There's a strange story this week about researchers who put zebra fish into contact with bees. Do you have to connect the dots on for this is this is basically that kind of story that comes along. Maybe once a year where your brain is just blown basically these researchers in Europe decided that they wanted to figure out a way to get Bs, and zebra fish to communicate using robots, and the reason they picked bees, and zebra fish is that these are two animals whose behavior has been really well studied, they both exhibit social behavior and collective decision making. So what the what the authors of this study wondered was if we could get those two collectives the fish collective in the be collective to talk to each other. Somehow would they make one big decision as a group and the answer is yes, strangely. They created a robot that could communicate with bees that could get bees to move in a certain direction left or right. And they also created a robot swims around that could get the zebra fish to swim left or right. So the. Question was could they get the robot that was talking to the bees to communicate to the zebra fish robot? You know, the bees are moving left, you guys should move left to. So what they did in the experiment was first they had the bees move in a certain direction, they retract into this robot 'cause it was warm and so in bees are attracted to warmth. So they all moved laughed, and then the b- robot said to zebra fish robot. Hey, get the fish to go left. So that fish, swims laughed and kind of pushes the the school of fish to the left. So that worked out pretty well. When the bees told the zebra fish, what to do zebra fish telling the bees what to do not so much. They couldn't really get this zebra fish. They do engage in collective behavior. It takes them a little longer they tended to be a bit more chaotic, and so they would communicate to their zebra fish robot. Hey, go whatever direction you want. We don't care and the bees would kind of have what the what the scientists referred to as a lot of interest in their here. But the great part is ultimately they were able to create a loop where? The bees were communicating with their robot, which communicated with Uber fish robot with the fish and it created unin under thirty minutes. They actually did reach a collective decision about which direction to move. And this really the implications for our yet super cool, and what it means is ultimately, there's some kind of principle underlying collective decision-making that transcends species, and that is just mindblowing. You're right off mind blown. My work is done. Your work is done and have a good weekend. And only knew it science journalist and author based in San Francisco now, it's time to check in on the state of science. This is.

NASA San Francisco Ray Yuga Houston Benue Ray GU California Europe million dollars five hundred thousand years one hundred thousand years one hundred years thirty minutes thousand years ten years
"rex mission" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"rex mission" Discussed on This Week in Science

"And so there have been a few reports out recently saying pushing more and more in the not true direction. And so a group of researchers from who Brecht institute in tact, the Amsterdam University Medical Center, a coup normality in Leon and the Francis Crick institute in London led by Hans cleavers. They tried to basically create a cell by cell map of the dividing cells in a heart after heart attack. They took mice. They gave them myocardial infarctions. And then they looked to see what was dividing because finishing of stem cell at this point in time is the ability of a cell to replace lost tissue by south vision. And so they went looking for those dividing cells to see what they were. And they went to see what they turned into. And all they found. Blood vessels into Munis cells, and those fiber blasts that had turned into the scar tissue. No, new heart muscle. So this study is one of many that is establishing that there may not be a cardiac stem cell and the study is in mouse hearts, the marine heart as opposed to the human heart. So maybe we're special maybe we have the cardiac stem cells, but it's pretty likely that if some of our closest relatives don't have he's cardiac stem cells that we probably don't have them either. So this study additionally gets rid of what those false leads were where win stem cell. Researchers said they saw dividing cells, and they must be cardiac stem cells a really looking at these precursors to new blood vessels and immune cells, which would be very important to becoming the health of that area, the heart. Whereas the muscle itself would not necessarily be the important part. Art, recovering the health to the heart. And in fact, they determined that in those cells where in in the hearts of the mice where the fiber blasts were allowed to turn into scar tissue that actually that scar tissue as much as we don't like it is necessary because without that scar tissue the hearts were were not really able to function when it's blocked the mice had acute cardiac rupture their hearts loaded. Yeah. So that scar formation is very important. Even though it does diminish our hearts of -bility to beat and pump that blood. But right now, we may not be looking at heart stem cells that can be brought into action in the heart after heart after cardiac arrest, maybe we're going to be looking at other regenerative therapies like heart patches, where they where they bring in cells from other areas where they try and patch that damaged area and get the area. Get the cells on either side of the scar tissue to communicate with each other out that can dunk conduction that occurs between heart cells in the heart. I think those those carry heavy ethical issues with him much better genetically at it. Somebody not that. We started. All of these really ethically. Troubling type of. To preserve human life long. That's right. We're back to where we started back to the, gene editing. But yeah, I'm not gonna say anything I'm gonna take just not by not just totally like laid down declarative statements that said I saw early and -firmative -ly ev- staked out some ground, which I'm not gonna tell you what it is. But I definitely later can revert back to this point and say, yes, remember when I didn't say this is what it was very well done. I got to really quick stories for the end of the show, really fast, really fast. We've got Cyrus wrecks at Benue. And no, I'm not speaking little angry. This is exciting. Nasa Cyrus Rex mission arrived at the asteroid called venue this week in his preparing this is I'm gonna use a technical term. Chunk of space gravel to grab a piece of it and bring it back to earth right now. It's actually testing the surface with lasers trying to actually map the surface of the asteroid. You can find a good spot for the boop age. It sounds. You know, it sounds funny..

