20 Episode results for "Reverend C T. Vivian"

Honoring The Legacy Of Civil Rights Icons C.T. Vivian And John Lewis

1A

34:48 min | 1 year ago

Honoring The Legacy Of Civil Rights Icons C.T. Vivian And John Lewis

"This is one eight I'm JEN white in Washington. America recently lost to civil rights giants in the span of twenty four hours, representative John Lewis and Reverend C t Vivian led the way in the nineteen sixties, practicing nonviolence, even in the face of angry mobs and beatings police, they were part of movement that wished America forward one march freedom ride and demonstration at a time. Today, that movement lives on and Black Lives Matter We wanted to make space for all of you to remember and honor the lives of those who are on the front lines for change, and we want to talk about where the Movement for racial. Justice stands today for that. We're joined by Bernard Lafayette Junior, longtime civil rights, leader and activist. Brittany Pack Nick Cunningham activist, educator and founder of love and power. It's a firm focused on justice and equity, and she was a member of President Obama's policing task force, and also with US derail Jordan a senior political science major at Morehouse, college and a former White House ambassador for Hec US everyone welcome to the program. Thank you. So John Lewis was the youngest speaker at the march on Washington with Martin. Luther King Junior and until his death last Friday. He was the last speaker still alive here. He is on that day in nineteen sixty three. We. We? Do not want freedom gradually, but we want to be free now. Are. We are him being bipolar. People locked up in jail all in all again and then you'll be. How can we mean? We want our freedom. Britney to have them both pass on. The same day is a big blow. How did you? How did you handle that news? It was a big blow. There were many many tears. But you know as a person of faith. As both Mr Lewis and Reverend Vivian were I, recognized it as a moment that did not come to us by accident. I really feel like the creator of the universe guide. Whatever it is, you call this force that is bigger than all of us. was reminding us of our collective responsibility in this moment. I've sat with Reverend Vivian and Mr. Lewis in particular at a multigenerational civil rights meeting during the Obama Administration the likes of which had never happened before and tears filled. Both of their is in part because they saw their legacy living on, so there's something comforting especially in my faith tradition about recognizing that they felt free to finally be at rest because their work with continuing, and they could pass the torch. Thousands, if not millions of people not just in America, but around the world who are bearing that torch every single day. But it was also a reminder to those of us who have chosen this work that as the old folks say, we can't rely on our parents religion and we can't rely on somebody else's freedom work that we have to engage in this study and the discipline and the practice it will continuously take to make sure that we are lifting mantle, because we cannot rely on the work and the Labor of past generations. We have to make sure that we are consistently stepping up to the plate. So many people are, and that's exactly what we have to keep doing Durell. What about for you? I think. This moment was it was very disheartening to see just knowing Congressman Lewis and the stories that he told that life to. He lived for me as a young person It was a Saturday. It was a sad day to lose both of them in the same day. and also see that the same thing that he lived for he died fighting for, and it's something that I believe that we as a generation and we as a nation. Should continue so that their their life's work is not inveigh Bernardino. Both Congressman John Lewis and Reverend C T Vivian. I would imagine this was. A law, she felt very acutely. yes, I am still struggling with it such A. Shocking thing for both of them die within a twenty four hour period. After all the years they worked together and. I knew them in Nashville from the very. Beginning of mine involvement in the movement. And that's the thing. So Yes, it is, it's Spill something that I'm you know struggling to? Think about and then. We keep hearing about people who are pass it on medgar evers brother chows down just died yesterday. Though they're going one by one. Close together! Many, people were familiar with Congressman John Lewis, but maybe less familiar with Reverend C. T Vivian Bernard. Can you tell us more about what he stood for and what he was passionate about? you mean TVs are. Oh, yes, well. He was a little bit older than we were quite a bit. but he was riding along with us, and so he did a lot of coaching for us. Because he's gone through a lot of things that we were as young college students going through. And we learn so much from him. He was a constant teacher back. He was my. Teacher because he was insistent. To the homeworks teacher there at the American Baptist College in Nashville. So It ended up that we were cellmates and. On the freedom ride in Jackson Mississippi here. You thought you had left your classes and here you've got your professors cellmate. So we never stop learning, and so that was just really remarkable. At Was Right there with us, but he didn't try to be the spokesman. I say that it was necessary. He did, but he encouraged US quite a bit. Well In was hopeful for the next generation, and here he is giving the message to today's young people. It's up to us to create the world we really want. We have to say we have sing it. We have to do it because that's the only way we can really find out what the world will be like the world we want to create our generations that have come before us have desired it. We're the first. That can really have it. Rear the frost can make a reality. We've lived waited for you to come along, and because the conditions are right for you to win. GIRAL. You're just really beginning your political career when you hear that admonition from C T Vivian. How does it? Make you think about the way you're approaching your work. It. Just really. It pushes me and motivates me to continue to carry the Mantel that they have left and it provokes me to. Work with people of my people, my age people in my generation to continue that work to start new organizations and just to to continue their legacy. I got this message from a member of our TEX. Clubbed reads among the many things that should be done to honor. These two brave leaders is their contribution to our society should be in every elementary school, history and High School Civics Textbook, still to come more on the legacy of Congressman John Lewis and Reverend CT Vivian with Bernard Lafayette Junior Britney. Pack Nick, Cunningham and GIRAL Jordan I'm Jen White. You're listening to one eight from W., AMU and NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor better help the online counselling service dedicated to connecting you with a licensed counselor to help you overcome whatever stands in the way of your happiness. Fill out a questionnaire and get matched with a professional tailored to your needs, and if you aren't satisfied with your counselor, you can request a new one at any time free of charge visit better help, dot com slash one eight to get ten percent off your first month. Get the help. You deserve with better help. Do you talk about the news with your friends, your family or maybe perfect strangers, you can get all the facts. You need to be up to speed on this busy news cycle on the one A. News Roundup. Find The podcast in your feet every, Friday. A Minneapolis business owner's daughter is called publicly for racist anti-black tweets. Fighting to save his business and trying to make amends, he calls on a prominent black Muslim leader for help. He's an Arab Muslim. Come here today. Telling me what to do to hear what happens next. Listen to code switch from NPR. I'm JEN white today. Remembering to civil rights tightened congressman John. Lewis and Reverend C T Vivian both died last Friday after spending their lifetimes, fighting for change and today's the funeral for C, t Vivian for friends and family Georgia, but we're looking ahead to sharing your thoughts and ideas about how we best honor their legacies. I'm here with Bernard Lafayette. Junior longtime civil rights, leader and activist Britney Pack Nick Cunningham activist, educator, and founder of love and power. It's a firm focused on justice and equity, and also with US Durell, Jordan he's as senior political science major at Morehouse. College Britney. When someone achieves that, icon label. Some of the nuance, the pain gets lost in the retelling. Do you worry about that for these two men? I worry greatly, but now is the time for us to make sure that we are course correcting before it deeply becomes a problem, Djamil K Smith wrote about. Both of these icons for Rolling Stone magazine, and he really challenged us to make sure that our remembrances are about more than just sweet moments where we are actually correctly and accurately convicting the country that continuously let these men down. Given, their immense sacrifice that has yet to be fully answered for not just in American systems and culture, but truly in American policy. Everyone wants to focus on the good part of John. Lewis is good trouble. Nobody wants to talk about the trouble that both he and Reverend Vivian, and so many of their peers Reverend Lafayette found themselves in because they were deeply and intentionally counter cultural. So, what does that mean? We have to replicate in this moment. It means that we have to make sure that we do not allow people like Mitch McConnell to. Stand up sweet remembrances of John Lewis when in fact he has stood in the way of restoring the voting rights act in the honor of John Lewis. That was that was destructed and stripped. By, the Supreme Court in two thousand thirteen, he has stood in the way of that bill, passing in the Senate. It means that we have to make sure that Brian Kemp who leveraged the very voter suppression tactics that John Lewis and Ct. Vivian bled for to fight against. A does not just stand up a nice tweet about John Lewis that he actually has to be held to account for the ways in which he leveraged those voter suppression tactics to sit in the office of governor in John. Lewis is home state that he's sitting in right now. It means that we have to make sure that we hold on tight to the truth of history just as your texter. Texter said to make sure that we don't years later have to reclaim the legacies of CT Vivian and John Lewis in the same way. We're having to do with Dr Martin Luther. King Right now. We have to recognize that good trouble still requires trouble, and it means standing in the way intentionally of a status quo that continues to benefit certain people and continues to oppress the rest of us. Tom From rockport West Virginia emailed US saying Republican lawmakers want to honor Louis and they should pass phoning rights legislation already passed by the House and stop their empty platitudes of sympathy. Well give Ian notably stood up to a sheriff who was blocking black-americans from registering to vote in. Selma and Vivian was punched in the face so hard that it broke the sheriff's hand, but through this he's still stood for non-violent action and here he is talking to democracy now in two thousand fifteen. What we have to see beyond all sense. Martin King Right was our leader what we have and what was given to us from its very beginnings is an understanding that we could not win by killing. Light doesn't come because of darkness are right. We are here to change. American always have been. Bernard you studied nonviolence, and were part of the some of the training courses on the subject in Nashville. Can you tell us about what you learned in and how you all defined nonviolence? yes, It was a special situation because we had people there who embraced Martin Luther King's approach in the Montgomery bus boycott. And also had their own experience. T been involve in nine dollars even before Nashville. But we had Jim Lawson who had studied. nonviolence in India. And MARTYR SCANS as ask him to come south and he came to Nashville and enrolled at graduate school. At Vanderbilt University, so one of the things in terms of nonviolence, as you have to always make sure. That, the steps that you're taking leads to the goal. That you're trying to reach another words if you want a peaceful lovin. reconciler and community. You can't get that by retaliating. with violence. In fact every. Move. You make. You must exemplify that goal that you're trying to reach. One of the things the other is that as much more difficult. But you have to withdraw your support from an evil system. And that way you have to by the power in the. Situation that you're in. Models kings. definitition for power was very simple, although he was very articulate and Malta syllables and his Speaking, and that kind of thing. His, definition of power was one is very simple ability to either supply. Or withdraw. Needed resources. and. That's where we had economic was strong. Okay. And, so we have to identify in every situation. Where is the power? What do we contribute to the situation? Now. As black people. Dollars segregation all those years, so we contributed to it, so we had to do as make things change is You know like the bus boycott in Montgomery, withdraw? Financial support. To the bus company. Okay. So you have to look at and ways We contributed to the system because we're part of. It can't be assistant. Let's all parts of cooperating. When it come to you because I think we've all seen a lot of conversations about nonviolent is a protest tactic in recent months, and and what are the conversations? You're having with your contemporaries about non-violence. so the conversations that we're having We're seeing from Atlanta. Even here to Birmingham where? We have marches demonstrations. We have protests. that are centered around nonviolence, and then they make a turn, and there's some type of uproar. There's some type of damage and we don't want that to Excuse what we're what we're trying to do. we're trying to accomplish something and that type of action can make it seem like a legitimate, and we're not serious about what we're trying to do. so my generation. We're having conversations about. How can we work with our local elected officials are state elected officials, and even on the federal level to get some type of legislation passed and to just do things in our community one thing at the time whether that's working with our neighbors to get them registered to vote on our blog whether they're starting, organizations whether that's even going into schools and getting young people to vote it's it's those small steps that we have to continue to to make sure that that this work is completed. We had one listener call in didn't want to be identified. She was part of the march in the sixties, and she says people regularly police, the people around them to make sure no one through anything, or did anything that could be considered a violent act, and she says she's disturbed. By the way, people are not keeping each other in line the same way today. That was her perspective for nod when you hear or when you speak too young activists today. What are the major ideas are lessons? You try to leave them with. Well, first of all. I want them to understand that. In order to bring about change. Is Important to win over the majority. If not the active support. sympathy of majority. It was Polian who said no revolution has been one. Hundred Away with a win. The sympathy and I have support. Of the majority. So we have to look at the total community. Not just one segment? And look at what is best for all of us. So, I think the earlier point was made is that we always have to have marshalls? marches and that's the thing that really makes a difference and helps. Like example, a lot of the marshalls in these demonstrations we had. with students or actually trained as Marshall's is little known for example that some of the marshals on the Selma March itself. After that started you know down the road leaving You know someone's going to Montgomery. Some of those marshals were actually gang members from south side Chicago. The Vice Lords. The pitcher that you see in the museums with the young fellow with this Black Tam on. Turn back on his head. Carrying the American flag. Business King and Dr King and Abernathy and Abernethy. Walking behind the American flag with fellow carrying, that cell is Lamar McCoy. TRAINED HIM IN CHICAGO. Okay. WE'RE WE'RE GONNA pick up this conversation in just a moment. We heard from Beth in Takoma Park Maryland who says we were lucky enough to meet Mr. Lafayette last year while visiting Montgomery, he and his wife came to the Freedom Rides Museum to talk to a group of young teachers, and we were invited to sit in with them by the end. End He had us all singing freedom songs. They had sung in jail. It was a precious memory that I will never forget. Thank you for all that you continue to do. We're talking about the legacy of two civil rights icons, and WHO's ready to carry the fight forward. I'm Jen White. Hear much more from you and our guests in just a moment. We're only months away from election day and every week or even every few hours. There's a new twist that could affect. Who Will Win the White House to keep up with the latest to into the NPR politics podcast every day to find out what happened and what it means for the election. Remembering the lives of two civil rights giants, and talking about what their legacy means for the next generation of activists. I'm here with Bernard Lafayette Junior. Longtime civil rights leader in activist. Brittany Pack Cunningham activist, educator, and founder of love and power. A firm focused on justice, equality and member of president. Obama's policing task force, and we have Durell Jordan senior political science major at Morehouse College and former White House ambassador for HEC US back in two thousand sixteen. John Lewis accepted a national book award for the graphic novel March. His autobiographical take on the civil rights movement. Thank? You This is unreal. This is unbelievable. Somebody, you know. I grew up in rural. Alabama very very cool. Very, few books at home. and. I remember in nineteen, fifty, six I was sixteen years old. Some of my brothers and sisters and cousins. Going down to the Public Library, trying to get a library cards. And we were told that the library swoop bikes on it and I cuts. To come here. Procedures Award. On these. Too much. Thank you. One of the future in elementary school told me read not child read and I tried to read everything. I love books. Reverend Lafayette. We've heard the stories about the march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma advocate for voting rights. That march resulted in in could John Lewis. Having a skull fractured Alabama. State troopers were often in very dangerous situations, being attacked by both police and mobs. How did you? How did you get past the fear? Well There is always fear because if you didn't have fear, then you wouldn't be. Conscious of the danger. So is certainly. Very conscious of the danger. And so, but you courage must overcome your fear. And the way you do that. Is You constantly think about the end that you're trying to read? And by focusing on the end that you're trying to reach. It makes you realize that that end that you're trying to reach is possible. So by. In. That he you going to accomplish your goal regardless of what happened? To you. That you gotta set the example for others to follow. No matter what happens to you. So. It's not about. The individual. It's about those young people that you hear hearing from now. We are so excited and we used to. Just how we'll. We see each other knowing that these young people are taking up the torch. And the black and white and Asian the. All working together. That's important to keep coalitions doll that things that you apart. And this thing is war or what? And I'm just glad I've lived this long to be able to see happen. Durell I have to ask. You is the youngest person on our panel. when you hear Reverend, Lafayette Talk About the joy it brings him. To see young activists today. What does it mean for you to be one of those young people who he's describing? It's. It's exciting to hear and to see young people not just here. The United States, but across the world raising the torch and actually taking up this work. I'm reminded of a song Make them here you Brian Mitchell and it states your sword can be a sermon or the power of the pen teach every child to raise his voice, and then my brother Stan And one thing that we have to do is put pressure on our elected officials on our leaders, and we have to make them do the work, and if they're not willing to do the work, we have to get in east positions, and we have to do the work ourselves, because if we can write black lives, matter on a street, and they can come out, and they could take pictures, and they can take photo ops in front of Churches, and they can do these other things. Then, clearly, they can put that same energy into legislation, so that black lives matters also on the street, but it's also legal. To treat us as if our black lives matter, you have to treat us. As if children's lives matter, you have to treat us as if our education matters, and we have to s John Lewis say redeemed the soul of America. Well on the topic of being heard here's Congressman Lewis speaking on the House floor last year. About the voting rights act the right to vote is precious, almost sacred. In a democratic society it is the most powerful nonviolent instrument or two that we have. In my heart of hearts I believe we have one more responsibility to restore excess all of our citizens who desire to participate in the democratic process. Many people my protested for the right to vote. Slum gave a little blood other. Very live. Britney there's a push by Democrats to expand the Voting Rights Act in honor of Congressman Lewis. There's also a movement to change the name. The Edmund Pettus Bridge in his honor. What are your thoughts on these MOMS? I think they're critically important. As we recognize the danger, in. canonizing figures of confederate history, segregation and white supremacy, certainly the name of the Edmund Pettus Bridge needs to be changed, and who better than Congressman Lewis to have his name emblazoned there, and at the same time in our collective grief for losing both of these men and is reverend. Lafayette said an entire generation more and more and more. People who gave us the very freedoms? We enjoy right now. We have to ensure that our grief does not prioritise symbolism over lasting change. The very lasting change that giral is talking about and that lasting change can come in parts by insuring that Congress passes within a veto proof majority, the restoration of voting rights act in both of their names. There is an understanding of what grief does to the body and the mind, and the soul that will make us reach four symbolism, but what can happen is that people who have no intention of following through on Reverend? Viviana and Mr Lewis and Reverend Lafayette's legacies to exploit that desire for symbolism that desire for comfort, and give us all of the right rhetoric, and do none of the right things, so we have to make sure as Girardi, said that we are putting the pressure on those in power. To ensure that they are making. Moves and not simply symbolic ones and we as reverend. Lafayette said half to remain disciplined in our focus on non violence, disciplined in our clarity of message, disciplined in our fight, and doing the quiet work, then it will take to not just pursue this work when it is popular and win, the headlines are leading, but when no one is paying attention, but we still have to plan. We still have to train we. We still have to organize before all of our elder sat at those lunch counters and marched in the streets. They trained. They learned. They read they a built coalitions. They made sure that the people of Color Jewish folks Muslim Folks Immigrants People lgbtq folks disabled people who are experiencing oppression that we understood that we were stronger together that we move forward together, and we are continuing to increase that and expand those coa. As. We move forward. That's precisely the work that we have to do now. So that we're not see. She aided by mere symbols, but that were only satisfied with deep real lasting equity justice change. We've only got a couple of minutes left here, but coming to you I Reverend Lafayette. We're at a time when people have deepening mistrust in government institutions. People who feel like their votes don't matter. What do you say to folks who? Don't feel a deep urge to get engaged because they they just don't. They don't believe it will make a difference. Well I think that is a very important question because that would make all the difference. If they don't feel that they're making a difference. And the thing that can cause them to make a difference as the result. Of their work. Now, since we only have a few minutes out. his my proposal this. I'd like to see all the knives a you legislature. Ages twelve to seventeen. Have those young people. Create a replica -cation of the distant legislature with their own candidates. And what they would do is Have those young people be aware of what's happening in the older legislative body? and. They would invite those. Candidates I mean and as well as those exist in You know representatives to a Muslim meeting in call it a party. Okay Youth Party. But they also can give prizes and give gifts to those who turn eighteen 'cause every month. You have a whole. Group of young folks China and eighteen. So they can actually vote now. Turned eighteen, but in the meantime they'd be getting informed about the issues and adding their voice to the conference. Reverend Lafayette. That that's. What's going on? Yeah, well, Britney in Giral I think you've got some marching orders there. That's Bernard Lafayette Junior. Longtime civil rights leader Activists Britney Pack Knit Cunningham. She's the founder of love and power, and also with this today giral Jordan senior political science major at Morehouse College. He's a former white. House ambassador for ABC News thanks to you all for joining us today this last message from a listener who? Who Says Education is the key to positive social change, and even as a white woman with no children, I can and must be a part of any change. I WANNA see in the world I. I must educate myself that I must be got to family and friends. Parents to kids are teachers, and most importantly to our leaders, and just like Louis I will keep speaking out until my very last breath. That's all for the today. Remember we're on instagram. Follow us at the one a show. This conversation was produced by Michelle. Harbin and edited by Matthew Simonsen to learn more about them and the rest of the team visit the one eight dot org. This program comes to you from W.. A. M. U. Part of American University in Washington distributed by NPR I'm Jen White. Thanks so much for listening. Let's talk again tomorrow. This is one eight.

Congressman John Lewis Reverend Lafayette Reverend C T Vivian Britney Pack Jen White US Bernard Lafayette Junior Vivian bled founder Reverend C. T Vivian Bernard NPR Nashville America Congressman Lewis Edmund Pettus Bridge Brittany Pack Cunningham Martin Luther King
Remembering Rep. John Lewis, Civil Rights Leader And 'The Conscience Of Congress'

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:34 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Rep. John Lewis, Civil Rights Leader And 'The Conscience Of Congress'

"From NPR WBZ BOSTON. Marty. This is on point. We, are tired of being policemen. We're kind of people. Love them in jail all in all in your hobby. How can we meet? We won't our freedom. A twenty-three-year-old John Lewis speaking at the march on Washington in nineteen, sixty three. Congressman Lewis died on Friday. He was eighty years old and throughout his life he never stopped making good trouble necessary trouble as he called it expanding his push for justice and civil rights to the fight for gay marriage to the need once again to protect voting rights to calling for an end to gun violence as he did here in two thousand sixteen. We were elected to lead. Speaker. We must be had likes. Likes! We cannot continue to stick our heads in the sand and the reality of mass gun violence in our nation. Headlights shining forever forward toward the expansion of the American ideal until quote, true freedom comes Lewis said until the revolution of Seventeen, seventy six is complete. Will this hour on point Bernard Lafayette, the Reverend Jesse Jackson Senior Representative James Clyburn join us to remember the life and legacy of John Lewis. We will start today with Aaron Hanes though she is editor at large for the Nineteenth, a nonprofit news organization reporting on Gender Politics and policy, and she joins us from Philadelphia and welcome back to the show. Magnette thank you so much. It's good to be with you although for. A very sad occasion. Of course. have been thinking about this all weekend. There is a page turning in American history. We had a death of Congressman Lewis. Just just your thoughts on what's the nation has now lost since his passing. Absolutely well I would say with the passing of John Lewis, and also I should say the Reverend C T Vivian. who was another civil rights leader? Both a them died in Atlanta. Just hours apart and. These these types of men and women, this generation you know what they survived, and and what they sacrificed in in trying to really make this country live up to its founding ideals right until the revolution of seventy, seventeen, seventy six is complete as congressman Lewis said. With with their passing. For so many years, just just their physical presence. In many ways was a guardrail for this country, a reminder not only of. An era that did I. I would say most of the country does not want to go back to but but of the progress That was hard, fought and won. and so you know without those people here I think that there is a real fear and concern especially as we've seen kind of the retrenchment of racism in our current. Political and social climate. Even as we see people pushing back against that and tried to reject in this national reckoning on race that we see in a lot of that is in the spirit of folks like Congressman Lewis and Reverend me. Right you know so. There are just a sort of. Coincidences in history. Maybe not incidences facts in history that give give me goosebumps sometimes right because. You remind rightly that Reverend CT Vivian and Congressman Lewis died within hours of each other. It just suddenly popped into my mind that you know talking about the unfinished worker or the real realizing the founding principles of this country like Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died within hours of each other to answer. I think I would put both Reverend Vivian I would definitely without a doubt, but both Reverend Vivian and Congressman Lewis and Lewis in the same firmament as founders of champions of what we what should be the American ideal. That's absolutely right I. mean those men and Women you know the folks who were on the front lines, but also you know the foot soldiers whose names and faces we don't always know are among our country's founding founding mothers and fathers, because they really did help to make our democracy real for so many who had been so long excluded. I mean I think about I think. Think about that generation you know especially the women of that generation to who had to fight twice as hard to get the vote that we celebrate obviously with this intention of the Nineteenth Amendment for which mine newsroom is named, but but really much like the greatest generation, which we honor a lot for defending freedom during World War Two these black Americans are really. Survive battle at, and they helped strengthen our union. Well Erin. If you can just stand by for a moment I'd like to now turn to South Carolina Excuse me, South Carolina, Congressman! James Clyburn he joins us from Washington Congressman, Clyburn. Thank you very much. John Lewis was your was your friend for many decades both in? Activism for for Civil Rights and in service in the Congress. Can you tell us what you you miss most? You will miss most about him. We'll thank you so much for that. John and I were friends for six decades. Reserved here in the Congress, together for almost three of those decades. We've met back in October. Nineteen Sixty Day. It was during the time, but there is some disenchantment. Inside the movement quite frankly the night. Figures was Tober fourteenth of fifteen. Is when we set up with Dr Chain from around ten o'clock in the evening to almost four o'clock the next morning. And we were debating. What the best tactics were! became out of that meeting and convinced. The Monitor Luther King Junior's tactic of nonviolence was the best for us. That is a weekend that we organize the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee. By, its name People knew that we were buying in. Two kings philosophy now for many of us. We adopted non violence as a tactic, not John Lewis. John Lewis internalized nonviolence. It became his way of life. And he continued. Right up to the end. Background non-involvement the snake is we called it. was taken away from us. It was taken away over. Tactics stokely Carmichael and others felt. That, they needed to be more activism more direct action but they took it to a level. The John was not comfortable with. The headlines. Coming, out, of that, effort. burn, Baby Burn. John was very concerned about that several months ago and he and I talked about it. The fact that we lost our. Back in nineteen sixty s overhead lines and we did not want to see the black lives matter movement. Lose momentum. And lose its effectiveness overhead lines, so both of US spoke out against defunding police. We thought that was sloganeering. That could be helpful. And so John and I spoke Saturday before last now this Saturday for passed away. We express love for each other but I knew that that was the last time that we will get to talk. Congressman Clyburn. To have been a fly on the wall on that night, you and Mr Lewis Dr King Sat together I can only imagine. How transformative a moment in history that was! Can you tell us a little bit more about the? So so so the fight is never ends the United States has made progress, but not enough. Can you tell us a little bit more? About how Congressman Lewis? saw this moment where we see once again. Marching feet marching in the streets of the United States for the continuation of the work of civil rights. You know. The sound too strange, but. John what out to black lives? Matter Platter Plaza with the of Washington. He asked that occurred early in the morning. and. They stood in that plaza together. On the night the morning after he passed away. I woke up. And our look out of my window I. saw the sun coming up. And I've thought about on and that plaza. And I went outside. And set up my tripod. And did some. I've never done before individually. Film. Or video to. My tribute to him. because I knew. That the best thing that we could do for jar. would be to restore. The Voting Rights Act of Nineteen, Sixty five that act came about. Signed into law August six, nineteen, sixty five. After Bloody Sunday in February of nineteen, sixty five eat blood. A Sunday on the mccullers bridge gave life gave life to the Voting Rights Act. I believe that after the supreme, court has now gutted that by. Getting rid of the formula insects and four. really rendered that act useless so what we need to do now. is on John Lewis. By following the Road Map that Justice Roberts gave us telling us what we needed to do in order to make a constitutional again. Mustaches now working. With other staffs here on the hill, staffers speaker Pelosi. Leader haulier. Chairman. Bennie Thompson and Marcia Fudge. We're trying to put on the floor this week. The John R Lewis voting. Rights Act of twenty two. Because John worked hard. For the seven years since that decision by the Supreme Court in the show bay the holder. Trying to restore that act. Less restart in John's name. And that's send it off to the Senate and we ought to pass it. And the President or the sided? Well. South Carolina. Congressman James Clyburn also. House, Democratic whip and long time friend of Congressman John Lewis. Congressman Clyburn thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks very much. Aaron hanes standby for just a moment. I also want to note that the house did pass another voting rights restoration act. That is still sitting on Senator Mitch McConnell's desk. We'll be back. This is on point. This is on point magnetic regarding remembering. John Lewis Today. The civil rights icon Georgia Congressman died on Friday he was eighty years old back in two thousand, seventeen Lewis recorded a letter to his younger self. He did that for CBS this morning here. He is reading a part of that. John Lewis. You're so full of passion. Your lifetime you will be arrested forty. TIMES, Your mission to help redeem the soul of American. Will Aaron Hanes joins US today. She's editor at large for the Nineteenth, a nonprofit news organization that reports on gender politics and policy an errand before the break. You listened with us to Congressman James. Clyburn talking about the house. Putting forward another voting rights, act. Which is? A terrific idea and would there could be no better way to. To honor John Lewis his legacy, but as I quickly noted at the end of that segment they had already done, so they passed one in December of two, thousand, nine, thousand, nine hundred, and it has gone nowhere in the Senate. Senator, Mitch McConnell won't put it. Put it down. Put It on the floor for a vote, so there is already the opportunity here to. To honor John Lewis and yet, for some reason, it's just not happening in Congress. Right, but you know I really do believe that with the passing of Congressman Lewis especially for so many of his colleagues in Congress. was voting rights being kind of the? Signature issue that he was most identified with. That issue is going to take on new an even stronger meaning. For, folks, who are trying to make that legislation real. and. I think that that is a way that they see i. mean you see within? seventy two hours of John Lewis, passing that that this strategy is already in motion as a way that they feel I would be the most appropriate way to honor congressman, Lewis Legacy. And I think voting rights and the issue of voter suppression was something that was already on the ballot for a lot of voters, particularly black voters right but but but I think that. The the Congress passing is really. Something that could go a long way to galvanising not only black voters, but I also think black lawmakers, and and really any what was concerned with the issue of voting rights and ballot access which used to be a bipartisan issue, but but has become. Pretty polarizing politicized. In recent years, and so really to make it. About John. Lewis, somebody who? Was Beloved on both sides of the aisle by so many I. Think Really refrains and potentially resets this conversation for some folks in the interesting to see. If if If Congress is able to to make. Some headway on this legislation in a way that they were not when the congressman was still with us. Right know but although. If just to sort of lay bare some of My personal cynicism here. It, what does it say about America that it takes? John, Lewis and other. Activists in nineteen, sixty five having their heads crack bashed in by police while trying to cross the Pettus Bridge to to galvanize. The signing of the First Voting Rights Act in nineteen, sixty, five and then. Decades later it takes. The same man's passing to possibly re galvanized the movement to restore that very act right. Sure and also go ahead. And also congressman Claburn grant who was on the front lines, if they as a young man in South Carolina fighting for voting rights, fighting for civil rights is now still on the frontlines, and he is almost eighty years old. Right still pushing for a lot of the same things that he was fighting for as as a young man, but I think you know I think what we know how America is that that racial progress and backlash have always been the pushing pull of this democracy and that you know people of of Congressman Clyburn Congressman Lewis Generation were declaring in their time. That black lives matter and they were fighting to make the country recognized this as a statement of fact an. As I believe you were saying earlier. This is at my something does have to be defended over and over again? In this democracy in these. It's you know things like voting rights are. You know they are fragile and You know folks who are committed. To. Making the country live up to its founding. Ideals must be vigilant about that in in every generation. Well Aaron Hang on here for just a moment because I'd like to now turn to the Reverend Jesse Jackson senior. He's founder of the Rainbow Coalition former presidential candidate, and of course. Longtime civil rights activist and icon as well. He worked alongside Congressman Lewis for decades and was also as people should remember. He was with Dr. Martin Luther King Junior at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. On the day Dr. King was assassinated. So Reverend Jackson Welcome to the program. Your Wars Magda. So Reverend Jackson first of all tell us what is it that you will miss most? In your friend John Lewis. Signal, book was sitting there and leaders. that. The six years I've missed the call him on the phone. Call from him. I think one of the mistakes been million and that was happening John. Join the movement. After fifty eight years of legal. Pot. Separate but equal decision. Services they've been moshing led the drive. Cosmic a modern to make pot illegal. Magnificent to fool. Most hookup may sending. All sixty five. put it this way. I pause London And she said well. We're testing for the ballot. And southbound I in the back of the bus but I imagine I couldn't go back. To the most period there. And so Jones joined up the King Rosa Parks. Protection the law because eight years to get from. Combination of the back of the bus. John John. Breath conclusion. Thing? Is that that if I go back was democracy was born in something Alabama. Not. At the same ideals. On! My Mellow. That was no that. Exploit back in that quite willing to vote. black. And so. That Osama blast of over the personnel department as Women is. Aging. A Sandwich board campuses. Bilingual. The moccasins Alabama. Not. Rink. So Reverend Jackson. Your phone lines are a little shaky here so I just want to recap a tiny bit. If people couldn't hear all of it, you talked about. Talked about plus. Versus Ferguson. Essentially gave us a history of of. The work and fight to expand that American ideal that you were talking about does. The frame may seventeen fifty four. August six, nine, thousand, six, hundred, the frame John John John. wrote. The book and for? The. Join the movement live. With Marsha the legal foundation. The huge decision to make A. Legal imperative for. The state's rights barbarism abounded. and. Protection from denying the right to vote. The back of the bus. And in Washington. and John Lewis for from shows in Florida Maryland. Between us a Singapore toilet. Browser bad not printing the WanNa marry Roach basic. We couldn't. We couldn't use holiday and how? Does. That will start looking. Trump was followed by a sort of had mature. Meaning those which? Controls struggle that has. Lasted that yeah. Yeah. Well I mean to your point. Mr Lewis was what's like you said he was seventeen when he first wrote to Dr King. Because, he wanted to go to. What's now called Troy Troy University so I take your your point very very well reverend, Jackson. But what would you describe? Then? How? How do you view then how we should see as Congressman Lewis as role in that? The bigger historical movement that you're talking about your, join this filthy. And I can to sit insert place in Greensboro North Carolina. There were first. So informed Snick is sorta version in in the spring of that year. I was GONNA. Fall a bit yet nineteen sixty. And connected to the Ransall they were not for the. Duration of the end of the joined the movement that was already in progress. Lie Mental and Tumble George A. Join the movement. To? Lose you. moshing around the country. And so John Courage and his. Willingness to suffer. Class. I said I was joking about sending team since I must say. But, John About turn the back last. She's. The most the most. Longest. A long distance runner. What you do, you have a favorite memory of congress of Congressman, Lewis that you think sort of really demise, the kind of man he was. A. Sit around talking to. That same day, she you. From Tacoma CJ Senate in Nineteen Point, seven and McCall on. Eight years before Montgomery. fourteen years for citizens. We. Send talking with guys. We've been in that of long time. That's I. Remember sitting around talking about. This are we things in the bungalow? Would we we would. That's I urge those. Be. At the end and going struggle. Soon right now. We've got the right book sixty five. Then thirteen the Robin would happen. Took it stain. and. Philip Protection. We it must be. It must like for the cost of the right to vote. Rather movement. Costas right to vote. You. End Up. Printing time. Causes A. Separate. Elections will not. Elected grab fifty elections. That's apparatus. One for Washington one so. You Know Mississippi wasn't. SEATTLE. One for Miami. National next year. would. Turn the right. I hope that today. WAS NOT. Just don't believe voting power costs the least Petrola. Under, central this. Positive determine baby for each. Term Very of politicians. So politics the. PATROLMAN! Example and in Minnesota Joyce lawless kill. I remember governor. Prosecute from the county. She Easy Gimme. He do nothing. About the guy who kills US law. Will we way? We get Keith Ellison. Said Attorney General who? AMATEUR DO I say Yo turns out. He arrested the four jobs. For Osama. Bin. Ever, for killing a black in Minnesota. Politics Police. When the young man was killed in In and then loud Georgia. Allow elect elect Paul how the Charles America. So John John, Thaw said. You're still don't police to me like after their miss. The politics of the bone marrow to sing those legend. were. Interesting so just just underscore it, you said you said as defunding. The police's like the EPA terms, but politics is the mayor right of how you make change in in the United States I've just got a minute or two left with you, Reverend Jackson. I just want US see more question. On Saturday you put out a statement about congressman. Lewis you said he is what patriotism and courage look like. Can you just tell us a little bit more about the character of this man that you knew so well? Willing to Grad the freedom the buses. All all the bus I was local. All the. The. Helen Brown buses and Trevor Bus. And you just sit in the colored section. The freedom rides. About the way. Was a dangerous mission. They said the bustle. Alabama. John was on the percents so in Rock Hill South Carolina. Alabama. Real risks or Came to allow to? Hang! For taking it for the south. Danger junk took the danger and. He Music Brennan Bus. Will bring them bridge. I Want Watson. Journalist said we. Forty Dad. Member Joyce he had more black cabinet does. Something up. So we talk. Turn the. Dogs loose on all the marches. Just as he's played this same CAC. If I, if I had not let the truth is. The mob! Mob has been worse. Never heard. They have to disperse the mob. Marches. Kinda back in federal, thinking to deal with. So that that. We didn't anticipate the confrontation. In. Georgia session now the charger. And is this? Being heard. FOOD LOSSES IT'S BEEN BEING looked. The or assemble. John Lewis and. Miss Miss A megaport. They'll leave her out important season. In, Dallas, how the bose the? Chan bind up the king to. Indy some of that year. At the guess of Della, channels. I'M! Since birth best pieces here. On the show awesome the workhorse. John was on. On jeopardy. Champion, win. They'd rather people show this. Heroes where people? Who John Show on the bus. Routes show and the voter I say. It gets. Don't give him Louise. Ago. And John at that time to be there for the rights. Along with end. To The the. Leave to get stop giving. Well Jesse Jackson. Reverend Jesse Jackson senior I. Thank you so very much for joining us today to help remember congressman. John Lewis Thank you. And Aaron. Aaron hanes stand by for just a moment. We'll have more when we come back. This is on point. This is on point. I'm Marco Bharti. We're talking about the life of Congressman. John Lewis. He died on Friday at the age of eighty, and just before the break. We were speaking with the Reverend Jesse Jackson senior. Now it's live radio, so I just want to acknowledge that. His phone line was pretty rough and it might have been difficult to understand what he was saying. I kept going with that conversation. Because it's just too important right now, so my staff doesn't even know I'm about to do this but I'm about to ask them what we'll do the very best that we can go back and listen to that conversation with the Reverend Jackson and get a transcription of it up on our website. As soon as we can, because he actually had a lot of very important things to say in memory of Congressman Lewis, which are worth at least us being able to to read hopefully. By by this evening, so sorry staff, but that's what you have to do. In moments of history and I appreciate the work that we're going to do to scramble to make that happen now. Listen one thing that we definitely were able to here. Is that the Reverend Jesse Jackson and Aaron Hanes also joins us this hour both mentioned that also on Friday. The Reverend C T. Vivian died. He was a trusted adviser to Dr Martin Luther King Junior. A famed civil rights leader himself the reverend. Vivian was so here. He is in the early nineteen sixties, confronting a Dallas. County sheriff, who was preventing black people from registering to vote. But believe me those that followed hip. No like you blindly follow this Sheriff Clarke. Who didn't their day would come? But they also were polled into courtrooms, and they are so given their death sentences you not this bad racist, but you are racist. The same way that Hitler was a racist and your blindly following a man. That's leading you down the road. That's going to bring you in the Federal Court. I am representing people in Dallas County and I have that right to do so now, and there's I represent them, and they can speak for themselves one to. Two thinking and what you believe. This is not a local problem. This is a national problem. You thank you for anyone in the United States. Without hurting the rights of other citizens democracies built on this. Why every man has the right to both regardless? That's the Reverend Vivian in the early nineteen sixties. He also died on Friday the same day. As congressman John Lewis now, Aaron you wrote. A piece for the Washington Post this weekend about Reverend Vivian there might be some listeners out there who are less familiar with him than Congressman Lewis. Can you just tell us a little bit more about Reverend Vivian? Absolutely and thank you for bringing that up because of Tindale Vivian and congressman, Lewis, their destinies weren't intertwined all the way up until their deaths C T Vivian was part of the Nashville student movement. Sit Ins just like Congressman Lewis. That clip that you just played. With, SETV, and confronting sheriff carpet was a month before bloody Sunday C T Vivian also fought for voting rights and staredown, white supremacy and violence. He was punched in the face. By Sheriff, Clarke for daring to challenge You know the the What was happening down in Selma and demanding that black voters be be registered to vote. C T Vivian was also awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom Barak Obama. Because of his his lifelong commitment to civil and human rights and You know it's important. Not to lift him up, even as we are lifting up congressman Lewis because we really Kenna on our congressman without honoring C, t Vivian and I think that it is. It is fitting that that they passed on the same day in the same city because see Vivian has a. that that really was just as large, but but you know if I can just take a second to to to add listening to Reverend Jackson. you know I started my career interview and a lot of these people Reverend Vivian. Ambassador Young Congressman, Lewis Reverend, Jackson and and others and and you know I was interviewing them about the legacy of of the work that they did right. And and I now find myself covering the threat. To that progress that did they fought for? And these are men and women who at their age now have lived long enough to see both the gains and the losses of their efforts and and yet. These these really are heroes. These people who were always willing to fight until they took their last breath for what they believed in right. I mean for Dr King, obviously, that was age thirty nine, but you still i. mean you just heard Reverend Jackson's key Congressman Lewis Ambassador Young? We're committed to push for voting rights. Even this fall right right? They're still on the front lines, congressman. Claburn is nearly eighty years old still on the frontlines that that just is really. Really so remarkable? Well if you can just hang on for another few minutes, Erin I now want to turn to Bernard, Lafayette Civil Rights Activists. And was obviously a student activist in many campaigns in the nineteen sixties staff member at the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Program Director Martin Luther King Junior. Southern Christian leadership conference. He was a dormitory meet with with John, Lewis, and also author of several books, including in peace and freedom. My journey in Selma. Bernard Lafayette Welcome to the program. I'd you. Of all Mr Lafayette I just wonder if you could just tell a quick story about. When you first met John Lewis I believe it was at at college in in in Nashville in shared that room with him. What kind of things did you talk about? What was that that like sharing that space with him? Well, one of the things that we always talked about was the ratio situation. And the segregation. And the the impact on the minds of the people. because what we many times think about. As what happens to black people because of the same recreation and discrimination. But we don't think about what happens to the white. People? Particularly, the young people coming up. And I think that that was one of the most important things that happened. Is we. Recognize that. We needed to have white young people involved. In the in the in the movement and we made sure that happened that made special efforts. Well I think I believe i. read that that that you had you had previously said that it was. It was John Lewis who got you to come to the seminars on nonviolent protests. That Reverend Lawson was having at the time. Is that right? Bernard Lafayette he's still there. We're going to try and get him back on the line here. Aaron Hanes react to to what? Mr Lafayette just said there about the belief early on in the importance of sort of. Showing White Americans the effect that segregation was having on them absolutely and also the importance of that multiracial coalition which I think you're seeing today. In this national moment of reckoning and many of the folks that are on the frontlines, today took the lessons of folks. Young folks like Bernard Lafayette like. Congressman Lewis like C T Vivian. You know these these. The the the these these folks started Diane Nash Right that these folks started so young they left a blueprint behind for for the young people that we see confronting racism today, and you think about the the white folks who joined with so many of them are for freedom summer right. Down into into the deep South and try to to confront systemic racism together. Know. It does take. White Americans of conscience. To also be part of this movement, and really you know that. Helps to turn the tide and tip. The scale really did to get. The kind of racial progress that black folks have been raised have been raising the alarm about systemic racism for. You. For the entirety of the time that we have been in this country, right but it, but it really takes. A multi-racial coalition to get on board to really confront the. That statistic racism in the big struck throw away that must be confronted for things to be different. For. Those communities right. Well absolutely, and hopefully think we have Mister Lafayette back on the line. Can you hear me? Okay. Apologize Nickel difficult. Yes, I can. I apologize for the technical difficulties. We've been having today Mr Lafayette, but I wonder if I could ask you a question about the day or the moment in the civil rights movement in the sixties. That Congressman Lewis himself said that he thought it was. His most important moment then that's of course the march from Selma to Montgomery. For Voting? Rights and That day when he was on the Edmund Pettus bridge with other activists, and they were literally beaten back by police I. Wonder if you could just tell us about your experience of that day. I was very much involved in the Selma March okay yes, or by this time I was in Chicago. Okay, but I've started much earlier in in in Selma Alabama. But. What is very little known fact? Is that when you see. One of the photos. Of the group going into Montgomery Alabama. You see a black fellow. With the Tam on backwards. And he's holding the American flag. And Martin Luther King and Mrs King and Abernathy. Behind him? You'll see those pitcher in the museum. That picture of the museum in the museum doesn't say his name, but that foul name is Lamar McCoy. McCoy. Was Ahead of the vice lords gang in the west side of Chicago. I trained those gang members in Chicago. To be marshals on the Selma much. This was all very quiet because I wanted the gang members in Chicago to have a nonviolent experience and I wanted him have very specific low, so we started the movement in Chicago. They would have a role to play and they will marshalls. And, so therefore they will not go out and do gang stuff. So this was like boot camp. For the Chicago Gang. And also tell me more in the in the last minute that we have. If you could. What was it about John Lewis in his heart, and his soul, and his character that allowed him to work so tires tirelessly for so many decades until the end of his life. To continue to try to realize. Realize. The dream. John Lewis was committed as a child. When he experienced. Segregation in rural Alabama. And he realized that. That's the kind of life that you would have to live. And he rejected that, and that's why he took to Martin Luther team. Because of the Martin Luther King's movement there in Montgomery, Alabama, which is very not too far from Troy, because listen to Martin Luther King on the radio. So, we heritage his speeches and that kind of thing and he was a minister. In John Lewis was interested in the ministry, so he began to look at what kind of ministry he was going to have in his life. That's why John Didn't get involved in pastoring churches and not like that because you've found that. This was the most important thing that he could contribute I. was his roommate have the American Baptist College? And he's the one that persuaded me to go to nonviolent classes. The Jim Lawson was taken the workshop. And so Wanted to make a difference in these things and he saw a to do it, and that was through the nonviolent approach. And Confrontation. So I was with him in Nashville and I was with him. You know and many movements along the way the freedom rides. And I'd be segregated the buses before nine, hundred, sixty, one and the freedom riders. In. Well. You know what I hear that phone line getting shaky against some afraid I'm just going to have to to wrap up with that Bernard Lafayette Civil Rights leader who was John Lewis's called roommate in the nineteen sixties as you just heard desegregated, the Greyhound lines in Nashville, author of many books on civil rights, including in peace and freedom, my journey in Selma Mr Lafayette. Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you? and. Aaron Hanes editor at large for the nineteenth. Thank you so much for joining us today to remember Congressman Lewis. Thank. You Magnum. And folks, we want to wrap up this hour by hearing the congressman himself again, and we want to turn back to the final words from Lewis's speech at the march on Washington in nineteen, sixty three remember. He was twenty three years three years old. Then it put him on the national stage a place he never left, and at the heart of the question of what kind of nation this country truly wishes. To be. Let's listen I'm chalker body. This is on point. Spirit of law wouldn't. That we have today. Our demand, our determination and our numbers. We just spent a gated. Pieces. Of and democracy we must wake up. Wake Up. We cannot stop. We will not allow invasion.

Congressman John Lewis John R Lewis John John Congressman Reverend Jackson James Clyburn Congressman Clyburn Congressma Martin Luther King Aaron Hanes Reverend C T. Vivian congressman Claburn South Carolina Selma Alabama Congress United States Alabama congressman Lewis
The Tension Between the CDC and White House Reveals Further Fractures 2020-07-20

The Takeaway

44:39 min | 1 year ago

The Tension Between the CDC and White House Reveals Further Fractures 2020-07-20

"It's the takeaway I'm Tansy Nevada and welcome. Monday. We've got a lot to get to today. including the loss of two giants in the fight for civil rights, John, Lewis and C T Vivian. We're GONNA. Talk about their legacies later in the show, but we have an eye on Portland as well now more than fifty nights of protests at new reports of unidentified federal troops making arrest all that is coming up, but we start with the fight against covid nineteen. According to the Johns Hopkins Corona Virus Resource Center. There are now more than three point seven million cases of covid nineteen in the United States, and so far more than one hundred forty thousand people have died since the beginning of the pandemic federal agencies have been split on how to stop the spread of the virus and last week. That division reached a fever pitch. The trump administration ordered hospitals to begin reporting covid nineteen data directly to the Department of Health and human services, bypassing the Centers for Disease Control. Although the CDC has continued to publish recommendations to stop the spread of the virus. The trump administration has implicitly an explicitly defied the CDC's recommendations. For example it wasn't until last week at the president was first seen wearing a mask in public, which has been proven to help mitigate the spread of the virus divisions between the White House, and the CDC it how they've shaped. The direction of the pandemic is where we start today. For more I'm joined by Dan Diamond Political reporter tracking healthcare under the trump administration Dan. Great to have you back on the show ten Tina, how are you? I'm well. Thanks and also on the line. We have Dr Howard Co. former Assistant Secretary for health in the Obama Administration and a professor at the Harvard. T H. Chan School of Public Health Dr Co thanks for joining us like so much. Dan The White House says it wants to streamline data-gathering. Tell us why they say they want direct access to this data from hospitals bypassing the CDC. Is it about streamlining? I think that is a legitimate explanation. Tansy and more than three months ago, the trump administration gave hospitals choice of where to submit data about the coronavirus. Chew their state. They could submit a to an outside vendor where they could submit it to the CDC's own long-running network of healthcare information, but inside the administration that Patchwork Response Different submission processes in lead to data gaps it lead to some confusion, and frankly some hospitals found that confusing to and asked for more simplified process. The trump administration behind the scenes has been going back and forth with the CDC over what it's data system could collect CDC. CDC was given a new mandate to provide more data senior officials. There said they couldn't do it. On the time line that the trump administration wanted so that ten days ago, the administration said they were going to simplify the process. Hospitals did not need to report data adjusted the CDC or report today to the CDC at all, but needed to keep reporting data to these other vendors, and that announcement has sparked a wave of concern that the trump administration by going around the CDC, public health experts wouldn't have access to the data worse that the White House would find ways to modify it. Dr Co you have been directly involved with these organizations. Can you give us a sense for how your assessment of the trump administration's decision to essentially bypass the CDC, and historically whether or not? That's how data has flown flowed. I should say from hospitals. Well the CDC is the premier public health agency in the country and one of the premier public health agencies in the world. And at a time of public health crisis, we always rely on the CDC for data collection. Analysis Guidance and coordination of a response. As you have already noted through this pandemic, which is at six months and counting, there have been a number of instances where the CDC has been sidelined or even frankly bypassed so. A ton of pandemic. It's critically important. Try to update data collection. Streamline it as Dan has described. That's a legitimate. Issue but to do it so abruptly, and in such a surprising fashion has raised so many questions about access availability transparency, accountability this unfortunately yet, another example where there's so much confusion about what a national response can and should be a. we really need in this time of crisis with the pandemic spinning out of control to. Unify our efforts as a nation going forward, and that means putting the CDC front and center. The apparently that doesn't seem to be happening here. Dan I'm wondering if you can give us a sense about this. These fishers in this tension between the CDC and the Agency for Health and Human Services and the White House. When did we start to begin to see? Tensions was at the very beginning of the pandemic response. It was quite early tens. The trump administration soured on the CDC months ago. For a number of reasons I think I. It's important for listeners to know the CDC is not lead overwhelmingly by political appointees. I'm here in Washington DC. This is where the headquarters of the health department is located CDC is down in Atlanta historically. There have only been a few political appointees who are sent down to administer the Agency of Director obviously and a few other senior folks, but it is dominated by career scientists and those career scientists early in the. The outbreak were issuing warnings that were at times more dire than the warnings at the White House itself wanted to put out enact created some public consternation with messages, not aligned between the CDC and the Health Department Jess that also the president and the White House were concerned that the messages were too dire to severe at a point in the outbreak where the White House did not want that message that the coronavirus could be as deadly as it turned out to be reaching the American public at the same time, the CDC. Mess up early in the response, there was a responsibility by the CDC to get testing out to public health laboratories around the country. Those tests were flawed as we came to learn. And that's one reason why we were caught flat-footed, and did not have visibility into the coronavirus spread across February tomorrow wasn't the only reason, but it was a very big reason and combined with those factors I I think the director of the CDC again a political point, a man named Robert Redfield is widely seen inside the trump administration as a fairly weak leader. Someone who is. is not skilled in the bureaucratic infighting, and especially the vicious in-fighting that marks the trump administration so when leaders are around the table in the White House, arguing for their various portfolios, he is not the most effective leader compared to some of his rivals, representing either parts of the health department like chest, other parts of the administration like the economic branch that has come to define so much of the past few weeks of the white. House, Response Doctor Co I'd love to get your thoughts there on CDC director. Redfield, who has not to Dan's point? Lead visible during the crisis really at all you published an op Ed in CNN on Friday calling for for you WanNa see more daily briefings, and you want to see the public health experts at the forefront, but we do have a coronavirus virus task force Tell us what you think about redfield sort of low profile, and whether the coronavirus task force is actually doing what it's what you're asking to be done here. Well in the early days of the pandemic, we had daily briefings and White House coronavirus task force. Even though those were far from perfect, it was a way for the American public to hear daily from our government leaders about the status of the pandemic. The trends are they evolving science and what we needed to do to protect ourselves going forward as we all know, we have not heard from that task force publicly in briefings in quite a while. And in my view, we need to restart those immediately and show the American people that our nation is tackling this. Pandemic of our lifetime head on, and it needs to feature top. Public Health Officials Dr Chee of course should be front and center. Dr. Redfield is a very respected scientist. He has been low profile, but he needs to be war, front and center right now, and he also represents thousands of CDC professionals who have tackled issues like Ebola Zico and each one and one. When I there in two thousand nine Assistant Secretary I work closely with the CDC on that major challenge. So this is a time where we need. More coordination more leadership from the White House coronavirus task force, and putting the CDC Director and Dr Pfau chief back in the center of Communication Going Forward Dr Co. are you concerned about the fact that this data at least as I understand, it will not be made. Available to the public. All we need that information transparent immediately, and there's again as Dan has pointed out of questions about. Exactly what the motivations were for this change and how it's going to roll out, we need transparency. We need accountability and the data right now are going in the wrong direction. That's disturbing for everybody but the. Way To respond. To. Unveiled this head on and show the American public that we are confronting this issue as a nation and as a public health community right now there is no public attention to this through a daily briefing, and we hear from our health officials and only scattered fashion, and that's not the way to do it. We are seeing a challenge of our lifetime. Our country is in the public health fight of our lifetime, so if the start by looking at the data, and then looking at the information, and then formulating guidance and commuting communicating in reckon people, so we can get this crisis behind us. Dan last week. Former heads of the CDC wrote an OP ED in the Washington Post that criticized the trump administration for quote politicizing science Have we seen the CDC politicized in this way down? I do that. The warning the public hell she not be politicized is very welcome. We've seen the president repeatedly attack Dr Foul She. His allies worked to undermine DR FAO by the CDC to Dr Coz Point has not been as visible in addition to the white. House coronavirus briefing. The CDC's briefings were put on ice for a number of months, so it is a concerning time when it comes to a simplified public health message with the public health experts in the foreground. A I do think it's important to know. Tenzin about the data my sources and my colleagues on the politico story who worked with me last week, we came to believe that a lot. Lot of the outrage over the missing data was while well intended perhaps outpacing the facts on the ground, and that there is a good chance that the data that is now being rerouted will be made available in the coming days, so while the CDC is absolutely an agency that has been under public pressure under private pressure from political appointees. Some of the concerns don't quite map to what we have found in our report, and I think that the tension between the CDC in the rest of the federal government that is telling Fisher. In that. During pandemic, don't want to see these sorts of fights, but at the same time some of the fights as they've spoken to the press are not quite. What's happening behind the scenes? Years suggesting that there's better cooperation between the CDC and the trump administration or We'll definitely not better I mean it is. It's in a bad way and I think Dr. Co would say the during the Obama Administration. The tensions between the different parts of the agencies were not like we see today where there are stories. Nearly every day of officials were fighting over territory or turf, which is bad at any moment, but certainly not something you want during a historic pandemic at the same time. Some of the concerns about what has happened to the CDC. My colleagues I believe are. Somewhat Miss Stated for instance, there were dashboards that the CDC took down last week. There was widespread concern that the trump administration the White House had ordered these dashboards taken down, but my colleagues and I found was the CDC itself that took those dashboards down, and some officials said that was done out of peak and concern that they weren't going to be able to control the data the way that they wanna. Dan Diamond is a reporter with political Dr Howard Co a public health expert at Harvard, university thanks to you both like thanks for having me. In Portland, Oregon, protests against police, brutality and racism have continued for over fifty consecutive days. The trump administration has recently responded by deploying officers, some of whom are unidentifiable and driving unmarked vehicles to arrest those protesters, and that's been happening. Since at least July fourteenth according to local reports so far more than four hundred protesters have been arrested since May. We're joined by Jonathan Levinson reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting based out of Portland Jonathan. Thanks for being with us. Thanks for having me, so I started seeing early reports of these officers I. Don't know how we would characterize them dressed in fatigues. When did you all I hear about what was happening? Because it wasn't until you all confirmed what was happening that I knew that this was this was in fact really happening. Yeah Federal Officers Started making an appearance at the protests I guess you could say July first, and at that point they were coming out and sort of clearing the protesters away from the federal courthouse, and then on July fourth, they made really big show of force and cleared protesters away from the federal courthouse with tear gas and impact munitions, and then kept going into the park across the street in that. That city property and then kept going beyond that and they were joined then by Portland Police emmer clearing for multiple city blocks well past any federal property, and that was sort of their their first big show of force, where it was clear that they were gonna be taking a more proactive role, and then these the use of unmarked vehicles. We saw videos posted on twitter of of them driving around downtown late. Late at night and Mark Minivans, and I started reaching out to people, and you know looking for people who have been arrested and came across Mark Pettibone and his story, you know he was at a protest downtown him and a friend at about two thirty in the morning, walking back to their car, and they bumped into a group on the way back. Their car told them that there had been a minivan driving. Driving around with guys in camouflage, camouflaging it about a half a block later minivan pulls up four or five guys. Jump Out. They grabbed mark. They pull a beanie down over his head, so he can't see and toss him in the van. Hold his arms over his head and driving around for a little bit, and then he ends up getting unloaded inside a building, which later he would learn was the federal courthouse. Jonathan this feels I'M NOT GONNA. Say It's unprecedented because we're now today, we have the the use of video which you know. We hadn't had for much of our history, so, but this just feels bizarre I mean to use a word that we can use on public radio to say the least what is going on in Portland officers. All I mean it. It does feel bizarre I. Think doesn't understatement like you said. I was interviewing the an independent Phoenix reporter here, Tuck Woodstock, getting their sense of of what had been going on, and they said something interesting that actually really resonated, which is when the report of the minivans came out, they weren't super shocked, and that was because over the past fifty plus days, or just in the steady escalation, you know. The Portland police stopped using their name tags on their. Their uniforms and they were using impact missions in tear gas in protesters had been severely injured, and the federal police showed up, and they started doing sort of more of the same, and so when these reports started coming out, it just felt like next sort of incremental steps, and it wasn't until even for me writing this story, and seeing the response that I realized just how terrible it was. Mentioned local police stopped using their their name badges or started covering their names so they were unidentifiable. So this has been a slow escalation. Johnson, who is directing this? Is this coming all the way from the top cop? If you will Attorney General Bill Bar? Is it coming from local police departments? Is this a federal directive? There are worn many chains of command player when it comes to poor them police. It is certainly a local thing. It is the city that is that is in control the name tags of Portland police that is because they were concerned about their officers getting docs federal police. This is this was done. In response to the president signed an executive order on June twenty sixth to protect statues monuments, and to address what he called a criminal violence in response to that Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice sent. Sent federal officers to various cities in the country I think of Seattle. Washington DC Gettysburg National Park in Pennsylvania and Fort Land, and so we are told, is that when federal officers are responsible for federal property and city police are responsible for the city, and that when federal officers when they are clearing city streets that there are two totally separate chain of command that Portland police chief is in charge of police and federal police are in charge of themselves, and so even when they're acting together, it's two separate chains of command. But Jonathan that still doesn't explain this idea of grabbing Americans off of the street, stuffing them into the back of a van, and then throwing them into a federal courthouse without having explained. Why what the charges are? What the grievances are any of that? This just feels. The ACLU has been on the ground. They're this quote flat out on constitutional. Tell me a little bit about the challenges to this behavior that are coming right now. The mayor said if the federal officers can't stay inside their buildings, then they should leave. The governor said that their presence is a provocation Oregon Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden have said that they are going to introduce an amendment to the defense bill this week to prevent what Senator Merkley called a practice, a paramilitary soldiers in American cities something along those lines. The Oregon Attorney General is opening an investigation into the US Marshall who. Shot and severely injured a protester here with an impact munition. colloquially rubber bullets there. Actually there's there's various forms. Some of them are a little plastic munitions, and some of them are larger, really hard foam rounds, and they caused severe damage I mean they can. They've killed? Protesters blinded protesters. I don't want to take anything away from Oregon State officials, but is that enough? I mean I. Think for people on the ground here once you start getting into these political machinations right and you know senators in DC during their thing at the governor. Doing their thing, it does feel like quite an abstraction when every single night you're out there getting teargassed and getting shot at. Is it enough? I know that you know last night. There were still hundreds of people out protesting and again they got teargassed, so nothing's changed so far. Well, but getting teargassed is different than getting picked up off of the street shoved into the back of a van. I mean are we still seeing that type of behavior to what one of the officials called paramilitary behavior? We in doesn't mean it hasn't happened, but we have not seen it happen. Since this story came out at the same time, Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security. Cancun Kelly did say that this is a tactic they use. He didn't disavow it. You didn't say that they're gonNA. Stop doing it. Well, could you now lead to that point also said this is something that they use. Not just an Oregon. Correct again I haven't seen reports of it. Being used cities, but I would imagine if it is that. We would start hearing about it more. Jonathan Levinson is a reporter for Oregon public. Broadcasting based in Portland Jonathan. Thanks for your time. Thank you. The Navajo nation was hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic early on, and had some of the highest rates of infection in the country here with an update on how the Navajo people have been with the pandemic is searchlight New Mexico reporter and member of the Navajo Nation Sunny Clutches Chile Sunny. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. Tell us. How hard hit? The Navajo nation was by the corona virus. It's definitely interrupted. All aspects of our lives I'm sure like many people, but for us You know we're so used to being. Really just left off the grid for the most part, but it was so hard. Hit that now just about everyone knows who we are on the Navajo nation because of the pandemic when we talk about hard hit to we mean in terms of infections in terms of deaths. In terms of what are we seeing so far? Infections deaths the interruption of culture, the effect that it's had on really just every aspect of our lives more than anything probably infrastructure because it's. It's really brought to light the issues that the Navajo people have been dealing with for so long. We are known to be very close. People are people who look after one another, and so our first instinct is to go and check on each other, and that's something that's really hurt us with this pandemic, because it's something that we're wanting to do, but it's also getting us in trouble in terms of infection rate. Are You satisfied with whatever the federal government's? Response has been to the Navajo nation. Have they offered to provide any financial or medical assistance? Well, they've offered, but They've taken a very long time to to kind of get that to us. I mean it took months before we were able to get anything, and even that it was delayed, and so the Navajo nation you know was a recipient of the some federal funding, but there was a lot of issues that came with that and truth. Be told that's what we're known to deal with. When it comes to the relationship with the federal government were typically left behind and I think our Navajo nation president said it best when he said that you know we as the first people. People of this country should not have had to waited so long for assistance, because the government is obligated to essentially help us in these times of need because of treaties that are in existence between our tribe, and with the Federal Government, the act of morning, in funerals have been taken away from people How is the is the playing out in the Navajo nation? Are People able to mourn the dead not in the ways that they would like to. There's a process involved in wishing someone affair will join me into the next world or to the next life and where being cut. Cut Short that if not robbed a bit and it really depends on how people approach their funerals, because, of course, not everyone is the same, but for some of the more traditional people you know they've got the four days of mourning. They have a process in which they sit and visit with the families and talk about the person that they've lost talk about the good memories. They had what they know of them and really just comfort them, and so so we're used to that personal response in terms of losing people and in addition to that Navajo. People they like to come together. It's A. A community effort, and so when someone passes, the community is is known as known through radio services, because that's the best communication out here, and then people from all over the reservation, and maybe even off, who know that person will come back, and we'll give to the family to help with funeral expenses, and so those kinds of things can no longer happen, so a lot of people have resorted to go fund me account. and a lot of people are being left to choose which family members can go to funerals, which here funerals are fairly huge, and so it's it's extended to everyone. Sunny. What are we seeing Navajo nation in terms of the most vulnerable populations I like to think that it's it's anyone I mean. No one is immune to this and for us. It's our elders are elderly folks here who know the culture more who know the language more fluently, those are the people we were losing, but now it's gone to other age. Groups more recently. The conversation has been thirty year olds, a lot of people within that in that demographic or maybe that generation are starting to see that people within their generation are losing their. Their fight to the virus, and so there's this strange discussion about how it's. It's unfortunate that that's happening. And people who are in their thirties are afraid and quite honestly that puts me in that demographic. I'm among those who starting to realize that people within my generation are starting to become susceptible to this, and we've seen some members in the community who have lost their lives, and it's just you know it's just taken us a back and so we're we're. We're just really concerned that it could be anybody at this point. I think that's the acceptance. And Sunny finally, what are the preventative measures that are being put in place right now to prevent the spread? We know that the CDC guidelines include re regular hand, washing and social distancing as well as the use of masks. Can you tell us how the Navajo nation is adapting to or whether they're implementing from what you've seen on the ground, any of those protective measures to help contain the virus. Wait for a vaccine. One of the things that they're doing is. There's the implementation of a fifty seven hour curfew, and so that prevents people from going in and out of the reservation, and so visitors are really left to to their own discretion to go through or visit the reservation, because nothing is open during this curfew, and so that's a way to keep the virus out, but it's also a way to keep the Navajo people home so. So that they practice that social distancing, and that they're not being put in a position where they are susceptible to possibly getting the virus, and then the other thing that they're doing is i. know there are organizations who are putting together a handwashing stations or people are getting creative in terms of getting the Navajo people who do not have running water or indoor plumbing, the tools that they need to be able to wash hands, and so that's. Probably one of the trickier things here because the the the Navajo. Nation can be a very rural area depending on where you go, and so people don't have the basic necessities like electricity and running water, and then lastly. The Navajo nation also has a a week day curfew, and so during the week, everyone is to get home by eight o'clock in the penalties for for breaking. This is really just a fine that they are issued, and so some efforts are definitely being made, but bigger ones for sure will need to happen so that should something like this. Come within our lifetime again. are better prepared sunny clashes. Chill Laghi is reporter for searchlight New Mexico Sunny. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. We should be open up the political process and let all of our citizens come in and participate. People died for the right to vote friends of mine colleagues of mine. Last Friday, the country lost to giants of the Civil Rights Movement representative John Lewis. Who heard there and Reverend C T Vivian? To particularly devastating losses for the country, and particularly for Black Americans, many who have been fighting for racial justice, and whose communities have also been disproportionately affected by Kobe. It almost seems unfair to lose these two giants now. We'll talk about representative Lewis in a few minutes, but we want to start with remembering reverend, C t Vivian, who slightly less in the public eye, he was a Baptist minister, and when if Dr Martin Luther King's closest advisers what we were doing with creating a new south? as part of a whole new concept of our participation in the nation, right and So that when you see people who are thinking liked that. for a lifetime. How important it is is that. You know that it opens doors and that people take you seriously more seriously than they did before Vivian helpfully boycotts marches, and since at lunch counters during the civil rights movement after that he helped found numerous civil rights organizations. Vivian died in his home in Atlanta at the age of ninety five. Joining me now is Greg Carr. Socio, professor, at Howard University and the chair of the Department of Afro. American, Studies Greg thanks for joining us. It's a real pleasure to Xena. Really Admire your work in screw to be in this conversation this more today today. Well let me tell you that at for a hot Monday that put a great smile on my face. We appreciate you joining us. You know when we talk about a lot of the civil rights figures. There's so many that come to mind. We don't often hear about Vivian. Tell us how. He got his start in the civil rights movement. In truly unfortunate, and that's why. I'm particularly glare that you took some time with the takeaway today to talk about both of them in tandem Scored Tindale Vivian. Was Born in Missouri, just outside of Bloomfield Missouri, in nineteen, nine, hundred, eighty, four and six years old, he moved to mccomb Illinois He raised and trained in integrated schools and went to Western Illinois University and he is a figure who is but intellectual, really who became an activist as you say, he was a minister, and in nineteen, fifty seven, he went to the American Baptist the logical seminary in my hometown of Nashville, and that's where he actually talked Martin. The king had met Dr King. He had studied that king a little bit, and then he met Jim Lawson, James Lawson who is still alive. It's very important. Because Lawson is really the the figure administered himself who? Who brought ct Vivian into what became the nonviolent strategies that fit the Nashville Movement We're GONNA. Talk about John Lewis in a minute, but Lewis was a student by then at the same seminary that that Vivian was at, and they engaged together with others in what was what we know as the Nashville student movement about a three month period that really gave birth along with the work that was being done in north. Carolina A and T and Bennett College in North Carolina to what we call the student phase of the modern civil rights movement within a year. C T Vivian was at the Freedom Rides He became a pastor in Chattanooga the year after that and. And by the following year he was Martin Luther King Staff so c. t Vivian is an anchor person for us understand that moment in American in world history. Well, we're his what we're CVS main priorities. Once. He entered the movement. Vivian interestingly enough was brought onto Dr King, staff kind of as a lieutenant for Wyatt Tee Walker who was another one of these great intellectuals out of Virginia New York past for many years Vivian was brought in as eventually the director of affiliates, so he was kind of a tip of the Spear Guy. He was on the steps in Saint. Saint Augustine Florida fact. He was almost killed there. He was in some in nineteen, sixty five. His job was to coordinate the affiliates of the southern. Christian leadership conference to kind of engage in direct action protests. What what Walker by nine hundred sixty three in Birmingham operation seat confrontation, and they narrated their villains very. Very carefully, the Bull Connor's Birmingham the Jim Clark's of Selma. And that's where we see. Vivian Confronting Jim Clark on the courthouse steps in Sylmar of course he very famously get struck by that sheriff, and that kind of galvanizes an electrifies the movement in tandem with John Lewis, who of course was on the bridge at Independence Bridge down the street in Selma, so his his philosophy of nonviolence, his his his intellect, his his moral and courage and conviction kind of congealed in this confrontational style, even in his eloquence in having a confrontation that that makes Vivian part of the tip of the spear of that movement in the nineteen, nineteen, sixty, two to sixty five. Vivian and John Lewis who were going to talk about in the next segment, knew each other and I'm wondering Greg. Can you tell us what their relationship was like? Absolutely I mean it's very interesting. We tend to freeze John Lewis on that bridge and Free C, t Vivian on those steps, but you know they both nine hundred sixty five important year where we see the peasants, the Voting Rights Act after nineteen, sixty five, they become kind of these economic figures in the ongoing struggle for human and civil rights in this country ninety-six also year. Year I was born so in many ways they became kind of north stars for those of us who were born in that generation, and after to look to in terms of how to conduct ourselves in terms of protests and struggle, and how to think about the meaning of being African. American and the evolve in American. Democracy. Vivian of course went on, he moved to. In nineteen sixty six, he started the urban training center. There to work on getting young people events in the lives of young people. He was an architect of upward scale, which know is a very important program But he but in short he lived the rest of his life, eventually relocating to Atlanta Helping Jesse Jackson were for president in one thousand, nine hundred four he lived his rest of his life kind of as a a spokesperson for that thrust of continual protests to reconstruct in some ways the nature of American democracy. That's why he so iconic, and that's why it's so important to talk about him and lift his voice in this moment as will. We've got about a minute left in this segment, but you've met him in person. was there one thing that stood out to you greg? Oh thank you, thank you, it. Lydia Vivian was a world class bibliophile first time I met him in Knoxville. Tennessee we talked about books and the gleam in his eye kind of riding my father, he kind of looked like my father, and we talked about books, and it's very important to stand that he was one of the great minds of his generation, and he believed preserving memory and education, and in some ways that's probably his greatest legacy education. We must always study to improve. Ourselves can improve the society we live in. We're talking about civil rights leaders Reverend C T Vivian and representative John Lewis. Who both passed away on Friday before voter rights. I'm nineteen sixty five. It was almost impossible for many people in the state of Georgia in Alabama in Virginia and Texas. To Register to vote to participate in the democratic process, if Shane for this bill is a slap in the face of the declaration, of independence, It denies gay men and women. The right to liberty and the pursuit of happiness marriage is a basic human right goes well, said, be patient and wait. We must say that we cannot be patient. We do not want our freedom gradually, but we want to be free now. John Lewis was the son of a sharecropper in Alabama who became a hugely important leader in the civil rights movement as a young man. Later went on to become a congressman representing Georgia's Fifth District in the House for more than thirty years Lewis died in his home city of Alabama from pancreatic cancer at the age of eighty. Greg probably one of the I mean just listening to John Lewis's voice there. You know you can't help but feel that that voice and I think one of the most interesting among many of the interesting things about John. Lewis was how his fight for equality he. span so many issues. We heard him at the top talking about LGBTQ marriage rights. Is that something that was unique to John Lewis in his term in the way that he framed equality. Yes I actually think it was not only unique to Congressman Lewis in the public imagination in this country, but it was also representative in fact of a broad swath of African people in this country when it comes to the principal defence of our common humanity John Lewis all of his colleagues study Carl Michael. So many others who might disagreed with him sometimes ideologically with say something that I hear often from the snick veterans, who still with us John had the courage of his convictions. They would say. Congressman Lewis was consistent, if nothing else in his faith and belief in his in his religion, and in the possibilities of the American experiment, so it was course come as no surprise to any of them that he would defend everyone's right not to be in harm's way. And also John, Lewis decided to run for Congress. I mean ultimately trying to some folks would describe it changing making change from within the same federal government that had been oppressing black Americans. Why did he decide to make that move? Well, that's a fascinating question Since Xena I think that is a lesser known set of John. Lewis thinking some of his colleagues would say you know John was a gentleman. He had the courage convictions and John was also possible he could. He had the possibility of being bare knuckled in his political brawls, the congressional elections of Nineteen, eighty six between John Lewis and his friend, his brother, Really Julian Bond. Is One of the most controversial elections in the history of black. American electoral politics John Lewis, it actually approached Julian bond when that district kind of opened up in the wake of the civil other, the voter rights act to run for that position himself in in between that candidacy because. He wouldn't run. Andrew Young ran became the first African. American since reconstruction to be elected Georgia, and then when John Lewis Ran Julian bond actually declared before. So what you saw was really in some ways. The class divide in Black Communities Julian Bond, the majority of black votes in that election John Lewis won the majority of white votes in that district, and was sent to Congress, and and there there were charges that Lewis. Kinda played up his aw. Shucks, plainspoken kind of persona. He caught himself a workhorse to in contrast to Julian Bond. Who We called a horse and so even. Even with all his years in Congress in his courage of conviction stances, what we see at that moment is John. Lewis becomes in many ways more of the public face of the civil rights movement and the so-called conscious of the Congress, then then a Julian bond type C, t Vivian type, which may have been perhaps even frankly more unsettling to the American body politic in terms of representing what that movement enemies and Greg I'm wondering I've been thinking a lot about him. Being called the conscious of Congress, and I'm wondering whether or not that was a burden to representative Lewis. Oh of course of course I mean why would any black person or black people or any non white person in this country have to be called upon to be the conscience of a con a country when we all have a conscience, so when John Lewis, who said he regretted not standing with barb relief, for example in condemning Iraq war in voting against authorization for for Bush to go into the war for John Lewis, who sat on the floor of the United States Congress joined by Nancy Pelosi and some of. Of the youngsters who would come in Alexandria or Qazi Cortez and and Yana Presley and others to say we must pass gun violence legislation. Why would it be on John Lewis? Anyone else breathing to have to set out that marker when there are four hundred plus members of the federal legislature, it's an incredible burden, and it's a testament to John, Lewis the strength that he was able to not only hold onto that burden, but to continue continue to carry that responsibility which I suppose. You know cruise to the benefit of us all. there. Do we know anything about his reaction to two things, the gutting of the voting rights act and the killing of George. Floyd to imagine that John Lewis had spent his entire life fighting for these issues to Leave us at a moment where we are at such we're. There's such an uprising in such a battle for some of the basic protections that black and white Americans a largely black Americans I should say have still not been offered. What do we think we got about? Two minutes left in the segment Greg Do we know what his reaction was to these two issues right now? Oh absolutely tenzin, he, he spoke until the end in terms the voting rights. Of course he suffered there that bridge in nineteen, sixty five is very good friend Jim Clyburn has said that there must be a restoration of the voting rights act, and he is suggested it'd be renamed the John Lewis Voting Rights Act so we know that that he spoke out in favor of restoring the Civil Rights Act, he shed blood, and as far as the young people are concerned. You know John Lewis was twenty one years old when he pulled him out there. Alabama and tried to kill him with the freedom rides. He stood in the black lives. Matter Painting there on Sixteenth Street alongside the mayor of DC instead stand black lives, matter and more importantly, he stood with the organizes. A black lives matter so John Lewis right until the day that he may transition was a very vocal supporter of the youth energy, the intergenerational multi racial contingent that is engaged in this general strike against the American social order John Lewis let us know what he thought. Until the very end, he stood on the side of right in those cases. Greg car wonderful talking to you Greg cars and associate professor at Howard University and the chair of the Department of Afro American Studies thank you so much for coming on the show Greg. It's a pleasure Tanzania and please continue the good work. I'll be listening to the takeaway. Feel like Been Mace! The piece of real estate. That we call earth to do something as passed. Journey! All right everyone. That's another Monday takeaway in the books. We love having you along with us. Glad you chose to spend some time with me today, and of course you can always call us about anything at eight, seven, seven, eight. My take percents sinister tweet at the takeaway. Thanks so much for listening. I'm Tansy Nevada. Takeaway and we'll be back with you tomorrow.

CDC Congressman Lewis John Lewis president Pandemic reporter CDC Greg Dan Diamond Portland Tindale Vivian White House Jonathan Levinson White House Vivian federal government Reverend C T Vivian Atlanta
John Lewis Gave Young Activists Our Marching Orders. Let's Make Him Proud

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05:01 min | 1 year ago

John Lewis Gave Young Activists Our Marching Orders. Let's Make Him Proud

"John Lewis gave the next generation of activists are marching orders. Let's make him proud by Brittany. Pack Nick Cutting. Ham Britney Pack. Nick Cunningham is an activist educator and writer. She is founder of love and power and organization dedicated to moving everything that stands in the way of justice. Our elders become our ancestors to remind us to be free. When Tony Morrison passed, it was this thought that brought me comfort when the reverend, C T Vivian and congressman. John Lewis passed on the same day. It was this thought that fired me up. I am blessed to be one of the thousands of activists who decide daily to get Mr Lewis's favorite form of trouble the good kind we're strong in number, we fight the varied manifestations of oppression everyday across the globe we press for green new deals, and for America to make good on its original ideals. We radically reimagined public safety and public health to prioritize care over punishment and fund wellness instead of violence. Violence we protect the water's at Standing Rock and in Flint we fight detention at rikers, and at the border we take on a Semitism and Islamaphobia. We say black lives matter because we mean it, and we are unashamed to remind you that we mean all black lives the SYS-, entrance ones, the disabled and able ones, the women, the men, the gender, non conforming and everyone who doesn't belong to a binary. No matter the work we do, all of us are clear. We stand on the precipice of transformation now because people like John, Lewis tilled the soil, though this transformation may seem sudden to those who are not ardent students of black history, the seedlings of freedom have been planted over generations, and he is the direct result of persistent freedom, work and hands that never left the plow among. Among the greatest to farm, the lands of Liberation John Lewis sits high in the American Canon of heroes, because his blood and tears watered the ground on which we now stand. There is no greater love this jurisco land down your life for your friends biblically there is no act more moral politically. Some activists may not have agreed with every vote or choice Mr Lewis the congressman made. The, some of his life is greater and grander than most humans could even imagine not a single solitary soul with any semblance of historical or moral understanding could ever deny how indebted our country is for his sacrifice, it is a debt that can never be fully paid, and yet as heroic John Lewis has proportions in life, which have only increased in-depth our family, despite his long inconsequential life appoint of celebration, which inspires deep gratitude. Our Grief is magnified because we lost someone who felt both immortal and intimate someone far and someone close it occurred. Occurred to me on the day of his passing that at least half of my social media, acquaintances had met and taken a photo with John Lewis at a book, signing a congressional event, a march or a meeting, our heroes are rarely this accessible, but John Lewis was perhaps it was his deep rudeness and a Christian faith that champions humility and service of God's will Mr Lewis and I spoke several times many of us. Organizers and activists considered his presence a gift of ship, whether we shared space, one time or a hundred, the particular connective. Connective tissue for me was his faith. He often said that he wants thought he'd be a preacher and would preach to the chickens on farmland in Alabama in his formative years at one time I too thought this would be my path, but in him I saw someone who instead chose the Ministry of Social Change Spreading The Gospel of justice, as an often demoralising feet, and yet his hope remained consistent, and his determination, fierce into his elder years, and once asked him about this, and his response was candid, but clear-eyed. You will have setbacks he. He told me just a month before the two thousand sixteen presidential election. Perhaps this was a warning, but be consistent. You will get there. Any observation of John. Lewis is life from his early years. To as many terms in Congress communicates as simple truth, courage is a discipline in order for courage to change the course of history as Mr Lewis did it cannot be episodic. It must be unwavering. We should count ourselves blessed to have witnessed a case study in the continual practice of the discipline of courage from a master teacher in our lifetimes. Our elders become our ancestors to remind us to be free. So what kind of ancestors will we be daily? The some of our future ancestry is being totaled. Will we choose your words or as his compatriot and fellow hero the Reverend? C T Vivian reminds us. Will it be in the action that we find out who we are? At, bottom those who herald John Lewis's life, but in salt his sacrifice must be compelled to transform their practices political forces like the GOP including its leaders and Lewis's home. State of Georgia must be forced to part with their persistent practices of voter. Suppression Racist Tactics John Lewis was cleared a call out in life. He bled for the franchise. It is impossible to honor him and dishonor the vote. It's pastime we get in trouble. Trouble and get in the way enough to stand between the arm of suppression and Black bodies at the ballot box. What kind of ancestors will we be prayerfully? Ones that ancestors like John? Lewis will welcome through the gates with open arms and beaming smiles of pride. That's precisely how I imagined. Martin Luther King Junior, welcome John Lewis home. Thank you, Mr. Lewis C. You on the other side. We hope to make you proud.

John Lewis Mr. Lewis C. Nick Cunningham congressman Britney Pack Nick Cutting founder Tony Morrison writer Standing Rock Vivian Islamaphobia America Martin Luther Flint Alabama Congress
NPR News: 03-06-2021 8AM ET

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 03-06-2021 8AM ET

"Live from npr news. I'm joyal snyder. President biden signature one point nine trillion dollar covid relief. Bill is now on track for senate passage as soon as today. Npr's amy held reports. It was stalled until democrats passed. A compromise amendments early this morning clearing the way for a final vote debate stretched past midnight before the senate voted on the unemployment insurance amendment. Fifty days or forty nine and the amendment is agreed to unable to lose a single vote. Democrats conceded to senator joe manchin moderate from west virginia who objected to four hundred dollar weekly benefits voting to keep it at the existing three hundred dollars with a tax break and an end date of september. Sixth the white house said in a statement. President biden supports the compromise. The hold up coming on the heels of a republican delay tactic that saw clerks read the six hundred plus page bill in its entirety on the senate floor. Democrats are eager to move on to final passage and biden signature before current benefits expire. Next weekend amy held. Npr news. senate is in the middle of marathon session with democrats turning back. Republican attempts to modify relief package vaccine management software supposed to make covid nineteen vaccine appointments. Easy but the opposite can happen. If that technology does not work for many people bugs and technical issues have been standing between them and their shot angus chen of member station w. b. u. r. reports massachusetts spent over four hundred thousand dollars for a program called prep mod supposed to streamline kobe nineteen appointments but for some. It's just been a headache sean. Mcauliffe is the director of a local board of health and massachusetts. You know. I'm taking a risk running a clinic tomorrow because i don't know if i'm going to be able to use prep line. It's just frustrating. And then suggesting in total twenty seven states have purchased a license to pratt mod. Another handful of a free program provided by the centers for disease control and prevention but officials across the country have reported issues with both pieces of software for npr news. I'm inga's chen to iraq now. Where pope francis has been focusing on interfaith relations on this the second day of his visit to the country and peers al's fordham reports. He's met with the revered with a revered muslim cleric. The pope flew to the holy city at nash. Jeff and was received by the country's top shiite cleric grand ayatollah eleusis donnie for a private audience in the aided clerics modest home it's part of a long effort to foster good interfaith relations francis's traveled to other muslim majority countries and met senior muslim clerics. This is the first time he has had such a meeting with a leader from the shiite branch of islam. Also on the agenda is an interreligious meeting at the ancient site of according to scripture the birthplace of abraham who's revered in islam christianity and judaism with attendees including representatives of iraq's different religions and sects at fordham. Npr news iraq. This is npr. Judge in new york has released three men who have been imprisoned for nearly twenty five years for two killings including that of an off. Duty police officer f- the judge said prosecutors had suppressed information that others may have committed the crimes he's released george bell. Carrie johnson rohamn bolt on their own recognizance while prosecutors reexamined the case this weekend marks of fifty six th anniversary of bloody sunday when peaceful civil rights. Marchers were attacked. Trying to cross the edmund pettus bridge in selma alabama impairs debbie elliott reports. This year symbolic bridge crossing will be largely virtual and without mus leaders for decades congressman. John lewis returned to selma annually to lead marchers over the bridge where he was once beaten by alabama state troopers. Lewis died last year as did other civil rights. Icons the reverend c t. vivian. And joseph lowry all were part of the nineteen sixty five movement to march from selma to montgomery demanding equal voting rights. The violent confrontation struck a national nerve and led to passage of the voting rights. Act since then. Salma has become a rallying cry for social justice around the world virtual events. This year will emphasize theme beyond the bridge. People power political power economic. Power debbie elliott. Npr news costanza. Prime minister has won. A vote of competence. And the nationalist simply imran khan secured more than the required one hundred seventy two votes today after the loss of a key senate seat this week. I'm snyder npr news.

President biden npr news senate joyal snyder senator joe manchin Npr news angus chen amy Npr centers for disease control an pope francis al's fordham massachusetts ayatollah eleusis donnie iraq Mcauliffe west virginia
NPR News: 03-06-2021 6PM ET

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 7 months ago

NPR News: 03-06-2021 6PM ET

"Live from npr news. I'm janine herbst. The senate passed a one point. Nine trillion dollar covid relief bill following a marathon session started. Friday morning lasted through the night ending with a vote this afternoon. Npr's amy held reports the bill next heads to the house where it's expected to move on for president biden signature senators slog through a series of amendments and more than twenty four hours of debate before finally passing the bill along party lines the us fifty the days of forty nine. The bill as amended is the congressional budget office. Says it's the biggest stimulus bill in the nation's history it's near two trillion dollar price tag nearly one tenth of the entire. Us economy republicans object to the scope of the spending after congress already authorized some four trillion dollars in relief. Say it's needed to address the dual economic and health crises one year into the pandemic it contains fourteen hundred dollar stimulus checks billions for cities states and schools and extended unemployment benefits amy health. Npr news the cdc's has more than eighty five million covid. Nineteen vaccines have now. Been administered in the us in many states. The process is supposed to be getting help from software designed to make getting a vaccine appointment easier but as angus chan of member station w. b. u. r. reports. The technology isn't always working massachusetts. Spent over four hundred thousand dollars for a program called prep mod supposed to streamline cove in nineteen vaccine appointments but for some. It's just been a headache sean. Mccullough is the director of local board of health massachusetts. I'm taking a risk running the clinic tomorrow. Because i don't know if i'm going to be able to use promo on. It's just frustrating. And then suggesting in total twenty seven states have purchased a licensed to pratt. Maude another handful of a free program. Provided by the centers for disease control and prevention but officials across the country have reported issues with both pieces of software for npr news. I'm inga's chen. The dalai lama tie bet spiritual leader became the latest global leader to encourage vaccinations after getting his first shot today. As npr's yuki noguchi reports the eighty five year old is in india which has the world's second-highest caseload behind the us. The fourteenth dalai lama left his home and made his first public appearance in over a year. He got his vaccine at a local clinic dharamsala where he lives in exile in a video statement recorded afterward band-aid on his right shoulder is visible. More people should have got. Today is in decision it will serve the greater good. He said and doctors say it's safe. His message comes indian companies. Make a concerted push to manufacture and distribute vaccine. Most of the vaccines are already made their yuki noguchi. Npr news and you're listening to npr news. This weekend marks the fifty sixth anniversary of bloody sunday when peaceful civil rights. Marchers were attacked. Trying to cross the edmund pettus bridge in selma alabama and debbie elliott reports. This year symbolic bridge crossing will be largely virtual and without its famous leaders. For decades congressman. John lewis returned to selma annually to lead marchers over the bridge where he was once beaten by alabama state troopers. L'ouest died last year as did other civil rights. Icons the reverend c t vivian and joseph lowry part of the nineteen sixty five movement to march from selma montgomery demanding equal voting rights. The violent confrontation struck a national nerve and led to passage of the voting rights. Act since then. Selma has become a rallying cry for social justice around the world virtual events. This year will emphasize the theme beyond the bridge. People power political power economic. Power debbie elliott. Npr news in pakistan security forces say they raided militant hideouts in two different operations in former taliban strongholds in north waziristan killing eight islamic militants and three commanders of the taliban the military says those commanders were involved in militant activities against security forces and civilians in recent months militants stepped up their activities in the region raising fears. They were regrouping in the area which was a former taliban stronghold i'm janine herbs and you're listening to npr news.

npr news Npr news janine herbst president biden yuki noguchi angus chan cdc us congressional budget office massachusetts dalai lama Npr debbie elliott amy senate
NPR News: 07-23-2020 5PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 07-23-2020 5PM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Jack. Speer Congressional leaders are set for a showdown over the next corona virus relief package both sides fighting over the tentative one trillion dollar agreement with GOP negotiators reportedly still haggling over new federal unemployment benefit. NPR's Windsor. Johnston is more. House Democrats passed a three trillion dollar measure in May that includes additional aid for state and local governments and another round of direct payments for eligible Americans Senate Minority Leader Chuck. Schumer says the Republican plan falls far short of what Americans need won't provide hazard pay to essential workers who've been risking their lives and their families lives. It won't make the necessary investments in communities of color. You won't provide new funding for state and local governments and the need to keep teachers and bus, drivers and sanitation workers on the job. The Republican plan does include a second round of direct. Direct payments and measures that ties school funding to the reopening of classrooms Windsor Johnston NPR news Washington. President. Donald trump ramps up the rhetoric about sending federal agents to more cities, the US justice. Department's Inspector General's office says it will launch a review of the Conduct of Agent Center Portland Oregon and deployed in Washington. DC The watchdog says it will look at allegations of excessive use of force among agents rounded people up in Portland and used flash grenades and other harsh tactics to disperse demonstrators Washington's Lafayette Square partner the white. House, we will focus on whether agents followed proper guidelines. Floated today's reporting its largest number of deaths in a single day from the corona virus, one, hundred, seventy, three. NPR's Greg Allen reports officials in Florida. Say they see signs of the surgeon. Cases is leveling off though. Florida's reporting more than ten thousand cases of the Corona virus today. Florida's behind only California and New York. In total cases with nearly three hundred and ninety thousand people, infected hospital, statewide or stressed, but doctors and administrators say they have adequate capacity in the city of Miami Mayor Francis Suarez says orders, limiting gatherings and requiring face coverings are working at the peaky says the city was seeing one hundred twenty five new cases a day number that's now declined to twenty, five one six. Rio increase which means that the curve. Is threatened for as much of the spread is now happening among people who live in multigenerational households Greg? Alan NPR news Miami after showing signs of stabilizing the number of people filing first time jobless claims take back up again last week. Rising to one point four million Lei number reminder of the major role, unemployment benefits are playing and keeping the economy afloat as the coronavirus pandemic, the began in March shows little signs of easing estimated thirty, million plus Americans are currently receiving jobless benefits. Stocks closed sharply lower on wall. Street today. The Dow dropped three hundred fifty three points. The Nasdaq was down twitter and forty four points. This is NPR. City officials in Roanoke Virginia. Say a statue of confederate general rule e Lee that was set to be removed from downtown area was toppled this week, officials in Virginia. City noticed the monument on its side. Late Wednesday, while police say it appears the monument was intentionally damaged. They say no recipe invade roanoke city council. This month approved a resolution to remove them on Mitt into process would have taken several months. China is hoping to land a rover on Mars in about seven months. NPR's Emily Chang says. The spacecraft lifted off this morning from an island south of mainland China a week before NASA plans to launch its next Mars mission. China's ten one mission will take seven months to reach its destination. It contains an orbiter to revolve around the Red Planet and Land Rover which are expected to explore the planet from the ground up the mission. Mission was timed to coincide with when the Earth Mars at their closest distance, and more than two years a joint effort with Russia to put a rover on Mars failed in two thousand eleven. The US is now plans to launch its Morris Perseverance rover a week from today July. Thirtieth China has declared its Mars mission at test of the relative strengths of the US and China space programs NASA has landed four rovers on Mars so. Emily Chang NPR news Beijing funeral services were held today for civil rights pioneer the reverend. C T Vivian. Who died last week close ally of the Reverend Dr Martin. Luther King Vivian helped end segregation across the south among those attending the Services Oprah Winfrey and baseball great Hank Aaron being got his start organizing sins against segregation in Peoria Illinois in the nineteen forties. He was ninety five years old I'm Jack, speer NPR news?