Hans cleavers Francis Crick institute Brecht institute Amsterdam University Medical C Nasa Leon London Cyrus Benue
"rex mission" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"rex mission" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Other worldly has pretty cool yeah and that's where you have to start with the now that the hypothesis that this is contamination yeah you know um unless you can prove that it's not okay so dan so them is there a effort to go out and you know find something more pristine may be um rather than doing getting a meteorite may be go out and get an asteroid that has not touched the earth's atmosphere is there something we're doing now yep i would be oh cyrus rex so it was irish rex mission is on his way to banu it will collect samples from that asteroid is a carbonaceous body uh we can tell this by spectroscopy at a distance and um actually what what we're we're we're touching on here is a sample return missions and why you would want to do that mrs actually really nice conversation leading up to um for example uh uh let me explain why you want to do missions like this and general lemieux's example of mars okay we're we're we're we're seriously talking about started doing this uh collecting samples for marjon returning from earth now i had said earlier that we already have a quarter a metric ton of martian meteorite sonner so go and just get if you're just going to go get more for the sake of getting more it's really not a really good uc resources but we also talked about how any meteorite that falls earth is you you have to assume it's contaminated and so what you really nice things you get out of the uh out of a sample return mission that you can't get for meteorites is you get to collect meet materials where you very to great detail know their contamination an alteration history and by and large you're gonna get stuff is very minimally altered if if if it's that sets usually one of the one of the design coals of the mission definitely.

lemieux dan banu
"rex mission" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"rex mission" Discussed on WREK

"Down select in a december 20th blog entry at planetary dot org he actually includes a some great tweet post on this exact topic of uh of venus so getting short shrift once again but listen for now tell us about the two that are still in the competition the two that got through the down select are both proposing to go back to places that we have visited and even landed on before but that's where any similarity ends one of them is called caesar it's a comet sample returned mission and it proposes to go to the comment that rosetta visited 67 p or trey him off casamanca and land on it and bring samples back comet surf assemble return is one of the priorities and that the cable survey the dragonfly mission by contrast seeks to land on tighten and deploy a quad copter to go explore through titan's atmosphere visit several a little spice touchdown in different spots on titan and carry out an entirely different kind of mission that is never been attempted before an any body much less than outer solar system planet it's really very audacious city the drone to tighten two to check out that little world lemme both of these missions are exciting but i want to volunteer to be on the surface of tightened with that too drome remote control yeah i think everybody is really thrilled about the prospect of a of a quad cup trump tightened but the fact that it's so crazy sounding may not bode well for its future and selection by contrast sesar is a very high heritage mission it you're talking about a spacecraft it looks a lot like the us iris rex mission that's already on its way to an asteroid you have a very seasons principal investigator in steve squires who's the principal investigator for the mars exploration rover missions you have a comment that spin studied very upclose before whereas the landing on tighten while impressive was only in one little spot by one relatively incapable lander also on dragonfly we have a younger principal investigator um her name's elizabeth turtles she would only be i believe the second female principal investigator ever in nasa mission history and the team of people that.

principal investigator steve squires rosetta solar system remote control elizabeth nasa
"rex mission" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"rex mission" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Homes have been completely destroyed in harris county which includes houston and nearly forty four thousand homes were damaged a huge asteroid is hurtling toward earth but don't worry it's not the bruce willis movie armageddon the asteroid is named clearance san is almost a three mile wide rock that will pass safely within about four point four million miles of birth this morning nasa says and while a few million miles sound like a lot of room it's actually a pretty close task when you you're talking about the daphne space other asteroids have passed closer to earth in florence put you have been this big it's the largest asteroids have passed by our planet disclosed since nasa started their program to detect and track from your earth asteroids florence does offer a great opportunity for scientists to think that any asteroid longer than a half mile could have worldwide effects if it hit the planning to they'll study florence as it gives owned by nasa said they're goldstone solar system radar in california and the national science foundation's are cbo observatory in puerto rico will snap radar images images will help scientists learn more about the asteroids composition shape third his properties and roughness as well as the presence of older he also may learn whether or not florence has a satellite having florence do apply by his a lot easier than chasing down anasta reuters in space although nasa is doing that as well with its risis rex mission the spacecraft was launched in two thousand sixteen to chase down a potentially dangerous asteroid called the new it'll take a sample of that asteroid and in a.

harris county houston nasa florence california national science foundation puerto rico florence reuters bruce willis solar system