NPR China US Florida Roanoke Virginia speer NPR Greg Allen Alan NPR Miami Americans Senate Minority Emily Chang GOP Windsor Johnston Land Rover Donald trump Washington Washington Hank Aaron NASA
The CRUSADE Channel Newscast For March 8th 2021

CRUSADE Channel Previews

07:48 min | 7 months ago

The CRUSADE Channel Newscast For March 8th 2021

"Low crusaders with the growing success of the crusade channel and the many services activities there. Many listeners may have forgotten that our founders still maintains an updates his side at my church dot com from the pile of prep. Mike's daily rundown of stories from the mike church show to cook and with king dude barbecue and original craft cocktail recipes. The king do truly is a renaissance man. Mike site is also home to the ater knights of the rosary. Stop by and say hello today by crusading over to mike church dot com crusade channel news. You can trust because the truth can be trusted from the crusade channel news desk. Here's round stafford and good order crusaders. Welcome to monday. March the eighth twenty twenty one. I'm ron stafford reporting from the crusade channel. News desk at stafford studios in beautiful saint michaels maryland. This report is brought to you by our friends at bogo kia for the best deal in the usa on a new or used key on shop wearing white church shops for all of his cars at bow. Dog drive on over to vote dougy dot com or call them at eight five five bulldog. We'll see you at bodo kia and tell them the crusade channel said you. Here's what to listen for this hour. More are saying that cuomo should resign. Remembrance in the struggle for civil rights and restoring a mission in california. The majority leader andrea stewart. Cousins said. Yesterday the governor andrew cuomo should resign from office after more women came forward and accused him of harassment inappropriate behavior while st assembly speaker. Carl hasty appear to agree with our statement and questioned the governor's ability to lead the state. The democrat governor insisted to reporters on a call that he would not resign from office and said the attacks against him are politically motivated previously stewart. Cousins. the democrat said she would call for cuomo's resignation if a fourth woman accused him of harassment. So far five women have done so in other news. Activists who gathered virtually and in person to commemorate a pivotal day in the civil rights struggle that became known as bloody sunday called on people to continue the fight for voting rights as they also honored giants of the civil rights movement including the late. Us representative john lewis. Who died last year. The some bridge crossing jubilee marks the fifty sixth anniversary of plenty sunday the day on march seven thousand nine sixty five that civil rights marchers were brutally beaten by law. Enforcement officers on selma's edmund. Pettus bridge lewis the reverend joseph lowry. The reverend c t. vivian. And attorney. Bruce bloomington where the late civil rights leaders offered on sunday day became a turning point in the fight for voting rights and footage of the beatings helped galvanize support for passage of the voting rights. Act of nineteen sixty five. Finally a catholic group has received a large grant to restore one of the oldest california missions and provide a place for tourists to examine the state's religious and cultural history and february carbon mission foundation received a one point eight million dollar grant for the doughty museum and basilica forecourt restoration which seeks to rejuvenate the mission. Son carlos mayo descartes meadow located in kabul california about five miles of monterey. The project is scheduled to be completed by the fall in time to commemorate the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of the mission's establishment are quote. Today comes from saint other wishes gonzaga. It is better to be the child of god. Then king of the whole world coming up are saying till the day. This ain't lived through decades of sin and suffering before a profound conversion the led him to embrace poverty eighty and charity. You're listening to crusade channel new. Lots of talk from the biden machine of banning and confiscating our weapons. But there's one weapon that is truly biden and cult of death kryptonite the rosary and for the fine handcrafted rosaries made here in southeast louisiana. Visit our very own. Maggie o'connell's little by you rosary. Part of the founders trading post catholic corner store at my church dot com forward slash shop or for customers re or chaplain designed khalas at eight four four five two seven eight seven two three cd entire little bayou rosary collection at my church dot com forward slash shop are saying today is saint. John of god confessor. John was born in portugal during the year. Fourteen fifty five to middle class. Parents tragically the age of eight. He was kidnapped by a stranger was later abandoned to homelessness in a remote part of spain as shepherd until h twenty two when the opportunity came along for him to join the army of the holy roman emperor charles v this apparent stroke of fortune however would eventually lead john integrator misery. He was nearly saved on two occasions from what seemed like certain death once after instinctively uttering a prayer to the virgin mary after falling wounded enemy territory and again when he was falsely suspected of theft and nearly executed but for another soldiers intervention events such as these weighed heavily upon him and his regiment was disbanded. He decided to amend his life beginning with approach to saint. Spain's santiago de compostela cathedral along the way of saint james confessed his sins and committed himself to living a life of repentance at age forty two. John returned to spain and picked up nearly where he had left off. Twenty years before working again as a shepherd this time however he was committed to living out the faith in god. He had regained later in life however he felt compelled to give himself entirely to the service of the poor sick and vulnerable. He opened his house to them allowing it to be hospital. Homeless shelter and halfway house run entirely by john himself when he was not bandaging wounded occupants or breaking up fights between them. He would go out begging on their behalf. The bishop of grenada approved his work and gave him the name john of god. A group of volunteers came to accompany him in his work. Many of whom had i come to him while in dire need themselves john the second the poor for fifteen years before meeting his death through an act of charity he jumped into a freezing river managed to save a drowning man but came home. She weakened from the ordeal allayed down in one of his own hospital beds where his condition further declined. The bishop of grenada came to administer the last rites as the bishop prepared him for death. John express a number of anxieties. There are three things that make me uneasy. He said the first is that i have received so many graces from god and have not recognized them and every paid them with so little of my own. The second is that after i'm dead. I fear lest the poor women. I have rescued and the poor centers i have. Reclaimed may be treated badly. And the third is that those who've trusted me with muddy and whom i have not fully repaid bay suffered loss on my accounts. The bishop however assured them that he had nothing to fear john than asked to be alone and summit has last strength to rise from bed and neo before a crucifix. He died in prayer with his face pressed against the figure of christ on the night of march seven. Fifteen fifty saint. John of god was canonized in the year. Sixteen ninety and has become the patron of hospitals and the dying so orders tipster ron at crusade channel dot com stay tuned to the crusade shadow with live breaking news updates all day and the best alive. Talk radio anywhere up next. The mike church show continues. I'm ron stafford for the crusade channel seeking news and finding truth.

mike church mike church ron stafford stafford studios bogo kia cuomo andrea stewart st assembly Pettus bridge lewis joseph lowry Bruce bloomington Mike religious and cultural history doughty museum california Son carlos mayo white church andrew cuomo Maggie o biden
NAACP's Michael Curry On The Legacy Of Rep. John Lewis

Radio Boston

09:54 min | 1 year ago

NAACP's Michael Curry On The Legacy Of Rep. John Lewis

"We WanNA end today's show by marking the passing of a lion of the American Civil Rights Movement. Georgia Congressman John Lewis. Lewis died on Friday. After a battle with stage four pancreatic cancer, he was eighty years old. Lewis's life work was fighting for racial equity in America and the right for all Americans to vote so much of his role in that fight has been remarkable including that it twenty three years old. He was the youngest speaker at the nineteen sixty three march on, Washington. Anyway. We. We do not want out freedom gradually, but we want to be free now. Years later on Radio Boston in two thousand thirteen John Lewis recalled. What do you observed earlier that day? And, then we start walking down constitution avenue the sole. Hundreds and thousands of people already marching now. We were supposed to be deleted. It was almost like saying their goal. My people let me catch up with. So here to reflect on this incredible legacy with US Michael. Curry of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers Michael is also former president of the Boston chapter of the N. Double Acp a member of the national. Board of directors and a friend in the show. Welcome back Michael. Thanks for having me. So. Michael it is particularly killing me that I'm listening to you over headphones instead of like sitting with you with a glass of ice tea where we can relax. You know have the conversation that this moment deserves. How how are you thinking today about the loss of Congressman Lewis, and by the way another civil rights leader Reverend C, t Vivian who also passed away last Friday. I think this moment reminds me that for any of us. who had a chance to study these civil rights? Giants in school whether it was when you were young or in college. We feel like we've known them for a long time, and I tell people I met him way before I actually met him. and I'm just I think the sad part of aside from losing him. and I think he was so courageous in those final few mountain months of his life. I'm saddened by the fact that people just got to know him like they're just learning about. His activism is decades of service. I think desuetude saddens me most, but I think I'm also encouraged by the fact this is going to. Drive people to to learn about the student violent coordinating committee or the Freedom Rides. And I'm looking forward to that rich conversation worn out of his active. Why are people just getting to know him now Michael Yeah you know there's so much untapped history right in this country, and we don't know about the sacrifices of others, and we get the short two or three sentence lines in our history books whatever people might know of the march on Washington. They don't know the back line in the march on Washington the politics behind the challenges of Senator Kennedy, and then later with Lyndon Johnson. They don't know what led up to the Rights Act. So there's a lot. We that people don't know that. That will even make you appreciate 'em more as you know, truth catches up to history and as people to dig in and learn about a as work and his upbringing, I think his the so much in his story I share with people that born in one, thousand, nine, hundred forty. He was a little kid. He was fifteen sixteen with the Montgomery busboy COT, so he was in Alabama as a child of Alabama win. Rosa. Parks refused to give up a seat. He was inspired by that movement. And it gave birth to his activism that he would then take Fisk, university, and then take the student nonviolent coordinating committee, so we need to know what drove him as we're starting to see, young activists live out his his legacy of walking in the streets, taking risks of being disruptive in a way that will make this a better country. And you know my understanding is one of the things that really struck. You was the youth of his activism twenty three years old speaking at the march on Washington only two years old when he was in Selma. Being beaten by police. How what was your as a young man? What was your reaction to the youth of his activism and how you think about it now? Just just inspirational. You know I was a student at Macalester College in Saint Paul when my history professor introduced us to John Lewis and and Julian bond and stokely Carmichael later named climate story, and you almost based on the the introductions, these giants. You felt like you knew them. You knew their ashes on. You know their politics and he was one that really stuck with me on because he was willing to take the risk when he got on those buses and Freedom fries. he knew that it could cause him his life. He knew that speaking up to injustice at that time, could could cause you to lose your life. I I mean there's no greater sacrifice so though we have difficult conversations today, though we may lose our jobs if we challenged injustice s not the same as the risk. He he had when he got on those buses in the nineteen sixties. That's not the same as when he marched across that bridge in Selma. and. He has the scars. The show for US I think in whenever we fill in weary, overwhelmed a challenged whenever we're feeling like there's resistance to progress. We gotta remember what he felt and he left us with that message that we need to get in good trouble. I think we need to adopt. What good trouble is today? With that for a minute I want. I want to play some sound because we heard a lot in the last couple of days about his humility, his selflessness, but his fearlessness is. humbling to me so. We been watching. Some videos have been walking resolute leading this protest across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on blending bloody Sunday in Selma Sixty. Five march of that year. He was beaten by the state trooper so badly that day that he fractured his skull here. He is reflecting on that day to CNN. By. Over an old again going to arrest, US became toward. Leaving us with nightsticks. Trampling horses. A went down. On my knees. Legs from under me. I thought I was going to die. He was actually treated and tested for brain injuries at mass general hospital in Nineteen, sixty five after that instant. That is what he has termed good trouble. That is scary trouble. Where do people dig deep to find the will to stir up that kind of good trouble? In this moment, what to people who say no trouble is good trouble. Yeah, I. Think we have to remember the history right so when you think about the evolution as nonviolent Coordinating Committee that Group of student activists from across the country John Lewis was in those founding members that got together at a college in North Carolina, and decided to organize. They were all already desegregating lunch counters. We gotta remember that that came out of a passion to resist injustice. That is the John Lewis that that was a young boy. His twenties, challenging a segregation on. We have to remember that when he was participating. Participating in the march on Washington, he didn't agree with everything that Dr Chang and the other architects, the big six and that movement to organize the march on Washington, but he humbled himself in his negotiations with the other leaders like Dr, King, who are who are elders to him and really compromise and a gain respect for him, so there's a lesson in this for all of us. There's a lesson of resistance a lessons lesson of disruption. There's a lesson of compromise and there's a lesson lesson persistence. How do you stay true to the mission? and. He did throughout his lifetime. So I think there's so much rich lessons in his life for us now now is time for us to go back and an unpacked his life and figure out how we can apply today. We've got about a minute left Michael Congressman John. Lewis reflected on where our future leaders will emerge on radio. Boston Twenty fifteen here he is. Lead the not necessarily. Dame. appointed. They grew out of a movement. They grew out of the struggle. Michael in our last minute, or so he's gone now. Who are the standard-bearers that we look to now? Who's going to carry on this fight? So there's so many I. Remember having the congressman when he was in town, meet with some of my young leaders in the end of Lacey Pe- Boston branch about thirty young men, and women sat with him or the JFK Library along with some other young people, and he shared his life lessons. I have no doubt you'll see. Those young people take that lesson. Those lessons that he shared that day and they'll show themselves on college campuses in in corporate offices on the streets, and I'm sure there on the streets right now. one of his proteges, and I should say staffers Michael Collins worked as his cheek staff as a Bostonian. And all these years, if you ever see a picture of Congressman Lewis, you'll see Michael. Collins standing right next to him. We got hold Michael. Cop because that's like family to him. Because he has a legacy of young people, he's given birth to across the country and their activism and they'll great things. Michael Curry of the Massachusetts League of community health centers and a member of the national and W. C. P. Board of directors. Sorry for the loss. Thanks for joining us today. Thank you sir.

Congressman Lewis Michael Congressman John Lewis Boston Washington Washington Giants American Civil Rights Movement Michael Congressman John Michael Collins Michael Curry US congressman Georgia America Selma Edmund Pettus Bridge CNN Macalester College
The Honorable Andrew Young (Ep. 43, 2019)

In Black America

29:39 min | 2 years ago

The Honorable Andrew Young (Ep. 43, 2019)

"Streaming K. U. T. is always great but you can make the experience even better with our brand new mobile APP you get one click access to news from K. Ut Texas standard in an NPR on your iphone or Android smartphone plus news alerts and your favorite K. ut podcast download the all new K. UT APP from the apple or Google Google play store today and now enjoy the program take from the University of Texas at Austin K ut radio this is in black America knew. I didn't want to be a dentist but I didn't have the strength to tell my daddy. I wasn't going to do that he. He warned me to be a baseball player and a Dennis and that's the only sport I I mean I. I resisted both of those because I wanted to be me and I didn't know who I was but when I left how I was was it going back we stopped in North Carolina and I ran to the top of a mountain just because I was frustrated and I needed to burn up some energy not well. My parents went to meeting and from the top of Kings Mountain North Carolina I I looked out in the world just made sense and I realize everything everything I saw. The corn had a purpose to sunflowers had a for the pine trees had a purpose the clouds had a purpose everything had a purpose and I said whoever made all this couldn't have made me with no purpose so it has got to be a purpose for me to the end of Andrew The J. Young Civil Rights legend former. UN Ambassador Congressman and Mayor of Atlanta Georgia in nineteen sixty young help change this country as a leader in the civil rights movement his legacy include being silly activists elected official groundbreaking Ambassador Social Entrepreneur. You're an adviser to presidents. Currently he leaves the Andrew J Young Foundation's effort to the BELVA `support new generations of visionary leaders who array sustainable global approaches to Economic Development Poverty Alleviation Ama- challenge of hunger young was a close confidante to the late Dr Martin Luther King Junior and a key strategist negotiated during campaigns that led to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the voting rights act of Nineteen nineteen sixty five this past spring young was in Austin Texas to participate in the summit on race in America at the AUBERGE Presidential Library on on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. I'm John Leo Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program and exclusive interview with Civil Rights Legend the Honorable Andrew Young and black America Reverend Vivian was really the first one have a sit it in he was he had a sit in Peoria Illinois in nineteen forty seven that was way before Montgomery and and Martin Luther King we go into his ninety sixth birthday next month he still with us. He was a freedom rider he he worked with us from beginning to end and he's still on the case James Several Janesville genius but he was also very eccentric. Maybe crazy but Dr King being used to say that all of us a certify ably insane because you've got to be kinda crazy to think that you can change America America was no money no organization we had nothing but the spirit of the Lord moving in our hearts it it changed when one speaks with the honor Bell Andrew j young you can still see it on his face and hearing his voice the Passion and commitment he still has for the call for social justice as Executive Director of the southern Christian Leadership Conference in one thousand nine hundred sixty four he was on on the front line doing America's doctors days born and raised in a segregated New Orleans young. I attended Dillard University in the city then attended Howard Howard University and earned a vintage degree in one thousand nine hundred fifty five from Hartford theological seminary working as a young pastor and Thomas Field Georgia he he first became part of the movement when he organized voter registration drives and nineteen seventy s first attempt to elect politics he loss but with a new campaign campaign finance chairman in Nineteen seventy-two he was elected to Congress becoming the first African American representative from the deep south since reconstruction he was reelected in one thousand nine hundred seventy four and again in one thousand nine hundred seventy six and nineteen eighty-one. He was elected mayor of Atlanta Georgia this past spring in Black America sat down with young exclusive interview during his stay in Austin participant in the summit on race in America. Mrs Young tells what was is New Orleans like back in the nineteen forties and fifties. We don't strangely enough it was segregated but but I I had to deal with Sarah Gatien and from four years old on because you know the Nazi party headquarters was fifty yards from where I was born. There was an Irish grocery store in Italian bar and I was right in the middle and then I had to go to Lina See Jones school which was a public school in another neighborhood that was called the bucket of blood because it was so much fighting and stuff going on there and I was I was younger longer than everybody and smaller than everybody so My Daddy told me said look you never going to be big enough to beat everybody so you need to learn to fight because if you know how to fight you don't have to fight nearly as much he he said but you're not GonNa win. Many fights comes he said but you probably outrun run a lot of people but you feel good running from problems. I was GONNA ask you. I read that your father hired a fighter vital to teach you and your brother well he was he was a dentist and we we live near the coliseum where the boxes is trained so when they had need dental work and no money he would fix the teeth free but then he'd make them them take us to the gym to teach us how to box notion. was you need to know he said so that even when you get in a fight you might get beat but you need to let them know that they've been in a fight and you will have to fight right that much. What was your favorite subjects wagon school recess manual training I guess I a sort of like math and science. I didn't like school so but I like certain teaches and whatever they were teaching. I happen to like it usually those with teachers at like me and put up with me but a school school for me was learning to get along with other people. I mean I was again. I I went to school young and I was small and ironically you know Martin. Luther King went to college at fifteen and Maynard Jackson at fourteen I wanted fifteen fifteen and my buddies would just coming back from from the military and and so David Dinkins who came to New York was sorta one of my mentors he'd been a marine been office in the Marines Marines and came back to go to school after being in the Marine Corps and he saw kind of looked out for me but he I was fifteen fifteen he was about twenty five twenty four. You went to Diller for you then you transferred to Howard why the move because I grew up on campus my mother and father went to and I needed to get out of town. I needed to get away from there because everybody thought of is a little oh boy there and I wanted to be a man. You was -ticipant becoming a dentist but obviously you got to call. How did you know that you a sudafed administer well? I didn't know I was suited for the ministry and I still don't know that I'm suited to the ministry. What happened happened was? I knew I didn't want to be a dentist but I didn't have the strength to tell my daddy. I wasn't going to do that he he. He warned me to be a baseball player. Anna Dennis and that's the only sport I I mean I resisted both of those 'cause I wanted to be you me and I didn't know who I was but when I left Howard I was going back. We stopped in North Carolina and I ran to the top of a mountain just to those frustrated and I needed to US burn up some energy while my parents went to meeting and from the top of Kings Mountain North Carolina I I looked out in the world just made sense and I realized everything I saw the corn had a purpose sunflowers at a purpose to pine trees. He's headed purpose. The clouds had a purpose. Everything had a purpose and I said whoever made all this couldn't have made me with no purpose so there's gotta be a purpose for me too. I didn't know what it was. I didn't care but I said I'm GonNa just this is something that I'm supposed to do in life that nobody else can do tell us about the first church pass it in when Marian Alabama well I was sent to marry in Alabama and I was sent to run a recreation program for the Summer Nama and I didn't know I was GonNa have to preach and they put me in a rooming house that was over a juke joint and all night long they played the Lordy Lordy Miss Claudia and one mint Julep all night long and I was trying to think of you know what am I gonNA preach about. I don't know what what happened but I got through and and I think though the being in that small community community which happened to produce the woman I married but also Dr King's wife came from that same high school uh-huh and row Abanez wife is born in the same county and it was a special county produce some he's really smart tough wonderful women and they didn't look too bad either. You wanted to develop an interest in hot Megani because I didn't see innocence and fighting and killing I mean I didn't WanNa get killed but I didn't want to kill anybody and Ghandi's method of noncooperation with evil we say nonviolence but that his his message was you can't cooperate with evil you you must cooperate with the good and so- segregation was evil and the way we challenged segregation was refused to cooperate now we were segregated because we let ourselves be segregated. We went in the back doors. See We drank from colored fountain. We spend our money where wouldn't let us work and finally we said this doesn't make sense we don't have to we don't need anything and so in Birmingham when we finally pulled it off well. They did it in in Montgomery I they just stopped riding the buses and then they had to integrate them in Birmingham. We said look we're not going to spend our money where we can work and so for ninety days three hundred thousand people black people mostly in some whites didn't buy anything but food or medicine well. Let's shut down the whole economy and when we explained to the business community look as Dr King put it. I can't help it that I was born black and you can't help it that you were born white but that's an unjust situation and we're just saying that we're not blaming you for it. We're just saying that if you want our business we're not GONNA do business with you in in a way that makes us feel inferior and so when you change the way you market us when you hire black people to work working your stores when you take down the signs on the fountains that said Black Hawaii to call it away when you allow us to to try on clothes we're going to buy meat from the lunch counters like anybody else. Then we'll bring money back doc ninety days people kept him money in their pocket and that meant that the whole business community shutdown I think that were slipping back and the reason is that we were so close that I was with Dr King when President Johnson said we shall overcome and we were sitting in Selma and I saw tears drip down is is because we will almost and the next election we lost by one vote per a precinct and it's been we've been looking for a message ever since I think thank President Johnson was the icing on the cake that Franklin Roosevelt started building I mean baking and and then all of a sudden we slipped back and we slipped back literally because it takes sixty percent of the population to make change literally but medicine is going ahead. Technology is making rapid rise. My symbol of the future is a AD whether you've been here in Texas but it's a cancer cell being eaten up by another cancer cell and it says how far technology has taken us it's now we have not been able to get well and to keep it from being racial and I wanna make invasion the one not not to be racial. It's all white folks between Brexit and in Europe. You've got nothing to do with race. That is his England. I don't know what they want but they can't have. It doesn't exist anymore anymore. Now Germany has been different and we have four thousand German companies in Georgia because Germany realized that they were too big for Europe and one of the things I'd started working on when I was mayor was was getting people who are growing too big for their own countries to come here now. That's also true of almost everybody here is an emigrant except us and maybe we coming and so making sense of this complicated world is going to take a little time but it's happening I think and and the thing that messes up the politics is not only the the slogans and the needs but it's is well when I put all my money into politics into television. Somebody advised me. I lost when I kept the money and started knocking on doors was an organizing people block by block. I have lost racists and when you all were engaged in the civil rights movement. Was it particularly focus on the south or did You on vision going national well well. I wanted to say in the south because that's the way I was and I frankly thought to. North was much more integrated than it is but they weren't but I think the there were about fifteen people working for Martin Luther King when we started out we never had more than fifty and we were doing well in the south in smaller cities the thing about Chicago was they had more people in black people in Chicago the whole State Alabama and we didn't have any more people and we ran into different kinds of problems we solve them and we worked with them. and they were real problems there that nonviolence worked on but we couldn't sustain it you mentioned about the individuals working for Dr King We know about Jose Away route five minutes and yourself Dr King who are some the other individuals we should know about that. Were part of that group well C T Vivian Reverend C T Vivian was really the first one to have a sit in he was he had a sit in Peoria Illinois in nineteen forty audie seven that was way before Montgomery and Martin Luther King we go into his ninety six birthday next month he still with us. He was a freedom rider he he worked with us from beginning to end and he's still on the case James Janesville genius but he was also very eccentric may be crazy but that the king used to you say that all of us a certify ably insane because you've got to be kinda crazy to think that you can change America with uh no money no organization a mill we had nothing but the spirit of the Lord moving in our hearts and you hit it changed you went to the sec and sixty then you became the the executive directors. I think two two two four years years later what was it about that organization that galvanized the movement well one. We were mostly preaches. Okay we will all born practically and south and we had grown up in the south and we learned we had like I was taught uh at four years old. Don't get mad. GET SMART. You lose your temper a fight. You'RE GONNA lose the fight and we knew how to. I was not afraid to talk to white folk. I didn't think there were any of them any smarter than me. We we disagreed but I didn't feel inferior and I wouldn't anybody how big how black a how white they were made me feel and I mean I got that from my grandma and and if you have to die you die but die like a man. Don't don't don't give up going back down. Don't chicken out and that's that's the way I was raised and one of your comments during this week here in Austin you mentioned that when you move to Atlanta you started answering having some of the mail from Dr King. What kind of lettuce will he receiving there well most of his mail was congratulating relating him asking him questions about things but he had some hate mail to and we made it a point to answer all of it and and you know you didn't have a lot of time to think about it because there was so many of them but that gave me a chance to oh? I think that's the way I got closer to him that that was what he was worried about. He was worried about getting his mail answer and I answered as mail. Why was it important for Dr King the risks and things that you weren't really in favor of him going back to Memphis because you all didn't really know the lay the land there you know nobody wanted him to go to Memphis? In the first place he was exhausted. He had taken on too much watch and we didn't we we'd run out of time. We were running out of money and we had enough. We thought to get to Washington for the poor people's campaign but we didn't know we didn't know why we were taking on another movement. He felt out though that he could not pass by the sanitation workers and it was his call to Jerusalem. I tinky knew he was. I think he knew his death was close sandwich and between Maynard Jackson the first time and then manage acted the second time and what do you think your biggest accomplishment as mayor of Atlanta I think mainly built airport building with no government funds and we built it with Private Wall Street money and once it was built we open it up in December nineteen eighty one and I I became mayor in January nineteen eighty two so my job to fill it and so we brought in we built an international terminal and and we brought in airlines from all over the world we expanded the employment there we made sure that it started out that twenty percent of every contract was done by a minority contractor I raised it to thirty five percent and forty percent and it just well then I think we brought the Olympics in but before the Olympics I started it'd bringing in international business because there was no money in Washington in America was in a kind of a slump but there was plenty of money in Europe so we abroad German companies in we now have almost four thousand in German companies in Georgia and we have almost a thousand Japanese is companies and we have we have businesses from all over the world and we've grown from a million in nineteen sixty one into six and a half million now and we've had the Olympics which was the biggest Olympics of our Olympics was bigger than China China or Russia and and we paid for privately and forty one percent of of all of the money went to minority businesses for let you go ambassador tells about the end to young foundation well. Somebody asked me when I turned seventy five Did I have a bucket list and I said No. I never thought of it that way. I said but there's some things that I have you know Sorta in me that I would like to do something about if I got a chance in somebody said you ought to you're listed and let us know maybe we can help and so I started listing. The things that I was concerned about. One was feeding the hungry. We're we'RE GONNA. WE'RE GONNA RUN OUT OF FOOD BECAUSE WE'RE GONNA run out of water. Only two percent of award on earth is clean for fresh water in you. Don't grow plants in salt water very well and so we're going to have to change the way we eat the way we grow food and so I've been experimenting with a number of people in a number of universities both in the US in Africa with how we're GONNA do that. I grew up in New Orleans and I've been watching your business. If River flood all my life and I thought ought after Katrina I said why don't people do like we did with the airport. We didn't wait for Washington. Send us the money we went to New York Gawk and we put together a plan and we got money and built our own airport. Why don't we and I decided that we could help to cities along the Mississippi do things to prevent flooding? They don't have to just sit hidden. Wait until after the flood and so we've we've we've organized eighty. Three cities between New Orleans in Minneapolis is hard to get them to think outside outside the box one thing about Atlanta and is probably a result of the fact that you had for I raid colleges and we had a we had black professes who would help you sink in a new way the Annaba Andrew J Young Civil Rights Legend Former Union Leader Congressman and Mayor of Atlanta Georgia if we have questions comments suggestions as future in black America programs email LLC in Black America at Kt that org also let us know what radio station you heard is over remember to like his on facebook and follow us on twitter. The views and opinions expressed on his program are not necessarily those of this station or other University of Texas at Austin Uh you can hear previous program online at K. U. T. Dot Org until via the opportunity again for technical producer David Alvarez. I'm I'm John Hanson Junior joining us today. Please join us again next week. CD copies of this program are available and may be purchased by writing being in Black America CDs K. Ut Radio Three Hundred West Dean Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas seven eight seven one two. That's in black America CDs K. Ut Radio Three Hundred West Dean Keaton Boulevard Austin Texas seven eight seven one to this has been a production of K. U. T. Radio. I'm Sean Peachtree Typewriter Rodeo Guca friends writers we write custom poems on vintage typewriters. You give a word idea faith and we will write you a poem on the spot the typewriter

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Chicago Tonight: Black Voices, May 2, 2021 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

26:48 min | 5 months ago

Chicago Tonight: Black Voices, May 2, 2021 - Full Show

"At third we believe when diverse voices are heard and empowered communities are made stronger. Lives are better than the future holds greater promise for all. that's why we're proud to support chicago. Tonight black voices together. We can make a difference together. We can drive change chicago tonight. Black voices is made possible in part by fifth. Third bank and by the support of these donors. Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. Black voices. i'm angel edo brandis. Friedman has the evening off. Thanks for sharing a part of your weekend with us on the show tonight and the year unlike any other public art has blossomed on chicago streets. We'll talk to artists about how art has the power to inform and educate as well as beautify months black voices book club selection traces. The civil rights trail blazed by reverend. Dr c t vivian. We'll talk about the co author and his books like see john. Lee hooker says lead their board boogie. Woogie 'cause there's any and it's got to come out and i sit down with chicago. Blues harmonica master. Billy branch first off tonight. The pandemic and the protests of the last year have brought turmoil to our city but also a flourishing of public art especially murals and in chicago murals originate and resonate with their communities has a long tradition beginning with the famous one thousand nine hundred sixty seven while of respect in brownsville which depicted black luminaries today themes of justice. Pride and community have blossomed into murals on chicago. Streets and storefronts creating a constantly evolving and thought provoking backdrop for tumultuous year. Joining us to talk about the power of public. Art are artists dorian. Sylvain who was the lead artist for the mural moves campaign and artist educator and curator wars hawkins who is also adjunct faculty at chicago state university. Now thank you guys so much for joining us. I wanna get right into it horace. I know that your mother originally helped create the wall of respect. Could you tell me just a little bit about the significance that that mural has with chicago's black community I can speak pretty strongly about it. The waller respect became of an anchor for the community. One it was primarily a source of pride. It wasn't so much sort of funded by a lot of external grants or anything like that. They were artists came together. Who really wanted to create something meaningful in the community and as a child growing up around the wider it did become a source of understanding of our history because there was so many people there and we took pride and being able to recite of the people that were on the wall there but on a longer broader sense it really sort of fart the broader mural campaign that permeated not only chicago communities but really nationwide walls respect. Start up around chicago. You really started to see an explosion of murals lat next communities and just all throughout the country april. Were seeing that. That wall art public art was a very potent way to get the message across. So why this group of people absolutely now during and i know that chicago artists. Eugene weighed in several other artists helped recreate that murals several years later. I'm unfortunately he recently passed. Could you share a little bit about his legacy and impact and public art. Yeah eugene ada. Who was which we in. The artist community called him Eat outweighed was a giant figure. In the public arts movement a giant figure in the black community movement that grew into the the black arts movement and part of what made such a giant figure that he was unapologetically black. He wanted his work to be about black people for black people by black people and aside from his role at when His role as a lead artist at the wall of respect another one of his great accomplishments was the series of doors at he did for malcolm x college in which he grounded all of his designs in the history of egypt and it was a moment just like in the sixties where he claimed the history as a framework to talk about what greatness and to be eight inspiration for the young black community. That i was a student body of malcolm x. At the time the they they were able to enjoy his word for for decades. Now can i ask what you would say. The importance of public artists on in public discourse today It it has a lot of roles in the more important ones move beyond just decoration If you were looking at sages seventy four street and jeffery one of the projects murals for example it brought a lotta brightness to the vibrancy and now you see murals popping all the way down seventy first street down from warner so it certainly gives us a sense of hope. It lands ration- but it also has the power to communicate. A lot of what we saw in the eat is work was at pride in heritage and pride in our accomplishments and things like that and that really permeated his work really throughout his life from the wall of true through the projects that he collaborated on with william walker all the way through the doors. Those muros now during i would like to ask. I mean i know that. Public art provides a sense of agency for artists that traditional institutions don't provide but thinking about the fact that they are not long-term. Would you say that that is an advantage or disadvantage. Well you know. I guess it does been looking at it as a painter myself. I've kind of just understand that. That's a par for the courses they say is that the the paint will weather it will fade. It will flake off. You know so. It's not a permanent as permanent medium. Say is as mosaic wouldn't be however sometimes art is just A reflection of its moment of its time kind of as children. We are also children of our time and we speak to our experience. So i think that there's still something very special about a mural and even watching its life span go from a brand new iteration to something that has over time become a very integral part of a community and maybe we're watching this weathering watching his age jane. I am a proponent for restoration. So i don't always want to see girls. Am this long. Slow death you know. I do believe that the time and space intervention and some of the murals around the city are just so important to our cultural fabric Speaking particularly of calvin jones mitchell catan who've done some amazing work around the city We need to hang onto that. I think i think it has value for future generations now. Whereas i would like to ask. What do you think. Public art provides opportunities for creatives. That may not see themselves fully as artists but want to express themselves. you know. have something to say. I want to share a little story. working on the project on seventy first street a number of people will come up and just as i do something can i help and even if it may have been just a few brushstrokes and their name or something. People wanted to be a part of that and it's a beautiful day because really is a more democratic way of art art nike. it's more communal. Uc multigenerational influences. There i was working alongside students alongside elders and so it is. It's an opportunity for everyone. Lost to participate to come out and have a hand in that creation. That's really how my mother got involved with wall respect. She was not originally a member of obasi but she was in the community. We lived around the pointer and she just wanted to quit her artistic stamp on it and have a hand in it. So that's really a beautiful thing and that it can open up as participation while are just final thoughts. What do you think the future of public. Art looks like dory and. I know that you've mentioned that. A lot of the boards that were painted last. Summer are now being repurpose. What other opportunities do you see. Public art having more kind of longevity in the city. Well i i see what regard is being a very a very integral to the fabric of our cultural landscape here in chicago. Not only do. I see organizations funding more public projects but even our city. Our state are putting more money behind public expressions to some degree at pulled off of the The idea of needing more monuments at a more representational but a large degree. I think it really just comes from the idea of community meeting voice needing to have their own expression to establish their own aesthetic. And so i feel very good about it. I see more and more public. Art happening all the time. Well thank you so much ladies. I think that'll do it for us. Our thanks to dorian so vain and juarez hopkins joining us. Thank you thank. Give up next a new biography about a civil rights. Pioneer who stood alongside martin. Luther king junior stick around dr martin luther king junior called minister and fellow civil rights. Pioneer dr ct. Vivian quote the greatest preacher to ever live but well. Before his work alongside king and other activists across the country vivian was participating in non violent protests here in illinois starting with a nineteen forty seven sit in demonstration at bishop's cafeteria and peoria. Now vivian died in two thousand twenty at ninety five years old just as he was nearing completion of his memoir leaving co author steve pfeiffer to finish the book now the result of their collaboration is this month's black voices a book club selection. It's called it's in the action memories of a nonviolent warrior and vivians co author c. Pfeiffer joins us now to talk about it mr pfeiffer. Thank you so much for joining us this afternoon. I'm happy to be your angel. Thank you so. I'm curious to hear how did you and mr vivian. Develop a relationship. Twenty fourteen. I was working on. A book actually appeared on the w. wtt w. talking about this book. In twenty fifteen is called. Jimmy lebron james to lives two deaths and the movement that changed america and it was about the fight for voting rights in alabama in one thousand nine hundred sixty five in the bush for the voting rights. Act and dr. Vivian was in selma at that time. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five very involved in that movement. And i wanted to interview him for the book and i call him and we struck up a lovely correspondence and when i learned that here was this man ninety years old and he'd been so involved in almost every stop along. The journey of the civil rights movement any added written a book about his activities. I said you've got to write a memoir. And we went back and forth hundred for a while and we finally decided to collaborate. So i know that he was a big part of the creation of this book. But i'm curious to hear what it was like Completing the book once he passed well it was difficult particularly as you said. Martin luther king junior called him the greatest preacher. Wherever lived so channeling. That voice is rather daunting for anyone. And fortunately i had a lot of recordings with him from interviews and there's quite a bit of information on the internet youtube. Serve his sermons other interviews. The family was wonderful giving me access to documents and we just put it together. The best we could absolutely. And i know dr vivian. Also mentioned how instrumental his wife octavia was. Could you tell me a little bit about their relationship. Sure i'm glad you asked that. Because the women of the movement at that time are not given nearly as much as they should be given and he gave octavia in rape doses drought his life. She was an activist in her own. Right in pontiac michigan before they met they met in peoria in the early nineteen fifties and once they got married and he went to seminary and started having children. She went into the background in just supported him when he went off on these very dangerous missions. Be at Selma be the freedom rides and saint augustine in one thousand nine hundred sixty four all the stops on the movement and she was home taking care of the kids. But i've talked with the family a lot about this. She was protecting the kids from news about what was going on in the movement. She was working so that they can put food on the table and she was supporting him. And say you go. Even if something happens to you the family will be okay. Wow now in two thousand and thirteen dr. Vivian was awarded. The presidential medal of freedom. Here is a clip from that ceremony. Rosa parks said of him even after things that supposedly been taken care of and we had our rights. He was still out there. Inspiring the next generation including me helping kids go to college with program that would become upward bound and eighty nine years old brother. Vivian is still out there. Still in the action pushing us closer to our founding ideals. Now mr pfeiffer. I'm curious to hear what you think. Dr vivian thought of being awarded this honour by The first black president. Well he told me he never thought he'd lived to see a black president and he was so happy that president obama had been elected and that he had accessed jerem at various times to provide counsel and he was just so honored to be in the company of other recipients of this award like john. Lewis is another fellow atlantan hank aaron and all the all the other wonderful movement leaders who had preceded him so it was really it was really quite an honor very soft spot in his heart for president obama and if i may they had a relationship that dated back to when it was candidate obama in salma in two thousand seven giving a speech during the bloody sunday commemoration and obama had a list of all the dignitaries who were in the audience to hear him. Dr vivians name was not on that list. And obama ad libbed and said there's one person who's not on that list. I can see him out there in the crowd. We wouldn't be there without him. And that's reverend c. T vivian martin. Luther king called the greatest preacher. Whomever live and dr vivian. Said he actually got tears in his eyes when candidate obama recognized him. It's so interesting that you bring that up. Because i i wanted to end this conversation. Just picking your brand. Nyu think that. Dr vivian hasn't received the same recognition as a lot of civil rights leaders. You know i've talked to the family about this. Andrew young and the title of the book. It's in the action. Says it all away. Because dr vivian was all about the action and he was always busy. Always doing something. Even after the movement as obama said in recognizing him rating upward bound e created the one of the first remote learning systems and he flat white supremacy long before it became popular to do so and i think that he just was so busy and also a very humble man that he just didn't have time or think he was kind of worthy to do Memoir and it couldn't be further from the truth. This is i believe a really important book to inspire a whole new generation of people to be active now again. The name of the book is in the action memories of nonviolent warrior. You can read an expert on our website and thanks to c. pfeiffer for joining us angel now chicago's music scene is slowly reopening and one local artists is wasting no time getting back on stage chicago. Blues legend billy branch share some of his life highlights with us as he returns to performing live once again. Lose her monica player. Billy branch has been playing the mouth harp since he bought his first one for one dollar at eleven years old. I put in my mouth. I could play any folk melody or christmas. carol. I think when that harmonica would wear out because i play it all the time i'd go back and buy another one. This natural skill quickly turned into a passion branch went on to play professionally for blues legend willie dixon and the chicago blues. All stars for six years pretty women then show. It was after playing at their berlin jazz festival in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven with dixon and several others. That branches owned group. Billy branch and the sons of blues was born. I consider amazing to have played with such legendary greats. Willie dixon and bo diddley. Rush junior wells. These are the guys that laid the groundwork for the the big rock scene and rock and roll branch continued his commitment to the music genre by starting his international blues and schools initiative in nineteen seventy eight. That is still active today. I've always seen part of my role as a professional musician. Too is kind of so the seeds Because when i discovered the blues the beauty of it the depth of it. I felt like everyone should know about this but despite his national outreach branch says there's more work to be done it needs to be embrace by its creators by its originators because we have situations now where there are festivals was no black performers blues festivals. Which is kind of like oxymoron. What more do you think that the city could be doing to acknowledge and honor. You know the impact that blew has had on the city the city as a whole should even more fiercely embraced the blue in a perfect world. I would like to see people like common chance. Who are right here in chicago. Direct some of their energies in it t attention to the blues and make it relevant. The twenty first century branch received a number of accolades work as both an activist and musician. Last year he was inducted into the two thousand twenty blues hall of fame and he recently created a song with artists specter entitled the ballot of george floyd that will be featured in the woody guthrie exhibit at the grammy museum. Can you make talk so then you wanna get do you. As branch continues to educate and advocate. He says his mission remains the same to give blues the recognition it deserves. Everyone can relate to this because it is the soundtrack for the human condition. Everybody goes through struggles everybody as problems and the blues is away of releasing and expressing this and making it not feel so bad Now as we mentioned branch was inducted into the blues hall of fame. Last june visit our website to read what the organization had to say about his contribution to the blues. A gary. indiana native made history last. Sunday's academy awards. Hairstylists mia neil along with her colleague jamaica. Wilson became the first black woman to win an oscar for hair and makeup styling and their work on the film. My rainey's black bottom in her acceptance speech. Neil pay tribute to her grandfather. I was raised by my grandfather. James holland regional husky air man. He represented the us. In the i pan am games. He went to argentina. he'd met he. He graduated from northwestern university at a time that they met. They did not allow blacks to stay on campus so he stayed at the ymca and after all of his accomplishments he went back to his hometown in hopes of becoming a teacher but they did not hire blacks in the school system. So i want to say thank you to our ancestors who put the work in where denied but never gave up and i also stand. Here's jamaica. Can i break this glass. Ceiling was so much excitement for the future. Because i hit black trans women. Standing up here in ages and sisters and lead tina's and indigenous women and i know that one day won't be unusual or groundbreaking. It would just be normal now. Brands friedman spoke with me. Neil when she first received her oscar nomination. You can watch that full interview on our website. And that's our show for this sunday night. Be sure to check out our website. Wtt w dot com slash news for the very latest from wtt w news and joined parachutes and brandis friedman this week at seven on chicago tonight and we leave you tonight with some more from chicago. Blues legend billy branch. Now for all of us here at chicago tonight. Black voices. i'm angel edo. Thank you for sharing a part of your weekend with us. Stay healthy and safe. Goodnight closed captioning for. This program is brought to you by robert a clifford and clifford offices serving chicago a personal injury law firm since one thousand nine hundred eighty four.

chicago billy branch dr vivian angel edo brandis Dr c t vivian Lee hooker wars hawkins mr pfeiffer Vivian eugene ada dorian muros malcolm calvin jones mitchell catan Dr vivian obasi Luther king chicago state university juarez hopkins Woogie
Into a New Voting Rights Act

Into America

31:05 min | 1 year ago

Into a New Voting Rights Act

"Great honor. To be back. Ebony Baptist Church In the pulpit of its greatest. Pastor. Dr Martin. Luther. King Junior. To pay my respects to perhaps his finest disciple. Today a final celebration of life for late civil rights icon. Georgia Congressman John Lewis it was held ebeneezer Baptist Church in Atlanta the church once led by the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior. The life of John Lewis was in so many ways exception. Vindicated. The faith in our founding redeemed that fake. That most American of ideas. The idea that any of US ordinary people without rank. Or title or? Fame. Can. Somehow point out the imperfections? Of this nation and come together. And Challenge the status quo and. That is in our power to remake this country. That we love. Until. It more closely aligns. With our highest ideas. After the funeral, the congressman was laid to rest at South View. Cemetery. He was eighty years old but decades earlier. John Lewis's life was almost cut short. March today to dramatize to the nation, dramatize to the world hundreds and thousands of Negro. Citizens of Alabama for here in the Light Bill The My. Old. On march seventh, nineteen, sixty, five, a group of protesters gathered at the base of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Alabama calling for voting rights. Twenty five year old John Lewis led the way. It was the first in a series of plant March from Selma to Montgomery we intend to march to Montgomery to events than fever's govern. But before they could get very far state troopers attacked the protesters with horses, billy clubs and tear gas. John. Lewis. was barely being his skull fractured. Dozens of other people were injured. That day became known as bloody Sunday. And images of the violence broadcast nationwide put pressure on Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act. President Lyndon Johnson made this address to Congress days later. It's not just negroes. But. Really. It's all of us. who must overcome the crippling legacy of beggar tree? And in just. And we shall overcome. The nine hundred, sixty, five, voting rights act outlawed discriminatory voting practices like literacy tests and poll taxes. And every year that John Lewis served in Congress. He would introduce a vote to protect the legislation he nearly died for. There's a long history in our country. Especially in the eleven states that all confederacy from Virginia to Texas. But discrimination. Based on race. Color. Jeff, stink before the Voting Rights Act nineteen sixty five. was almost impossible for many people in the state of Georgia in Alabama in Virginia and Texas. To read a certain vote to participate in. Democratic. Process. In two, thousand, thirteen, the supreme court gutted key elements of the Voting Rights Act. But the passing of John Lewis. Is that a new fuel to fight against voter suppression on Monday South Carolina Representative James Clyburn reintroduced hr four restoring what had been stripped from the voting rights act under a new name. John Lewis what rats at a twenty twenty that would be the way to honor. Our Louis where it's a great. But the most meaningful thing that you could do it put such it's to those words. I'm Cherie Lee, and this is into America. Today as John Lewis laid to rest. A look. His death could breathe new life into the struggle for equal voting rights. I know this is a celebration of John's life. There some who might say we shouldn't dwell on such things. That's why I'm talking about. Post devoted his time on this earth. Attacks. On democracy. What's best? Right up. Let's ask Brown philanthropist political organizer She's the CO founder of the Black Voters Matter Fund and nonprofit dedicated to building black civic engagement particularly throughout the south she joined me to talk about the ongoing fight for equality. Generally have you been this has been a rough. Week for a lot of people the passing homegoing of Congressman John Lewis how you feeling? It has been a very challenging week. We also lost Reverend C, t Vivian and who was like a mentor to me. We lost some great men, some giants that were really significant in our community. There are a lot of people who may understand in a superficial kind way the work that was done in the sixties and what men like TV John Lewis were fighting for. Okay. Voting Rights. But what were some of the barriers to the the Franchisee black folks we're facing? You know what's interesting is it's so pair of what we're seeing right now what's happening right now one the attack on democracy, but also the uprisings that related to George floors murder. Fundamentally if you really know what happened around the southern Montgomery March it was actually stemmed from Jimmy Jackson Jackson was a state sanctioned violence in which the murder of a young marcher in Perry County Alabama who was marching with his grandfather, and he was trying to shield his grandfather and in the process he wound up getting killed by the state police and the people were so upset they decided that night that they were gonNA, Walk Fifty Miles to Selma and take his body, lay it on the front of the Capitol steps, and still the Selma to Montgomery March was actually at the intersection of voting rights but also human. Rights and against police state sanctioned violence, and so when you think about right, really what they were fighting for it wasn't just about a law there were literally fighting about their humanity and that their humanity honored and recognized they were literally fighting a four that that their community would stop having abuse, right they were really fighting to make sure that they were speaking in the space of we're going to be transformed around love and so even the right to vote was to the extent in which people had the power that was given to them in the constitution that they could actually demonstrate and operate in their own sense of agency. Love, their word of agency you're harnessing power in through the franchise, connecting yourself to your citizenship and agency as full American citizens which many of us would argue black folks still haven't been able to fully recognized ourselves as full citizens. But then there were legitimate policy issues. I want people to understand some of the actual barriers between black folks vote one it was poll tax. You know my grandfather who was born in one, thousand, nine, five he actually kept his car his receipt he paid poll tax. So there was a charge for people who you knew had to pay to be able to vote. There were also buried around registration. Voter registration just to be able to qualify register, you may be subjected to answering questions similar to how many jelly beans are in this jar or please recite the preamble of the constitution. What we also know is that in addition to that, there was a lot of intimidation with people don't talk about that. Many of the people at that time were sharecroppers in the deep south, and so they would live on land that had been formerly plantations, and there were living on that land and still working as black farmers, and so they would get kicked off the land if they had registered that happened to Fannie Lou Hamer. So it's A. Layered approach to prevent African Americans from voting and participating in the process would is it? Do you think fundamentally about the power of the vote that was so precious but they had to keep us from it. It wasn't about participation. It was about power vote is about power. We've reduced our conversation about voting in this country as if it's about participation participation is just a part of it just because you participate does not necessarily mean that that automatically leads to power. But what it can do is if there's a leverage particularly these communities when you saw the black belt like in Selma, that was a majority African American population than. Those ears what happens when the minority of white people what you saw as you saw this very extreme suppression of the vote because in those areas, you had seventy eighty, ninety percent of the population where African American. So in fact, if they could vote, they could actually make a difference and make a decision on who the leadership was on where resources and policy got made and who would actually benefit from that. So part of it wasn't just around, we don't want black people to participate because we don't want them to participate, but this was fundamentally then as it is. Now, it was literally about suppressing the potential power of black people. So after a lot of organizing and bloodshed and sacrifice, you get to the voting rights act of nineteen, sixty five. How did that change landscape and participation and access to their power? We're talking about with that. you start seeing elections where you saw massive turnover you start seeing elections where you start seeing African Americans get elected for office the Democratic Party in Alabama, their symbol they had a rooster and the symbol said white supremacy. That was the Democratic Party state. Of Alabama after that, right when African Americans start voting their interests and voting for candidates that support it whether they be white or black you start seeing changes in the language you start seeing even changes in the overt racism and so what what happened with the nineteen sixty five act is that it did certainly open up a space for the enfranchisement of African American and all voters, but it did not solve the problem and it did not create all the repair. Once, votes were actually registered voting rights act pass, and there were thousands of African Americans particularly in Lounge County in Dallas County Wilcox County Down in Alabama black belt that we're now registered and participate in the process you had a record voter turnout in the next election cycle. But what you also had, you had white backlash that so many people got kicked off of their land or got kicked off the land that they were renting or places where they were staying. There was actually a city outside allows county highway. Eighty they call it tint city people literally after the voting rights. act. Well, people don't know is that there folks and live in a tent city for over year because they were kicked off of their land and so I think that is really important for us to recognize the fight for the vote never stopped matter of fact, even intensified at points. If people look at the picture of some bridge on bloody Sunday and nineteen, sixty five, there is a man that's standing right behind of John Lewis's name is Albert Turner. Ironically years later, his wife who had been doing vote a work, her entire life when black people started gaining power and having positions in that area, it was in the early nineties, Jeff Sessions, the Jeff sessions of Alabama charts, his wife and other people. He actually accused them a voter fraud because they were helping people registered to vote. So it has always been an attack. The just wasn't around the voter, but it was every access point in which African Americans have been empowered to participate in the process. There has been some backlash in this country around. Now we talked about just how pivotal important the voting rights act was in at least giving folks access but weren't there some protections built in. So I mean it kept being tested but weren't there fundamental protection built in. What really gave t to it and made a substantial change and what was happening in the south what was called section five. There was a section and the voting rights act that actually provided a vision pre-clearance from season and this clear provision is those states that had a history of voter suppression and not adhering to voting rights that they actually had to go through either the Department of Justice or a federal panel to be able to get clearance of any voting plants that they made and. The President of Justice made a decision or the federal panel made a decision whether that plan was approved or not, and if there was some racism or some other elements that said that racism was involved as part of the decision making process however, what happened in two thousand and thirteen when the pre-clearance clause was struck down by the Supreme Court and many advocates just like myself I was at the Supreme Court we whipped to the Supreme Court to listen in on the arguments and also advocate. Essentially what the Supreme Court said was there was no longer deed for that. That happened in nineteen, sixty, five everything had worked itself out because black voters were actually voting and we were voting in high numbers and I have to say about that two black people voting and participating in this country has nothing to do about America making it easy. So into thirteen years, she'll be county versus holder which gutted the voting rights act would happen next what do we see happening across the country? When we start seeing voter ID laws, the mask close in a Poland sites particularly in black and poor communities and people of color communities. We saw series of local any state laws that actually we think added to the disenfranchisement of African. American. Voters. There is a study that the Brennan Center just put out in this study they talk about currently right now that when you look at those states that no longer cover covered now because the pre-clearance has gone but that had been covered in the voting rights act and section five that currently in those states, they have a forty percent higher rate. Of Black and people of color being kicked off the voting rolls then than the national average surprise surprise surprise surprise, you know it's like a death by thousand cuts moving a polling site ten miles away from home where people say particularly in the south where you don't have a real comprehensive public transportation system where you have massive numbers of people who are the working poor in those areas that when you move site ten miles, there's a major drop off in participation because now people are dealing with our transportation barrier I know an Alabama, there were some police is there were actually places police resistance. The police precincts have not been necessarily a friendly place that black people want to go that we're actually dealing with police violence is that somewhere that we want to go and vote. and. So ultimately, the process of vote becomes very inconvenient for people then so you start seeing those little elements that make a major difference and you'll see a drop off in the process. They'll save it. They're making them more efficient or that there's massive voter fraud happening or now it's like it's cove covert nineteen. Is there any possibility that all this just happens to be chains? I mean, my grandfather would say if it looks like a duck walks like a duck quacks like a duck, it's. Like this is it. This is a new we have seen this I even we'll tell you you know I have been working in Alexis for twenty seven years I have worked in Alabama Mississippi I mean I work in the real good states? In the states where I have a an egregious history of voter suppression but what I experienced in Georgia this last election cycle actually takes the cake what I. And witnessed and bore witness as a black voter myself that literally I left one polling site literally in tears because I go vote and it took three hours ago on the other side to assist someone who lived in a majority white district and there was no wait took maybe five minutes I come back to assist voters in Atlanta at another polling site it is one pm the. Machines had just come alive at twelve that many people had been waiting outside for five hours. It will people wrapped around the building while we were in line there's a woman who was a caretaker that said she works for an older white woman that she's a caregiver to that she had taken her to vote earlier. It was seven minutes in the car taking her out to vote in. Seven minutes wet would she came to her polling fight on her break her our bright she had been in line for thirty five minutes and they were they were anticipating a two hour wait. So what was hurtful and painful to me is, why is there such a distinction and experienced a way that white voters vote and where they vote and we're black voters vote it should not. Matter if there's a Democrat or Republican in office for my rights vote to be protected, right I actually reject that voting is not a partisan issue and I will do the same if there was a republican and we which Poland inside, they would not let them vote I would fight it's hard for them as I will look for myself because I fundamentally believe in the principles of. Democracy. When we come back Latasha night talk about the current push for voting rights including her work with the black. Voters. Matter. Fund. Stick with us. We Go to the mall and the other thing not because they are easy but because they are. I'm chuck, Rosenberg on my podcast. I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who do things because they are hard this week former senior F. B.. I. Official Amy Hess, he was kneeling down holding babies shoot. He just dissolved in tears of a sudden the evil that happened in Oklahoma City struck me join me for season three of the oath in MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes. Everyone's Day. Hey everyone. It's Chris. As you know these days, I find it helpful to just take a step back from the day to day onslaught of news and take a broader look. The issues I haven't had time to cover a my TV show all in everything from the legacy of racism in America to how community and creativity can flourish amidst a pandemic to how Democrats could win and Deep Red America I do each week my podcast wise is happening and I'm joined by uniquely qualified guests like Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Nicole Hannah Jones progress does not mean justice or equality or that we are right after four hundred years the black people. Being in this country tie remarking incremental progress in patting ourselves on the back for that has been long over author Rebecca. Solnit. How do we take care of each other in the context of not being able to physically be with each other in ordinary ways crooked media's Jon favreau. It's going to be the highest turnout election in history, which means that it is a persuasion game and many others who helped me make sense of what's happening in our society and our world. I really enjoy our conversations I. Hope you will to join me for new episodes. Every Tuesday just search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. We're back with. Latasha Brown. So in two thousand thirteen, the voting rights act is essentially gutted allowing states rather than level. The hurdles at height to the hurdles is the only way to fight that teaching people how to jump over the highest hurdle like what are the efforts like not just a whole bunch of people to jump around and over these hurdles. But actually lower the hurdle we've got a mobilize educate and do as much as we can to protect the vote in the short term. In. The long term we got to have some radical changes in this country so that the burden doesn't you don't put the burden on the very people who are being oppressed. Insanity. So I think we need a couple of things I. Think one I believe that we need a complete complete shift around how we run elections in this country right now, we should have universal registration which should have same day registration I. Want to see a vote is bill right? I know people say well, we haven't had that before. Well, the bottom line is that we didn't have nineteen sixty five before we had the nineteen sixty. So we're in twenty twenty right now, what we need is we need a voter bill of rights because the Constitution has nothing in the constitution that guarantees the vote. Right if the we need to actually guarantee a constitution actually gives rights to voters enshrined in the Constitution we need that. We have a department of Defense. Why don't we have a Department of Democracy a Department of voting we should have to have a radical re imagine if we're just see something different, we can't continue to operate in a broken system expect that it will repair. It will not. Can you get there without restoring a section four and five of the voting rights at the house reintroduced and renamed hr four after John Lewis which is meant to repair what's been taken out of the voting rights act do you need to get that I? You know if America wanted to America decide tomorrow to be democratic. Is Not a precursor. However, I do think just being pragmatic. Take having that I write that because that's before Congress right now passed the bill do you think they will because they've tried to get it restored in the pairs you think this time with the goodwill after George Floyd and goodwill after John Lewis's death. Do you think now might be the time I think this should be the time but I have very I don't see the kind of leadership from the Republican Party. At all matter. Of fact, it was just two weeks ago that. Mitch McConnell says that he doesn't see any evidence of voter suppression while obviously he didn't go to his own state to vote on the last primary and owned Saving Kentucky and Louisville in Jefferson County which has six hundred and twelve thousand voters there was one polling site for six hundred and twelve thousand voters you know obviously, he didn't recognize the challenge. In that. But aside from that, let's be honest. The Republicans have openly said that when there's a high of voter turnout that it favors the Democrats he even himself said wanting people to vote was simply Democrat. Power grab you know the the bottom line is if your party is not getting people 'cause they're not voting them perhaps you need to change the elements of your party, but that doesn't mean that democracy should. Suffer because you can't wear because you got policies. That means that you should change your agenda that is more reflective and more inclusive of Americans I think embedded in the work that we're seeing them do some of what they're saying is they have actively decided the voter suppression as going to be a strategy to maintain their power women thing you said at the beginning of this conversation, we're talking about the loss of Louis. Vian as their spirit right and what they were fighting for and what they were pushing for, and so many others that it wasn't just about the right to vote. It was recognized and our humanity and our citizenship and love seems to be central in all of this right the Kenyan beloved community and I wonder how that spirit of love and recognize now humanity and our agency feeds the work that you do in the work of black voters matter. We we shall not be moved. We shell not. We shall not be moved just like a tree that's leaded by. We shall not. Be Moved. You know I wanted to sing that just a US about really what this is about. This is really about humanity being recognized and that's a freedom song. It was in the spirit of that work. You know both folks did not have a political party on their side, the Republicans or the Democrats quite frankly you know they didn't have resources what they had though they had a belief in their own agency. They had a belief in their own humanity and they had a particular spirit and courage that they needed to change. They were not going to be moved that they were going to stand firm and I think that is how change happens. Democracy does not fix itself particularly when it has never been fully realized. When I think about American, we talk about the founders. Let's talk about who the founders were the founders of this country where the founders of a nation they had particular ideologies and thoughts and positions around democracy. But they didn't believe in democracy. Let's be honest clearly and they didn't even believe not just black people. They didn't even believe that white people white me and who didn't. Vote. Right they didn't even believe that women should vote. My point is they were never the founders democracy. But John Lewis and C t Vivian in a million pointing and Marie foster and James Orange but not Lafayette Zola's were the founders of democracy that was a generation of leaders who fundamentally believed and not just black people right vote. But every single citizen in this country and they fought forward and they got beat Ford and they stood Ford and they worked for two when I think about who were the founders of America they were not the same as the founders of democracy when I think of the founders of democracy who literally forced America to take a position that to say that all people on some level had the right to vote it was people like John Lewis. As, we lay John Lewis to rest and his home going service today. I wonder if you feel good and feel hopeful and this feel. Like the future is in good hands all that work, and now we see passing generation and if he was anything, he was a freedom fighter and activists, but he was also a bridge from one generation to the next right do you feel good about the direction we're headed in? Absolutely you do absolutely absolutely let's let's be honest about America grew out of a protest. It would the Boston Tea Party wasn't that Nice. Let's sit down what people were upset. That's what's turning point. And was full says that we need a new nation right and so I think the same thing is happening now the largest multi racial multi generational uprising, and all fifty states in this country that gives me hope that people are saying enough is enough and whenever people work together these gotta change whenever we worked together we win and so ultimately while I think that it won't be an automatic overnight process I think we've got a long road ahead but what gives me hope? I was part of the procession, the motorcade that followed John Lewis's body from Selma to Montgomery. I cried the whole, the whole fifty miles I. Think I was crying for multiple reasons. You know part of it. I was crying because I was angry because I was like, why are we gotta go through this? Why am I? Still why do is still I'm I'm committed but why am I still fighting the same fight but then as we go on I, will see people lined up on the side of the road and I would cry because I was I felt affirmed I felt that there were people that were saying we're still standing right and that they were Still, in alignment as we went on and we got to the capital and he went into the capital I, was thinking about here lies a man in state in capital that wouldn't even allow him to enter. Right? They did their part in is up to us and so what I am seeing the kind of energy, the kind of clarity the commitment that I am seeing with young folks is given me so much encouragement and hope because if America is ever to get better, it won't be because of the Democrat and Republican Party. It will be because Americans decided and demanded that it is better and so that's what gives me hope because I do think that there are more people that are engaged even care about this process and are paying attention and ways that they've not paid attention in the past. latasha. Thank you so very much. It's clear in your passion and you work that you walk in the spirit of men like John Lewis in women like Diane, Nash and C T Vivian Navas folks. So, thank you for being with us today. We really appreciate it. Thank you thank you covering the story is really important. Thank you you were. That was political strategist, Latasha Brown Co founder of black voters matter. We. We shall not be moved. We shall not. We shall not be moved just like a tree. That's bled it by the way. We shall now happy moved. He. Into America is produced by Isabel and Alison Bailey Aaron Don Max Jacobs Barbara Rab Claratyne I actually Turner and Preview Var thon a real music by Hannah's Brown our executive producer is Ellen Franken Steve Lick Tie is executive producer audio I'm mainly, we'll be back on Monday. Introducing Peacock, the new free streaming services, NBC Universal. It's hit movies current. So's live sports, trending bits and timeless. And that's why you can't not watch peacock Wasser free upgrade for more stream now at peacock tv.com law and order svu streaming now.

John Lewis America Alabama Selma congressman Montgomery Georgia US John Supreme Court Congress Republican Party
Introducing: A Word  with Jason Johnson

Trumpcast

25:18 min | 7 months ago

Introducing: A Word with Jason Johnson

"Hey trump castle listeners. It's me virginia heffernan. I don't miss our forty fifth president. But i certainly miss you for the past four years. I've hosted trump cast on this feed. I've done hundreds of episodes each one devoted to another facet of the migraine. But now all of a sudden over trump's out things are looking up but sometimes the republic still seems to be hanging on by a thread. My next podcast after trump is not so much about that. Good riddance president. But it's a guidebook alongside legal scholars jack goldsmith and bob bauer. Both former trump cast guests to reforming our laws norms and ethical codes. So we never get in that fix again after trump is coming soon to a podcast app near you to learn more go to after trump pod dot com but also got some other big news. I want to introduce you to something brand new from slate slate. A word with jason johnson. You've heard the awesome. Jason johnson on trump casts several times. Now every friday. He'll bring his sharp analysis to discussions with policymakers journalists entertainers and other experts about america's challenges around race and ideas on the way forward so check it out. If you enjoy this episode. And i know you will make sure to subscribe to a word with jason johnson in your podcast at. This is a word a new podcast from sleep. I'm your host jason johnson. Have you ever been cancel for using the wrong word. Having a wrong ideas being racist when you didn't intend to be often. Viewed as a weapon of the woke laugh cancel culture is now being criticized by everybody from centrist democrats even some people who are usually called progressive. It if all you're doing is cast stones. You're probably not gonna get that far so as cancel culture really out of hand or is it just privileged people angry about the fact that they're suddenly being held accountable. That's next on a work with me. Jason johnson stay with us. Welcome to a word. I'm podcast about race and politics and everything else. I'm your hose jason johnson. If you spend any time on social media you've probably heard of cancel culture. That's when a group of people sometimes famous but often not call someone out criticizing them for past actions or alleged actions or comments. They find offensive. It's a subject of outrage. For many comedians and people do a little bit of both like late night talk show host bill maher and finally new rule liberals need a stand your ground law for cancel culture so that when the woke mob comes after you for some ridiculous offense you'll stand your ground. Stop apologizing. Because i can't keep up anymore with. Who's on the shit list is that mob. Justice is it accountability. Loretta ross has a lot about this issue. She teaches a class called white supremacy human rights and calling in the calling out culture as a visiting associate professor at smith college and professor. Ross joins us now. Thanks for having me on your show. So the first question i want to ask is what is calling in what is calling out and what is cancellation like in your class. Those things well this when you publicly. Shame somebody you're stra shade all them humiliate them for something you think. Sad or they're they've done the way that they look is always done publicly either. A social media are in real life but the point is to mealy the person because you're seeking accountability. But i say is that the best way all time now calling in is the opposite. You're seeking accountability. But you're doing so usually privately and you're doing it with love. Respect so calling in is a call out done with love to have to act like you're holding others person's heart in your hand and you don't wanna squeeze too tight 'cause you want somebody to treat your art the same way to part of what can happen professor ross. Is that if somebody is called out. The consequences of that is the potential that they get cancelled. so what is it to be cancelled. Book get cancelled all the time. I mean because they've done stupid things. And i mean whether or not they deserve to be cancelled. I asked the question of. Should we ever watched bill cosby anymore. Even though he did things that were horrible. he's in prison for them. But at the same thing in the came on. I watched the show because as a whole lot of sambol of cast members and stuff but if he produce something new right now probably not. We have two new us these days because you have to be able to see. Its case complicated. People to produce complicated art and what mediocre people reducing mediocre art. I'd be bored and so he's perfect but when you are threatened with cancellation actually. There's a recovery process. You get engaged and that is acknowledged you've done something wrong. Own your stuff and then make reparations for the harm that you've done and then figure out a way not to do it again so everybody makes mistakes. The people that i call out of the people who make mistakes and then won't admit they made a mistake is back. They doubled down on it and then they do it again. But if you make a mistake and you want to do better and you may choose don harm. Then i'm gonna call you in. Here's what's interesting about this. And i skeptic cancel culture. I mean to me. Cancel is the term cancel. It comes from television. It's like okay. This show is canceled. It's never coming back. But if people can come back or they ever really cancelled or are they just facing consequences well first of all. We don't have hillary's stocks in dole's anymore permanently cancelled somebody like alexander. Hamilton got cancelled but then there was a playmate about him so was he really cancelled. The point. i'm making is that. Powerful people who have a large platform rarely are going to suffer from being canceled. Because they're still gonna be rich. They're still going to be powerful delilah platform so i even questioned whether that's a working strategy for us who want to hold them accountable but we can in fact engage with them but the most people who get canceled on most vulnerable people because most of the punching and the cancel culture punching down not budging up and nobody actually complained about the cancel culture to the people who are previously being punched started punching up so is a real question how we have to nuance this. I think that though most people who make mistakes and that's everybody is capable of revealing themselves. If they choose to but you have to be able to look your mistakes in the eye without shame so that you can say i can do better and i'm one of those people that's going to help you do better. We've now reached this point. Where i i'm curious where you see the of this. The people who primarily are concerned about cancel culture are powerful libertarian and or conservative white people. Right you hear your bill. Maher is complaining about cancel culture. You hear your milo yiannopoulos is your jim. Jordan's it's almost as if they have co opted concerns about cancel culture as a way to defend themselves so they continue to be hostile to people. How do we reclaim the damages of cancel culture to actually protect the people who are usually getting screwed over. Well first of all you have to realize that people right are nothing but imitative. They don't get anything they try to call off civil rights they try to co op. Women's rights. They tried to go up the whole calling in calling out they just steal stuff and they try to rebranded as if they are the primary victims lawless stuff. And i'm calling bull on first of all 'cause you ain't that original and in fact the whole cancel culture comes from the right i mean. Do we remember. They're protesting the passion of christ or harry potter or even going back earlier saying that we couldn't teach evolution in schools and going back even further. Dra offer the witch trials of. Get off my last nerve talking about now. You're the victims of a process called white supremacy that you put into motion. I don't. I don't even give him any brief on that but i wish they'd be more originally come up with their own strategies instead of elvis thing hours if someone today is saying. I'm afraid i'm going to be cancelled. I'm afraid that you know if i if i wear a t shirt by this band and i'm on instagram. And we find out that ban did something wrong later. then i'm going to be cancelled. What do you say that that person who lives in fear of cancellation. Well as first thing. I'd say is you need to worry more about the right thing because your reputation is what everybody thinks they know about you but your integrity is what you know about yourself. You have to sleep with yourself every night. So protect your own integrity. Screw the reputation. Where would you wanna wear do what you wanna do. Stand in your truth. Be kind to people could effort. You're gonna get in return. You're kind of people but if someone wants to call you out for wearing a t shirt or something like that and you don't think that t shirt is is designed or somebody. Tell them to go get a light. Don't try to that. You care about their trauma trying to visit your story. We're gonna take a short break when we come back more on cancel culture. Were professor loretta. Ross and how it's playing out in politics. This is a word with jason johnson. Stay tuned most of us have the best intentions to eat better cutback on takeout make home-cooked meals. Look i'm going to be honest. 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Gobble will make for your household they're offering listeners. This fantastic limited time deal six meals for just thirty six dollars. Plus free shipping. That's dinner for two or three nights for just thirty six dollars only available if you go to my special url get this special offer. Now go to gobble dot com slash word with that's gobble dot com slash word with. You're listening to a word with jason johnson. Today we're talking about cancel culture with professor loretta. Ross so this is something that hits me personally and i've read about you. Hit you personally as well. People who have been direct victims or or someone has tried to come after them and cancel them. We've seen republicans celebrities and powerbrokers sometimes attempt to call out individuals with bad faith outrage in order to cancel them. How do you deal with bad faith calling out. Well the first thing you have to do is let go of your short fuse. Don't believe every call out you have to do due process. You have to find out what somebody being accused of is actually true. You can't just jump on like a anguish road rage mob. Just start canceling people there because somebody you trust told him to now bandmate actors they get on my last nerve. That's why rarely appear on all these right wing talk shows they keep inviting me. Because they do not want the truth they wanna gladiatorial combat thing deprogrammed people at white supremacist moving clan and the released adage. It's really important to make sure that you do your research. These people find out who they are so that you can meet all of their lives with facts. If you choose to engage. But i choose the deep platform i walk all shows. The last time i was on a right wing showed lor e-group kick me off or call her races so i don't do it anymore. There's a there's a great sort of internet anthropology ever hear a woman named danah boyd. So she she was like an early internet anthropologist she wrote about facebook she wrote about my space or whatever but she talked about the concept of drama which she said. Is that drama means. It's performative locked and the internet sort of thrives off performative conflict. People want to publicly disagree right in order to seek valid nations that attention. How do you deal with the fact that for many people they want to have public conflict because that is where their power comes from. Well first of all. We're all acting like the unpaid internship. Google facebook because every time something reaches a million clicks million likes. They just made a half a million dollars. And so they're gonna keep cultivating this this road rage of the internet stuff because it makes a lot of money actual sorry for people who apparently lack affirmation they realized that they seek it through strangers over the internet that to me is a psychological problem. That isn't just you know. Social media has a problem first of all. These young people aren't fool. Old people like me. We could fool will fall into a queue conspiracy theory but the teaching college every day. We don't believe ninety percent of what reseal the internet. We know people are lying so there's a real perverse inverse kind of thing happening with the mounted engagement. People are demonstrating and how much they actually don't believe but we're in i. I hate to use this word of deal liberal capitalist system that has an attention economy going and they're competing for people's attention and don't nothing. Grab your attention like watching a train wreck. I really ask people all the time. How walking around with a short fuse really work to bring you. Joy aren't too just a permanent fight. Always looking for a place to happen. That has to be very miserable. Way to be in the world and don't have somebody that could love. You ll actually knows you into these strangers. Internet who's attention so fleeting that they'll forget about you the minted. The next controversy comes up. I mean it's very fat place to be if that's all you can get. We're gonna take a short break when we come back. We're going to talk more about cancer. Culture what to do moving ahead with cancel culture and what it's going to mean for american politics and in particular young people going forward. That's ahead on a word with jason johnson. Stay with us. You're listening to a word with jason. Johnson we're talking about cancel culture and what might replace it with activists in professor loretta. Ross professor ross. To some people focusing on cancel culture seems misguided. It sounds like action people who experienced discrimination and even violence because of their identities to be worried about whether privileged people will get their feelings hurt or not is even focusing on cancel culture. A good idea are we. Are we like losing track of what's important by focusing on kind of a social phenomenon. Equally to pay attention to the underlying instances of racism. Sexism whites apparently transphobia homophobia we know the buzzwords because those are the drivers of oppression. And the problem. That i have is that in our human rights movement. Just dobbin is to end oppression. We spend too much time. Treating it like is a public therapy space. This is not what the human rights movement is supposed to be about so yes. It is a bit of a red herring to worry about the cancel culture all the caller coaching but the reason. I'm concerned about it. As a human rights activist is because it determines the effectiveness of building power to fight fascism and we're circular firing squad turning off each other instead of to each other. This is going to limit our ability to take on the real opponent one of the things. That's really impressive about your background. Is your human rights activists. You've been doing this work since the nineteen seventies. Your mentor by vivian Tell us a little bit about your work with d radicalizing nazis in nineteen ninety. I took a job with what was formerly known as the national anti klan network which was renamed the center for democratic renewal and it was founded by reverend c t. Vivian super five years. He was my boss and one of the things he used to tell us. Was that when you ask people to give pate. Then you need to be there for them when they do. And i didn't understand what he meant but then i started getting these phone calls from these. People have been innate lula and let's be clear. They have their penalties long before they reach out to civil rights organization. Or you don't actually flip nazis. They themselves and then if they find out that that those people were hanging out with not good people and so that's why they come to us is not go inside. And smith don't believe hollywood and so it's wonderful work for reverend. Vivian set the pace for us. 'cause he said he saw it started national anti klan that were occupied anti klan. Protesters were killed in north carolina in nineteen seventy nine and. He was very serious because he had been an aide. Dr martin luther king and he was serious about passing that legacy onto younger people like me. I'm trying out. Pass it onto young people like you that there's an effective way to beat back. Hey and that's with low and i'm talking about radical. I'm curious what your thoughts are on this. If there's somebody who has a real fear of being canceled it would be someone who's pass was with a neo nazi movement. So what you're saying is if that person can be de radicalized are you. Saying there's there's hope for trump people that Kellyanne conway should we be embracing them with radical love or still be cancelling them. Because i don't wanna see kellyanne conway on dancing with the stars. I think she should suffer consequences for working for trump. But you seem to be suggesting that there might be something else we can do. Well it on how far they're willing to own they're stuck if kellyanne has got a double down and talk about her support for trump and i was a good thing that she did. She has a repeat again hassi so it really depends on what they do now. Of course the seventy four million people voted for trump not all nazis. They're not all racist sexes. But they were willing to be next to support a racist sexist dunk. So that's a whole lot about them but again are they willing to all messed up. They will just say. I made a mistake. I was fooled. I was manipulated. I did wrong. I caused harm then. I'm going to be willing to have that conversation with you. But if you double down and i'm going to use the same tactics i would use on you that you were in a hood. 'cause i understand. They don't always sheets know what the opponent looks like. I spent five years intensely. Studying the white supremacists. That's why teach about it now. I know what they look like it. You're willing to repudiate them that. I'm willing to give you the benefit of the doubt and so progress might be in the form of sitting down With former trump supporters and saying look are you willing to have this conversation about how donald trump is damaged people. And if you can make that realization then maybe we can sort of invite you back in the world of humanity or you saying we should have that sort of You know. I don't know a truth and reconciliation committee with some of these people. I think that's the way we should go to. Reconciliation doesn't work without justice and accountability It ain't just forgive and forget right is being accountable for the harm that you've done and actively working to undo that har I want to close with this. Because i think it's really it's important. I saw you do an interview. You said look. We're going to be in class and somebody all need to realize that you don't have a right to not be offended and i think the core sometimes cancel culture is people saying i'm offended that you have this opinion that i don't like and i think them beer existence of that opinion. Means that you should suffer financial or political consequences one way or another and i hear you sort of argue. It's like look no. We have to live in a world of difficult opinions. How do you get into the minds of people who have been marginalized that. Hey look just because that person is homophobic just because that person has raises just because that person is anti semitic or anti muslim or something else like that. it doesn't mean they have to be cancelled. How do you. How do you find that space because these people have a legitimate complaint. But you also can't live a life where you're free from people who don't like you well. It's not the job of people. Who are the victims of hate to see about the healing of hater. Better job number. One doesn't take care of themselves because when they're constantly being stamped in the same wound. There's no healy possible. But i'm saying that there are those of us who could be bridge builders. There are those of us who can be truth tellers and witnesses. There's a lot of different roles and can play in the calling in calling out continuum and the one that i think i need to bring you into this. Conversation is a concept by sonya. Renee taylor where she talks about. I'm not calling you in. I'm not calling you out is backed. i'm calling on you be a better person. That's an intermediate step at my favorite calling on sentence is when somebody says something that i just don't think it should be saying just look straighten. It is eight at beg your pardon and i just let it lay there while they review in their head what they just said that it landed the way they wanted to land. And so you have to call in. You don't have to call. And then if they want to double down you walk away you decide that. That's the person. I'm a workaround is to the person on the work with the ross is a longtime activist and a visiting scholar. College her upcoming book is titled calling in the callout culture. Thank you professor. Roth threw me on your show. And that's a word for this week. The shows e mail is a word at slate dot com. This episode was produced vianna angel and jasmine. Ls is managing producer of podcast. It's gabriel roth is editorial director for audio alicia. Montgomery is the executive producer of podcasts. It's late june. Thomas is senior managing producer of the slate podcast network. Our theme music was produced by don. Will i'm jason johnson tune in next week for worth.

jason johnson Jason johnson jack goldsmith bob bauer Loretta ross sambol Ross milo yiannopoulos heffernan professor loretta smith college bill maher loretta bill cosby migraine kellyanne conway dole Dabo Maher
The Craft of the Director with Ava Duvernay (Ep. 264)

The Director's Cut

1:26:27 hr | 11 months ago

The Craft of the Director with Ava Duvernay (Ep. 264)

"My need to be able to tell scripted feature scripted television. DOC FEATURED DOT television. Now I'm an unscripted doing an unscripted show I'm doing animation that comes from a survival instinct. that. Doesn't come from I want to necessarily do all these things I mean I want to be able to always tell my stories. So I want as many tools in his winning weapons to tell my stories as possible. Hello and welcome back to the director's cut brought to you by the directors guild of America. Today's episode features the DJ special projects. Committees recent event the craft of the Director Eva do for night. The sears conversations with master filmmakers features an in depth discussion about the directing process and pre production through post. Mr Vernon's direct royal credits include the Academy Award nominated film Selma Be. Kademi Award, nominated documentary thirteen. A, wrinkle in time. Middle of nowhere. I will follow The DJ award nominated an Emmy Award winning series when they see us and episodes of scandal and Queens Sugar. please. Enjoy Ms Duvalier's conversation with fellow director Alex Stapleton in front of a virtual audience wherein they discuss her philosophy on directing child actors and how she went deeper while directing when they see us. Well I am I'm so excited to be here with you and to to to start this conversation I know we don't have enough time to go into every single detail that I would like to but I wanted to kick off by saying that I just want to say that your crap the way you have approached the craft of storytelling. Is Revolutionary You've given. Given such dimension to black lives on screen that is A. Deeply. Inspiring. We do and I I can't believe that I'm getting emotional. KEEPING IT OFF IN A. World. War You can't. You can't break me down four minutes in says. We're GONNA, keep it together with. Thank you, I. I. Appreciate. That Berg. When thing that I've noticed looking at your body of work is that you are in it from the ground up and I'm wondering if that's the key to how your your work feel so authentic. and. Especially when you're looking at your most recent film series when they see us. I would love to my first question would be how did you? How did that project come about? How did you? How did you begin? Very happy to be here. Thanks thanks to everyone who's joining us I see all the participants taking up. So that's really nice What else are we GONNA do right we're home. We're not shooting although some of our friends are starting to shoot, which is really exciting. So I look forward to that day sit in jealousy until it comes But how did how did I start when they see us it? It was a long process and I think you know it starts primarily from a place of. Mindfulness and empathy with WHO I I'm telling the story about and whether that's you know when they see us or thirteen or you know Meghan a wrinkle in time, you know my goal is to try to get inside. The mind of the character and really understand the perspective from which I'm going to be telling the story and the perspective of when they see us from the boys point of view it was challenging because everything I read every news piece every article, every legal briefs to be honest not from their point of view. They had no voice in the. Hop Culture Canon as it related to what happened to them during the process how did it feel to them? What were they experiencing? What were they not experiencing and so was a good four and a half year process to try to reverse engineer from all paper that was in front of me. to sitting in the homes mothers to spending you know hours and hours and days and days with men to understanding their extended families. How big touched they didn't that was the base worker for. You know we even started to right and so that's how I I try to approach. Everything is from a place of research and historical analysis. Because I'm a big nerd and also just the way that I know to build character. And originally, the idea was that it was going to be a five part series in you're gonNA follow each. Each character, each each young man or No originally I was going to be film. I originally talk to one of my producers Jonathan King. John. King was a friend who was at participant at the time and we were at A. Charity, kind of cocktail party and I said against the money. Does. I don't have any and I need to pursue. You know the the story rights were the Central Park Five. and. That's all I said I said I'm GonNa make movie. And I'd worked with participant before and literally she said, okay that sounds good. Let's do it. And that's really how I mean nothing's ever that easy but this one was So. He's interest because we're interested in the same things was easy really understanding the form was different because at the that I started this. Is Looking at limited streaming series like that was not top of mind for me to make limited series or a streamer. And so in that for years so much changed about this, my point, my perspective on that form but also see the flexibility in the forum I fell in love with it. It's like wait a minute. So this is technically a five hour movie. Cut Up no commercial like don't have to worry about yes. Signed me up and so the idea that. I could just kind of take the idea of the limited form originally started as a five as I got into start to research and we started to write it felt like well, you're GonNa do five just because Netflix said you could do by because the story really wants to be four, and so in that moment you have to on the story and listened to the story and so glad we made that decision early on. I I'm pretty sure it's the first time someone called Netflix's instead. So I'm GonNa take less than what she gave me in half moving around I. Remember not great people over there. Are you sure you want to just keep the fifth episode in your pocket and just let's just keep it on the books and I said, Oh no, the money on. A moving. Out. amortized across less episodes I'm saying this money I'm saying less product. But they were lovely and. And so yeah turned out to be war. But in my mind early on, you know how you? have to try to have organizing principles for me anyway, organizing principles for for me as I began like, Oh, five hours one for each man. But you know the story telling me to be different. So, what was your approach to casting because that seems like the first kind of Gant to task in putting this besides writing it and in doing that and getting through all the the the court documents and you know all of that aside when you really started to roll up your sleeves and get into it, how did you go about casting the young men for me rolling up the sleeves and getting into it was the writing and the research and to try to be as accurate as possible with the feelings in the intentioned I was a the feelings that men were sharing with me and their families. And my intention to try to share that. Once, we got through that hurdle. Then you start thinking. I need all these boys. It's really challenging to mine young performers who? I won't say can do the work I'll say have been. That are untrained to do it a different way. And that's the challenge even with a storm Reid and Derek McCabe wrinkle in time. So many kids are kind of trained in the NICKELODEON Disney way. and. So big part of it is to look for kids who have not been shrink because it's hard to get that off. There's nothing wrong with those shows but that's different than what we're doing and so that straining that very hyper animated, you know kind of big. Work that we see on those shows that kids love doesn't really translate. So a lot of looking for is. Just as specific background. Someone who is acting is not acting in a certain way and that's hard because our industry as it relates to the on performers really preferring them to be in performance a certain way. There's no conversation about casting that can happen without a a not even just mention a will bow in June you flex coli was Mike Casting director. She's the only casting director I've ever had very For, some reason to conceal continues to. Work with me and and she's really taught me over the years. She's tried to teach me some things. Some things I'm too stubborn to to. Learn, but she you know as as a relates to kids. I don't have kids in my real life. So I don't treat kids like kids you know what I mean. I I DOWN TO THEM YEAH Yeah and I don't think not having kids does that because I've seen prince who don't have kids who really do the Omani thing because I. Don't have kids a lot of people with kids are like move and get. Stopped. At and move over. I think a little bit from I come from the friend. rear. You're that Old Lady. Who's just you know she's like friendly. So I tried to just. See See them where there are in a friend space big part of the cast and getting back to the question. It's about that straining that you're you're looking for. A not that layer of Hollywood veneer training received from young performance, but it's also and with so much of casting who is this kid? Who is family? His or her family the family is going to be such a big part of the process. Right. This is how the actor the young actors going home. This is who they're processing with. This is who when they do very strenuous day that's violent it's emotionally This who they're going home to, and so for the safety of my actors, I WanNa make sure that I am selecting actors who are going to be able to go home to a safe space not safe in terms of you know it's going to be violent with safe in terms of emotionally available because I'm asking them to do work that needs to be processed by kids mind the next day. Hour that even and even in the preparation so I'm really when I cast young people particularly for when they see s I'm also casting the family. And I'm trying to understand who that kid is what they're going home to how they're coming in to me. and. And kind of what their preparation with their support is at home. That's a big part of the selection process for me. I've had not cast kids who were great in the room and I just felt it's wrong to put this kid through that because I don't feel like they're to happen now hell. Not In preparation but in the Processing what they'd have to do i. mean those boys were put through a lot. In this, how did that work with like Asante, black crew? Is is just a miracle boy so home. Is. something. He's never acted before. So active before you got the emmy nomination for this thing, the kid never active he did that he acted in a school play in Baltimore. And he likes to remind me of that but he was this lovely and gist. Of. The things he said to me early on. On the actor you know I he was reading you know. Reading books on theory and study ways and. In just was just very committed to. A larger process but also he came from a family that supported that process. They knew they have the special kid of May were pouring into him in protecting him and you know helping him at all. So for him, you know I love the day a scientist game. I knew he'd had a little because he has someone in his family is an actor, a a well-known after and so with all the boys I said, would if I say something and you don't know it. Tell me. I'm going to be talking about marks and blocking, and if I say a word, you don't know don't act like you know that is the rump in the right thing to do is to say, let's not me right and that happened a lot for many of them but it's not I was I was amazed he'd never been on a set, but he never asked I. Wonder a later. was He just kinda playing. I think he'd studied so much as to what to expect why winning walked in. I remember we did the scene of his interrogation for people who don't know he is he's kid in the red jacket who at the end of episode to hold the Horn plays the horn and a dream sequence in the street he plays Kevin Richardson and. I remember Coming on set and. And we had a particularly. Was the part of the interrogation where he Needed, to rank you know like he needed to get to the point that the actor had told the real man had told us this is when literally broke me in half mentally. And so working with this. Is Not happening. I say this kid. Komo heighten UK comfortable. Okay. Let's make sure you good. Okay. Good what a strikes? Okay, go do it again I'm watching. Come on get they're not getting them like. No go over. Hey. So Le- let's talk through. What what's happening I would what would? Do understand what's going on like how let's break down what's going on and? Go back again with the try I mean I'm going to every every trick I won't give up my membership. Only. Time. Cut and I'm about to call a break like he just needs a break needs a break. Over to and I was like so. Is this him? As like yeah, no this this is the. Like right now, like I'm GonNa. Roll in this aisle. Yeah. Okay. No. This was the part that was again. Oh my gosh I'm sorry. Yes. This is the part action this kid. is mean the whole place grown men grips gaffer's ro everyone is crying at this kid he just. Is this the party wouldn't go for. So anyway I could talk all day about Asante, black? But. He and all of these boys. Men Now. Just gave it. They're all they were all different. They were beautiful and I'm grateful to each. Well, how did you wanted to rewind to ask how how much information did you share especially with your younger cast members? How much did you have to walk through? Because you're unloading in this film are the THUMP SERIES SYSTEMIC Giant systemic issues you know when it comes to race and giant interpretations of how we see Young Black Youth. And then just the facts of the case in Mike. What happened? How did you prepare them? What did you give them? What was that correspondence like without maybe at afraid that you would overwhelm them with too many. No it wasn't afraid of I did not talk about the larger issues and things I had them focused on their guy and their story I told them. I. At the moment that I cast you, I'm no longer the expert for this character you the shepherd for this character you have everything you tell me what he would say and do and move right I trust you now, and if I'm giving you that responsibility you better take it in you better be serious. Here's your homework. got a huge packet. All about a all about their their guide they were. Portraying they had time with the Roman man. It was hard for the boys though I talked to a couple of number mean they're talking to a grown man? And so they have to be that person this adult when adult was young, right? Oh. That was a bit of a process and I would tell them you know don't look for gestures don't look for the way he is behaving just listen to historian fill it in your heart and he'll tell you about how he felt during that time That's all I want you to do is feel similarly, you don't have to behave. Be like him. You just have to feel like you madam out and so So yeah, that's how we worked on it but I didn't want to overload them with the larger part of the process and I told them not even to pay attention to the other story. You know it was enough heavy lifting just focus on your guy. and. You know. Don't let your guide and. You. Now this is you're you're the one, you're the bearer of his story, and so this is on you and I'm going to be by your side, but you know this is for you to do so they ought to really seriously. and. I can't. I can't resist asking what giral drone. Who plays, Corey wise which is an incredible. Incredible performance. You chose to keep him the same throughout instead of casting a younger actor in the version of him he plays. The twenty five year span. Wasn't about him as an actor that that were you saw that he could handle that and how did you work with him specifically? To continue that threat yeah. You know I always thought I was going to have a ten actors playing the five characters but. Durrell came in and auditioned for the young version of Corey. And also came in and addition for the older version of Corey. When essential New York. Let me shot this. Let me try that and it's a bit of a long drawn out story but ultimately I saw him in the room do both in pop. Wow. This lends itself to the way that we've written it because. Ended four episodes episode one to you see boys from their arrests through their trial episode three you see in Rou- round voice to men, but you only see the four that didn't go to adult prison in episode four or you see what happened to Corey from the moment that he is convicted to the end when he's released and so episode three quarry is absent. They just talk about court what happened to Corey where Corey and you drop a warm it's all about hord it's based. Form based on my to Corey of when I I sat with him in Harlem. He said there is no central park by Ma'am for he knew me. There's four plus one. Because they went through one thing but I went through something else that they'll never know and so he didn't. He doesn't like that term. Central Park. Because he feels like it doesn't they all have that same experience and I said, if you work with me and you tell me your story I'll make sure that everyone knows. That while you love while you loved them on support that you had a different story and so that was that intention carry through the structure and so when we came across Giralda Jerome I thought Oh, wow, this could even further highlight that promised that I've made to Corey in that his characterization would be different from everyone else's with one after So you just you know it's not even lucky. I don't even know what it is that you find an actor from Rome who is able to do. In the span of six months that we shot go from. Sixteen innocent with his girlfriend walking through Harlem with this swagger with this red. Hi, top fade to. The truth torture that he endured. And so. Yeah, it was a blessing. And he also it I want to know more about onset. What is the process because it feels like you cocoon you can feel it you could feel it exuding. Onto how how the performances are delivered it the performances are all. Young men and men, Michael K Williams who I've never seen a more vulnerable performance come out of him like how how jangled reliance? Thought this performance was. was because it was just so layered with. especially in the interrogation scene that that guided me and I had to stop watching for a day. because. It was so symbolic and again, it goes back to this larger thing of how you work least how it comes across to me, which is you that once seen after he talks to that way. Cop who tells him Thought, you could trust me but no, not really and he has to. that. So, quickly, go back into the room and look his son in the I as a man. And tell his son to basic you know to to compromise the truth like. The layers of what you're working with what you were working with That day did you how did? How did you? How did you dissect that with micro? What was what was the conversation had had a diet get choreographed people always talk about talk to me about that scene and I appreciate you pulling it out. There were two acquisitions seen. It was Michael Kay Williamson. Acne Jas lastly, Bartok I think it is, and you know that that that white lease officer that's a performance there because when he first starts in the room, he's good cop. You know what I mean, and so he's leaning into that. He's doing this thing in a way that. You know feels very sincere and I wanted folks to. Feel that trust of him. When you first roll out into the hallway, you're trusting that officer you you're trusting that you being protected insert right in that moment by detectives and that be turned I didn't want any of the. Law Enforcement for trails to be. On the nose writer of they're they're they're. The outweigh that officer is is trying to get something to close this case and he's doing what What I'm told by the family happened McGuinness's from good families, perspectives in the perspective of men and this character for Michael K Williams tough because that father. has passed away and thought and the the child and trauma Craig one of the by. has very hard feelings about what is father did. and. So as I'm sitting hearing the story from Linda McRae rest in peace who's away since we make film an Shaun McRae about what happened. I have piece together with Michael, the psychology behind why the father did it. and. It really came from Linda McRae more than anyone. Her interpretation of why in that moment. Mr McRae walked back into the interrogation room and. The Lai, the police, and Michael I talked so much about it it. It really came from not fear but I'm going to protect this way at any cost I believe what that officer has said even though he's shown me to be disingenuous I believe that if I do this, I can take him. Frank and so the direction is. Get them home. Get that way home, and if this man is told you the only way to get him all is for him to save this. Then you'd better get into say it. And and so that was the the engine for those scenes and it was A. Tough Day. You've also. I'm seeing this throughout your work to you. We're talking we're talking about this cop in particular but I do appreciate how much dimension you give to the villains. In your work. I mean I'm calling them villains. But you know even with Salma. With George Wallace let not before we had said the words Vera for me. And with that I have to. Because that lady is how that woman is something else she is a I don't even know what to say one of my favorite actors had really wanted to work with her for so so long. And you get. You get you know as a director, you get an accident that you wanted to work with for. So long onset you feel the way you know you're. I don't know I do feel. This is my day and and We just clicked so beautifully and she was so open in giving and you know she played really hard will there as Elizabeth letter and she she's one that had to interrogate the boys on the on the stand. She's the one that had to. Kind of do that hard heavy lifting on the stand she. Gosh. I can't speak highly enough about the experience of working with her and you know I really whether it's Somma with the with the folks that have to play racists you know whether it's it's you know when they see us with the folks that had to play officers that. Were found to have. been part of a case in which miners were convicted for something that they didn't do. It, easy. And easy and so I find that in a lot of my my work, my black actors are applauded as well. They should because they're. But. They're acting opposite someone that has to apply that pressure and I found that some of my most intense conversations are with the white actors on set who have joined the production because they appreciate the intention and they wanna get the story across but then they have to be the aggressor in seen. You know what I mean and and that's a hard to grapple with I, remember for some. These are these are just background actors in Alabama. Let's start there. All right. They're not even used to anyone in the director. Oral, Union. Having any kind of conversation with done nobody's even. I'm coming over director I'm coming over. We're in the south. And I say, okay. I names album. So happy you're here. and. I hand up Ma'am I just WANNA. Let you know I'm not a racist and I am here to you know 'cause I saw add and I believe in Dr King in wouldn't ask for. Thank you, sir. No. I. Know that you all are not real racist. I'm going to believe that you're not real races 'cause you're here she wanted tell the story these five. So, don't worry. I. Don't think you'll racist. Did you have to act like a racist today? Okay. Okay. We'll do it. So then they continue on and I'm telling them what I want is not on the page but these are the things I want you to yell, and because of Sag you all have to yell this together. So any other directors out there you know you can't have one person saying something that's. Different pay rate. We didn't have a lot of money so they have to say it as a group. So all of you are kind of yelling these following terms, go home in word. and. I'm telling them. What to say faces are falling is getting big lag now. Young. Lady raises her hand. Ma'am. Do you want us to say the N. Word or the N. Word and I'm like, what does that mean I say? The N. Word like. The full word I said the full. Yes. No don't say the words. The N.. Word. Save with full real word. But can I just say in were I said, are you asking me if you can just say the actual words the N. Word like get out of here, inward? Yes. Ma'am I said no Ma'am you cannot. You have to say the word because at that time it was no inward. Back when they said. The real word I mean Alex some of the combos across the movies have been. They've been really telling, but they touched my heart because people you know have a real hard time with and so part of my job while bolstering the black actors in these situations also typically hold hands with our white actors who? Rightly have some challenges. Is that Do you find when you're on a project? On a project like when they see. Do you feel when I do like heavy content with my docs. It's By the end of the day I'm I'm spent I'm drained I. have nothing left to give. It seems like you give so much onset. How do you recharge your battery when you're in the middle of shooting? Oh I don't. I did ask the lot. Tell us about your self care routine. no, you know. We know when we're directing in it. I mean I was talking to a director. He's like yes. Really famous I was on a festival jury with you said. Yes like Sasha's. Said why shooting it was on the weekend yes. You don't resources on the weekend I said I do not get from the weekend. They. Come to they come to the hotel. They give you a massage I said okay well, no, that's good to go I said no I don't do that it like, and of course you you know you you. You you have meals you know brought in the. Catering. I said Oh like crafty like kate catering. Your own special meals that are brought in to nourish you through in vegetables varies. Who who, who, who? Know who pays for that? Oh. The Studio said this your studio base. Respectful. Damage I've got the black woman's deal and there wasn't a chef included but yes. There things that people do I'm I'm sure someone pay would pay for it. If I ask I'm very sure if I said, I, need mills and a masseuse it would be taken care of but I don't because I am obsessed during that time and I'm just waiting to get into the next day I'm trying to sleep I'm trying to restore. I'm trying to say China pray I'm trying to continue to study on constantly iterating on the script and and just just Working to make the best thing happens I'm worst answer of that question. The answer is I do nothing? Sleep and go back to the. What do you do? How do you start your days onset? What do you do when you when I arrived? What are they? At. Different. You know so often on. The indies. But certainly on when they see us, we were in New York. I can't believe how much we were out and about a new. York. When will we be able to shoot like that again, we were everywhere but. You know it was a five hour film and so there was no way to fully prep that every bit of it. So we're rolling prep so days I started the day scouting somewhere else. Something that's coming up release from now or reviewing and approving sets on stages or bill so much that it was very rare that I might first thing I did on the day was land upset. So, that was a big part of that piece or I'd start in a rehearsal for something. The next day was a hundred and thirty four speaking parts casting was on a rolling basis as well as when we started, we're not fully cast. The prep would have been too long expensive to do it in that way. So we were on top of each other. You right you were. You were you were cutting to your host for part of it. Yeah. Yeah. We were in post but you know I I might editors on that incredible Spencer Averick. Terry. Shop Shire and Michelle Zora or so trusted in skilled that. I really. I'm not a big. Cut Watcher while I direct like I'm not really interested in seeing cuts while later That's really different. Some people really like to see cuts us they go. I may say I need to get my mind around how this scene scene looks as it connects to something else give me a rough, but I'm not trying to see assemblies as I go. because I know myself and I know I'll get down on myself and you know let me. I'll do all the depressing stuff later when I get home. So So we were shooting in New York and cutting in l. a. and beyond just things that were needed for continuity or you know obviously things you need for affects to keep that rolling into beat beating the effects, machine. I really didn't watch. Assembly. So so yes, post was happening I was wasn't emotionally engaged. I'm curious. You know just kind of going back because you mentioned shooting on stage To to maybe kind of segue into like where your visual inspiration comes from. The visual language in when they see as is incredible, the production design is incredible. Obviously Bradford is incredible. Where how do you communicate? Especially, with with your work that's based in has a historical context how you communicate the Lens in the way that you wanNA. Shape that story at to look and feel. To your DP production designer your whole team. Just really detailed work in building building by brick together early on on Selma there were some Paul Fusco pictures that I loved that the photographer chick. A Funeral Procession on the train that I was really enamored by had these soft edges kind of. Really. A theory of feel that I brought Bradford young cinematographer of Sound Mind said You. Know I want these frames to look like this was the basis for a lot of our common language you know on on a on a DC comics pilot sniper, HBO MADS DP Matt Lloyd. Completely different references. On when they see us you know something I was we were still finding and and it was really came out of being on the ground in Harlem in the Schaumburg. Projects in prisons in in precincts feeling it was just this. Layer of. Smoke everything felt gray and kind of. Like bowed walking. Yeah. Kind of cloud cloud though as positive since Kinda like stark. And so you know that that Added to our ideas about really shooting through atmosphere on that, there was constant atmosphere going through it. Our poor boys they sit in the chair with bringing the atmosphere pumpkin smoke atmosphere and remember one time. What are the thing was Khalil Harris like so is this Is. Is. This is there's GonNa. Be Smoke in this room, and like you're not going to see in the small, it's like what how can I not I can barely see you said, no, the camera's not going to pick up the snow you feel smoke. But I promise you there won't be smoking. So one of those Roy's didn't believe me that. There's no way all the smoke in this room isn't GonNa be on the camera names actually play in a smoke. Should be coughing and moving this away I said standstill or quitting smoke around you, and so you see that light haze of that red shot group for it. Kid. Which one it was amazed that you couldn't see it because literally the smoke onset was quite thick let the look beautiful. So yeah, it's a it's a it's a process. You build layer by layer and I think if you go into prep you know thinking you've got it off figured out. You know it's just a waste of energy. I started going with references, ideas and a spirit of collaboration around it off, and that's different from some directors were very precise. Mom I. Think I think there's a precision to my collaboration and out Barra will go. But I'm not going in. Lacking flexibility around ideas. All feeds into. Something, that will have my name one. So I always. Sake my head I. I can't figure out rectors who are not collaborative as if. It's GonNa say directed by these nine people I mean ultimately. You, can you get to hear the ideas? Everyone is graciously giving you their ideas. Take, them. You get all the credit, the air. Why fights? If you're confident enough and your position as director than you shouldn't fight ideas. You know what I mean usually the gifts can make you look good. You know what I mean. So Open your arms and take them that's that's how I think of it, and that's how we. WE GET DOWN ON OUR SETS And how important is it to you? Because you do have frequent clobber collaborators like Bradford goes all the way back to with you from one of the early documentaries Mike Sense sounds nice and you can see the style that you guys do together kind of starting to percolate and what nowhere it's. Really it's really there. And it just. What is your working relationship like? With him and and. Guys push cold. Do you how does that process work? So I think you know Radford's work which me looks different with his. Work with Denise Villaneuva in different than his work with a hundred. He he adapts, he can adapt to the look. Of, the director that he's working with and still keep a consistency that feels like his you know I think my work with him is probably the most. The list, the the the least experimental is work with Andrews Delicious like I actually want to take read in dip it in the picture and eat it like butter on Brad. It's so gorgeous and beautiful and just dripping with. Energy Flavor and so so yeah no, it's it's. It's it's On with whether it's Bradford whether it's cure Kelly in Antonio who the DP's sugar setting that look whether it's accurate Kellyanne Hans Charles who were by deep thirteen. you know. Be Slur WHO's. My DP on. You know that that DP relationships oh Wanting to say vital to success for me. Because that is that position in my editors position really are of my best friends in the endeavor the two people that I have to feel that I can trust and rely on in order to. Sue. To get what's in here out. All those choices are really hard to make. Lucky I've had the same editor. For Arts. Collaborate another. Yeah. Yeah and. And so yeah, it's it's it's it's like getting married. You got up choose carefully. What's interesting because you? You have amazing documentaries that you do. You have amazing scripted projects that you do in I. Think it's really rare especially with Spencer. As an editor to had most doctors only work with doc editors and we don't really touch the scripted editors and vice versa. So. Is that like the relationship in how you direct is it change 'em how you give direction or how you work through post? On your scripted material with Spencer versus. You know when you're on the dock space. Yeah I mean for me I think it's all you know it really for me is all storytelling I think my My need to be able to tell scripted feature. Scripted television. DOPP FEATURED DOT television. Now I'm in an unscripted doing unscripted show and doing animation. That comes from a Instincts. That doesn't come from. Necessarily do all these things I wanna be able to always tell my stories. So I want as many tools in his winning weapons to tell my stories. It's possible. Because one day, the day will come where folks don't want to see my movies in. My Net, my scripted features maybe they'll see. My doctors and they'll come a day where they won't WanNa see my docs features will maybe I could tell the story an animated story and they'll come a day where they won't see that wanted to tell the animates it'll be like you know what? Branded content. Let me do that and if they're like, you know what? Not The radicchio like you know what? Sky Writing Stories I I'm Never GonNa not do it so. I got know how to do it in in. The mob because they're not a real precedent or. You know black women directors have long careers consistently creating work not to say say that there aren't black directors been working for a long time with. So many of our heroes are heroines Julie. Dash Arnett was on policy have not been able to consistent. Powered and supported to consistently direct work right and so it's from watching them insane seeing, diversify, many of them teach many of them have gone TV the things that they've done to say, Oh, I'm going to do that. I'm going to be able to always be a moving target because this shuts down I'm going here I'm doing this. It has been helpful especially in this Kobe environment I can't shoot. I've said this for years. We gotta have many tools in my toolbox. In case I can't shoot now we can't shoot and so unscripted television and animation, and you know you can always cut a doc research for your dock and always making sure that there's a way to tell the story. So an answer to the question. When I think about how to make the story that is a function of standard process but I don't think of the story in terms of form I. Think of it as a story I must tell my job is to find the best form and luckily can cause i. Have, trained myself to be able to work in different forms I if I get a story book now. I get a lot of books I can. This film or TV. Yeah, this official or a series. Is the. Or is it narrative? And to have all those tools at our disposal at this point is just so rare. And a beautiful thing I really enjoy. And you're taking so many people with you on the journey my best the other part of it that you know I know that's not about being on onset in a way you know directly related to how you operate you as director but you you're you're navigating these spaces, pass for people to do the same. You know behind you are in front of you are all over. All around all around I did want to selfishly kind of talk about your your Duck I. Think you're documentaries are amazing. I? selfishly wanted to carve out a little bit of time to talk about. Anyone that doesn't know Alex is a beautiful doc filmmakers so that she wasn't introduced as a as a formidable warm. It will warm edible filmmaker but she is. I would encourage you to check her out. Thank you a Vava to job. Thank you. I wanted to to ask you with your when you approach a documentary 'cause I know that your student of history you get way in there how much do you? How much can you at this point? Out The story that you WanNa, tell before you start shooting. Or, do you find your real narrative? You know how you're going to get from? A TO Z in the at any edit a do you have at the rough idea? You always go in with an idea but when I when I analyze it on the back end? Very little in the dock space very little of the original idea makes its way through. Because you get into that edit and. And it's my favorite place. If I ask filmmakers sometime, this is a total nerd director question but I asked maker sometime okay. You can only choose to want you either be in prep. You can be in principle or you can be in post, which would you choose? Eighty percent say. They want to be shooting principal. And? then. The other twenty is split fifty, fifty between Bret and host reme-. It is one hundred percent. Host if someone just gave me the footage. Said, you're you're asleep and we shot hog this. And be like, okay. Cool. Great I. got it from here because. For me post is the place where it really comes together. That's why when I said earlier when I'm on set I'm not really engaged because I'm like I'm GonNa. Get to that. You know when I'm impose it is. That is where I make. That's where that's where Romy that's where I make it. And that's where I have the most freedom. In. Post in that edit with that color with that sound with that all that that is where I really have the least amount of people around me. Even your shooting it's like, okay, free. All right. Come on in. Let's do this and even in A. Lot of people lot of voices but it all gets quieter and Quieter Inquirer at the end of the day and owes its me in Spencer at a little. In one room and you're. To people, it's an. That's right and what other what drinks is there to be in a dark room with your friend and your footage I mean that's a party. So I love it. I love post in end it always changes and that's I think my favorite part about filming. The do you do a lot of test screen for you know? I mean I'm sure some of it might be required when you're in a large studio project, it's might my view to test brings a really changed as I've. matured. As a filmmaker just got older. I used to be very against it. especially, the Studio Environment Sykes Okay so these people are going to tell me. With this store. Very against it very I mean it just felt like stab wounds to have to go through that process and you know I've been through studio process in that way where you know. Sometimes, it's used to. further certain narrative at the studio wants. Backup to whatever they they, want. And and so it's really just come from gaining more control over my projects and being able to to pick partners in a different way that's helped me. Just screenings and here differently I think one thing that they you know some things they don't teach you in film school I would no I didn't go. But I don't think there's a class about how to hear how to get feedback from test grades because that's a whole course had actually hear that feedback in be able to discern. Helpful. Information, and stuff that's just gonNA. Throw you into a tailspin. And and so that's only come. Through. Time. NBA should be able to be comfortable to show something early and to. To, know what I want to get out of it. Right. These are the questions I have about the thing I'm not looking for. Okay everything. You say you're Charlie Brown's mom what do you think about this part? This is the part I. I'm not sure about into some of these tools that I think are helpful in that. You know as filmmakers we need to talk about to each other more. Yeah now. and. That's you know that's all part of the in product. Also, I'm a former market or publicist I get a lot of calls from my fellow filmmakers about marketing publicity and lot. I should start a small side practice call. Your filmmaker marketing presentation is tomorrow and. Should. I get a lot of and I love it. It's still let's my Martin is still get. I don't know how you find out his I don't know how you know we. Used to be art of those filmmaker means on the other side of. I know what the marketing departments going through to get ready for the meeting and I know how to hide things and a fudge. You don't really have the thing you already know a much has. You know just trying to get filmmakers more robust questions to ask help them understand all the different departments are and. Anyway. So but it's it's I think if more directors talked about their full process, there's something about our profession added. It's like we are the leaders. So we know. but I think you know. Some of my best conversations have been about times of wallner ability we talked to and gone through it. And, you're able to get insight into. I wished you know some of the? Makers of note, go make your sewer well-known gone through this stuff or even you know. Filmmakers from generations before who may not be actively making some. There's so much information and knowledge to be shared there especially around navigating the politics with. At least would share more. Well, and that's why I mean like everyone who's tuning in is probably very grateful for you taking time and it's not a wrap up folks because we do have more questions here. For you to take the time to kind of dissect your process. I. I also wonder in my head because I hear you when you talk about directors, we operate in silos we have our own little ecosystems of how we make content. And? Citing I didn't even graduate from college so. Did Not go to film school and often I when I ran into directors that did don't have the film school pedigree. There's Over it now. But when I was younger, it was like who I can't even really let people know that I have no idea what you're. There's so much star in the Khuda you trust because you have to appear to be in control at all times. And it's like you were talking about with your actors like. Giving them permission or encouraging them rather. To to let you know when they had a question. What would you say to? Some of the younger directors may be tuning in right now like Trying to navigate that that that balance you know being taken seriously but also. Trying to to learn as they go. Right now it's tough to find your own try. You know because everyone's not to be trusted and there will be people who are lacking she doesn't know this. So you have to able to talk to people who you trust into. You know I really don't like the Word Mentor I've talked about that before but The because of process in Hollywood, it's so disingenuous. Walking up to someone and saying, will you be my interest like walking up to someone and say, will you be my lover? It's like I don't know you. Know. Why I don't know anything about you because it's for me that mentor ship exchanges, intimate process I'm going to sit down and tell you what I've experienced. I'M GONNA try to help you not do that. I. Need to know you know that you're taking that seriously in feel like you're worth that exchange because it's my time right and it's my heart in it's the way that I feel and so. So with that, you know, I just encourage people to look at building relationships and building kind of circle of folks that they can trust unity at one person. A great friend WHO's the director who I go on walks with we walk maybe three times a week. And and we talk about we talk a lot about work you know and what we're experiencing on calls on what we're. Experiencing on sets and what we're experiencing negotiations were experiencing with actors. Trading pages and all that stuff, and that's just one I knew if she was the only person that I walked with would be enough. Luckily, I'm very fortunate to have more, but if you can find one. One kind soul. Who will look upon you with with? Empathy that we all want as artists. You're ahead of the game. So just find one you do that. Not You but. Person, out there watching. And I wanted to. kind of pivot here but. I am so interested book just again with how you work with actors and your relationship. With someone like who you also direct. Do you is it is it a when you have a relationship outside of A film project. Is that like a tricky thing when you get onto set like you know how to to to kind of take the role as a director especially when you are dealing with? As as as large and Formidable as Oprah is what is it like direct Oprah's A different category generally, do I find it hard to take the director Mantle of theirs someone? I know in real life absolutely not and never find it hard to. Take the director Mansell. Really. But is my favorite thing to do what I need to do is wreck less. For example, when we were prepping for this to come on this. This this this `Cau- Alex you is there book that you WanNa put on the bottom of your laptop to raise up your screen so that our is looking. And I heard myself You don't have to direct zoom fan. Will it back Don't ever don't directors zone and she was gracious. She went she found a book she put it up wasn't quite high. If there was on my said I'd say, no higher but I said, you know what? I said it's beautiful. It's fine. So what I need to do is back. From directing but a different thing now you're dealing with stratospheric icons, legends Sicily Jason. You know there are a few people where you get into a real space of what am I going to tell this person? Like literally, what can I ever tell Sicily? Tyson. Is Not that I can tell her. Sicily Tyson said to me On the show I have called chairs today. In, there were a bunch of directors who are GonNa be directing or through these shoes series regular. Direct. I like to be directed. I'm just telling you that right now some people don't want direct me and that upsets me I want to be directed I, said okay. Yes, ma'am. I said how much? Do you like to be directed I. Want Feedback I WanNa know I want answers to my questions. I WanNa know what to do. Okay. Thank you how gracious to know that you are a living legend and you're walking onto that and everyone's like, what do I even say? I remember reading an article about how either out. Pacino Robert. Deniro And he? It was a someone that he was directing was fairly new and the article was about the the director, and the director said that's an always stuck with me, and this is before I was directed. Will be wonderful to have that kind of graciousness. The director said he overheard to narrow say. I'll call you back my director's coming. In that distant hearing that it made the young director feel like he thinks of me as a director like I'm GonNa step up and. Be. I think that kind of graciousness. If even with directors note can give to their their crew members in a department hits. You know sometimes you get into these environments. I'm finding a little bit now for me that people might be. I don't. It's unfortunate but people might be hesitant to tell me what they really think. and or to correct me or to give me an idea and so you know to ask question and I think that gracious to open up space to say this is my expectation is that we're GONNA. Be In collaboration you gotta ask questions you got on. Likeness Tyson did like. Oprah did very early on. Is What we should be doing for each other. They did that for me and made it a lot a lot more comfortable. Not all the way comfortable because it's Ok to say. So could you? And she says. Yes You. Can thanks. Okay. Rolling whips giant yen. It's very could be demonstrating early on, but we've done it a couple times now. So it's easier. Always been interested in comparing what you are you guys interacted on our. What the process was like on Selma versus wrinkle in time and in wrinkle in time, it's like she's inness with the three. Mrs. They had such mindy They played off each other like was that was that all a candidate decision edged to to to cast the three of them Were there did they the two of them agreed I mean how did that all work out? Well, Mindy was the first one that I wanted because I wanted a mrs who wasn't black or white. And she was she was in my early early before the Castro was on the project. I said you know we gotta get indicating and because I needed a comedian I felt for this one particular Mrs who didn't talk. Much she only spoke. Speaks in quotes. So I mean at the script is actor can only speak in quotes. You need someone who's GonNa put some vision that make it. Funny. You know. So I knew I needed a comedian for it. I didn't want anyone who was black or white at wanted another another culture, another another kind of person and Minnie was my first choice and. And she was the first. Yes. From there you know. I remember someone saying in the reproduction were in early casting. This. person this character sounds like Oprah. kind of like her. Asker. And I had faster rule. She said she loved the book can. Okay. And then res such a big massive star and you know that ask big I did not know her at all nowhere well-managed is all. But I think reese was as stratospheric she is now we were I mean we. Talk to me like lady you run Hollywood companies shows. Do you have? Your. Producing an acting in an have the book in Him. Those perfect looking chance like what? What are you doing in your cooking on I G my? What is happening? You perfectly dress everything's ironed. Actually does tick talks. Funny and What are you doing? Yeah she's incredible. She's at. Yeah. So they were a great threesome and. Them, working together, they kind of lighten They lightened I. Think they had a lighter weight on their shoulders because it wasn't all along one person like they all have been leads this one was an Anon- Somboon. They were able to play off each other and at the time it was super fun were making that smell. And how was that because you know you you right so. Basically. Everything that you may just about right of wrinkle. So what was that process like? How did you? How did you incorporate? Jennifer lead. into the process or you know, how did you guys? Work and what was that process like adapting like one of the most. Cherished books around yeah legitimately and genius you know? Yes he's wrote frozen. Across yeah yeah and. Then, enrolled winkle but also runs. Disney. Animation things does national. Yeah. She's a president of shape was a writer and producer, and now she runs the company she's like. You know. The. screenwriting started just as a MC and how. Ends. The thing that's Jennifer. Lea Great Lady but ultimately going into wrinkle. You know I knew it wasn't mine. Not none none none nothing it was. was a mind script wasn't mine? You know this was me trying to serve Disney as best I could within The way that I knew to do things and so it was a very different way of making films for me something that I'm so happy I experienced I I don't I don't think I was particularly healthy within the the time wasn't wasn't particularly good at it There's some folks rape friends of mine who are really good at really good at taking things that are. Within that studio environment and making it their own and being able to hang onto. Their voice through the process I I definitely struggled with that. There I look at that film and I'm out of it and I think fondly on time making it. And when I see the film is like. You got some good stuff in there. That was never meant to be there right like I'm I'm I'm I'm. I'm. infiltrated. And got some things in that. You know I think wouldn't have been there if I wasn't there and. Are An unhappy that their on screen and they exist. But ultimately you know. That, that that process, it's a different process than when they see this or thirteenth or sugar anything where the buck stops with me and I can control it also if I see something wrong or something that fitting or something that working I came to fix it. Right myself out of it. I can edit my way out of it. I can direct my way into it and you know it's a different animal. So but beautiful experience wind changes. And how would you when you look back at like even your first, the first season that you put together for que- sugar `nother show is I mean it's like it's just A discount on and on and on and my mom actually sent me a list of questions to ask you about journaling moments not appropriate to ask three questions. Is the. So that is a secret cult following. Watch quit sugar, love, queen, sugar, and. Majority Black Women Audience but I'm always surprised I have this thing where when people And I'm fortunate in my life. This makes me emotional I think rebound fortunate in my life to be able to walk out of the door as A. Black woman director I mean. And for people to. Look at me. Come up to me. I WANNA talk to. and. Smile at me every day I get smiles. I think of so many people. Emotional in this world who are never smiled upon. Every day my work has brought smiles into my life in people walk up to me in a smile me and in that moment, right before they're going to speed. I used to think they're going to ask you're gonNA say something about this person looks like they'll say something about. This person looks like thirteen. It's going to be about thirteen. This person and the one of the joys of my life. Is stopped doing that and I've just taken smile and I am I'm marvel. At the kinds of people talk to me about different projects that you never expect. The Filipino custodian. Came Up to me in Washington DC. As I got off an elevator I was walking away Ma'am tapped me on the back is you are you the lady who made wrinkle in time? Yes. I tell you how much. That book saved my life and will tell me the story and I would never imagine him. Or the I was a shooting. When they see us it was a woman Blonde Maga-. Okay. Like full on. Prison staff. In New York City who was assigned to me to take me where I need to go whenever I walked off the set I it was a working prison so she had to be with me. And we had a nice rapport. Not, a nice rapport and at the end of it she. I said to her so you you know. You believe in the Great thing. And she's like, yeah, you know I do. And we had a conversation and. Then, start talking about Roth Angel Queens sugar route. Angel is combine your back man. Yes. We sugar who does not have anything to do with this lady there's nothing there's nothing connecting this lady in that and she broke down I. Don't think he should be regardless because she she has her own issues shades to be rehab and none of the. Mind blown like just. This is these are the gifts these the joy that I get to experience with or clock next to me talking to me about I. Don't know what your question. No I put this again like where we start at the beginning of this conversation, it's why your work is radical. It's why the power of what you're doing and you know queens sugar, which by the way, my mother flew from Houston Texas to allay to come see you in the past. Two years ago. Like flu. Known just to come see you. You Know I. I see the power that that decrease sugar has in that audience. When I look at even my own mom and like. When she watches, November mom is black southern woman who's a lesbian who grew up? With me a kid in the eighties like I mean you know the most we talk about living in silos. That my mom lived in the silo. Yeah, and what you do with the show like Queens Sugar. Is. You give people these access points. You create a character like no against like my mom like, oh, at like five she left Nova and he's never been able to enjoy like kind of the the family drama kind of show has to separate herself out of it and you put everybody an even within our own culture. and. That is like that is sheer. Mac It just it's magical. It's It's to me. It's it's activism. It's it's. It's it's all of the things that changes like how we how we. How we deal with each other, you know in this crazy country. Just starring Dj but yeah, like it's they'll be okay. Yeah. Okay. But I also feel that Queen Sugar. You, you have the the icing, but you also kind of. That's it's a really powerful show you're dealing with like systemic racism. Life after incarceration. Sexuality. Within the bucket me so much stop is packed into that show. How do you know like? Okay, I think we've got we're a little bit on a soapbox right now or like we how do you measure the dance i? Think we sugar a combination of soap operas soapbox. Just looking for the soft space in the middle you gonNA walk away from a season of Queens sugar with a character who has you know had a a very scary encounter with a racist Cobb. You'RE GONNA be dealing with. Land issues you're going to be dealing with you know you know Fear around the Trans Community within the black community you GONNA be dealing with issues of faith challenged all wrapped in you know. Six. Packs. Of Beer of APPS. Ray Close. you know some rafts. You Know Romance and the idea is I just want you to watch you know I want you to get the protein. Bar But I'm GonNa, put it in a snickers rapper. And you'll be eating approaching GRONK snickers. So you know our audience, you know come come around angel you know stay for novus politics. And he has a lot. He has log onto that character all of them are built. Dominant in adapted macbook taking those characters and putting them in this world was built This you know they look one way. They're functioning within the story and wave at hopefully can can can take us to different places as think about issues within the black community but I love I love hearing about it from Sisters Black Women? And I also just shocked at this very small numbers of people who aren't black who watch it mostly southern white women. And I was on a on a on a a native peoples reservation and. Working on a project and The project I was with a friend and. I couldn't believe how many native women were telling me that their favorite shows sugar it was set for a reason. Made me so sad. What else will we what we anything watch with us? So it felt close if family structure. Close I understood. Auntie and you know what? I mean everyone who's in it at understood the anx that understood that rural feel and it was in nat moment that I decided to start developing us a show similar. So. All all native cats. Wow, and which is so good at the script ish. So Great. But just the idea that that the work in the intention that we have with work, you never know as an artist where that intention is been ricochet in. Touch and how you know when I'm making no GA, you know I may not specifically thought about her mother is nothing better than hearing that there's someone out there who sees or connects with that character there's just nothing better. Seventy, she's almost seventy. I will. He's got to come to the center. Well we had we have about ten more minutes so I feel like we we. We should. Go back to Selma. It would feel I would not feel right ending this conversation. Not Talking about John Lewis and Reverend. C T Vivian. Who both passed away. On the same day. What was your? How much interaction did you have with them when you're creating? While talking about reverend. C. T. Vivian I as I was making sound. It's similar does like working on some DC comics up right now you gotta get to know the superheroes to be able to create the world. And you have to know their powers so that you can create the story in so how their powers work. So that's how I approached some, they were all super jails to me in the story wasn't just about kings about it about all at. So I studied them all watch tape on them all read all their books as I can really understand that and I have to say out of all of them. See TV. Bay. At. One. So when we invite into the set And I interviewed him a little bit on the phone I remember the day that he walked on the set. I. Could. I. Could even get myself together hours. So it was like superman walks on the set I was so sweaty on and so. You so great to me and still. Himself as I'd studied him and I had the occasion to to be around him a bid in the premier activities and just was Everything, you would want your hero to be. John. Lewis Congressman I've never call him lose Hong Congressman. I was much more too much more. He was really UN ambassador young with the to printed it on most of the scripts. And he This a love we love. And it's been so much time with me. And answered every stupid. That he probably answered two thousand times. My favorite thing is when you would say, no, one's ever asked that question. No one. How this week, it happened maybe four times. but so gracious. So lovely. So call and check on me just checking in came to the set of times. Always, gave the best. In a great advice that that went beyond the film last time I saw Bo. Was this year earlier this year I saw them together mile at. Tyler's opening of his studio. I'll tell the story as we. Get towards the end. So it's Tyler Perry's opening of the studio. which I don't feel like folks in Hollywood pay enough attention to or given up of to to what he's done. There is extraordinaire you have to walk to to believe it. It is every studio in Hollywood. So imagine the universal lot the Warner Lot Disney, lot of paramount lot Sony Lot of. All put together times three. That's how big land is that he has a former army barracks, right? He's taken that over with sound stages state of the art that he's built scratch and like full towns that can like Oh, this is full town. This is a small. Is this a neighborhood notice not a neighborhood RV sets. Yeah these are. But it can't be as far as the I could see like what you would usually do with visual effects. It's real and there. I usually just have the house and. The effects takes over the street. Now we could just. Pick. Solar at the opening of this and it's a hot ticket and the invitation to come the summer the summer before the save the date in bike opened up automatically confetti. It was like, Oh, my Gosh isn't the antibody? Yes, this is going to be fantastic and everyone's GonNa. Get their Atlanta black-tie dressed. Everyone it's beyond say it's Habur next it's If they were black and done anything of note in the culture last in a living there there I'm not playing with you. So every Mary J. Lo I mean. Everyone, you can make it every grammy's you've been to or watched. Everybody personnel to manage their. It's a big room. People are just mesmerized by the even even stars resume raised by the stars. Oprah. Everybody? In off in the corner in a in a place of prominence but still like not in the Hullaballoo because why would they WANNA be? Is, Congressman John Lewis Reverend C. T Vivian and Ambassador Andrea. And their companions I see them across the room to them. I saved gentlemen hi remember me. Sit There We remember you. You talked your ear off two years. Yes. We remember you sit down. Eggs. I haven't told the story about about hugs round. I sat down next to a congressman and I. Happen to this country what's going on in February January February. I happen to us. And he said we'll be fine. We always are we survive this is going to exist. I said, what do I do I do he said to me? And so I hope we do I hope we do everything I try to do everything and take that in the way that it resonates with you. Whatever everything is to you it doesn't mean. Quantity means. Quality. Quality in which we're telling our stories quality with which building our crews. Quality within. which we're. Gauging with each other listening to each other you know it. All matters is basically what he was saying it all matters every little thing matters. So this matters you matter Alex Stapleton. Sh and thank you so much. We're doing this with me. I'm really glad you agree I. I'm just honored to to because this is what we do. This is a part of our culture. For the first time we get to share the oral tradition and we get to make movies we get to make content and you you are are are. Are, your your shining that that that bright light you know that we can all flock to so i. I'm just so happy to be here with you as well. Russia was in person but. Next time. On each other and I just wanted the DJ. For allowing me to this you know I don't know Obama Likely Pick I. Don't know what instigated this invitation but I accepted I received I going to thank a whole DJ staff board. Special Projects Jeremy progeny. Committee Jeremy We gotTa do more of these We only we only scratched the surface with your worker. So thank you today. Thanks out things everyone watching each day H. I. Everybody I. That wraps up this exclusive discussion with Eva Dube Rene. If, you'd like to hear more from the craft director series checkout episode to sixty three, which features director meaning leader discussing her extensive mammography or visit our youtube page to find discussion David Russell Leslie Linka gladder and Guillermo del Toro. The director's cut is available wherever you get your podcasts. Also don't forget to subscribe rate and review, we'd love to hear your feedback. You can help fellow film buffs the show. Thanks for listening and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by the directors guild from Erica. Music. is by Dan Wally.

director Alex Stapleton Emmy Award Spencer Averick Corey wise Selma Netflix directors guild of America Director Eva Harlem Jonathan King Bradford editor Hollywood Academy Award Kademi Award Berg Meghan engineer John
Seahawks Get Adams

First Take

39:25 min | 1 year ago

Seahawks Get Adams

"All Pro Safety Jamal Adams gums to the seahawks traded for the jets Saturday. After seven month, five track disputes seahawks up to par with the pair of first round picks a third round, pick and safety. Brandon McDougal well before Adams. Amish appeared Friday's New York Daily News Ripping Organization. The jets will will include talks the Seattle seahawks. Recently that they can drag wow and develop really good talent and retain them. But the forty niners and the Dallas cowboys were. Involved in this process, this Franken's their holes. Was Already rock a playoff spot I think ends a top Qua- abuses of plans lead and in day. He's a safe. Way with, all day. Jeff fans got to be through. All. Right and we're thrilled to be joined by Bruce Irvin Super Bowl Champs Hawks linebacker. Bruce, thank you so much for making some time for us today and we wanted to get into this mega-trade obviously getting Jamal. Adams joining your squad, but I. I want to get your thoughts on the breaking news story involving baseball now I know the seahawks report to training camp tomorrow. We've just heard that. The marlins have postponed their home opener, and now the Yankees and Phillies as well, and that was due corona virus outbreak. What are your thoughts on that? With the fact that you report to Training Camp Tomorrow? I mean I didn't even know what happened to. Turn into, but I just I this an interesting It's an interesting time in America right now and. You know obviously safety's I so. I agree a hundred percent with what baseball is doing but me as far as being worried. What situation? I if I if I told you that I, didn't think about it would be lying so I have complete faith in the seahawks organization that they took the cautionary measures, the necessary steps to make sure that we're all going to be. Safe in a healthy environment. Not only do now on this show up in You know, see what happens. So what was moving on moving onto? WHAT THE BIG NEWS! That just happened for you guys? What was your reaction when you first heard about the fact that you're going to playing with Jamal Adams this upcoming season? Man, soon as I've seen the trade I'd say John Schneider like man a hell of a job. You know so. Anytime you got added top top five top ten player like there. Is always a win. In all, they gave up a lot, but I I believe in my heart. He's he's well working things on companies I'm doing great. Thanks for your Shit. Bruce when you see him play, watch him on film. What is it about? His game jumps out to you that you think it'd be really helpful for your defense. You know that's the number. One thing I noticed Washington state. guy expect a quarterback of May overfill taboo. The coverage do everything so What more can you ask for it in a player and he obviously is a leader he. He's very emotional guy that. LOVES LOVES THE GAME OF FOOTBALL, and you know when a guy loves the GAME OF FOOTBALL I. mean. That's all you can really ask for so like I said. It's an honor to did your place on and. Hopefully. It could be many years to come. I high hopes for your seahawks team especially now, so tell me this. What squad are you most looking forward to lining up against this season? I was I. don't I'll sixteen really on. What about Tom Brady? Tom Brady's in the NFC now. Who I was said NFL Kaz. Though because that's my hometown and played their eight weeks in a you know I don't think things went as they should when I was there so. I feel like I got a bone to pick with them, so I was stayed. At first game of the year is the most. For to? Bruce you now have been through the Legion of boom and the Legion of zoom just got Jamal Adams. How would you compare the two I know you haven't played with Jamal Adams on this team yet. But how would you describe the difference between the Legion of boom and now the Legion of Zoom? Will. The leasing boom was a proven group You know those guys did a year in year out for a long time. That's what his league is about about consistency. Lobby nothing lightning in. Those guys were not there You know I've seen. Daily you know those guys come in and work their butts off? You know as much accessible guy. Had they never let it get to them? Guy Still was hungry guy still humble. Guy So criticism, and and try to critique the game as much as possible so I really take. It will never be a time like that and Seattle again, but. As far as leader zone, so you call it. I think those guys have a lot of potential. And you know you gotta put in the work to be successful, so like I said. It's no be interesting to see what these guys can do, but I have. One hundred percents faith in all of them. well as somebody who played in that previous era. Do you see it is your responsibility to bring some of that accountability that you remember from then? I would say so. Yes, I go around. I was I was a younger guy, and I've matured into a man now. So I think I'm a little bit more outspoken. You know Baghdad. We had so many leaders in so many, so many guys is just like I just Kinda. Stay back and play my role so this time is this time around I? Think it's a different situation from me I'm older. I'm coming into a younger group so I think. I'm going to be more vocal. GonNa lead by example and you know hopefully. Those guys just take take. Take me under and we just out to go. All right well, we can't wait to see it especially. seahawks falcons week one with a chip on your shoulder. We'll be looking at that matchup within the matchup. Pros appreciate you stay safe. Thanks for the time. Policy from state farm gets you collision coverage and this radio ads on state farm gets you coverage of this beloved ninety hits who to call. Guy? My For more coverage isn't state. Farm. Dot Com For businesses around the world, today isn't a restart. It's a rethink that's why they're partnering with IBM to change they from supply chains to customer service. Let's put smart to work visit IBM. Dot Com slash smart to learn more. Breaking news into I take the Miami, Marlins Home Opener against the Baltimore Orioles on Monday night. It's been postponed as coronavirus cases continue to pop up among the teams seven more players, two coaches with the Marlins have tested positive for the virus as an outbreak has spread throughout their clubhouse and brought the total cases in recent days to at least thirteen sources familiar with the situation I've told us here ESPN. The marlins remain in Philadelphia continued to undergo testing, and we're also hearing too. Marley Rivera's reporting this that the Yankees phillies game will also be. And now we bring in our friend. Be Analyst. Jessica Mendoza Jessica I. Know How excited you were about this season. You know we've had you on leading up to this clearly disappointing news on a on a superficial level sports fans. But how concerned are you about the spread of this virus this early on? I'm scared. I mean honestly I've like so many of these last three days was beyond Giddy and just seeing baseball return to the field, and what's the point of sport? Anyway, right? It's too. It's a distraction. It's a way of forgetting about really what's happening in our country is bad or good. Is that is? That's exactly what sport does, and it did the same for me and. and. This was a slap in the face this morning, and honestly even yesterday when you start to hear three cases four cases, and by the time I woke up that number to eleven just gives us a reality of where we're at and the fact that this is something that is not only not going to go away, but needs to be handled in a very different way. Just considering we've got. I believe it's eight players so far who have tested positive? What do you think or how long will it take for the models to be in a position where they can return to the field? Oh it's GONNA be weeks in my opinion if they do it the right way and the fact that they've been played yesterday. Mean let's talk about that. There were quotes within the athletic on Sunday morning from their key players. They had a team meeting and talked about that point. They had already have three positive tests and there concern amongst the clubhouse. Should we play this game? Game or not, and then the consensus came out. Yes, WE WANNA play. We want to get back on the field. It'll be fine. You wake up this morning. You got eight more players and really my concern right now, and I think for a lot of people all Eiser Philadelphia because yes, we see what's happened with the Marlins, and there might be more positive cases that. That come up. But when you're talking about the future Major League baseball when you're talking about the NFL and where they turn, it's about how this affected the teams. They played against so for the more marlins playing against Philadelphia all weekend long and now they will be tested. We will find out tonight if there are any Philadelphia players that now have contracted the virus if If they have think about what that means, so it's not just about this marlins team, but about whether you're playing in sharing a ball with another team that is being exchanged everything that's happening. Yes, there are more spread out than any other sport, but still if those phillies players come out with a positive test now we see something and we're talking even more bigger picture. Even if they don't Jessica if you played for the Yankees, how would you feel about using the visitors club? You're using the MARLINS clubhouse. Not The phillies. The phillies are using there's how would you feel if you were the Yankees and you had to travel to Philadelphia? Reason the Games postponed. I mean I I, was texting Maron. Boone, I'm just like. How is this even going to be played tonight? Let alone tomorrow to your point. Max is the fact I wanna get anywhere near that clubhouse. They actually brought their own staff because they didn't even WanNa be around the staff that was in that visitor clubhouse, so they traveled with their own so that they be the ones within the clubhouse. If they have to be there, so yes, this is the postponement, but if I'm a Yankee player Max, there is no way that I want to be anywhere near there for days not. Not just tonight's game. You're looking at a postponement of when first of all you're going to have. Test results are so many questions that need to be answered, but let's be real. We're talking about health right now. This is an injury. This isn't Justin verlander going down with flexor strain. This is the corona virus. This is something that can affect you. And now we're seeing the longevity of it. How how it can affect you. That's what's hitting home. And if I'm the wife of one of those players I'm telling you get your butt back to New York. I don't want you to be anywhere near Philadelphia. Good if I, I think that without a bubble situation or maybe for sports like baseball football, you need multiple bubbles. You have a very very low chance of finishing the season, but you would think that baseball has some protocols in place where if a visiting team was infected, had multiple players infected with the virus or even one. They have some way to sanitize that locker room quickly. Are you aware of any protocols that baseball has? That can mimic of bubble in any kind of way. It's not in the one hundred thirteen pages that are in protocols of how all the safety protocols that were put in place. There is nothing in there once. There is a positive case. The plan right now is to handle it on a case by case I. Do say that I've been doing K B O Games in South Korea, and you can think what you want of these game since May, which really have been some of the first to be played. They have not had one positive test and their protocol from day one is if they get one then shut down for two weeks. Shut down nobody's playing and the. The idea of that knowing as a player. If I get this virus, I am ending this for weeks for not just mean not just my team, but this entire league that's in their protocols, and they knew that going into it, so yes, one hundred thirteen pages and I. Give them credit for everything that they're doing as far as prevention within those one hundred thirteen pages. That's prevention. Now we're here. The the fact is we have positive tests. What's in the protocol for once? The test happened and there's nothing in there one hundred thirteen pages. It's team by team basis and that we're really going to see how MLB reacts. No question in just I thought it was interesting. The fact that you said as a wife you would tell your husband to come home and Auto Peres. I asked him I said. What would it take for you to opt out of the season? And he said all it would take as my wife saying it's time to come home. Obviously, you're also an athlete or an athlete, as well tons of accolades. We all know your story. Do you think he would even be comfortable. Playing or or having you know your husband play if a player and you have children at home at this point. I mean the athlete is the where I go I, and I would wanNA play I mean that's that's honestly all you want to do in this and to be honest without fans last few days it reminded me so much of backyard ball of being a kid going out and just playing to play the smiles on players faces. The way they're interacting is even different than we've seen in a regular season because there's not fans. Fans and there's just literally a want to play. I want to play. They want to play. I don't think it's a question that, but yes, when you start to think about the health concerns I don't think anyone's comfortable. I spoke with Mike Trout four days ago and he flat out said. I'm still not comfortable. He is playing. We're seeing a lot of players. Decide to play, but it doesn't mean that they're comfortable with it. No question and we'll see if that's even able to continue. We were talking about finishing seasons right now. We're having home openers being canceled. It's very scary and the NBA is looking like the winner right now if there could be a winner and all of this with having the bubble all set up Jessica, thank you so much for being with us and we will talk to you soon. Stay safe for donor throwing you off your game. Stick to a winning game plan with odor eaters, featuring three advanced odor and wetness. Wetness fighters. The lineup provides long-lasting odor control plus more to keep your feet on their game. Ota Readers powder provides outstanding moisture control, clear drying sprays the MVP in preventing athlete's foot wall insoles were continuously manage wetness will adding a layer of comfort. Pick up today at Walmart target, CBS dollar, general or other fine retailers, order readers destroy foot odor with the best in order defense. Was texting this guy before you came in, so you said you never talked to him. And say hat to Hello Sir. Colin. Congressman John Lewis Hi how you doing brother. Brother Fine. Thank you for all your work for your leadership. You have. Church me. You have inspired me. And to see you get an. They're pushing and in. Done so much. not just for the American community of before the war community. I said thank you Are You I love you? For paving the way for an opportunity like this. Is, is great to finally connect. You are doctor. Mississippi, about you all the time. We have great conversations so. Is Great to find the have this conversation be with to connect? The late Great John Lewis Speaking with Colin Kaepernick back in two thousand eighteen, the civil rights icon offering praise to the man who has become the face of the modern day fight against social injustice Congressman Lewis will lie in state today as they pay their final respects to the legendary activists on that note, joining us now is the man who introduced the to the great. Great Role in Martin. He's the host of Roland Martin unfiltered six PM Eastern correct me. If I'm wrong role in every single day you can check him out on multiple platforms and Youtube role in first of all. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for letting US air that that clip and that special moment and I just need to say one thing. That just highlight John Lewis's character yet again. How deferential in humble! He was with Colin Kaepernick. He ceases to amaze me. He's just such a class act in terms of how he conducts himself, but all right. That's enough for me. Wrong I want to hear from you, so please tell me why was it so important for you to connect those two? Well, as interested in Colorado, actually texting. Way there and I tried to I, was talking to Congressman Lewis before the interview. I was doing these series of interviews in advance of M. Okay Fifty, which commemorated the assassination of king in April, two, thousand eighteen, and so I called Cotler and before the interview he didn't pick up so I went ahead the end the because we have much time. And then he called during the interview, so I pick it up and I hand. That's why didn't go to the conversation and the we have is a miracle because we. We have three cameras, shootings, whole interview and we putting. Hard, drive crash, we actually thought we lost his entire interview. and luckily the only camera that survived was the one that was on John. Lewis I didn't need me. So, thank goodness for that, but it was. It was really amazing and what you saw there was you saw the appreciation between freedom fighters in? Have you talked to? And I've talked to numerous civil rights, activists and figures in sports. When I got the Hank Aaron award from Hank Aaron and same thing he hit and he said Hey. I've never met Collin and I committed those two together. Put them on the phone, and there is a connection between freedom fighters who understand of the struggle and the sacrifice, and that's really what you heard there and views here the full clip he actually invited. DC He said there are a lot of members will love to meet you and talk to you and also young folks here and so it really was in the mazing moment. Muhammad Ali refused induction. Services. Refused to go fight in Vietnam. He was vilified by the mainstream. And the Counter Cultural Forces of course, idolized him for it, but eventually the. Winds shifted the prevailing sediment was that Ali was a great American Hero when Colin Kaepernick originally tried to draw attention to police brutality. Even though we have instance of his instances of it all the time. We didn't always have a pandemic that changed what was normal for people and a moment like George Floyd murder. That says the winds shifted again and Colin. Kaepernick goes from vilified by the by the mainstream to now it's changing. No, actually maybe he's hero. What do you think capture Knicks legacy ultimately will be? Of course, what you just described is the continuous for black people. The rally years Dr King was called a radical even Roy Wilkins. He ran ended place, EP and Nineteen fifty-nine. Of course we see what ends up happening. That's the history of black people in America in the moment John Lewis was not deemed an American. He wrote Eric holder our texting last week, and it was a photo of John Lewis a reverend. Joseph Lowery. Vivian Ambassador Andrew Young and he said bounding off two point Oh and so that's America, but we do is in his country. We create these I call these civil rights mass dots. We treat out the key like he's bobblehead. Figure where we pull them out on Oh my God. What's so great? But in the moment? America hated them and so I. Think what you're saying with. Colin Kaepernick you have this whole new generation of athletes who are not the same as the guys. They were not the same as a magic, Johnson or Michael Jordan. who were not in bold in the take these actions to see athletes out there leading protests players with the Boston Celtics others when you see what Lebron James doing giving one hundred thousand dollars for the Florida restoration coalition, which trying to get the right to vote back with people who were formerly incarcerated. That's what you're saying now and so would Colin Kaepernick. The it was. He unleashed this this stinging inside of these athletes today men and women who say you know what we don't have just be all about sports. All about the money can use our power to change this country to rewrite the history and redefine America. Role? mollycoddle pointed to an early about kind of the humility of Lewis in the way that he's photographic. Ability like I. saw I forgotten about this after you pass that he was Jesus. Video from my president is black, which is something that nobody would have expected? You're sitting sitting congressmen let alone a man with the Reverend John. Lewis possesses to wind up doing so from you and your experience with him. How important was that approachability that he had because he's luminary figure, but also close for. For a lot of like with the hands on and ask the most important thing, if you wanna go biblical the woman with the blood problem. If she could not touch the him, Jesus, she would not have been healed. I say that because that's what it means to be able to be able to reach somebody chuck somebody talk to them. He made himself available. But that's what many. Many of these figures Reverend C, t Vivian and lowering the Andrew Young and so many others they speak at places, and they stop and talk to folks, and they take phone calls and they're. They're willing to engage the next generation because I think the problem for many of us today as we look at them as being seventy eight thousand five, but we forget they were eighteen. Eighteen nineteen twenty years old, and so they understood what it meant for somebody to be able to show them appreciation people forget the student nonviolent court committee. That's the organization that John Lewis was in, and we have to understand that James Forman, who was the executive secretary of Organization and actually I? I was just reading his book again. His book called the making a black revolutionaries. That's important because what a congressman John, Lewis and others realize that when you look at present day when you look at Meka, Mallory then, when you look at the saw, sore and Brittany Pat Net and tap Poe and folks are all across the country. They are modern day John Lewis. Diane Nash Septum Clark. James Oranges and so they're doing the exact same thing. They'd simply pick the baton up and run their own race. Now the most tangible part of John Lewis is legacy was the voting rights act of Nineteen Sixty Five, which twenty thirteen was decimated by the Supreme Court Raza exact. I was GONNA say to your shirt. Explain to people who are not as familiar with that the significance of the voting rights act in what has happened to it since. Well first of all black people have never really had the same rights as white Americans. That is the moment you're born Abbey's. Pass additional laws to give lactose rights which really were trying the constitution, a constitution remember that was written when we were considered three of a person, and so the problem with the Voting Rights Act was in order to even get past it had to be they had to had to. Affirm every twenty five years, and so it up happening was these southern states did not want the fact that they had to read will permission, and so within the Voting Rights Act. You can have pre clearance, and so, what ended up? Happening was all these different locales where they had a his discrimination discrimination came. The voting had to get approval from the federal government. They made any changes. Changes to their laws, they sued shelby beholder. A decision Eric holder was attorney general. That's why his name was on at the moment, the Supreme Court struck down that in the pre pre-clearance clause was deemed unconstitutional. Being states went crazy passing boaters suppression laws. You saw more voter ID laws. We have seen moving thousand voting locations. Shut down in the past ten years. We have seen massive. Impression being live, Republicans, in this country in North Carolina. They was so dastardly. An evil with a federal judges ruled at that was laser like precision targeting black people. You even have folks removing from the roles, and so what we are now dealing with John. Lewis Dodd, fighting the very same thing he was nearly killed for on that bridge, unbloodied Sunday that march was about voting rights. It was about trying to get the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five, and so we'll people need to understand and this is. Why Non Black people was important what you're seeing? Portland now the places non black. From this if you're Asian and you get the vote in your native language, you gotTa thank. Black folks because that's a provision but sixty five voting rights act. There's so many different things. People have been able to benefit from that, and so all these Republicans will praising John Lewis. I say to them especially senator. Mitch McConnell, don't you dare? Praise Congressman John Lewis would feel sitting on your Dick this the fixed. That's a court decision. Anything you say to me is irrelevant and Howell, because that's how you honor that freedom fighter by passing that law to fix it, so we don't have to have all of these proper to suppression in this country which will impact us in November. You bring up how a lot of oftentimes a civil rights figures and I think this applies to various kind of. Walks of life when when someone becomes old, they become a character they they become characters to some people. You brought them. Ascot's no these are three dimensional people who were treated differently not as heroes. When they were younger. And, in the midst of creating this, what we now look at his theology is in fact history. How important was it for you to make sure? Because now he is gone that that in elder-statesmanlike that was connected with capper nick while he's around, they can have that interaction I think you bring up the student nonviolent coordinating committee at the s the seal. I mean there were there were there were conflicts within the civil rights movement that eventually got worked out, so progress was made, and we see conflicts. Now we're different. People don't agree with tapper network, but these things can also be worked at and lessons. Baby can be taken from the past. So how how? Why was it important for you to connect them while there's still time? Oh usually important because. Again I. Don't think people really understand. How this mutual admiration society? For me when I got a chance to I, meet Harry Belafonte. Even now every time I get a chance to talk to Mr Bean and Colin Kaepernick. Reference Harry Belafonte in that discussion with John. Lewis your understanding that this is a man who went. Who connected with Paul Robeson? The Dr King the Nelson Mandela. And so it's important because you still learn of from the. Gleaned so much, and there's this appreciation and what it also signals to the wider audience is that you cannot try to create these schisms or these wedges because John Lewis showed his appreciation for Colin Kaepernick just like a Harry Belafonte shop. There's a free station for our farm. Parades onto meka marry Linda saw sore and Philip, agnew and others, and so with says is that that's the only generation saying. It's your time. And I'm here with you and that was. That is so important because too often. We get locked into this over Jong. All the old folks don't want to talk to the young folks. No, that's not true. It's where they can find common ground and learn from one another and guess. There was some people who disagree who disagreed with Congressman John Lewis, when it came to fund the police, and that was fine, but he steals software. A month before he died to go down to Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington DC the stand on their street with DC mayor. Ballard that was his way of saying to all of America I've might be eighty I'm Mike about? About the pass on, but I stand with this generation who are doing the exact same thing that I was doing because what they are doing. Today is what John Lewis. deion is what Reverend Jim Lawson did is what Septum o'clock is. What offended Lou Hamer? If what so many soldiers, freedom fighters, will they know their names the every single day? Well also rolled. I think that it's easy for us especially when we talk about Louis to kind of stop it nineteen, sixty five in the stop at marching, but he was in Congress for over thirty years while he was there. What contributions did he make from that role that we should remember? I think one of the things that when when you talk about what he did in terms of being able. To impact other legislation and see. One of the hardest things for people understand is all the time like all. Black Hog! They don't do nothing. Colleague doesn't do anything. Rally is very few members actually have their name on bills, but it's really the work that they do. Removing certain line or removing something, and so his ability to be able to again. The issue of voting rights of civil rights of impacting that type of legislation is critically important, and so it's so many things member of Congress do. We will never ever see that really impacts your district and impacts their state in the country as well and obviously people from people, usually the monument of National Museum of American, history and culture. You have to also thank John. Lewis fifteen plus years. He kept introducing that bill and Senator Jesse Helms violent racists from north, Carolina he kept blocking get! But. Here's something that people realize where Republicans were in control. It was congressman J. C. Watts. Who who step aside to ensure that Lewis's name was on that bill the Republicans controlled did not want that to happen, but JC what. Say it. No, I will take my name. All Lewis is named. GO ON THEIR BILL Republicans control, and so that monument, the most BITs BITs Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC that what's up in the John Lewis fought fifteen years to actually make happen, and luckily he was alive to see it built and to see it open. Now question and let's not forget. He started this fight in his early twenties arrested more than forty five times always peaceful in continued on until recently passing away a Roland I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you this. WHAT THIS SHIRT ON! What would you say to folks at home? That say their vote doesn't matter. Their voice doesn't matter. Can you please edify them on why? It's so important that everybody must vote. Vote, place here's the deal, folks. There is no issue that impacts your life. That voting does not have an impact not polished. It has no role in do understand that the birth certificate is a government document. Your death certificate is a government document this whole notion that all I can go on my life without being politics. You're absolutely wrong. If you care about education, you care about the environment if you care about. Economics if you care about even at stop, sign or speed, bump or getting new source systems sidewalks I think about my parents originally mel the Martin With the Clinton Park Civic Club in Houston a small group where people say they want to transform our neighborhood. That could not have happened if you not have the right people in political office if people sit at home and do not. Not Vote. It is shameful because what you're doing is you're letting somebody else? Make decisions for your life. That simply cannot happen and so i. don't care what the is. I don't care who you vote for. You must make sure that you register that you vote if his by mail. It's in person does not matter because if you don't vote real simple. Shut the hell up. Well and you are a wealth of knowledge. It's an honor to have you on the show. Roland Martin unfiltered. You can check that out every day. It's a digital show available at six PM Eastern, a fresh new episode Rolan appreciate you. Catch much y'all take care for businesses around the world. Today isn't a restart. It's a rethink that's why they're partnering with. IBM to change how they work from supply chains to customer service. Let's put smart to work visit IBM. Dot Com slash smart to learn more. Breaking News! You're on first. Take the Miami. Marlins home opener, against the Baltimore Orioles on Monday night has been postponed as coronavirus cases continue to pop up among the team. Seven more players to coaches with the Marlins have tested positive for the virus as an outbreak spread throughout their clubhouse and brought the total cases in recent days to at least thirteen, the marlins remain in Philly and a continued. Continued undergo testing now. According to our Marley, Rivera multiple reports, the Yankees Phillies game on Monday night has also been postponed senior MLB insider Jeff Pass and with us now in Jeff, we started the show with you. We come full circle and we finish it here with you. Tell me this. What are you hearing from officials and exact about what this could mean for the remainder of the season? Molly thing changes in a hurry so I don't want you to hold me accountable for what is happening in this moment, but right now the show is going to go on the Miami Marlins and the Baltimore. Orioles postponed for tonight. The New York Yankees in Philadelphia phillies postponed for tonight, but the expectation in this moment is that the rest of the Games across Major League baseball are going to be played now. Is this going to be baseball's Rooney? Go bear moment where all of a sudden the. The craziness of the situation dawns on everyone and they realize hey maybe might be good idea to take a pause I. Suppose that's a possibility and there's a large ownership called this afternoon where that could be broached, but in the end I, think the incentive for the teams right now for the owners for the League even for the players is to continue playing on despite this outbreak with the Miami Marlins and whether that is the prudent thing to do whether that is the correct thing to do i. don't know I just think that's the thing that they're going to do. Let's great as a baseball fan. I'm actually happy to hear that. Of course you. You'd like to figure out how to play this thing even if they have to stop the season a whole bunch, Jeff, is there some drop dead date? Maybe a bad choice of words where they must finish the season by this date you know they can. They can take sixty days. Sixty Games spread it out to when like when does the world series have to end the by? Well here's the thing right now. The end of the season is September twenty seven, th. That has always been the case going back months. Major League Baseball said. We need to get this done. By September Twenty, seven, th that was for a couple of reasons, number one the notion that a second wave may come around outboard, not even out of the first wave at this point, but more than that broadcast partners do. Do not want the world series going into November this year. They're already concerned with butting up against the election, so the idea that the end of October is going to be for the world series is locked in stone at this point i. think the likelier thing Max would be for them to shorten the season or trying cram these games in rather than pushed the season back. All I, just don't foresee that happening. Strategic decision as to whether or not ball right away. The decision as to whether or not to continue to play baseball, it falls entirely in the hands of the commissioner per manual that they have, but he can't make anybody do anything what happens if the players just say look, we're not doing this whether it'd be a team or whether it'd be the mess. It's a totally reasonable question, but. I don't know what the answer to that is having. If the players say, we're not going to play here, is the public perception going to go against them after this of course not, but does major league baseball. At that point say you're in breach of your contract. You are striking illegally. You are stepping off the field when you're not supposed to. They really hold them to that standard. I highly doubt it. Here's the thing though. I. Don't think that's going to happen I. Think a lot of players look at the way. Things have gone so far with as few cases up until this point is, there have actually been and say hey, we're doing things right. We're doing things okay. They've been going pretty well so far. That was just some other team and they screwed up not going to happen to us. When we all know, it could very well in very easily happen to any of the thirty teams out there, so anyone to think he is immune. At this point, it's a ridiculous conceit, but I think it's the sort of thing that's going to keep the season going at least in this moment. Jeff Passan latest. I will not hold you accountable on any of this information. We realized this is a fluid situation to say the least my friend. We'll talk to you soon. Thank you so much before we let everyone go i. just want to give you guys. The poll question of the day here. which team won the Jamal Adams Trade? Fifty two percent say the seahawks monitor you with it. I am with you. Max I I'm assuming you just asked me I think. Seattle is the NFC favorites after the trade. So maybe that is the questions all right? We'll leave it on that note. Thank everybody for hanging with us. We'll be back tomorrow with more have a great day. Stay safe.

Congressman John Lewis Miami Marlins baseball Phillies Baltimore Orioles Seattle seahawks Colin Kaepernick Philadelphia America IBM Jamal Adams Washington MLB Jeff Bruce Irvin John Lewis NFL Seattle
Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

The Current

38:37 min | 1 year ago

Remembering civil rights icon John Lewis

"The he smashed pretty much. Every billboard and streaming record that matters it has already been streamed more than a billion times. People still to this day. Point to this is the moment everything changed, but whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast. Is it really about him? Either? You're not an astute businessman, or you're inherently racist. When it comes to black music and his country, this is not a drake podcast available now on CBC. Listen or wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast. I'm Robin Bresnahan and you're listening to the current. We we are. Being by policemen. People in jail all in all the and then you hall Theresa. How long can we? We want our freedom me want wanted now. Well, that was part of John, Lewis's speech from the march on Washington fifty seven years ago, the US congressman and towering figure of the Civil Rights movement passed away on Friday from pancreatic cancer. He was eighty years old, Carol. Anderson knew him called him a friends. She is the Charles Howard candler professor of African. American studies at emory university in Atlanta. Georgia Carroll. Hello to you, and first of all my sincere condolences for the loss of your friend. Thank you, thank you, he was. He was more of my. Congressman Yes! Thank you We've lost a giant. Tell us what you were thinking as you listen to that clip there I mean John Lewis. He was the youngest speaker at the Marsh and March on Washington was only twenty three years old at the time. What was going through your mind as you heard that? How today we're talking about, we are tired of being beaten by policemen. And we are tired and. And I heard the resonances. Of the movement of today in what John Lewis was talking about fifty seven years ago. When did you first meet him? I met him Actually at emory when he was our. Commencement Speaker and I was there to be his faculty host. That's how I met John Lewis Just a great man, and then there was a another moment when we were on the same plane and had the same connection, and so we had lunch together and with A. Woman and her daughter her young daughter and you saw again John Lewis's compassion and his brilliance. S. he listened to this child speak of her dreams. just in his humility. So it. Is just. And and I think of as well how we are in this battle for voting rights right now. And how he was again in the middle of that will. decades ago. So, the resonances are so vibrant. He was nicknamed preacher because when he was young, he was responsible of care of the family chickens. He was one of ten children in his family, and apparently he would be preaching to the poultry reading the Bible. What do you know? Carola boat the roots of his activism as he grew up. Where did they start? I I believe that they started where a lot of black folks in the movement started in the church. and and you see how the language of nonviolence the the language of community the the language of. We are all in this together. that never left. That was always there, so we have just this year when he. With Pancreatic was there on the Edmund Pettus Bridge again in Selma in that commemoration. Because of that ongoing continuing fight for. The beloved community. Can. We talk about some for for a moment because of course, John Lewis. Very well known for being front and Center at the March from Selma. Montgomery for voting rights that became known as bloody. Sunday as many people will know. Just set the scene for what happened that day. And I'm. GonNa go back just a hair. because we lost another giant last week to on the same day, Reverend C T Vivian. and CT Vivian was also at some. And he was the one confronting. Sheriff Jim Clark on the steps of the courthouse in Selma and saying you know. You're not going to be following Nazis and Sheriff Jim Clark hit Reverend Vivian knocked him down the steps. He's bleeding. He stands up and he's reverend. Vivian gets right in his face and says we are willing to be beaten for democracy. Fat Is. The mindset in the frame that leads us to bloody Sunday. Because in Selma less than one percent of African Americans have been able to register to vote. And that's fight for the vote. Then was resonating through when Jimmy Lee Jackson had protected his mother from a beating. By the police was killed by the police during an earlier March. And, so the protesters were going to symbolically, Carey Jimmie Lee Jackson body from Selma to Montgomery. Now s seal was part of as was snick. The student nonviolent Coordinating Committee, but SNICK didn't want any part of it. John Lewis. Is the chair snick. And he's like. The organization May Not March. But I will well, and he wants, said you. You never become bitter. You never become hostile. You Never Demean your opposition. Did he managed to stick by that creed? Absolutely. Absolutely I mean what you see. He embodied the best of us. He in bodied the vision, the commitment, the integrity, and so on that scene in bloody Sunday when he and Hosea Williams are leading nonviolent protesters across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. And, they are facing Sheriff Jim Clark on horseback with bull whips. And the Alabama police state police, and you see the tear gas. You see the horses trampling over people. The bull whips cracking. You the images Mrs Amelia. Boynton from from Selma is knocked out cold. And in the midst of all of You see again. The sense of we are simply fighting for rights citizens. I wonder how John Lewis's view of the modern day protests. The ones that are going on right now about black lives matter. How did he see those protests? It, was like coming home again. because what they are fighting for. Resonates fighting for equality fighting for justice fighting for the kind of fairness and fighting across racial lines. Saying that again. We are all in this for a better America for a better society. Feel disappointed Carol. That fight is still ongoing. Yes and and frankly disappointed that you know when you think about what bloody Sunday led to. Was the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five. And that was a game changer in American society, because it put the weight of the federal government behind. the voting rights of African Americans. To Stop the states from doing all kinds of horrible horrible things to block black people from voting. When the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act in twenty thirteen, because they said racism was no longer a factor in American society. the states once again reared up, and that's how we ended up in this horrible moment now With a regime put in power based on voter suppression. With the voting rights act every nude voting. Rights Act just sitting on a Senate desk. Not being renewed estates continue to try to figure out how to stop African. Americans and Latinos and native Americans from voting. and so John Lewis Welcome Beth fight. He welcomed the energy of black lives matter he'd welcomed the kind of vision of all of fighting for a just world fighting for a better world, a more humane world. Carol I really appreciate your time today and thank you for helping us. Remember your friend your congressman, thank you, thank you, thank you. That was Carol Anderson. She is the Charles Howard candler professor of African American Studies at Emory University in. Atlanta Georgia she's the author of white rage, the unspoken truth of our racial divide and she knew John. Lewis not only as we're congressman, but as a friend as well. I'm Dr Hillary McBride. Take your microphones rarely go? Into my therapy office. It's where my clients hurt. He'll ultimately thrive. You're going to hear private conversations that we rarely ever have with ourselves. Let alone share with others. Welcome to, other people's problems. Maybe along the way you'll discover that other people's problems are a lot like your own. Season Three's out now. Subscribe on CBC Listen Or. Wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Keith MacArthur unlocking bryson's brain is a podcast about my son. The rare disease that keeps him from walking or talking bracelets perfect, and his life is really hard, and our families search for a cure. Oh my Gosh! Maybe science is ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mystery. We can do just about anything modifying DNA. Heart in my throat here is controversial unlocking bryson's brain. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Robin Bresnahan and you're listening to the current will as you've just been hearing Democratic Congressman and civil rights icon John. Lewis passed away on Friday from pancreatic cancer. He was eighty years old three years ago. John Lewis wrote a graphic novel trilogy called March With Co. Authors Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell about the civil rights movement and his role in it former host of the current Annamaria. tramonte spoke with them. then. Here's an encore presentation of that conversation. August twenty eighth of nine, nineteen, sixty, three, nearly two hundred fifty thousand Americans had converged on Capitol Hill for what was called the march on Washington for jobs and freedom. It was the day Martin Luther King Junior delivered his famous speech and the phrase. I have a dream. Another speaker that day at twenty three year, old from Alabama named John Lewis. TIME, com! On Martin to Washington. We Martha. Jackson Who? Came third. What are We March? that. We have today. Our demand, olive determination and We just. Stuff. Bowden pieces and putting them together. And Democracy we must wake up. Wake up for. We cannot stop and we will not. Be. Two years after giving that speech John Lewis would be marching once more this time on the bridge that crossed from Selma into Montgomery Alabama a day known as bloody Sunday when state troopers beat protestors as they marched peacefully for the right to vote John Lewis has continued his activism. He's a longtime democratic congressman in the US House of Representatives, he is also the CO author of a graphic memoir series that. That recounts his life as an activist. The trilogy is simply called March and the final installment has become the first graphic novel to win a US national. Book Award Civil Rights Leader and Congressman John Lewis joins us from Washington and with him CO author. Andrew is who is also the digital director and policy advisor to Congressman Lewis and Nate Powell the trilogy's artist who is with us from Bloomington Indiana. Congratulations on the award. The. Thank you very much. I want to talk to all of you of course, but I'm going to start with you John. Lewis just listening to you. You don't sound like a twenty three year old. That was twenty three. Ahead all of my hand, a few pounds lighter back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand three. But I grew up very fast. I grew up in rural Alabama. Very poor, and as a young child I tasted the bitter fruits, a cigarette and racial discrimination I didn't like it. At an early age I was fifteen. I heard a Rosa parks. A heard a Martin Luther King Junior. And in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven I met Rosa Parks, two next year I met more the Cain Junior, and these two individuals inspired me to find a way to get in a way when I was growing up, asked my mother, my father, my grandparents, my great grandparents, the best education and racial discrimination. They were suggest where it is. Don't get in a way. Don't get in trouble. The Rosa Parks Martin Luther King. Junior and others inspired me to get in trouble, not been getting in trouble ever since what I call, good trouble necessary trouble. When, you were a boy. Your Uncle Otis on a trip driving north from your home in Pike County Alabama was nine, hundred, fifty, one. I think What did you learn on that trip up north? We traveled from Rural Alabama to Buffalo New York. When we arrived in the city of Buffalo. I didn't see the signs that said white weighed in a colored waiting white men colored men. White Women Colored Women. How saw black people and white people living side-by-side. Sitting down and Eating together using his say water fountain sitting together on about. That, we cannot do in American south. I was really struck in your story that on that trip. Your on Columbus made sure he packed enough food to get you out of the South because he knew there would be no restaurants where black people could eat what we could not stop along the way in Alabama Tennessee. In a state of Kentucky we can stop until we arrive in state of will. before we made it to buffalo well John Lewis shoot ahead to nineteen sixty five. You were at the bridge at Selma. What had you expected when you started to cross that bridge in that March? When we were walking across debris, even before the. Arrive at the bridge. We thought. Was a possibility that we would be arrested. And taken to jail, we wanted to walk all the way from Selma to Montgomery. To dramatize to the nation into the war, all that people wanted to register to vote. I was prepared to be arrested angle jail on that day. I was when a backpack before it became fashionable to wear backpacks. In that backpacks I had two books I wanted to have something to read. Why was in jail? had a apple and our orange. I wanted to have something to eat hit toothpaste and a to rush since I was going to be in jail with my friends. And Fellow protesters I I wanted to be able to breast manatee. We get to the highest point on Pettus rich down below resources, the a blue. Alabama state, troopers? Became within hearing distance of the State troopers. A man spoke up. Major the Alabama state trooper said this is an unlawful march. We're not be allowed to continue. I gave you three minutes to disperse and return. To your. To your check. A young man, walking beside me from Dr King's organization, but a name a Jose William. Say Major. Give us a moment to kneel and pray. And the major said troopers at once has said Major May. I have a word who said that will be no word. They came toward US beating us with nightsticks. Trampling horses. Releasing it tick as. I was the first person to be hit. was hidden ahead about state. Trooper with the next day. I had a concussion at the bridge. I thought it was going to die. Of Death. I thought it was the last non violent protests for me. How badly injured, were you? Were, how concussion at the bridge! I was taken to the local hospital, but before going to the hospital, I went back to church. Where we left from. And I said something like I. Don't understand it. Have President Johnson can send troops to Vietnam and cannot send troops to Selma Alabama. To protect people who desires to register and vote. And the next thing knew I was being taken to the local hospital. Andrew. How did the idea come about then to create a graphic biography comic to tell his story? Yeah, let's call it a comic book. That's come out. We can be proud for it now. Now. It's one of the National Book Award. It all started in two thousand eight. It was the summer of hope and Change Barack Obama was sweeping through the Democratic primaries and I was serving as congressman. Lewis Press Secretary on his reelection campaign that summer. And, it was coming down to the end of the campaign, and folks are starting to to talk about what they were going to do afterwards. You know sort of the light at the end of the tunnel. Some folks said they were going to go to the beach. Some folks that they were going to go see their parents. I said I was going to a comic book convention. And when I said that everybody laughed at me. except for one person I heard a deep voice. Don't laugh. There was a comic book during the Movement and it was very influential. And it was John Lewis standing up for me as he stood up for so many of us. And once I heard about that comic book. Martin Luther King in the Montgomery Story. I went home that night. I looked it up and I just became captivated by the idea of a comic book playing a role in the movement. And after I read, it was beautiful. It was sixteen pages cover to cover It was his house. Fifty style introduced the reader to Rosa. Parks to Martin Luther King to Gandhi to the philosophy of nonviolence. I just. Couldn't shake the idea. There should be a a John Lewis Comic Book and so the next day, or in a couple of days later when we start talking about, how do we teach the movement young people? How do we teach nonviolence to young people? How do we help them understand what was done during the civil rights movement, I was there with the suggestion each and every time. John Lewis. You should write a comic book. and. At first, he was very polite, and he said Oh well maybe. But. I couldn't accept that and I couldn't give up on the idea. And so I kept asking and I kept asking finally one day the congressman turned to me and he said okay. I'll do it, but only if you write it with me and that moment changed. My Life John Lewis Comics important to you. Well I kind of family. That couldn't afford A. Subscription to the local newspaper. especially. Descendants pay for, but my grandfather would get to Sunday's. Newspaper, but the daily also and even finished reading the newspaper. He passed it on. So I sold the comic Strip and from time to time I read, but one of my younger brother. Love. And he would sometimes just be laughing, talking to himself. But The Mondo Cane. Story that coming book with the Fresh Comic Book that I read. From the cover to the back page. Because it. taught me away out maybe a way in. You and Martin Luther King seem inextricably linked. Well, he became a leader. became. A real sense of hero. But. He was also was like a big brother. Wonderful friend I might him. I loved him for hand been for him I. Don't know what would happen to me and so many others. Nate Powell! You were brought in to create the images for this book was at all daunting as a white American to be working on to be the illustrator for this. Any any anxiety or pressure was more specific to the real life figures. Who? I had a responsibility to depict accurately unflinchingly so I'd say that there is a constant mindfulness of. Whether it's my privilege, my background or just my identity but I'd say that most of the most of the pressure anxiety came from specific representations of highly recognizable and influential. Together you've captured some fascinating detail in this series John Lewis. You have to tell me about your chickens when you were growing up. Up on the FOM during the forties and fifties, I feel in love raising chickens. became my responsibility. was like my calling. I became very good at as a young child, but as a little child I wanted to be a minister when I was very young, my. Otis had Senate club to bring me about. When you read the Bible so Fontana time, but they happened my brothers and sisters and cousins. We gather all about chickens together in the chicken yard. and. I was started speaking a preacher. And when I look back on some of these chicken Roberta hair, shake their heads. They never quite stay airmen. But I think those chicken that appre student afford his fifties. Tended to listen to me much better than some of my colleagues listen to me today. Some chicken was just a limo product. Stay produce aches. Andrew Aydin of this. This book is based in fact in all the research you did for the books. What surprised you? The single most surprising fact is how. None of the facts that we used were settled. You can read. Different accounts from amazing authors. Of the same period of time and get different stories from each one of them. And, the deeper we dove. The more we found that people were interpreting or referencing different facts about the same period of time, and so when we had a question matchup, we actually had to go down to the primary documents. So we were able to go in and look at meeting minutes after action reports and watts line reports, which was sort of this one eight hundred number in Mississippi and other parts of the south where they could report violent incidents. and. It was a tremendous help to us because you're showing a single moment, you're not describing a feeling or Portraying an emotion, but you're showing a single moment that actually happened, and so the amount of information you need to make that moment as accurate as humanly possible to give nate the tools that he needs to draw the most accurate picture to Suss out the full breadth of those moments Took a tremendous amount of work and was really surprised me. How the the the the history wasn't settled and so interesting. That just speaks to how politically charged it was and is. Oh absolutely I mean I think. Facts themselves have always been up for debate. and I think it resonates more strongly today because we're seeing people use terms like law and order and states rights much the same way that they did in the nineteen sixties and twisting facts to serve those needs much in the same way they did in the nineteen sixties so in your research, Andrew. How many how many documents how many boxes of documents did you accumulate of probably got it fourteen or fifteen just in my basement right now. But then it was also digital I. Mean We were combing through. The FBI's. Declassified records they'd put up on out. Because a freedom of Information Act requests and so we would be going through. These files at the FBI or the local authorities like the. Sovereignty Commission or the? These different groups that were based in Mississippi and Alabama to survey all the activists We were able to go through their documents as well which have been thankfully digitized in fact, right up to the last just what the last scene of the book! There is new facts being uncovered our editor in fact found that Rosa parks who was seen as the mother of the Movement had spoken at the program on the steps of Alabama. State Capitol at the end of the Selma Montgomery March and in none of the other books that we found that out except that, we found a partial transcript of it from one of the sovereignty commission files. John Lewis, why has it been important for you to tell your story now in a way that reaches young people. I heard Dr King I met one. The came to me. I met Rosa, parks these individuals inspired me. And, not because of. These two young men. And Driving Innate Powell spent so much time put together. March book one book to an book three. This generation of young people will grow up. And they will have changed America and in doing so changed the world that people all over America, but all of the world today, Reading much. when we finish blood three. It was so powerful so dramatic. Story so well because I lived it. That, it moved me I had to put it down. I kissed a book. And cry. It it is. Inspiring to me to see little children, seven eight nine ten years old high school. And College Students read the Book Teachers Teaching. These books. John Lewis in the last few years. Of course we've seen the rise of the black lives matter movement what has changed for black Americans in the decades since you were first marching. Made a lot of progress, we made unbelievable. Progress the signs that I saw I was growing up. They are gone. And the owner places young. People will see the signs today. We'll be in a book. In a museum on a video, but scars and stains of racism still. Deeply embedded in American society. So we have young people emerging. Some call themselves millennium. New Generation. But he had a man in action, and they are demanding that politicians and. Thought leaders speak to down on circumstances down conditions and they're going to have create. A different movement. How hope and I pray is that people will be guided by the philosophy and disciplined nonviolence and be inspired by. March book one book two in book three to lead us to a better place into crate Dr. King called a beloved community. We can respect the dignity and worth of every human being. You have not stopped protesting last year. You let us sit in on the House floor. What were you protesting well? We protested defy. That the majority party refused to bring up the hill to deal with gun violence. We have too much violence in America too many gone, and we need to teach people the way of peace. The wherever love and Stop the proliferation of guns and our society. And what did you accomplish in that city? Well we educate? And sensitise many many people. And that effort is not over. would not be surprised at in the days and weeks and months to come. That there will be other forms at election. What do you make of the protests against Mr Trump's choice of attorney? General Senator Jeff Sessions Will it was gratifying to see people young Malays older people leader of the NAACP leaders in Alabama, saying to Congress San to president trump. That we're not going to stand by and not say anything to see this man become attorney general. The United States of America with his background. I think that would be further protests. We need someone who's going to stand for justice. Stand for immigrant's rights. Someone going to be fair. We're talking about that and at the same time We're talking about your trilogy throughout the trilogy the March trilogy. You take us back to president. Obama's Inauguration Day January twentieth of two thousand nine. How do you look on that day now? Own Day. Here in Washington. First of all it was a cold day was very very cold, but I think in a hearts. We will want. It was it was on was unreal. It was unbelievable to be there probably more than a million people. And to see this young man. Taking also office to become. The president of the United States. I remember seeing him after the inauguration cervone. After he delivered his address. A hassle to sign something. And he signed. Because the Jain. When I saw him for years later. Similarly luncheon. Without me, San Anything. He said it is still because of Ugi. He provided. Country and people around the world. A greater sense of hope. and. We leave in a few days. I think we're going to miss him. What are you thinking as you approach the next inauguration? Thinking about the movement that you were so instrumental in pushing forward. Well probably go to try to hold back and not cry when he was inaugurated. cried. Tonight that he was elected at cry, and someone asked me why. You're crying so much. What are you GonNa? DO OPINIONS INAUGURATE US having two years left on crafts, the more. Exactly what I did. At cry because people like more. Junior Rosa parks. President Kennedy and Robert Kennedy. Mo Mother and father and grandparents and Gregor Pants. And hundreds of thousand Megyn people who struggle. Blacks and Whites Latino Asian American native Murga never to see his day. So. Do you think the chances that have been made since those days when you first took to the streets. Are entrenched enough to withstand anyone pushing back against them now. Well I think there forces that want to take us back, but we will not go back. We will resist. We will protest. We will organize. We will mobilize. We. Will Not go back. You cannot turn people back when they made up their mind. Dr King was there from time to time. We would be much. More. Powerful. Than the March feet of determined people. So all across America. In a few days people will be marching, so women watch on the day after the inauguration, people would be marching in more than one hundred cities in America. Standing up speaking up speaking out, and it's won't just be women and men adults, but it would be young. People would be students. It'll be children, could I? They've been reading watch didn't know what to do. You know how to do. It didn't know how to organize nonviolent protests, John, Lewis. You are the last of the six original leaders of that time. Who is still alive? Did you think that all these years later that there would still have to be a movement? To push for rights. I felt and still feel today. Maybe maybe! We would have been much further down that road. To a declaration. of Dr King Again Call The beloved community. He used to speak redeem into sole of America. We still have a distance to go. Recent election. Tend to make me. Fat about what is happening in America, but also give me. Stick to it nece and. The courage to to press home. and not to be patient. As I say at the March on Washington, August Twenty, eight, nine, hundred, sixty three. We cannot wait. We cannot be patient. How will you work with the trump administration? Will you be able to find middle ground? Well. I think it's GonNa. Be Very hard and very difficult. But I would not give up when I give in. With, press on and organize. My colleagues depressed. And travel around America. That's just so we can do better. We must do it. We must not discriminate against people because. History that background! Race color. Plays origin, religion. Sexual orientation of whatever. Feel Randolph who's one of the leaders of the big six used to seth from time to time. When we were planning a march on Washington, he was set maybe a four mothers and our forefathers all came to this great land in different ships. But we all in the same boat now. and Dr King. Put it another way. He said we must learn to live together as brothers and sisters if we were passionate SFU's so we cannot have someone. In Howell to put people down because of the color, the raise agenda because of their religion. And we will stand up. We will speak up we this. We will agitate. I WANNA. Go back to that very first clip. We heard of you as a young man. You're so eloquent Even in your early days, but you said that we must say wake up America. Do you think America has woken up? I think America Zenit Process Awaken up. I think the election this past November shot, hundreds and thousands and millions of American. And we will never be the same. Gentlemen! We have to leave it there. Thank you all of you for your thoughts today. Thank you very much. That was the former host of the current Annamaria tramonte in two thousand, seventeen in conversation with civil rights leader in US Congressman John. Lewis and his co authors at Authors. Andrew Aydin and nate Powell about their graphic novel trilogy March. John Lewis died on Friday at the age of eighty. For more CBC podcasts Goto CBC, dot Ca Slash podcasts.

Congressman Lewis John Lewis Martin Luther King Alabama US America Congressman Selma Washington Nate Powell Andrew Aydin Martin Luther King Junior Edmund Pettus Bridge emory university Carol Anderson pancreatic cancer congressman Jimmy Lee Jackson
The Conscience of America

In The Thick

40:29 min | 1 year ago

The Conscience of America

"Never underestimate the ease with which crazy politicians will stoke the fears of white people for political gain. That is as old as America itself. Contain the thick a podcast about politics, race and culture from appeal see perspective I'm Julia Gallery Laugh. What's wait? A minute was a hot lead. Not Maria. No No, no, we're going to call you. It all-star wash his guest co hosting me today as Maria Takes Day off. Also joining us are two other. It all-stars all stars in the house. Calling us from quarantine in Queens New York is under. Alan's Alex Ramirez senior writer at Gen by medium. Foss Andrea. How are you? How are you and joining us from her home in Boston? Massachusetts not far away from me. Is the Fabulous Renee Graham columnist for the Boston Globe welcome back Rene. Thank you and I just WanNa. Big Up Queens, which is where I'm originally from I. I know that about you so there you go all the queen's Love, one of the greatest boroughs in New York we're GONNA start today show by honoring to civil rights icons. Who died this past? Friday Reverend Corey. Vivian C T, Vivian and representative John Robert Louis. The Reverend C. T, Vivian died at home in Atlanta Georgia. He was ninety five ninety five years old. He's a Baptist minister and a field general for the Reverend Dr Martin. Luther King who advocated for non violence and protests. C T Vivian said this about the Nashville lunch counter sitting campaign in an interview with is on the prize in Nineteen eighty-six. We came back day after day, but then the. The opposition began to get ready for us to the young thuggish types in town. The clan types in the city right begin to also come into the lunch counters where we would be then that's when our training proved to be most helpful because they begin to attack. PUT OUT CIGARETTES ON. People jerk people off off off of their stools and beat them and CETERA. Poor things on people. Our students were ready and they set their. Course that brought on the police when we were not defeated by the police knew who they were working for. That police knew that they represented the city. They represent the merchants. They representative. The thugs more represented us and here again is the importance of nonviolence. is that they were reached. They did not want to appear to demanding to brute. They wanted to stop us, but when we would not stop, then they had to begin to work on the thugs because the thugs so bring out the worst of segregation. And a racist society that even Shane's. The people who are themselves racist and who keep the system going? And that clip is from the American archive of Public Broadcasting W. G. B.. H. And the Library of Congress then on Friday evening just hours after a Vivian died John. Lewis lost his battle to cancer at eight eighty. Lewis was a democratic representative for Georgia's Fifth Congressional district for more than three decades. And he was all. Champion of non violent protests, and has been remembered for saying. Make good trouble. Roy visit. Visit Tuskegee visit Birmingham I signs to say white men men white women win the White, leading lady. Go, downtown to the theater. On a Saturday afternoon, all of us the children had. Upstairs to the balcony. All of the. Scheuermann downstairs to the first floor. Woman S. my mother, my father, my grandparents, my grandparents, how? Ready is, don't get in the way. Don't get in trouble up. One day in one thousand, nine hundred to five days of fifteen disagreed. Heard About Rosa costs. I heard the worst part. Is the CAIN junior on radio? So that scenario, the pods and indeed ship, and the words of thing is fine me to find a way to get in the way and I got in the way I got in trouble. Necessary trouble. Congressman seven years ago at the American Library Association Conference Reverend Vivian and Representative Lewis for icons. Heroes in the trenches of the civil rights movement, who both were leading protests both took part in the freedom riders. Both men were at the historic and sixty five Selma March, which helped lead to the signing of the Voting Rights Act and not surprisingly over the weekend many Republicans share Trivia. To John Lewis something shirt. It's also Elijah, Cummings which was interesting. We'll talk about that. Despite the fact that Republicans right now are against everything. This man stood for in fact everything both men stood for and so as many of said the best way to honour representative Lewis and Reverend Vivian for the matter would be to restore the now gutted nine hundred sixty five voting rights act right, and Rene you recently wrote in the Boston Globe that representative Lewis wasn't just the conscience of the Congress, but I'm quoting, he was the conscience of America. And the deaths of Congressman Lewis and Reverend See TV the in happened while we're in this historic moment of the black lives, matter movement and the fight for racial justice, so it makes a lot of these civil rights icons, even more palpable. So Rene, where do we go from here? In carrying on the legacy of civil rights icons like Louis and Vivian. I think an important thing to remember is John Lewis fought against America but America's hypocrisy and. That is what we saw again over the weekend with all of these Republicans. Who as you said stood against everything Lewis and Vivian gave their lives for. Fixing their mouths to somehow make it sound like they will on his side, they were never on his side, and so I think as we go forward. We have to remember. It's the hypocrisy of this country that we fight this country that says one thing, but always does another that has to be defeated. I look at men like John Lewis and Reverend Ribian as the greatest generation. Baby. Dared to make this country live up to tie deal. Make those words into action, and you know I think that is exactly what the people who've been in the streets almost two months now they're doing the exact same thing. This is a continuum. This is what John Lewis fought for fifty years. This is what Reverend Vivian fought for decades, and you know there's something to be said that who among them now who the now knows that they will need to continue this. This fight for years for decades even for a half century, so I think that people will hear that and take that with them as they continue in the streets and try to make this country finally live up to its ideals for everyone at Renault. You're talking about what Reverend Vivian an representative. Lewis represented these icons. These heroes and I just remind people that President Barack Obama gave him the Presidential Medal of Freedom Right? Meanwhile, trump gave the presidential medal of Freedom Rush. Limbaugh okay. And also speak Republicans. I gotTA. Ask both of you because we cannot. We cannot not talk about Marco Rubio. Who in his love in his for representative Lewis tweeted out a photo. Of Elijah Cummings who, by the way, is a black man who passed away and a hero, and is not John Lewis Rene. Representative. Okay you have to actually know who it is that your honor and you can't stop any pitcher or black person, but you know. What Marco Rubio Ted. has happened to every person of color in this country where it's just like. Oh, you're Vivian or your. Bother just like we're all sort of interchangeable, and it's not wasn't just Marco Rubio. Who did it? People continue to tweet out pictures Dan Sullivan. Coming, so it's like. How do you not know the difference between these two men, and so it just it just spoke so much to just how hollow the Republicans are in even when they try to honor an American. WHO's greater than they will ever be? Andrea No, absolutely, it's just kind of comical how we keep doing this and also like John Lewis. Lewis was someone that wasn't congress for such a long time. He was working alongside Marco Rubio for such a long time that he was not honoring stranger. It was someone who wasn't the hall of Congress with him and to do this and then just tweet out some lame excuse. It just felt very flat and I. Don't know I also think Marco Rubio. And we've seen this before. We let us well I. Remember a few years ago the Golden Globes mixed up. Gina Throw Regis and America Ferrera even though they don't want anything I like, so I suppose this has happened to him a swell soul to do it. It was just like come on dude. You're not talking about some random person. This was someone who. Was your colleague, and you owe more respect than that. I'll be honest with you. It's not a good look now. It's not for Marco Rubio I. Mean It's it's this whole. You know here's I I. Don't know if you guys saw some of the other like means that came out of it. It's like here's Marco Rubio with you know beyond saying and it was a picture of like Michelle, Obama. And I was like it happens and I. Did my part I did my part. I tweeted out a photo of Ted Cruz meeting. Trump and I said Oh look Rubio and Putin. The general. Reaction as you saw these legendary icons in the civil rights movement in the context of the Movement for black lives that we're witnessing now, it was very moving to see a lot of young people of color, especially young black Americans. Trivia to John Lewis and the Reverend Wright because they paved away and so many aspects for people to take on the fight today. And to remember your elders that way. I found out very moving in and also just. A reminder that we are still dealing with a lot of racism in this country, systemic racism and we still have such a long way to go, but the way a little bit shorter because of the incredible work that this two men did for this country. Speaking about the incredible work, they've done and the living legacy in the fruits of their labor. We have the black lives matter movement, right, and so let's turn to that and you know since the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police. The protest for Black Justice and police abolition have been ongoing now. They're not in the news every day, but they're still ongoing across the nation and in Portland, Oregon things have taken a very ugly turn with the authorities efforts to suppress this movement now they're using tear gas. Gas They shot rubber bullets at protesters and federal law enforcement way let repeat forever. Law Enforcement in camouflage. T had been using unmarked vehicles. Yup, to grab protesters off the Portland United States of America straights, since at least July fourteenth, according to Oregon Public Broadcasting Right and people were what wait a minute. What what's that and this is going to quote this from Oregon Public? Broadcasting officers from the US Marshals Special Operation Groups and this is where Mike are. You kidding me and customs and border protections Bortobak. have been sent to Portland to protect federal property during the recent protests against racism and police brutality, but interviews conducted by OPB show officers are also detaining people on Portland streets who aren't near federal property, nor is it clear that all the people being arrested have engaged in criminal activity? Some of my best friends are fascists. What sorry? Wayne. Continue who comes up with these acronyms like I want that job but like. I know it's like yeah. It's like the Borg on Crack Star Trek. All right, but there's some good news here. There's good news. There's some pushback, right? Portland's Mayor Ted Wheeler. Oregon's Governor Kate Brown and both the State's democratic. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have called for trump to take these federal agents off the streets yet. Local police joined forces with the federal agents and made more arrests over the weekend so Andrea. We joke about this just for some Catharsis, but this is really echoing terrifying fascist regimes of throughout history and on Fox. News Sunday trump, said this many weizer killed also that I mean many many white killed I hate the sound for this is going on for. Decades, this is going on for a long time long before I got here. You know if you look at what's going on in Portland. Those are anarchists and we've taken a very tough stand. If we didn't take stand in Portland, yeah, we've arrested many of these leaders. If we didn't take that, stand right now. You would have a problem like they were gonNA. Lose Portland, so let's see what this so anytime of by the way, if someone asking about black lives, matter and and police brutality against black bodies, and you answer, white people are being killed. That's a telltale sign a racist but I continue. Andrea, are we seeing the expansion of coke? The border as trump uses border patrol and federal authorities to silence dissent. I mean. What do you make of these latest? This latest federal efforts to suppress the black lives matter movement. Yeah, so this all comes down to this executive order that trump sign and late June to protect statues and monuments memorial strike next week. Week in the thick will be airing an episode. The digs into that this whole notion of white supremacists, monuments, and taking them down, and and the whole debate and respond homeless Cardi created this task. Force called the protecting American Committee Desk Force, and that gives authority to the H. S to deploy customs and border. Protection and other agencies like US marshals to. BE DEPLOYED TO PORTLAND SEATTLE DEC- Sarah. It doesn't feel like A. Logical response to an extent. Right like we're not seeing the border move is just. They're using this part of Homeland Security to deal with protesters, but this agents are not really qualified for that. They're more. In tune with dealing with drug cartels, instead of like large groups of people protesting, it is scary, and some advocates have said that it does feel like a test. Run like a task for that. They could implement in other cities as well that have. been protesting police brutality, and and for change in the last couple of months. It's pretty terrifying, right? You know who the I listened with. Just Andrea said, and I'm like it's just a creation of trump's on police. Yeah, but the thing is. It's a border patrol. It's like on the said no one should be surprised. Just look at the the judgment you know. The Border Patrol can cover a hundred miles. All around the board of the United States I mean that's why there's Border Patrol in. Florida in the middle of central Florida because you're a hundred miles from the quote, unquote border, which is the Atlantic flipping ocean. The you know what I'm saying. It's so stretch like this judgment, but rene. You've seen the images. What are your thoughts about what you've seen in Portland? Never underestimate the ease with which craven politicians will stoke the fears of white people for political gain. That is as old as America itself. It is how newspaper editors justified lynching is how the government justified destroying the black. Panthers they'll call it law and order, and they'll call it civility, but we know those of buzz words right? That's just a dog whistle, but trump as usual. He's using a foghorn. So. This is all about him trying to gain. He can't defeat Corona virus because he's too incompetent and disinterested, so he's decided to wage a war. He thinks he can win. And that's what he's doing in Portland and I agree with Andrea. This is exactly this is a test case. This is a warning chief of staff Mark Meadows already said they're reading an executive order to expand the federal takeover of cities. Quote we're we're looking at is not only looking at what a lot of people have called. The executive order on statues which he did that, but that's really the statues are one thing, but it's really about keeping our community safe and the president is committed to do that. some of the unrest that we saw even in the last month or so, but particularly last night in in the week leading up to it in Portland it's just not acceptable when you look at. At communities not being safe and not upholding the rule of law so attorney general bar is weighing in on that with Secretary Wolf and you'll see something. rolled out this week as we start to go in and make sure that the communities whether it's Chicago or Portland or Milwaukee or someplace across the heartland of the country. We need to make sure there are communities are say. Cargoes Police Union chief drafted a letter saying they want federal help to come back the city's violence problem. So this is where we're going to be from now until November. He's GonNa continue to ramp this up in this idea that only I can protect him what he said when he was inaugurated. American carnage stops now. That's what he's playing into US smooth. We're witnessing. And he's playing into his white base to clear up their fears, so they think you know Joe Biden can't protect me. Only Donald Trump can protect me. Moving from Portland to another light topic, and it's something that I've been wanting to talk about an inch thick for the last couple of weeks, but we haven't had a chance with all the new cycles. It's this organizing for systemic and symbolic changes in this moment and one of these right is finally the changing of the name of Washington's football team. Yea, this has been a longtime effort, but there's also some push-back. Seeing that it's not nearly enough. Yeah I'm speaking about this I'm going to go back in the delorean. You and I were talking about this on the stream years ago. Remember that. Shows on. Both, back at Al Jazeera America and Aljazeera we did shows on the stream. You're right. And remember that people were like that so radical, and you guys are always whining and complaining and get over it and never happen well, twenty, twenty ladies and gentlemen, and there has been this push, it's it's not just for the Washington football team. It's kind of inspired. This movement and other example comes from Rory Taylor he's a scree, Chata journalist and former football player who wrote this for vox quote. There is a long history of entanglement violence and complicated feelings between indigenous peoples and American football while their retirement of the Washington name culminates decades of activism from indigenous peoples across the country. It is also hard knowing that this change primarily motivated by the loss of financial sponsorships like Fedex. has taken so long to secure right. It also reflects the most highlighted rule that indigenous peoples have played in America's favorite sport as mascots rather than actual people and quote. Despite this history, dating back to native, American boarding, schools, which essentially institutionalized violence and oppression against indigenous youth, but these communities have continued to resist and one way was to play on these boarding schools football teams, so many indigenous people including actually Roy and his father say that football. Is actually in fact. An indigenous game right. I Know The Washington football team name. Has Boston routes that I want to highlight and we'll have a Boston journalist colleague who might want to share about that? But before we actually talk about the name change. There was a whole other layer, so they decide to change the name and then a couple of days later. The Washington Post published a report that some fifteen women former team employees had come forward with sexual harassment allegations against three employees who were abruptly departed in the midst of all this. Rene I mean we're throwing a lot at you. In this current moment of reckoning and change showing how interconnected all of these injustices are from rape culture to racism to the dehumanisation of indigenous communities I mean. How do we begin to unpack? The symbolic and systemic changes? Well look, let's use the old line at the fish from the head. Now let's start with team owner Dan Snyder. Only for exactly album. He said years ago. He would never change that name. That's right. What hit him? This time was his bottom line, not his conscience, he didn't suddenly wake up one day and say Oh my God. This racist name is actually racist. He's reacting because his sponsors Nike. Fedex Pepsico were pressuring him to do so so while everyone is kind of patting him on the back for this. Honestly don't know why you have historian story that comes out in the Washington Post of this rampant sexual harassment of women in The Washington football teams. Organization, it's ridiculous. Ridiculous and it says everything about the way this place is run. It says about the way people are respected or disrespected and how it is tolerated. This isn't new. This has been going a long time. You know we're talking about some of these cases that they're talking about the post. Go back, you know years and years. What has been done about it? You know now there's this whole reaction, but they've done anything on the sly and very quietly. which is what companies tend to do, but I think it says everything about the management organization. Andrea, absolutely and I mean. This cases of sexual harassment are always so. Upsetting to me just because it's clear that people knew and enable it for years and years and years, and then suddenly, because it is widely reported than was like. Oh, we are changing. The culture is not that easy, you guys. Finley the fish ruts from the head, and you know it's downside or a super bowl matic, and in many ways you know I do wonder this is the case for many sports teams like the way that women are treated not only employees, but also female journalists like we've known this for a long time. These are like super sexist spaces flow of Misogyny, full of mistreatment, and there needs to be a wider reckoning and the way that. Are handling this I. Hope that there's got to be changed in Washington team and that they'll treat female employees better from now on will that happen I a little bit cynical speaking of reckoning, and and just trying to release it I just want to bring this up, guys. FEDEX! Took a stand, we had big money and a corporation. Take a stand and Dan Snyder like you said renee has been hearing this. We've been doing shows about this. Fool united show about this crazy years ago, right? You guys a crazy. Brown's. You crazy brownies always talking about taking away our football, and now you're taking away hotdogs and replacing it with Wrong with you. Fedex took a stand and if we want change, haven't we seen right in front of her face? Wash football team, if if corporations and big money take a stand, we can have change what I keep thinking back to what Saint John's University did in Nineteen Ninety Two the Red Storm, right? You're Queens, person. I was a huge Saint John's fan. I went to Syracuse so St. John's biggies them all the time that the eighties, but they're in Queens. I was just trying to make it Queens Connection Rene. that. Connection. And they were the Redmond. Nineteen ninety-four, they decided without a lot of weird pressure from corporations night all change the name to the storm, and they did that more than twenty five years ago so I don't want Dan Snyder and was football team getting a whole lot of credits right for this long to do this. They are reacting because they have no choice because Fedex and Nike were starting to be worried, they were getting pressure from their stockholders to do something about this. It all comes back to the money right and since I mentioned cleans. Cleans I also mentioned Boston Rene is a colleague of the Boston area journalists. This has Boston roots. The team is originally from Boston and they brought the name from Boston to Washington. So this is complicated and you know when you bring up Boston and racism, and and also the fact that I'll leave you guys with this. There's this movement of all these mascots changing in Massachusetts now and my My wife went to North Quincy High School, which is four miles away from where I live, and there's this like. This mascot and it's a stereotypical. Imagery that you're looking at it. In Two thousand and twenty and I'm like I can't believe that the Boston Globe even has to write a story about the countless of school districts that are also going to change the mascots but I. Agree with your name. It's like this could have been done a long time ago. Absolutely anyway, so listen everything we've covered in. Today's show is with the backdrop of the covid nineteen pandemic. Cases are spiking in forty nine places across the country. According to analysis by NPR on the data with the United States nearing some four million people. Infected by the disease four million. and. We want to take a look at Puerto Rico where I was born and raised in one of our guests is also from Puerto Rico Andrea. We're cases. And this is not a misquote. Is all according to the NPR analysis, cases have been increasing some two hundred and thirty one percent over the past two weeks and I think it's worth. The Rico in Kentucky are the two places in the jurisdiction in the united. States that have that number two hundred and thirty one percent. Increase over the past two weeks last Thursday governor won the Vasquez announced significant new guidelines from closure of businesses, too restrictive use of the beaches to restaurants have to re manage, and actually I have a lot of friends who are business owners texting me being like I got to close my restaurant again. There's actually reports of we're going to start finding people. It's just Porto Rico it was one of the first places to lockdown and it was praised, but. Did an amazing piece about the lack of testing and everything's GonNa come back because they reopened the reopen so two hundred and thirty one percent increase. Speaking about amazing piece, let's give a shout out to also Andrea. Who recently published a year long investigation which you all have to read in Gen by medium in partnership, with Type Investigations for your it wells fellowship, and your piece looked at this other epidemic in Puerto Rico. Domestic violence and I want to coach you, you wrote. Intimate partner murders skyrocketed in two thousand eighteen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Puerto Ricans have faced disaster after. Post Maria including a series of devastating earthquake and the CROMER's pandemic that cascading crises have given new urgency, the longstanding problems in how the police in courts responded domestic violence along with the underfunding of victim services and have highlighted how the government's misguided response continues to leave the islands. Women Vulnerable I'm. First of all. Kudos on the peace. Thank you guys as ing reporting. Can you talk to us a little bit about what you're reporting found? And then how the pandemic is impacting women on the island right now? Yes, so I looked for a year at how the government was handling domestic violence cases in the island. What I found is wash quoted. Is that the police? Police has now been handling this correctly. Nine one one calls a take forever to be uncertain when women are actually interacting with the police, many times do not initiate the domestic violence Bronco, stay should. There is a ton of abusers within the police force I've found that between two thousand, fifteen and twenty, nine, thousand nine, there were four hundred and forty nine police officers who? who were accused of domestic violence by their current or former partners out of all of those just one percent went to trial was found guilty so all things were exacerbated after your Maria, obviously, the island was in total crisis. There was not access to healthcare to employment, which obviously made the situation at home for a lot of victims, even worse, and it was very difficult. Difficult for people to get the help that they needed, but the coronavirus pandemic is something similar. Right like Barak was in lockdown between March fifteen and June fifteen, even though some of the restrictions were lifted. We're seeing now that because of the increase of cases, a lot of those restrictions are coming back and what we softer Maria Maria happening. September twenty of twenty seventeen. The number of intimate partner murders doubled in two thousand eighteen, so this was. Ongoing long in crisis, a similar thing could happen with the coronavirus pandemic like we're not gonNA. See The impact of. A murderer's immediately because this is also set to be a long ongoing crisis, but my investigation I found that there were ten percent fee or calls to please in the month after the lockdown was initiated, but what police says is you know victims are just not calling because they can't. They're stuck on home. Probably what their abusers and and it's not safe for them to reach out for help. We're also in the middle of hurricane season, so it's just all of this things combining. Combining at the same time, and and the government has really responded to this crisis and timely manner, or even with the seriousness at the surf's yeah, and you mentioned the government. The current government is Republican led and it's actually a government that relies on the support of evangelicals and conservative Catholics and traditional gender roles, and you know the woman has to stay in our place in mostly you know. I'm not trying to over generalize relationship, but there's a lot of patriarchy still going. Renewed rooted, it's rooted in centuries of colonialism and imperialism, and the a fantastic work, and thank you for shining light on a very reported story. Final segment moving on I know this. All seems like a Downer of an episode guys but hopefully. We're trying to make sense of the chaos and the tragedies of world we went from. Marco, Rubio Thinking John Lewis a light to cummings the loss of two titans. Fascism and The escalating crisis in Puerto, Rico at least Washington and changing his football teams name, and we are trying to cope with it speaking about coping, let's move onto the final segment cova coping. That's right. Hey, wait a minute. We did talk about biggies basketball. I just want to say I mean Queens in Boston. So there was a little bit of joy, and it's also joy be brought back. Great Memories of Al Jazeera was when we were a little bit younger and less gray, so I'll take it and definitely less pounds, so but listen guys. Let's try to end this and so this is the question that I have for everyone. How are you all finding joy in hope during these unprecedented times? Rene Music. It's all about music. Immersing myself and as much music as I can the other night I watched metropolitan opera's production of porgy and bess. Wow, fantastic. It was taped in February where everything shutdown. Alan. I I. Take my mind off everything that was going on, but of course it deals with police violence, and it deals with medical inequities, and all those sorts of things right Mexicans I was hoping, but the music is so glorious. The voices were amazing. That's where I'm finding solace at any moment I can get music in my life. That's what I've been. You know renee I created a stayed home. spotify playlist that started since March, and it's now up to three hundred songs, and it's like so I'm with you on the music. It saved me. I'm serious like the team makes fun of me. They're like. Can you stop sharing your cheesy bad songs with us, but? I'm a Cheesy Dad. Yeah, she said I have to admit on the glow. Slack channels global opinion. I post songs every day. At nine, a. m. and usually around three o'clock I post on the globe. TJ and that is my unofficial role. It has a long history, but yeah and people seem to appreciate it so hopefully. That's helping them as much of helping we. We Love Music. What about you? I have to say? My group chats I think that staying connected my friends that haven't been able to see him since. March Husband really helpful. As just a source of joy to me to be talking with all this incredible women that I love and who send me pictures of their kids are pets, and we have you know running commentary on so many things, and it's good to have a group chat because that prevents you from tweeting stuff. That might be you know no receive. Group chat. And Yeah I, do think that living in New York for the past several years and being away from my home. It kind of like prepare me for quarantine KNOB, being able to physically touched your loved ones and hang out them, so yeah, definitely that group shed is like wonderful way to stay connected, and like every day all day with just have ongoing conversations. Yeah, Hey, was what about you joy? Are You finding these days? I mean I have joy every day as you guys know, listeners know. My daughter was diagnosed. Diagnosed with stage four cancer last year last April. She was too, and right before she was about to turn three, and then so we spent the whole year trying to save her life. She had a liver transplant in September. Chee was cancer free in January right after find out. She was cancer free. We went to cove it lockdown so it's been a fun year, but honestly we look at her. She's jumping around. She has four costume changes every day. She's spunky. She beats up her older brother her hair. Her hair grew back. She's puts on her own makeup and we just celebrated her birthday last week her fourth birthday, so yeah, honestly my wife and I we independently we just look at her three or four times a day and we go. She's alive. I mean she's smiling. She's happy. What else matters so that that gives me enduring joy my children. That's great to hear wash. I thought it was going to be your cooking because I'm all over your instagram. Twitter cooking close. To superior skill during lockdown. I find that I can cook for like Twenty People Oh my God. They're amazing. You gotta see like when I'm hungry I'm like frigging waters is like. Like, it's. For those of you who've been married a long time? I'm going to hopefully celebrate my eighth anniversary next month, wife, my wife actually looks at me the way she looked at me before we got married after she eats my food, so if you just. Actually Lust for you again. Who are you coping during covert? Actually found joy to bring it back to the beginning with Congressman Lewis I saw Selma. Great movie first of all it's an amazing movie and the end and the music with common and John Legend and just everything about at Aberdeen. A masterpiece. As I am unable to exercise my constitutional right to vote. I do not have command of my own life. CanNot determine my own destiny. What is the tournament foment by people who see me suffered that succeed? Gone to say no more. More. That means protests that means March that means. Disturbed apiece. That means. You're. asking. But number two. How the fuck did not win best picture in the moment, she wasn't even nominated for best director nominated. It's a brilliant movie. That just shows Oscar. So white is real and it. You know this reckoning that everyone's coming to. There's still a lot of work to do. There's still a lot of work to do, but it's a fantastic film and. So glad, we watched it this weekend. All right ITT, all-stars. Ramirez senior writer agenda by medium and Rene Graham columnist for the Boston. Globe thank you so much for joining washing me on in the thick. Thank you. Yes, I'm Hulu Regula. And remember good apple podcasts to rate and review us. Really helps also you can now listen to in the thick on Pandora spotify, and wherever get your podcast, you can also find us on our brand new shiny website in dot org follow us on twitter and Instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook and tell all your friends johnny on chrome. What does? In the thickest produced by Nicole, Roswell nor Saudi and our new. York women's foundation ignite fellow partial. Would editorial support from Erica dill? Our audio engineers are Stephanie lebow Julia Caruso and Leah Shaw. Our digital editor is Luna and are in turn is at the Goodman the music. You heard his courtesy of Nacional Kept Z. K records. Fabulous thank you good times. Good Times dislike all time. Listeners. We will see you next time. Thank you so much for listening. Ramose I do. Next. And let's welcome, not Maria as Michael Host. I, didn't hey, not Maria. Hey I'm not Maria Ali. The opinions expressed by the guests and contributors in this podcast are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Fujairah media or its employees.

Representative Lewis Boston Andrea No Reverend Vivian America Maria Maria Portland football John Lewis Rene representative Washington Donald Trump US Marco Rubio Elijah Cummings Oregon FEDEX Massachusetts Border Patrol
Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., On His Friend And Fellow Civil Rights Leader John Lewis

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:34 min | 1 year ago

Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., On His Friend And Fellow Civil Rights Leader John Lewis

"From NPR WBZ Boston Meghna Chakrabarti. This is on point. We have. Being policeman. Kind, of people lock them in jail and all the in your hobby. How can we need? We, won't off freedom. twenty-three-year-old John Lewis speaking at the march on Washington in nineteen, sixty three. Congressman Lewis died on Friday, he was eight years old, and throughout his life he never stopped making good trouble, necessary trouble as he called it expanding his push for justice and civil rights to the fight for gay marriage to the need once again to protect voting rights to calling for an end to gun violence as he did here in two thousand sixteen. We were elected to lead. Speaker. We must be had likes. Likes. We cannot continue to stick our heads in the sand and the reality of mass gun violence in our nation. Headlights shining forever forward toward the expansion of the American ideal until quote, true freedom comes Lewis, said until the revolution of Seventeen, seventy six is complete. Will this hour on point Bernard Lafayette the Reverend Jesse Jackson Senior Representative James Clyburn. Join us to remember the life and legacy of John Lewis. We will start today with Aaron Hanes though she is editor at large for the Nineteenth, a nonprofit news organization reporting on Gender Politics and policy, and she joins us from Philadelphia Aaron. Welcome back to the show. Magnate thank you so much, it's good to be with you although for. A very sad occasion. Of course. have been thinking about this all weekend. There is a page turning in American history. We had a death of Congressman Lewis. Just, just your thoughts on what's the nation has now lost since his passing. Absolutely well. I would say with the passing of John Lewis and also I should say the reverend. C T Vivian. who was another civil rights leader? Both a them died in Atlanta. Just hours apart and. A these these types of men and women, this generation You know what they survived and what they sacrificed in in trying to really make this country live up to its founding ideals right until the revolution of seventy, seventeen, seventy six is complete as congressman Lewis said. With with their passing. For so many years just just their physical presence. In many ways was a guardrail for this country, a reminder not only of. An era that that I would say most of the country does not want to go back to. But but of the progress. That was hard, fought and won. And so you know without those people here. I think that there is a real fear and concern especially as we've seen kind of the retrenchment of racism in our current. Political and social climate. Even as we see people pushing back against that and tried to reject that in this national reckoning on race that we see in a lot of that is in the spirit of folks like congressman, Lewis and Reverend. Wright so. There are just. Sort of Coincidences in history, maybe not incidence facts in history that give give me goosebumps sometimes right because. You remind rightly that Reverend Vivian and Congressman. Lewis died within hours of each other. It just suddenly popped into my mind that talking about the unfinished worker or the real realizing the founding principles of this country like Thomas, Jefferson and John Adams died within hours of each other to as you're just I think I would put both Reverend Vivian I would definitely without a doubt, but both Reverend Vivian and congressman. Lewis Lewis in the same firmament as founders of an champions of what we what should be the American ideal. That's absolutely right. I mean those men and women. You know the folks who were on the front lines, but also you know the foot soldiers whose names and faces. We don't always know are among our country's founding in founding mothers and fathers, because they really did help to make our democracy real for so many who had been so long excluded. I mean I think about I think about that generation. You know especially the women of that generation to who had to fight twice as hard to get the vote that we celebrate obviously with the centennial of the nineteenth amendment. for which mine newsroom is named, but but really much like the greatest generation, which we honor a lot for defending freedom during world. War Two these black Americans really. Survive battle at and they helped fact are union. Well Erin if you can just stand by for a moment, I'd like to now turn to south. Carolina Excuse me South Carolina Congressman. James Clyburn. He joins us from Washington. Congressman Clyburn welcome to on point. Thank you very much. John Lewis was your. Was your friend for many decades both in? Activism for for Civil Rights and in service in the Congress. Can you tell us what you you miss most? You will miss most about him. Well thank you so much for that. John and I were friends for six decades. Reserved here in Congress together for almost three of those decades. We've met back in October nineteen sixty day. It was during the time when there is some disenchantment. Inside the movement quite frankly the night I think it was October fourteenth of fifteen. Is when we set up with Dr. Chain from around ten o'clock in the evening to almost four o'clock the next morning. And we were bathing. What the best tactics were. became out of that meeting and convinced. The Martin. Luther King Junior's chanted of nonviolence was the best for us. That is a weekend that we organize the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee. By its name. People knew that we were buying in. Two kings philosophy now for many of us. We adopted non violence as a tactic. Not John Lewis. John, Lewis internalized nonviolence. It became his way of life. He continued. Right up to the end. Background the Non Vitamin. The snake is we called it. was taken away from us. It was taken away over. Tactics stokely Carmichael and others felt. That they needed to be more activism more direct action but they took it a level. The John was not comfortable with. The headlines. Coming out of that effort. were burned baby burn. John was very concerned about that several months ago. And he and I talked about it. The fact that we lost our momentum. Back in nineteen sixty s overhead lines and we did not want to see the black lives matter movement. Lose momentum. And lose its effectiveness overhead lines, so both of US spoke out against defunding police. We thought that was sloganeering. That could be helpful. And so John and I spoke Saturday before last now this Saturday before he passed away. We expressly love for each other but I knew that that was the last time that we will get to talk. Congressman Clyburn. To have been a fly on the wall on that night, you and Mr Lewis Dr King Sat together. I can only imagine. How transformative a moment in history that was, but can you tell us a little bit more about the? So so so the fight is not never ends. The United States has made progress, but not enough. Can you tell us a little bit more? About how Congressman Lewis? saw this moment where we see once again. Marching feet marching in the streets of the United States for the continuation of the work civil rights. You know. The sound too strange, but. John. Out To Black Lives Matter Platter Plaza with the of Washington. He asked the that occurred early in the morning. And they stood in their plaza together. On the night. The morning after he passed away. I woke up. And! I looked out of my window I saw the sun coming up. And I've thought about John and that plaza. And I went outside. And set up my tripod. And did some I've never done before individually. Filmed or video to. My tribute to him because I knew. That the best thing that we could do for John. would be to restore. The Voting Rights Act of Nineteen, Sixty five that act came about. Was signed into law August six, nineteen, sixty five. After. Bloody, Sunday. In February of nineteen sixty five. Blood US Sunday on the Edmund Pettus bridge gave life give life to the voting rights act. I believe that after the supreme, court has now gutted that by the getting rid of the formula in section four. really rendered that act useless. So what we need to do now I think. He's on, John Lewis. By following the Road Map the Justice Roberts gave us telling us what we needed to do. In order to make a constitutional again, mustaches now working. With other staffs here on the hill, the Stanford Speaker Pelosi. Leader haulier. Chairman Bennie Thompson and Marcia Fudge. We're trying to put on the floor this week. The. John R Lewis Voting Rights. Act, of twenty two. Because John worked hard. For the seven years since that decision bound Supreme Court in the show bay the holder. Trying to restore that act. Less resort in John's name and that's Send it off to the Senate and we ought to pass it. And the president or the sided. Well. South Carolina Congressman James, Clyburn also House Democratic whip and long time friend of Congressman John, Lewis. Congressman Clyburn. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks very much. Aaron hanes standby for just a moment I also want to note that the house did pass another voting rights restoration act. That is still sitting on Senator, Mitch McConnell's desk. We'll be back. This is on point. This is on point magnetic regarding remembering John Lewis today, the civil rights icon Georgia Congressman died on Friday. He was eighty years old back in two thousand, seventeen. Lewis recorded a letter to his younger self. He did that for CBS this morning here. He is reading a part of that. Young John Lewis. Your. Passion. Your lifetime, you will be arrested forty. Times. You'll mission to help redeem the soul of American. Will Aaron Hanes joins US today. She's editor at large for the Nineteenth, a nonprofit news organization that reports gender politics and policy an errand before the break. You listened with us to Congressman James, Clyburn talking about the house. Putting forward another voting rights act. Which is you know? It's a terrific idea and would there could be no better way to. To, honor John Lewis his legacy, but as I quickly noted at the end of that segment they had already done, so they passed one in December of two, thousand, nine, thousand, nine hundred, and it has gone nowhere in the Senate Senator Mitch McConnell won't put it. Put it down. Put It on the floor for a vote, so there is already the opportunity here to. To honor John, Lewis and yet for some reason. It's just not happening in Congress. Right, but you know I really do believe that with the passing of Congressman Lewis especially for so many of his colleagues in Congress. With voting rights being kind of the. Signature issue that he was most identified with. That issue is going to take on new an even stronger meaning. For folks who who are trying to make that legislation real. and. I think that that is a way that they see i. mean you see within? Seventy two hours of John Lewis passing that that this strategy is already in motion as a way that they feel I would be the most appropriate way to honor Congressman Lewis Legacy. And I think voting rights and the issue of voter suppression was something that was already on the ballot for a lot of voters, particularly black voters right but but but I think that. The the Congress passing is really. Something that could go a long way to galvanising not only black voters, but I also think black lawmakers really any what was concerned with the issue of voting rights and ballot access which used to be a bipartisan issue, but but has become. Pretty polarizing politicized in recent years, and so really to make it. about John Lewis Somebody who. Was Beloved on both sides of the aisle by so many I think really. Refrains and potentially resets this conversation for some folks in interesting to see. If if If Congress is able to to make some headway on this legislation in a way that they were not when the congressman was still with us. Right, but although. If just to sort of lay bare some of. My personal cynicism here. It. What does it say about America that? It takes. John Lewis and other. Activists in nineteen, sixty, five, having their heads crack bashed in by police while trying to cross the Pettus Bridge to to galvanize. The signing of the First Voting Rights Act in nineteen, sixty, five and then. Decades later it takes the same man's passing to possibly re galvanized the movement to restore that very act right. Show at and also go ahead. And also congressman Claburn who was on the front lines as they as a young man in South Carolina fighting for voting rights, fighting for civil rights, is now still on the frontlines, and he is almost eighty years old. Right still pushing for a lot of the same things that he was fighting for. As as a young man, but I think I. Think what we know how America is that that racial progress and backlash have always been the pushing pool of this democracy. And that. You know people of of Congressman Clyburn Congressman Lewis is generation. were declaring in their time. That black lives matter and they were fighting to make the country recognized this as a statement of fact and as I believe you were saying earlier. This is my something does have to be defended over and over again. In this democracy in these it's you know things like voting rights. You know they are fragile and You know folks who are committed. To. Making, the country live up to its founding. Ideals must be vigilant about that in every generation. Well Aaron Hang on here for just a moment because I'd like to now to the reverend. Jesse Jackson senior, he's founder of the Rainbow Coalition former presidential candidate, and of course. Longtime civil rights, activist and icon as well. He worked alongside Congressman Lewis for decades. was also as people should remember. He was with Dr Martin Luther King Junior at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on the day. Dr King was assassinated, so Reverend Jackson welcome to the program. Wars Magda. So Reverend Jackson first of all tell us what is it that you will miss most? In your friend John Lewis Sixty seven book of sitting in leaders. That time. Six years I missed the call him on the phone. Call from him. I think one of the mistakes have been made and that was happening John. Join the movement. After fifty years of legal. Pot. Separate but equal decision. Service and they've been moshing leather drive. Cosmic a modern to make pot illegal. MAGNIFICENT TO FOOL! Most hookup may sending. All sixty five. put it this way. I pause Monday. Why did you sit there? And she said well. To testing. SEASON CHANDOLA BALLOT And southbound the back of the bus, but I imagine I couldn't go back. To the most as period there. And so Jones joined king on the pox. Now protecting the law because they years to get from. Combination of the back of the bus. Sixty call! John John Chicken everybody conclusion. The thing is that that? Back was democracy was born in something Alabama. Not At the same. Deals. On. My Mel. that. Expert back in that women couldn't vote. back. In so. That Osama blast of over the personnel five. Women. Over! San On campus campuses. Bilingual it's. A. Democracy I'm Alabama. Not. Rain. Reverend Jackson your phone lines are a little shaky here, so just want to recap a tiny bit. If people couldn't hear all of it, you talked about. talked, about plus, versus Ferguson. Essentially gave us a history of of. The work and fight to expand that American ideal that you were talking about how. The frame may seventeen fifty four. August nine, hundred, the frame and John John John. wrote down to change the book and for. The join the movement live with Marsha the legal foundation. The huge decision to make A. Legal imperative for. The state's rights barbarism abounded. and. Protection from denying the right to vote. Back of the bus. Kingscote in Washington. and John Lewis for from ship and slaughtered the Maryland. We can use a single puppet toilet. Black and Brown bad the printing the WanNa American typically. We couldn't we couldn't use holiday and how? Does. That will start looking. John was the father by a sort of had tour. Meaning those were. Control struggled at has. Lasting value. Yeah Well, I mean to your point. Mr, Lewis was what's like you said? He was seventeen when he first wrote to Dr, King. Because he wanted to go to. What's now called Troy Troy University. So take your your your point very very well Reverend Jackson. But, what would you describe? Then? How? How do you view then how we should see as congressman? Lewis is role in that. That bigger historical movement that you're talking about. George join this filthy. And I just sit insert place in Greensboro North Carolina. They were first. So informed Snick is sorta the version in in the spring of that year. I John Fall nineteen sixty. And Stiglitz connected to the Ransall. They will not for the. Duration of entity into direction. They joined the movement that was already in progress. Lie Month mental and tumble or A. Join the movement. To? Lose you. moshing and around the country. And so John. Courage and his. Willingness to suffer. Valedictorian the rock last. Said I was joking about sending matching myself. But John turn the back that. He. She's. The most the most. Longest. A long distance runner. Whatever Y- D- do you have a favorite memory of congress of Congressman Lewis that she thinks are really opinion is the kind of man he was. A sit around talking to see TV. That same day she she you. Tacoma Senate in nineteen point seven and McConnell and on. Eight years before Montgomery. Fourteen years, students. We talked with. Guys would be in that sort a long time. That's I remember sitting around talking about. This. Are we living below? Would we we would. That's I. Urge Those. Might be. The End L. going struggle. So right now. We got the right, good sixty five. Then turned thirteen. The Robert School decapitated took it stain. And and Philip Protection. It must be. We must like for the cost of the right to vote. Rather movement. She Costas Right to vote. You. End Up. Printing time. Causes A. Separate state elections will not. Elected grab fifty elections. That's rather. One for Washington one so. You Know Mississippi wasn't. Seattle, on for Miami. National next. Who guidelines that sort of the right to hope is moving today. Not. Just don't believe the voting power because the least Petrola. On Central, this. Positive Term Babe for these. These. Term Inveigh. Politicians. So politics the. Patrolman. Example and in Minnesota. Joyce lawless kill. I remember governor. Prosecute from the county. She usually Gimme he do nothing. About the guy who kills law? WILL WE WAY TO GET She's elephant. Attorney General who? SAY MAJORITY WHITE SAY YO turns out. He arrested the four and shots. semi-finals have been. Ever for killing a black in Minnesota. Politics Police State when the young man was killed in In Georgia. Allow the likely like Paul. How the Charles America. So John John Thaw, said she. Lease to me like. Miss The politics of the bone marrow to sing those legend. were. Interesting so just just underscore it. You said you said defending the police's like the Epidermis, but politics is the Merrill right of of how you make change in the United States I've just got a minute or two left with Reverend Jackson. I just want us to more question. On Saturday. You put out a statement about Congressman Lewis you said. He is what patriotism and courage look like. Can you just tell us a little bit more about the character of this man that you knew so well? World be willing to grab freedom the buses. All all the bus I was local. All the. The. Helen Brown buses and trucks buses. and. You just sit in the colored section. The freedom rides which. By the way. Was a dangerous mission. They said the bustle. Alabama? John was on the percents so in rock. Hill South Carolina. Alabama. Real risks or Came to allow to. Hers for taking it for the south. Danger John took the danger in. He music all Brennan, bus. We will bring them bridge. Almost enjoys wasn't. At forty died. Him and joins A. He had more black cabinet does. Something up. So we talk. You turn the. Dogs loose on all the marches. Just as he's played this same CAC. If I. IF I had not let the truth, be the the mob. Worse never heard. They have dispersed the mob. Marches. GotTa backwards in federal thinking to deal with. So that that. We didn't anticipate the confrontation. Things in a surgeon the. Georgia out. Now the torture. And is this. Being heard. Pooper did losses. It's been be. Looked the or assemble. John Lewis and Jose were misbehaving. Miss a mega point. They'll leave her out min born season. She is the one. In on the boys in the. Shan bind up the king to seven indy some of that year. It at the guess of the. Since birth best some pieces here. On the show. Awesome the workhorse. Amazon. On jeopardy. Champions win. They'd rather people show Lewis. Heroes wherein people. Who John Show on the bus. Routes show and the voter I say. It gets don't give. Him Louise Ago. And John at that time agreed to beat for the right. Along with end. To grapple for the fall. Leave to get the stop giving. Well? Jesse Jackson Reverend Jesse Jackson senior I. Thank you so very much for joining us today to help remember Congressman John Lewis Thank you. And Aaron. Aaron hanes stand by for just a moment. We'll have more when we come back. This is on point. This is on point, meg crazy. We're talking about the life of Congressman John Lewis. He died on Friday at the age of eighty, and just before the break. We were speaking with Reverend Jesse Jackson. Now, it's live radio, so I just want to acknowledge that. His phone line was pretty rough and it might have been difficult to understand what he was saying. I kept going with that conversation because it's just too important right now, so my staff doesn't even know I'm about to do this, but I'm about to ask them what we'll do the very best that we can go back and listen to that conversation with the Reverend Jackson and get a transcription of it up on our website. As soon as we can, because he actually had a lot of very important things to say in memories of Congressman Lewis, which are worth at least us being able to to read hopefully. By by this evening, so sorry staff, but that's what you have to do in moments of history and I appreciate the work that we're going to do. Two scrambled to make that happen now. Listen one thing that we definitely were able to here. Is that the Reverend Jesse Jackson and air? Hanes also joins us this hour both mentioned that also on Friday the reverend t Vivian died. He was a trusted adviser to Dr Martin Luther King Junior. A famed civil rights leader himself. The Reverend Vivian was so here. He is in the early nineteen sixties, confronting a Dallas. County sheriff, who was preventing black people from registering to vote. But believe me over those that followed hip. The like you blindly follow this Sheriff Clarke. Who didn't their day would come, but they also were polled into courtrooms, and they were also given their death sentences. You're not this bad racist, but racist same way that Hitler was a racist and your blindly following a man. That's leading you down the road. It's going to bring you in the Federal Court. Are Representing People in Dallas County and I have that right to do so now and as I represent them, and they can speak for themselves. To To thinking what you believe. This is not a local problem. This is a national problem. You ask anyone in the United States from voting without hurting the rights for that other citizens democracies built on this. Why every man has the right to both regarded. As the reverend. Vian in the early nineteen sixties, he also died on Friday. The same day as Congressman John Lewis now Aaron you wrote. A piece for the Washington Post this weekend. About Reverend Vivian, there might be some listeners out there who are less familiar with him than Congressman Lewis. Can you just tell us a little bit more about reverend? Vivian? Absolutely and thank you for for bringing that up. Because according to Tindale, Vivian and Congressman Lewis Their destinies were intertwined all the way up until their deaths C T Vivian was part of the Nashville student movement. Sit Ins just like Congressman Lewis. That clip that you just played. With SETV in Confronting Sheriff Clarke, that was a month before bloody Sunday C. T Vivian also fought for voting rights installments staredown white supremacy in in violence. He was punched in the face. By Sheriff Clarke for daring to challenge You know the the What was happening down in Selma and demanding that black voters there be be registered to vote. C? T Vivian was also awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom Barrack Obama. Because of his his lifelong commitment to civil and human rights. and. You know it's important. Not to lift him up, even as we are lifting up, Congressman Lewis because we really cannot on our congressman without honoring CT Vivian and I think that it is. It is fitting that that they passed on the same day in the same city because Vivian has a legacy that that really was just as large, but but you know magnate I can just take a second to to to add listening to Reverend Jackson You know I started? My career intervened in a lot of these people Reverend Vivian. Ambassador Young Congressman Lewis Reverend Jackson and and others and I was interviewing them about the legacy of of the work that they did right. And and I now find myself covering the threat. To that progress that did they fought for, and and these are men and women who at their age now have lived long enough to see both the gains and the losses of their efforts and and yet. These these really are heroes I mean these people who were always willing to fight until they took their last breath for what they believed in right. I mean for Dr King. Obviously, that was age thirty nine, but you still see I mean you just heard Reverend Jackson's key congressman. Lewis Ambassador Young. We're committed to a push for voting rights. Even this fall right right. They're still on the front lines congressman. Claburn is nearly eighty years old still on the front lines that that just is really. Really so remarkable. Well if you can just hang on for another few minutes. Erin I now want to turn to Bernard Lafayette have civil rights activists. and. was obviously a student activist in many campaigns in the nineteen sixties staff member at the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Program Director at Martin Luther King, junior southern Christian leadership conference. He was a dormitory. Meet with with John, Lewis, and also author of several books, including in peace and freedom. My journey in Selma Bernard Lafayette Welcome to the program. IQ. First of all. Mr Lafayette I just wonder if you could just tell a quick story about. When you first met John Lewis I believe it was at. College in in Nashville in shared that room with him. What kind of things did you talk about? What was that that like sharing that space with him? Well one of the things that we always talked about was the ratio. Situation And the, segregation. And the impact on the minds of the people. because what we many times think about. As what happens to black people because of the same recreation and discrimination. But. We don't think about what happens to the white. People. Particularly, the young people coming up. And I think that that was one of the most important things have happened. Is that we? Recognize that we needed to have white young people involved. In the in the in the movement and we made sure that happened that made special efforts. Well I think I believe i. read that that that you had you had previously said that it was. It was John Lewis? Who got you to come to the seminars on non violent protests? That Reverend Lawson was having at the time. Is that right? Bernard Lafayette. Are you still there? We're going to try and get him back on the line here. Aaron Hanes react to to what? Mr Lafayette just said there about the belief early on in the. Of Sort of Showing White Americans the effect that segregation was having on them absolutely and also the importance of that multiracial coalition. Right which I think you're seeing today. In this national moment of reckoning and many of the folks that are on the frontlines, today took the lessons of folks, young folks like Bernard Lafayette Light. Congressman Lewis like. Vivian you know these these. The the the these these folks started Diane Nash Right that these folks started young they left a blueprint behind for for the young people that we see confronting racism today, and you think about the the white folks who joined with so many of them are for freedom summer right at who wind down into the into the deep South and try to to confront systemic racism together. It does take. White Americans of conscience. To to also be part of this movement, and really you know that. Helps to turn the tide and tip. The scale really did to get. The kind of racial progress that black folks have been raised have been raising the alarm about systemic racism for. You! For the entirety of the time that we have been in this country, right but it, but it really takes. A multi-racial coalition to get on board to really confront the. That systemic racism in the big truck throw away that must be confronted for things to be different. For those communities right. Well absolutely, and hopefully we have Mister Lafayette back on the line. Can you hear me? Yes I can okay. Apology. Difficult yes, I can, and I apologize for the technical difficulties. We've been having today Mr Lafayette, but I wonder if I could ask you a question about the day or the moment in the civil rights movement in the sixties Congressman Lewis. Himself said that he thought it was. His most important moment then that's of course, the march from Selma to Montgomery. For Voting Rights and That day when he was on the Edmund Pettus bridge with other activists, and they were literally beaten back. A police I wonder if you could just tell us about your experience of that day. I was very much involved in the Selma March okay, yes, but by this time I was in Chicago. Okay, but I've started much earlier in in in some Alabama. But what is a very Moore non-fat? Is that when you see? One of the photos. Of the group going into Montgomery Alabama. You see a black fellow. With the Tam on backwards. and. He's holding the American flag. And Martin Luther, King and Mrs King and Abernathy. Behind him. You'll see those pitcher in the museum. Picture of the museum in the museum doesn't say his name, but that's name is Lamar, McCoy. The MOM McCoy. Was Ahead of the vice lords gang in the west side of Chicago. I trained those gang members in Chicago. To be marshals on the Selma much. This is all very quiet. Because I wanted the gang members in Chicago to have a nonviolent experience and I wanted them have very specific low, so we started the movement in Chicago. They would have a role to play and they were marshalls. And so therefore they will not go out and do gangs stuff. So, this is boot camp. For the Chicago, Gang. And so tell me more in in the last minute that we have. Fair if you could. What was it about? John Lewis in his heart, and his soul, and his character that allowed him to work so tyrus tirelessly for so many decades all the way until the end of his life. To continue to try to realize. Realize. The dream! John Lewis was committed as a child. When he experienced. Segregation in rural Alabama. and. He realized that. That's the kind of life that you would have to live. And he rejected that, and that's why he took to Martin. Luther, King Because of the Martin Luther, King's movement there in Montgomery Alabama, which is very not too far from Troy. We could listen to Martin Luther King on the radio. So, we heritage speeches and that kind of thing and he was a minister. and John Lewis was interested in the ministry, so he began to look at what kind of ministry he was going to have in his life. That's why John Didn't get involved in pastoring churches and not like that because he found that this was the most important thing that he could contribute. I was his roommate. Have the American Baptist College? And he's the one that persuaded me to go to the nonviolent classes. The Gen Lawson was taken to the workshop. And so He wanted to make a difference in these things and he saw a way to do it, and that was through the nonviolent approach. And the confrontation. So was with him in Nashville and I was with him. You know and many movements along the way the freedom rides and I'd be segregated the buses before nineteen, sixty, one and the freedom riders. In. Well, you know what I hear that phone line getting shaky against some afraid. I'm just going to have to to wrap up with that Bernard. Lafayette Civil Rights leader who was John Lewis's college roommate in the nineteen sixties as you just heard desegregated the Greyhound lines in Nashville author of many books on civil rights, including in peace and freedom, my journey in Selma. Mr Lafayette thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you. And Aaron Hanes editor at large for the nineteenth. You so much for joining us today to remember Congressman Lewis. Thank you magnum. Folks we want to wrap up this hour by hearing the congressman himself again, and we want to turn back to the final words from Lewis's speech at the march. On Washington in sixty three member, he was twenty three years three years old. Then it put him on the national stage a place he never left, and at the heart of the question of what kind of nation this country truly wishes. To be. Let's listen I magnin chalker body. This is on point. Spirit of law and what does. That we have today. Our demand. Our determination and our numbers. We Spent A. Style! Pieces. Of Law and Democracy we must. Wake. Up We cannot stop, we will not allow invasion.

Congressman Clyburn Congressma John R Lewis congressman John Congressman Clyburn Reverend Jackson Aaron Hanes Martin Luther King Congressman Lewis Congress Congressman John Lewis Congressman John, Lewis John Lewis John John John. Reverend Vivian Congressman Alabama South Carolina
Good Trouble (feat Renato Mariotti)

The Daily Beans

1:04:42 hr | 1 year ago

Good Trouble (feat Renato Mariotti)

"STARLINGS! Thank you for listening to the Star audio podcast network. We have so many great comedy shows to add to your playlist just last week on star. Burns audio on Gilbert Godfrey the amazing colossal podcast, Gilbert and frank joined by the legendary Allen and Adam Arkin. On the untold, our Jessica Joe and Andrew Bowser are joined by Connor. Go sell the man behind the haunted historian instagram account. On Small Doses Amanda Seals is going full cancer season this week, talking about the side effects of feelings this week on profiles and Eccentricity, an interview with bill and Ted Creators. Chris Matheson covering his new book, his famous father and time travel's most excellent adventurers on that black ash show w Kamau Bell Writer, comedian and host of CNN's United States of America joins. Joins say Sloan in celebrating Spike Lee's nineteen ninety two film Malcolm X. Search Star Burns audio on apple podcasts spotify or any podcast platform poor pool list of our shows featuring hosts like Shane Moss. Miss Pat and the sklar brothers don't forget to follow us on instagram twitter at star Burns audio enjoy the show and remember stay safe. Stay healthy and keep laughing. Hey I'm andy. If you don't know me, it's probably because I'm not famous, but I did start. A men's grooming company called Harry's. The idea for Harry's came out of a frustrating experience, I had buying razor blades. Most brands were overpriced over designed and out of touch at Harry's. Our approach is simple. Here's our secret. We make sharp durable blades and sell them at honest prices for as low as two dollars each. We care about quality so much that we do. Do some crazy things like by a world class. German blade factory obsessing over every detail means we're confident and offering one hundred percent quality guarantee. Millions of guys have already made the switch to Harry's so thank you if you're one of them, and if you're not, we hope you give us a try with this special offer. Get a Harry starter set with a five blade razor waited, handle, Shave Gel and a travel cover offered just three bucks plus free shipping. Go to Harrys DOT COM and enter eight, nine, eight nine at checkout. That's Harrys dot com code, eight, nine, eight nine. Enjoy. A. Look. Hello and welcome to the daily beans for Tuesday, July Twenty First, twenty, twenty. Today S State Department whistleblower report reveals ongoing inquiries over questionable activities by POMPEO. Top Democratic lawmakers write a letter to the director of the FBI with concerns. That Ron Johnson's investigation into Barista could be a hub for laundering foreign election interference. The House chairs asked inspectors general to investigate militia activity in Portland. Trump is skirting congress to install loyalist in the Pentagon a federal judges. Son Is killed as the husband is shot at home by a gunman dresses. A delivery driver trump is the Skoda's DACA ruling to skirt the law. A navy vet asked federal officers in Portland to remember their oaths. Oaths when they broke his hand. A federal appeals court affirmed the jury's conviction of X. Hawk back under Attila, calling the evidence overwhelming, an Oxford vaccine for covert triggers, an immune response the Saint. Louis couple that we've their guns at protesters outside their man has been charged with a felony. The Michigan Supreme Court is reviewing the case of a teenager incarcerated for not doing her homework governor Kemp Sues Atlanta. Mayor Kisha Lance Bottoms and she now says he's trying to block her from talking to the press and trump says he will bring back televised task force briefings I'm your host Eiji. Hey everybody. We have a lot of major breaking news stories. Today I can say this and you know you've been to me for a long time I. Rarely say this, but today has got to be one of the busiest Newsday's. Since we started either of these podcasts going all the way back to the end of two thousand seventeen. The stories are coming out at a clip that I'm I'm actually having a hard time keeping up with so I'm going to do my best to bring you all of the stories and even that spills over. We will bring you tomorrow I believe we're going to be talking to. Natasha Bertrand Tomorrow about the Ron Johnson story which. It's big I think it's one of the bigger stories that that we should be focusing on right now, and of course we're covering the response to unmarked federal police activity in Portland, and how trump and the DHS acting secretary or planning to expand those raids into other major cities. I'll be joined by Jordan Coburn for news from under the radar and also the good news block. And I have an interview brief interview with last minute here with Renato Mariotti, former federal prosecutor to discuss some of the resume points of the alleged gunman who attacked a federal judge at her home, killing her son and wounding her husband This all amid. Tons of other headlines playing out. We have a lot of news to get to so let's hit the hot notes. Hot Notes. Okay so today's lead story comes on the heels of our reporting over the weekend of unmarked militant officers in rented vans, unmarked rented vehicles, snatching people off the streets in Portland without identifying themselves without reading the Miranda rights without saying what they're being detained or arrested four whether or not, they're being detained or arrested, and how we discussed yesterday that that's a violation of a lot of constitutional rights and that they're being sued. We had said this was a trial balloon of sorts for staging, this kind of unconstitutional federal militia activity in major cities around the country and today during a press conference trump himself said he will send more federal law enforcement to New York Chicago Philadelphia, Detroit, Baltimore and other cities to deal with unrest quote in Portland. They've done a fantastic job. And the Acting Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security is told Fox News that he doesn't need permission of Democrat. Governors and mayors or local police to continue with the crackdown. Let's listen to what he said he'd hours are just misinformed. They're not accurate they don't understand the authorities. and the responsibility of the Department of Homeland Security has we protect nine almost nine thousand federal facilities across the country. We did that ten years ago. We did it long before. This civil unrest started and we'll continue to do that and so I don't need invitations by the. The state, state mayors or state governors to do our job. We're going to do that whether they like us there or not. That's our responsibility so in response Democratic Law was in response to this Democratic lawmakers called on inspectors general to investigate what happened Portland but I'm sure you know I'm not sure this goes far enough. We need swift action against this now before we find ourselves with an an identifiable federal police force in all of our major cities, as we approach a federal election We will keep you posted on the story as it unfolds. and. From The Washington Post quote. He came to the protest with a question. He left with two broken bones in a confrontation with federal officers that went viral. Christopher David. This of course is the story. We've been following up on in the news. He had watched in horror, according to the Washington. Post is video surfaced in. Offices and camouflage throwing protesters into unmarked vans in Portland. There's fifty-three-year-old. Portland resident had heard the stories protesters injured gas, sprayed with chemicals and tugged at their nostrils and burn their is and David is a graduate of the US. Naval Academy former member the Navy Civil Engineer Corps and he said he wanted to know what the officers involved thought of their oaths before you know, but that they had sworn to protect and defend the constitution, so he sat on Saturday evening. He headed downtown to Portland to ask them. that night's protest outside the federal courthouse was the first day of ongoing demonstrations, began with a line of local mother's linking arms and demanding the federal agent, stop targeting Portland Kids and David, who had never attended a protest before sort of hung back and watched according to Washington Post, he was trying to keep a safe distance because he has a lot of health problems that have made him vulnerable amid the corona virus take. He asked one woman when the. The feds would show up, but she said it was also her first protests. The Department of Homeland Security deployed tactical units from US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement and US Customs and Border Protection to bolster protections of federal buildings and officers in Portland, and just as he was about to leave David said the federal officers emerged. They rushed a line of protesters nearby, knocking them to the ground, so David walked up toward a gap in the line, calling out to the officers. And he said to them, why are you not honoring your oath? Why are you not honoring your oath to the Constitution? And officer trained his weapon on David's chest as several agents pushed him sending David, stumbling backwards but he then regained his center and try it again and another agent race has baton began to beat David who stood unwavering with his arms at his side. And then another officer unloaded canister of Chemical Eareckson spray into David's face. We've all seen this video, but that was all he could handle. He said he turned and walked away flipping off double barrels the federal forces as he went. This. Video taken by Portland Tribune reporter Zane sparkling, a captured all this has been viewed nearly nine million times. Unable to see from the chemicals burning his eyes, and his vision David said he stumbled into out of the cloud of gas that made him coffin wretch. He found his way to a bench in the park where a street medic aided him, and eventually pulled him away from the advancing officers and at the hospital. He said he learned his right hand had been broken in two places. There's a clear motive here by the White House a barn, pompilio and trump have been saying we need to prioritize certain human rights above all others including the protection of property property rights. And religious rights, but there's no evidence yet that any federal property was being targeted by these protesters that were basically kidnapped by unmarked federal agents. And now we're learning to this kind of response to the unrest in the wake of the murder of George. Floyd is now going to happen in what trump calls liberal democrats cities across the country. Chicago's next according to Cancun. Only that's the DAS acting secretary and trump himself. And we might not have a clue. From the Wallace interview with trump on Fox, how trump plans to do this? Because in a stunning moment which we discussed yesterday, he mentioned a several new executive orders were coming, and he's allowed to do it because of the recent Scotus Daca decision. This is from axios, quote, president, trump and top White House officials are privately considering a controversial strategy to act without legal authority to enact new federal policies starting with immigration, and of course, the according to administration officials. the white. House is thinking. is apparently being heavily influenced by John You. Why Oh, that's lawyer who wrote the Bush administration's justification for waterboarding after nine eleven? You detail the theory that the national re in a national review article. That was spotted top trump's desk. In the Oval Office and that article argued that Scotus is five four. Dhaka ruling makes it easy for presidents to violate the law. The president has brought up the article with key advisors and you wrote that the ruling and actions by President Obama pave the way for trump to implement policies that Congress will not. So could remain in force. Some some of these could remain in force for years even if he loses the election in November. You who next week will be putting out a new book called defender in chief on trump's presidential power, told axios that he has met With White House officials about the implications of the ruling. The first tests could come imminently. Trump said he's about to unveil a very major immigration policy via executive order which he says the supreme. Court gave him the power to do. This order could include protections for immigrants who traveled to the US illegally illegally as children something. Most Americans support that could be a political olive branch though the trump administration moved to end the Obama. Era DACA program which led to the Supreme Court's involvement in the first place, but the order could also include significant restrictions on immigration that couldn't get through Congress, but are favored by the President Jared Kushner and hardline adviser Stephen Miller. you told. Axios, that Chief Justice John Roberts opinions sets out a roadmap about how president can use his prosecutorial discretion to under enforce the law. The recourse would be if the next president wants to try to reverse. What that you know what that is Quote Suppose President. Donald Trump decided to create a nationwide right to carry guns openly. He could declare that he would not enforce federal firearms laws, and that new trump permit would free any holder of state and local gun restrictions. Even if trump knew that his scheme lack legal authority, he could get away with it for the length of his presidency, and moreover even if court declared the permit illegal, his successor would, his successor would have to keep enforcing the program for another year or two. This is somewhat strained. this is a somewhat according to axios. This is a strange reading of both procedural history and the law. The Supreme Court has never ruled either way on Dhaka's legality. That was not merits case, but the Supreme Court would not be able to decide the merits of anything. Trump does before the election. Just sorta using it as cover and to administration officials told axios that although the president has shown interest in us. Thinking the White House won't rely solely on that. Trump as I said, trump told Chris Wallace than in addition to replacing Daca with something much better. He's GONNA be unveiling a healthcare plan within two weeks that the Supreme Court decisions on Daca. Gave me the right to do. He sees this as his unfettered ability now to just declare law without going through Congress and the white. House declined to comment for this story. And next up a gunman dressed as a delivery driver shot, and killed the son of a federal judge and wounded her husband their New Jersey home on Sunday, this, according to law enforcement, confirming to the Washington, Post US District Judge Esther Solace, who was not injured during the shooting, which the FBI US Marshal, service and local authorities are now investigating. Salafists son died and her husband was rushed to the hospital for surgery. That's according to the Associated Press. Her husband is now in stable condition according to the Associated Press. WHO's fifty? One was New Jersey's first Hispanic woman to serve as a US, district? Judge She was appointed by President Barack Obama in two thousand ten G was confirmed by the Senate in two thousand eleven. She previously served as a magistrate Judge for the US District Court of the district of New Jersey. And? She's presided over a number of high profile cases, including the criminal trial of the real housewives of New Jersey Stars and she's been on the bench for recent cases involving the Great Streep Crib. The grape street crips according to a New Jersey advanced media gang charged with running a drug trafficking operation. Solace has more recently taken on a lawsuit brought by Deutsche Bank Investors Bank failed to follow its anti money. Laundering policies by taking on high risk clients such as F- Stein. authorities believe an attorney found dead in New York Monday is the shooter. The man's body was found on a property in the Sullivan County town of Rockland near Liberty, which is in the Newark catskills, one senior law enforcement official says the authorities are looking into whether there was a package or envelope addressed to the judge found near the man who may. May Have died of self inflicted gunshot wounds. The official said the FBI and marshals and police were at the scene while the vehicle. The man was sought to have been using is being searched at a nearby state police barracks. They're also investigating whether the gun found at the scene matches the one used to kill judge. Esther Solace his son and wound her husband. To sources described man as an attorney who fled who filed various lawsuits source of civil lawsuits over the years. No other details were available the time however. We are now getting information about the identity of the gunman. His name is Roy Hollander a New, York attorney and intelligence gatherer formerly based in Moscow We have his resume and the case. He tried in front of the judge Was We'll talk about that shortly. We're going to have Renato on. We're not to Mariotti to discuss this so before that let's get to the rest of the headlines while. We wait to speak with him later in the show and tens of thousands of workers nationwide today are planning to walk off the job. Monday and solidarity with the Black Lives Matter Movement this is hoping to draw closer scrutiny to the income inequality and systemic racism that organizers say have become more entrenched during the pandemic. It's called strike for black lives and leaders have dubbed the campaign have have taken this to more than two dozen cities including. From, a broad range of industries, Service Employees International Union. The International Brotherhood of there's the American Federation for Teachers and members of dozens of other labor and political groups plan to take part. Participants are pushing for an unequivocal declaration that black lives matter from businesses and political leaders action from government officials to reimagined our economy and our democracy with civil rights in mind businesses to dismantle racism, white supremacy and economic exploitation and access to union organizing accord, and this is all according to a list of demands posted on the strikes website. These kinds of protests are the kinds that were championed by John Lewis known as the conscious of the Congress and Reverend C. T Vivian. Both men were the epitome of quote. Good trouble. Lewis is favorite, saying and approach to confronting injustices without violence. they worked alongside alongside the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior in the forefront of the store struggle for racial justices in the nineteen sixties, both men died on Friday Lewis was eighty and Reverend C, t Vivian was ninety five. Our hearts go out to their families. May they rest in peace? We'll be right back with more headlines after this. Messages will be Brag. Hey everybody. It's aging today's episode. The daily beans is brought to you by better help. If there's something that's interfering with your happiness or preventing you from achieving your goals, you should try better help. They want you to start living a happier life today. Better hope is not a crisis line. It's not self-help. Professional counseling done securely online. They'll assess your needs and match with you and your own licensed professional therapists, and you can start communicating in less than twenty four hours. Everyone can use some help. During these tough times, I've personally sought support for dealing with P. T. S. I'm a huge believer in seeking help when you need it and better, health services available for clients worldwide, and they have a broad range of expertise in their cancer network, which might not be locally available in your area. You can log into your account anytime from anywhere and send a message to your to counselor, and you'll get timeline thoughtful responses, plus you can schedule weekly video phone sessions, so you won't have to have to sit in an uncomfortable waiting room as well traditional therapy. Better help is committed to facilitating great therapeutic matches, so they make it easy on free to change counselors. If needed, it's more affordable than traditional offline counseling and financial aid is available. You can visit their website and read their testimonials like this by better help. US S T whose Doctor Norris has been absolutely wonderful addition to my life after one session. I already felt so much more at ease. His relaxed attitude makes you feel comfortable in his knowledge. Listening skills are great would highly highly recommend I feel like better. Health has been an amazing asset as well same prices, one therapy session as a month sessions so definitely worth the investment. visit better help. Dot Com slash daily beans. That's better help, h. e., l. p. and join the over eight hundred thousand people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. There's a special offer for daily listeners. You get ten percent off your first month. Just go to better help. Dot Com slash daily beans. Alright everybody welcome back a so before the break we were discussing the identity of the alleged gunman in the tragic shooting at the home, a federal judge Solace and joining me to discuss is a former federal prosecutor. Renato Mariotti Renato thanks for agreeing to speak with me on such short notice absolutely anytime so I i. want to make clear that while I usually enjoy speculation. We put beans on things all the time. We have a phrase for it I always. Always. Want to wait until I have the facts and I want to encourage everyone to do the same especially in this case, because we still don't know the motive, and I want to discourage people from speculating on feeding conspiracy theories here because I think it can actually do damage to the family and harm the family, and this has to be a very difficult time for them, but I wanted to speak with you about the identity of the alleged gunman. Lawyer Lauren Men's rights. Activists Roy Den Hollander and I was wondering if you could tell us what you know about him. Yeah you know I was doing a little poking around the Internet He's an interesting character. kind of want. He seems like the sort of guy who would ordinarily represent Devon Nunez. You know a sort of off the wall. whacky lawyer. But. ironically graduated from Jd from Washington University and his. You know he's filed these kinds of this men's rights. Activists Guy who's filed lawsuits. Regarding, for example, ladies nights at the Bar of NATO outlawing those making sure that trying to, he followed the Wasi complaining about trump's coverage. Who is not was not an appropriate, just like a total wack job, and of course he's also got. His work experience all sorts of bizarre things you know for example in his younger years very large New York law firm, cravat very prestigious law firm then. He went to Russia for nine years. And ended up working kroll there, which is a sort of a a a kind of intelligence. And investigations firm very unusual that you know. He spent that time over season that now he's been back in filing all sorts of manner of lawsuits. Here in New York over the last twenty years, and apparently yeah, he had had a case or has a case pending. Still doing more research on this. Oh I. You know. This is from my minimal like frontloaded understanding of what's happening here, but there was apparently a case. that he was arguing in front of this judge, or had argued in front of this judge that he won that had to do with He believed that women should register for the draft just like men did, but I think the larger pointed. A of this is that he did try a case with this judge, and so we we still have no clue with the motive is. This gunman has been found alleged gunman I should say has been found. Dead apparently from a self inflicted gunshot wound in a car in New York, and so far. That's really all we know. Other than just looking at has passed resume. And you know as you said I agree with you that we shouldn't be speculating too much about it. I will say that you know. We had a case here in Chicago about twenty years ago where we had a federal judge, whose husband and mother were killed by a gunman who turned out to be a white nationalists who had litigated case in front of her and a similar sort of thing, and I, think one. One thing that it it it bears mentioning. Is that being a federal judge? Unfortunately, put you on the front lines. There's a lot of aggrieved crazy people who are filing cases arguing cases, and you know who knows what steps they'll take. It's why we have to is important to protect their federal judges exactly and her husband was also I believe a prosecutor, and so that opens the door to other motives that you know we. We could like I said we can speculate all day a however I just particularly finger in this case where there is a grieving family I mean this you know she. She lost her child. It's just gotta be so devastating that we just WANNA. Make sure that we're very careful. Not to go overboard. Wait to see what the facts are as they come out because this is obviously being investigated, and it will be investigated thoroughly. But you know I, just it's. It's an odd. It's just an odd series of events. Yeah, I think so and you know look. There's been a lot of speculation given the cases, the judge handling given how unusual this guy is, and what I I will say to everyone is. We do need to. Fully investigate this I. do think when when this when I first saw this. Mike while this is going to drive conspiracy theories for years to come. And who knows what the the re I mean we. We don't know and I. We're going to find out more I. Get why people are. Concerned I get why people are. Already speculating I admit I, tweeted about his resume earlier today because I found it so bizarre and I raise questions for me. You know when I was a federal prosecutor. I could investigate the questions that were raised now I can't and so I really have to have faith at the prosecutors. In the southern district of new. York, for example going to really. Fully carefully. This matter. Yeah and I think that you know because of Jeffrey. Berman's actions with the botched resignation tried to be forced upon him by bill. Bar who then refused to leave unless his predecessor Audrey Strauss took over the office. I think that that can give us a little bit of faith in their. You know a little more faith than we would have had had had. They installed who they wanted to install. So I think it's best for us to just wait and see what comes out of this investigation. Before we jump on any conspiracy. Theory bandwagon wagons. You know exactly right I think for for me right now. I'm just taking note of it. There's a lot of topics and a lot of things out. There were all trying to. You know you know beyond. Be informed. Part of what's going on here I. Think it's important. We're our for our. Our hearts go out to the judge and in the meantime GonNa GonNa Watch carefully as we all should be doing during this. Difficult time for our country yeah, one hundred percent, and it is art. It is in our human nature to speculate on these things like you know I've. I've sort of come to the realization the reason I'm able to be on top of all the news. Maybe not today. It's Kinda crazy today. But. In boil it down into digestible bits for everyone to listen to is because of my need to feel like I'm in control of something, and by knowing what all the news is, and knowing what all the past news is, and being able to sort of speculate on things that sort of gives me. A tiny sense of control in an absolutely chaotic administration, but I really do just just like you said I want to just hold back here and. Be patient you know it's. It's hard to do exactly exactly well I appreciate you coming on and talking today. I i. really just had some questions about this guy's resume, and it is, it's it's bizarre without a doubt. You a rash of lawsuits that I think anyone would would label him as kind of a looney litigants, and obviously kind of crazy white ring, crackpot type and unfortunately He's taken this to You know much earlier than he should have yeah much to the detriment. Of Justice and of course to this family I. Appreciate you coming on today. Will you come back and talk to us? When we learn more about this case? Absolutely happy to do it all right? We're not thank you very much former Federal Prosecutor Renato Marietta. You can catch him. He's got a podcast called on topic, and it's really really wonderful, so check that out. Everybody will be right back after this quick break. Stay with us. Hey, everybody it's. We've learned during this pandemic. 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That's sun basket dot com slash daily beans and enter Promo Code daily beans at checkout for thirty five dollars off your order again sun basket dot com slash daily beans and don't forget to enter Promo daily beans. All right everybody, welcome back! It is time for news under the radar with Jordan Coburn Jordan. How are you today? Do I'm doing okay? How are you, yeah? I heard I heard that you weren't feeling so hot today and I'm so sorry it's okay it's all right. Yeah, I just I need to details. You can check my twitter now. No but everybody send out good. Healing is to Jordan and I appreciate. You hear supporting me. Today has got to be the most bachelorette crazy firehose. Ridiculous Newsday I've seen a really long time, and you know I I only say that. What maybe like once every six months? Yeah, yeah, that sounds fair. Yeah, today's that day. So, let's let's kick it off. Let's start with the headlines All. All all kickoff with a quick covert update were approaching four million cases in the United States with over one hundred and forty thousand confirmed deaths today as several states continued, assess single day records teachers. Unions have sued Governor Rhonda Santa's of Florida on Monday. Over his administration's emergency order pushing schools to fully reopen next month. Even as krona virus cases are surging still in that state, the suit, which appears to be the first of its kind across the country sets up a confrontation between unions and politicians that could change the trajectory of school reopening over the next coming weeks. In other parts of the country, including California and parts of Texas, many large school districts have concluded in recent days that it's not safe to hold in person classes, but Rhonda, Santa's a Republican very special republican has been pushing for things to be different in Florida. Which is home to five of the countries ten largest school districts? And President, trump said on Monday that he is bringing back the daily Corona virus briefings that he halted in April. Tacit acknowledgement that the public health crisis he has sought to put behind him is still ravaging much of the country and I think that this is probably in response to a bunch of Republicans, who are starting to break with him on his covert response although I don't know why. It took one hundred forty thousand deaths for them to do that right or the fact that he's getting quoted constantly as quoted, but it is being reported that he is just done. With it. He's just done caring about it. Yeah, he's like I. My eyes on other things like sending militias out to major democratic cities ahead of the election. That sounds great. Let's give him a microphone when he's feeling a nihilistic about this. That's GONNA. TASTIC! Yeah, no big deal at all. With cases and deaths on the rise, trump told reporters that he would probably hold the first of his new series of briefings on Tuesday at five PM. He attributed his decision to revive them not to the increasing threat of the virus, but to the fact that the briefings had high television ratings. Minnesota which reported nine hundred cases on Monday as a single day record. I'm sorry did I, did I gloss over the yeah, just reacting high television Thai television ratings just imagining he's GonNa. Shoot Goya beans at a shirt cannons and kill someone. Yeah Yeah So. Sorry. Anyway Minnesota nine hundred new cases single day record also reported its first virus related death of a child, according to the State Health Department the Department, said that child was five years old or younger, but didn't list the exact age. Mayor Lori lightfoot if Chicago is starting to roll back, some of the city's reopening rules to help limit further community spread. She said this Monday that starting this Friday. Bars will once again be banned from serving alcohol indoors services like shaves and facials. That require people to take off their masks. We'll be banned indoor fitness classes. We'll be limited to ten people and property. Managers will be asked to limit the number of guests to five per unit to prevent parties. So that's what party is considered in Chicago more than five people. the largest school district in Georgia. Which is Gwinnett? County Public School said that classes will begin August twelve online only. The annual Marine Corps. Marathon has been canceled this year. Because of virus concerns the organization that runs the events that there will be a virtual marathon in place for the October. Hey to what Yup a virtual marathon! How does that work is in place, or is it just going to be a bunch of buffed dudes and women just running in the streets with Max in their hands, I don't know. I don't know I know that. We've had several like virtual marathons and virtual races. I was assuming that you just run around your neighborhood, and while it's happening like so let's say that the marathon is on August, twentieth, or whatever then you run a marathon that day wherever you're at. Instead of getting together with a bunch of people to do it, you just get on like I. Did it man that was tough. Guys good work. The next day. Wow, the MARATHA virtual marathon a record turnout finishers who finished all under two hours this week. Let's see what else here. I'm I'm sure there's some sort of tracking Japan thing you have to hand in your. I! Don't know I think it's A. I don't know that's funny. Tone Magin like the marathon system. That's cult like cross fit do they will? Route your fake ass out. Did the I did the half marathon rock and roll marathon in Arizona was like what are we just hang out around mile eleven hide in the mountains up in Papa. Go and just hop out of the last mile and be like. Look up to you and just like run to the finish. Near like now they've catcher. Dan. It Must I. Don't know maybe. Like massive online cheating marathon scandal. I'm into it. Let's see what else here. Delta Airlines said it required passengers unable to wear face masks because of health conditions to undergo a medical clearance at the airport before boarding or the passenger should reconsider travel altogether. I'm saying if you have a medical condition. disallows you to wear a mask. You shouldn't be traveling on rightly right because that means. Your respiratory system has to be so delicate that even that amount of lessened airflow is detrimental to your. I seems like your way too fragile. Yeah, you should stay home and I'm not saying this to limit your freedoms I'm saying this because I care about you contracting the virus and having a really bad reaction to it. Seems like the pandemics version of an emotional animal or whatever like emotional? Chickens that were being brought onto the plane. How this? Can Get abused And United Airlines also said starting next week it would leave its high efficiency, particulate air or hippo filtration systems, running as passengers get on and off planes, a move intended to maximize airflow. I didn't know that they didn't already do that all the time. Anyway, that's frightening. Well. Those are a brief covert updates I know there's a lot more going on and will continue to you know. Keep you abreast of what's going on with the coronavirus pandemic, but Jordan you have an update on the Michigan teenager that was jailed for missing homework assignments. What's the latest on that? We talked about it before. Yes, so Michigan Supreme. Court said on Thursday a few days ago that they're redoing that case in. In the circumstances that led to this fifteen year old, being detained in mid-may in the middle of the pandemic, because a judge said that she violated her probation by not doing her schoolwork, she didn't commit you. Know any of the other things that were listed out as far as I've read as violations of her probation and so yet because she didn't do her schoolwork, she got put into detention and then So that same. Day Attorneys filed four grace how she's referred to in the reporting. Her attorneys filed a motion seeking an emergency review in reconsideration of her case, and there was a protest that actually accompanied that move. There's over two hundred people that participated in one of the car caravans, and at the in front of the Oakland, county courthouse. So just I forget if we've talked about it at all in the podcast or I'm I'm sure people are familiar with it, but if you're not basically everybody just yep gets in a car together and has signs or shy should say that gets in their own cars separately drives together in a line has signs that are? Typically I mean there's so many like b. m. once everything anyway, so the fact that they did this super cool, because when we first reported this story, so many people that I saw twitter like how are we not hearing more about this? The you know I hope that there are directly organizing around this and they did and It seems like there was a really good turn out for that. Open, county, Judge Mary Ellen Brennan She's the one that's the presiding judge over grace's case. That concluded that grace was quote a threat to the community, and that was because of her prior assault charges, not because of her, not doing her homework, but ranted about this when we first covered this. She's bringing in issues with her past conduct into this present case, which seems to me. To be. Chitty and potentially not okay to do. We'll see because it's getting reviewed and I think that this is this is going to be. This is like in the national news now and we'll keep following it and see. What's going to happen? prosecutors have until July twenty four to respond to that motion from Grace's attorneys to reconsider that case but the judge denied the request released grace before a hearing that took place today. The said yeah, the judge said it is not in grace's best interests to interrupt the mental health treatment before receiving a report regarding her progress so. I guess. I don't I mean she's. It's IT'S It's just so much of the damage already been done. To Grayson, and in this case and I just like mid-may. She's been there. That's that's so long. That's two two months and it's appalling to me that they're saying that her being in this institution in this juvenile detention center is better for her because she's receiving mental health care there as opposed to being home with family. Yes, so I believe she got moved into a separate residential program, but she's definitely not home. She's not home with her family, so she went from straight attention to this residential facility, which is where she's getting that care, but point. Yeah, point being. Home, she should be home Well. I'm glad that this story is finally getting some national attention and we'll definitely keep everybody posted on on. What's happening with it? and yeah I remember. When we had the car caravan here in San, Diego I think we talked about that that car caravan protests that stopped in the Hoya and fifteen other places and went for a really long ways and how? We've added. That was a really excellent way especially during pandemic to protest so I'm glad that that's happening and I'm glad that this like I said I'm glad this is getting national attention. so thanks for that reporting. I have in the next headline here. US Court of Appeals for the second circuit has held the conviction of Attila that's the former deputy general manager of Hawk Bank, who served a thirty six month prison sentence for his role in helping Iran to avoid billions of dollars in USA economic sanctions. Remember we talked about the guy and the gold and the smuggling. Guy And the goal of the smuggling. Yeah, that's the description for for like all white collar crimes you know. And this three judge panel of the manhattan-based appeals court Monday found a flaw in one of the prosecutors mean theories of liability in the case, but nonetheless upheld Attila's conviction finding that the evidence against him was quote overwhelming again remember this case came out of the southern district and trump and bar were pushing to to stop the indictments from happening. They're pushing Jeffrey Berman. To not indict these this guy. And this by the way, this is just in right now. Yesterday I spoke in the in the block extensively about the subpoenas that the Senate Republican Ron Johnson is working on to get people in to testify about Barack Obama and the Biden's and today we learned early on that top two Democrats top two Democrats in Congress and leaders of the House and Senate intelligence committees released a letter on Monday FBI director Christopher Wray saying they are gravely concerned that Congress appears to be the target of a concerted foreign interference campaign. They wrote. The campaign seeks to launder an amplified disinformation to influence congressional activity, public debate and the presidential election in November. That was from early this morning and just now Natasha. Bertrand tweeted out that among the Intel that prompted. This letter is concerned that the Senate probe being led by Ron Johnson has become a vehicle for laundering a foreign operation to damage Joe Biden and that's according to people familiar with letter. So, it looks like Ron Johnson. Has Re Giuliani on speed dial so we're going to keep you. This is a huge huge huge national security breaking story about interference in the upcoming election, and Ron Johnson being a vehicle to launder disinformation about the Biden's and Barack Obama and that's probably what's you know prompting him to issue? These subpoenas that were supposed to be issued this Wednesday, but now with this letter out to Chris Wray. We'll see what happens. We'll keep you abreast of all of it And finally Jordan? What's going on in Atlanta right now? yes, so on Friday This is a day. Okay so governor camp. Basically does a shore headline. is suing. The bear because she She's bringing Atlanta back to the stricter phase, the strictest phase of reopening and this is amidst rising cases. Atlanta has one third of the state's cases right now in Georgia's cases in general are going up, as are a lot of different cities and states cases right now we're not in a good place with covid and Kemp is saying that he's going to move forward with the lawsuit, saying that he will not stand down because the mayor's disastrous policies threatened the lives and livelihood of our citizens, and this is so. This is really interesting to me because you have a governor that refuses to mandate masks even though. The case are going up. He says he won't go past. Just strongly suggesting that people wear them, and then you have a mayor that is more concerned, obviously about the pulse citizens and is choosing to require this. This mask mandates are enforce it, but what is so interesting to me? Is You know this question of WHO's more, powerful, a governor or a mayor and I was looking through in doing some research before we hopped on here and it seems like the precedent exists in Kemp's favor right now in terms of him issuing an executive order, but it's GonNa be litigated litigated in court. And, the mayor is welcoming that opportunity to argue this corporate I feel like. They're gonNA have to successfully argue that the health of citizens are objectively one hundred percent more at risk with his policy verses. Hers may be for her to be able to enforce that. Directly in contradiction to Kemp's order so. That's yeah, and I think a good argument here. I'm sorry to interrupt I think a good argument. Here would be wide just why just the mayor of Atlanta? wikileaks bottoms? Why is he not? Any other mayor who's mandating masks in rolling back the reopening of the states of the of their of their cities. It's just her and I think he might have a hard time. Proving why it's just her. And not. Any of the other mayors that that are that are doing this. Yeah Yeah, that's I I wasn't aware that other mayors and other cities. We're doing the same. As as she was, if that's the case then. Well I guess if he's just. Suing her directly. She doesn't get to increase her bench of. Defendants. But. Or, can't she? Could she get other mayors to sign onto the lawsuit? Can you do that? She's the defendant right right he's. Yes, so I mean she can bring any witnesses that she wants. But I just find it remarkable that that the only black woman mayor is the one that's being sued so right point being if other mayors are doing the exact same thing then maybe. If the you know outside of them, just coming as witnesses, they wanted to actually litigated that in in maybe a separate. Case or court or something with all of them together. I don't know because it seems like this has the. To set some serious precedent moving forward. pan-demic precedent it's public health precedent basically, so it's. It's really interesting to me. Yeah, and also part of this loss. He asked for an emergency injunction to restrain her from talking to the Press Yep. So. And she actually tweeted that out. Yeah, which was kind of a like a giant fuck you. Yeah, he's totally trying to like tire hands and put duct tape over her mouth now. Apparently the judge is GonNa. Take Up. The issue Tuesday morning at eleven, so we'll keep you posted. I've got a couple more real. Quick Headlines here a state. Department employees who reported witness witnessing misconduct by Pompeo, as well as hearing, numerous firsthand accounts of. Not Good behavior was blocked from further addressing the issue by top department officials who were protecting Mr Pompeo and that's according to newly public a newly public copy of the employee's whistleblower complaint. The heavily redacted version of the complaint indicates that top officials and abled misconduct by Mr Pompeo. Voiced concerns internally. An alleged circle of complicit of complicity that was not previously known after encountered resist enter encountering resistance from the department's executive legal offices. The whistle blower filed a complaint with the agency's Office of the Inspector General which apparently prompted an investigation into the misuse of taxpayer resources by Pompeo and his wife Susan details of the inquiry coming amid a cloud of accusations that critic say show a pattern of abusive tax payer money have emerged gradually since May. When congressional aides told journalists about it. The inquiry was one of at least two investigations that Inspector General. Steve Lineker was conducting into pompeo's actions at the department when trump abruptly fired Mr Link in May at the urging of Mr Pompeo. Mr Lyndon known to be cautious nonpartisan at served as inspector general since two thousand thirteen ran an office of hundreds and investigated fraud and waste in the State Department. So, that's happening, still more of that going on, and then finally the White House is taking advantage of a loophole to install loyalists to trump in acting senior roles at the Pentagon. Basically skirting the Senate confirmation process. We've talked a little bit about this and the Vacancies Act while the number of vacancies isn't new one third of the defense. Department's of sixty Senate confirmed. Positions are filled on a temporary basis a third of them. But the White House in recent months has been sending over people to fill in spots, open spots as opposed to the more traditional method of tapping people from within the Pentagon. Experts and Democratic lawmakers decried the campaign to root out those seen as disloyal and replace them with trump accolades. Some of them are very underqualified. They worry that a climate that values loyalty over expertise scares away the best prospects and injects politics into an organization that tries to operate above partisanship. This comes as the White House. Personnel conduct interviewing of the white. House office the personnel the PPO. We talked about this yesterday. Are Actually I think it was last Friday? Makati, conducting interviews with departments, political employees appointees for jobs in a second trump term, including high level undersecretaries such as Ellen Lord, who is the chief weapons buyer and this is all according to a defense official in two former defensive in two other former defense officials, current one and two former ones so. This is again just an ongoing systematic, sweeping of disloyal appointees in and disloyal means. You're not super pro trump. I think is what disloyal means, yeah, right, because Fox News is disloyal now. Yeah, exactly so just skirting Congress, and appointee process, and the Vacancies Act by just installing who he trump accolades, and it continues to happen now it's happening in the. They're just pointing out here that it's now happening at very high levels of the Pentagon. Frightening as it always is so. Those are headlines news from under the radar, which all should be on the radar, bigly, and usually, but because of everything else. That's going on. In this fire hose. Shit show Lullaby. those are those are the headlines from under the radar. Any anything you want to add before we get out of here Jordan and hit to head to the good news block no I. Don't think so. Now me, neither so everybody just stick around right after this quick break. We'll have the good news for you. Stay with us. Hey friends. Gene Portion of daily beans is brought to you by fit body. It is so important these days to focus on our health and fitness whether you're new to the gym or you've been lifting weights for years, it can be hard to find the right workout program to stick to, but with it bod, you get a truly personalized fitness program that adapts as you go fit. Body is a smart fitness out. That takes all the guesswork out of planning your workouts fit bots, algorithm factors in your goals experience level, equipment, workout, duration and muscle recovery to intelligently craft the perfect total body workout program just for you. I absolutely love this because now that I can't go to the. The Gym anymore where they would decide what the workouts are I have fit to help me. Decide what I'm going to do. And what each workout they learn your abilities, and they plan your workouts to maximize your results. I love that they cycle new exercises into the mix. It keeps my workouts fund in fresh, so I never get bored and they keep it balanced to so they never overwork a muscle group, so I always have recovery time I've never to soar to to start working out again the next day. Because there's so much variety, they're constantly changing rotating. Never get bored and I've I've stuck with it for that reason for much longer than I usually do with exercise plans. bought. I'm always looking forward to the next workout and I can already see results. It's super easy use, and even have an HD video tutorial to make learning new exercises a breeze. It's perfect for anyone who's looking to get a better fitness result whether your goal is general fitness feeling better strength, training, muscle, toning bodybuilding, Olympic weightlifting. That's my goal. No equipment, no worries they have bodyweight routines for those looking to get fit at home or on the go and integrates with other fitness health apps like Apple Health fitbit and Strada personalized training can be tough on the budget, but fit bod, only ninety nine, a month or fifty nine hundred nine year. Get personalized fitness plan that helps you work out smarter fit body dot me, slash daily beans. Try Fit bad for free for one month when you sign up today at fit body, dot me, slash daily beans. That's one free month when you sign up at fit body dot means slash daily beans. Alright, everybody welcome back. It's time for the good news. And back with me from the last segment for the good news block Jordan Coburn Jordan. Are you ready for the good news? Yes, why don't you kick us off all right I? have yes some great news coming out on the COVID nineteen front, so university of Oxford has developed a covid nineteen vaccine in. It's showing really positive results. There's evidence that vaccines can produce these immune responses that are supposedly going to protect people against the infection, so they need to do more trials because they need to get A. A wider Kesse, wider net and see how it affects people more, but currently they say it seems to be safe and effective. So this is great news. Yes, that's way ahead of schedule and it is very heartening to hear that, so we wanted to put that in the good news block other good news you ready for this Jordan. Yes, remember that couple that rich couple who waived their guns at protesters in Saint, Louis out in front of their mansion. I do they've been charged with felonies for unlawful you. We'll keep you posted. That makes me so happy I. Know God lawyers. got. That's incredible. Fuck yes! Along that okay. Next step or I slip from our audience. Good News. Damasio del Toro he him says. avondale listener since around two thousand eighteen, or so also the patron, thank you normally when I get a scam. Call from India Pakistan about my credit card rates I would just play along and give them fake credit card numbers which waste their time, and then end the call by cursing at you and hanging up. I HAVE I changed the way I do things now now when they call I, tell them I am Donald. J trump and ask for their vote ten out of ten times it sets. These people off in a profanity laced rant. It takes longer for them to hang up on me because they want. They seem to want to get all of the regime. It's all the Cathartic. If they ask questions I'll ignore the question and replied by saying. Do you think my daughter is beautiful? I do if I were not the president I would be dating her right now and I know you know what that means believe me. And any other outrageous tropism things I could dream up. I'll say so if you get those causes I do just do your worst Donald Trump impression and have fun with it. That's that is. I would have never thought to do that for fear of them, actually going out and voting for Donald Trump. Oh, but that's so you denise e Del Toro, yes I liked that data. I know they're mad PORP- those the what it would have shitty job I know. All right, let's see what's up next here from Matt Pronouns he him. I'm listening to your show for a couple of months now I really enjoy it. The good news segments are really touching and some have helped. Push me to my toes into the activism pool. Awesome. My wife is an risk for Cova did so I'm trying to get more involved without leaving the House I ended up. Joining a group called unemployed actions That's working to extend unemployment benefits during the. The pandemic I started text banking to increase turnout for mostly virtual rallies, town halls, and I've been amazed at how uncommon hostile how uncommon hostile responses are and I've even had some really nice conversations with people. It feels good to do something to try to make things better and I'm constantly inspired by the others in the group. Like one of your previous listeners. My wife also calls trump the orange menace, but I've always thought of him as the abscess in chief. That's so funny. I. I off. Awesome. Great work is very cool. I didn't even think about texting people I when I when I think of fun making it's always like the voice you know, so. It's kind of Nice to know. You can do good with your fingers. I think that I had coach? Love those names for trump to. I had thought of Orange Julius Caesar last night and I was like. I was like there can't vast to already exists, and it does, and it was very sad to see, but but it's gone one Orange Julius Caesar Of course it exists anyway. Orange Menace, absent and chief love it from from Laura, pronouns she heard Laura says. With other, seeing my spouses male, but her always knowing, she wasn't. She started a transition to female a few months ago. A few days ago after the San. Diego course reopened. We received the order from the judge approving her new name gender. We're both beyond fortunate to have a loving and supportive community of family and friends, and thank the stars that we found each other. My wife came out at work to hundreds of people at multiple locations, and now has a couple of months off in order. Order to get the legality stunned and to settle into her existence is female and get used to the loss of the privilege she had before she favorite person on the planet and a compassionate patient, hilariously funny and deeply good person and thanks to justice. Gorsuch never thought those words would be said by me for be swing vote in Skoda's case that will affect the lives and freedoms of US and LGBTQ plus folks in the years to come love from us to you all at the daily beans. were. That's very beautiful congratulations and thank you so much lower for sending that is so so read your. Whoever thought we'd be thinking just as Gorsuch for lgbtq plus writes. Yes, it's fucked up right now, but much love to you. and. Thank you for sending that in. Thank you for sharing that. Coming up now from Christina Pronoun she her. Hello. There beans ladies I have some good news from Europe international unmarried couples have been fighting for travel ban exemptions in order to allow their significant others to return to Europe from the US or anywhere. Really I guess. So far, four countries have opened their borders for this done Mark Norway, the Netherlands and Austria where I'm from. You can find out more about this on twitter Hashtag. Love is essential and Hashtag love is not tourism. Cheers, Christina von. Let's see. Verse Gish Vintner. Chris Bush Kushner thank God. Yes, I just want you. Just want you to hear me pronounce my last name you. Yes. I think that. That is like A. Versa with a cloud over the look. At probably not even close, but I hope so. Let us know how to hit us up sent us this. True! Bring back corrections goodness. Next. Next up from Oh pronouns them. I live with my daughter, her wife in kate their best friend. They help me with my bills since my SSD I-. Disability benefits only amounts to twelve hundred dollars a month. They have an art business, but have been sadly unable to do any convention since covid nineteen. However, they just did a kickstarter for their newest pins and reach their five hundred dollar minimum in less than five minutes. I'm so happy. That's really that's really cool and really fast. Check them out at atomic pixies dot, com or facebook dot com slash atomic pixies cool awesome, atomic, a. t. m., C. Pixies Pi X. I. E. S. Yep. I'm going to chalk out. Yeah, seriously. That's so nice. Thank you well of as a great website to all right well, thank you mo next from Sherry Pronouns. She her good news. The cat dog divide is not impossible to cross I. Am an Omni Pet. Owner cats, dogs, and fish with occasional birds, but I love rodents and reptiles to. We have just moved from the Clemson. South Carolina to Topeka Kansas just in time, and our new home is beautiful. It's a beautiful old house in the middle of feral cat middle of feral cat colony Lord. We have adopted. Two kittens. See attached photo to go along with the five cats. We already have and the two standard poodles who were huge cat fans. Although there, bouncy ways require getting used to them for felines. Hashtag Tobin's for Biden is a brilliant idea. Amanda thanks for Your Anger Humor your joy and intelligence. You are handrails in my life, a hall and there's a Kiddie picture that is so fucking cute. Oh my gosh, so there's a little little orange and white tabby, and then what looks to be a little Turkish rag doll with long hair in the background. And then a giant poodle that they're laying on which you almost can't see. She's almost camouflaged. She's they're laying on this giant standard poodle standard poodle smartest dogs by the way I've learned. Trying to get my I was trying to get a a service dog. For Ptsd Poodles are apparently head and shoulders smarter than any other breed of dogs, so they're they're. Poodles got a Noodle Huh. But to baby. We'll have to send this picture out in the newsletter which we send a patrons on a weekly basis. And thank you if you're a patron and we appreciate you sending in a good news, you could send your good news to us at daily beans. pod Dot Com and you can just click the contact form there, and you can also send quarantine confessions, their ideas for themes for the happier meet-and-greet that happens on Friday our livestream on crowd cast, and then you can also submit corrections if you need to. If you want to, and also you can do this at the pinned tweet on our twitter account at daily beans pod, so we look forward to you sending those in and thank you for that. I needed it today I was. My hair was on fire today with all the news and I'm there still stuff that I missed I mean I. You know we're just now getting reports about Hannity Tucker Carlson Being Accused of sexual harassment. I think I've got. I've look into that. Surprising headline and Just so much going on, and now I'm learning. I have to watch the task force briefings again thought my life so. I really! Appreciate everybody sending in your good news stories. Seriously they somebody said that we're your handrails y'all are mine, and so I really appreciate it. You got any final thoughts Jordan. not for me today now just have a great night grey day. Just be well, thank you, yes, and Jordan please feel better. Everyone. Send your healing fives Jordan. Because we need you. We need you one hundred percents. I'm totally totally okay. By the way I'm totally okay. I just have weird stomach. Things and body thinks happening, but that everything's fine. Yes, but we want you to feel better. Feel awesome, thank you. Got, all right everybody until tomorrow, please take care of yourself. Take care of each other take care of the planet and take care of your. Mental Health I'VE BEEN AG I've been Jordan Coburn. Them's the beans. The daily beans is executive produced and directed by AG Coburn and engineered edited by Mackenzie. Mozelle and starnes industries are marketing manager, executive, assistant, production and social media direction is Amanda reader fact. Checking research by AG Jordan Coburn and Amanda Reader our. Music is written and performed by they might be. Giants are web design branding by Joel reader with moxy design studios, and our website is daily beans, pod DOT COM.

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2020: The Fall & Grand Rising

On One with Angela Rye

58:11 min | 9 months ago

2020: The Fall & Grand Rising

"The steady strap to write people of free sixty god and everything. You pay everybody. Are y'all all right. i think i'm doing all right. I'm so happy because this is the last on one with angela. Arrived podcast for the year. And guess what we are finally at the end of twenty twenty the end finally drive my. I am so happy that we made it. This year was a lack. I think most of us will agree that we experience Life changing moments. Some for the better. Some maybe not so much in today's podcast. We'll review some of twenty twenty s moments. We saw some black excellence. We witness moments becoming movements. We have a black woman. Vp now at least in january will we also experienced some sadness with the loss of friends family members in heroes there was a common factor that shifted our way of living an existing on this planet. Tremendously we went from handshakes to elbow bumps smiles despising and head nods and hopefully. Y'all started washing your hands for real. We went from conference calls to zoom. Does everything that'd be his own now before we intertwining twenty one. I think it's so important that we take time to reflect on what happened in our lives. Before turning over a new leaf we should honor our growth and create space for ourselves and one another my word from our fortieth birthday. Which was last year was clarity. Thanks to miss nausea mix. And we're gonna ride that thing right up to forty two if i need to. I've incorporated practicing clarity in so many parts of my life through therapy exercise. Detoxing praying fasting and meditating. Being intentional about choosing ourselves can help us our way to our greatest selves so without further ado. Let's get into the top twenty moments of twenty twenty. I don't know if they're the top twenty but definitely the biggest plane corona virus ak covert nineteen aka. We have to start with that road. I don't think any of us understood. What would happen with this virus. Once the cdc confirmed the first case on january twenty first all hell started to break loose. It doesn't matter if you live in. The united states are overseas. It didn't matter if you're young or old if you're black or white poor or rich. This virus did discriminate in the win the way in which disproportionately impacted us but it definitely hit everybody in impacted all of us in some way after the announcement of the country going into a lockdown. There was so much uncertainty about how the virus would affect us physically or economically and many of us didn't understand what the toll would be emotionally. Hell i know i stocked up on food water paper towels and toilet paper shots of freedom paper company by the way as my friend. Katie always says i'm an absolute germaphobe and like to be over prepared and that if you're ever in crisis if there's a man made or a natural disaster you need to come to casa angelo ride as a germaphobe. As soon as i found out about the virus i bought has met. Soups already. Had gloves and masks at home. Because as i said i'm a germaphobe. I wasn't playing at the grocery store and even on the plane and some of you laughed but a lot of y'all were sliding my dm's in texts like a cop has met pseudo in i obliged at the time of recording this podcast. More than three hundred and eleven thousand people have died in the united states alone. One point six million deaths and counting world wide so many jobs less kids home-schooled restaurants closed small businesses decimated and even nba was in a bubble shout to this central workers who are working so hard every single day to keep us alive. Well and safe. And i want to send a special shoutout to two of my faves dr last stanford who answered all of my crazy kobe questions even on a podcast and to dr nana who is healing community literally right now testing people so we can ensure that we're state and we get better a lovely lady so much on a not so positive note. Imagine what could have happened. If y'alls president wasn't built busy colin the china virus and instead insane it was a hoax instead. Speaking of it as it really was a problem one that brings me to number two one that he tested positive for corona virus. Donald trump tested positive for their own after spreading lies about it being a hoax and not taking the pandemic seriously. There weren't many moments where his administration gave comfort to the american people at all. And when you look at the vaccine time line he was even questioning the credibility of scientists when he tested positive on october second the pandemic had already claimed the lives of more than two hundred thousand. Two hundred and seven thousand americans instead of using his diagnosis. As a teachable moment for the american public he doubled down on misleading rhetoric and further trivialized the ravaging pandemic ultimately leading to their demise. The white house became a superspreader house. Wash your hands an. Please wear your masks to number. Three is the coronavirus vaccine. All things related to covid in the top three because it really has impacted our world's shoutout to kizzie kids miki corbett the black woman immunologist and lead vaccine developer at nih. Who's a part of the team working to develop one of the two ima- rene vaccines that is shown to be more than ninety percent of. We will talk whether or not about whether or not y'all gonna takes it vaccine later but we do wanna recognize the black women who continue to change the world number four what we have done without club quarantine and versus battles. We may have been second side but thanks to my brother denies we were entertained and dancing on night and day shutouts denies who also patiently taught me a little bit of being lit up. Bang are two on the ones in twos. How to spin on during my podcast. Masterclass podcast with him. I can't wait for my in person. Derek i look forward to that. He was named a corona virus hero by the la times transformed the role of what the dj even looks like in twenty twenty. It was no longer about the club. It was about community in which he created every single night during club. Quarantine his small two hundred viewer crowd on instagram. Live soon turn into. And then that special day when he reached more than a million viewers participants. He had notable appearances from both sides. Michelle obama oprah drake and he and all of you of course made those moments completely unforgettable. We also witnessed legendary battles through versus brought to us by timberland and swiss beats. We witnessed the virtual battles of monica verses. Brandy jill scott erykah teddy riley. When he wasn't pros in versus baby face patti labelle gladys knight patti. Lean in a little bit shot out to patty. We also did a cooking class on on the masterclass snow. Wendy mags kirk franklin and freddie hammer. Because you can't gospel out an the legendary best coast best coast rappers e forty into sure. Y'all knew exactly what we needed. And for that we say thank you number. Five to queen off and tabitha brown taught us the importance of holistic living and understanding what we digest. We are what we eat so many of us went on a health and detox journey this year especially after eating all that comfort food. I know that was my testimony. Thanks to the journey. I can honestly say. I've never felt more at home in my body. These cleans are truly amazing tablet. The brown took the world by storm with her loving spirit and tasty vegan dishes to your team for telling me all about her. I went on a twenty one day. Detox with queen fula which transformed into a more holistic and spiritual health journey through this really difficult time with the rights of passage program that she does. I'm still catching up a little behind. But i'm so pleased to be with her on this journey through this evolution number. Six congratulations to the graduating classes of twenty twenty and the teachers and the new teachers is the parents. Yeah i know. Many of us are all the way zoomed out this year especially students who have to learn that way. I cannot even imagine with the remote classes and virtual graduations. This generations of this generation of students had to take on the pandemic and online learning. You may not have received the celebration. You are really deserve but know that we are all so proud of you you even had commencement speeches from folks like beyond say barack and michelle obama highly. Meg the stallion. How dope is that an extra special things. Like i said to the teachers or pivoting into the real. Mvp's the parents the leaders of homeschool. I bow down to number seven which is a tragedy. Kobe bryant of course was killed earlier. This year in a tragic helicopter crashed with his daughter. Gianna brian on the day. We heard the news about kobe. Death it really slapped the entire world. Perhaps this was already. This was a sign that we should know. The twenty twenty was gonna be difficult With former basketball player kobe. bryant. Of course of the lakers who died tragically on january. Twenty six twenty twenty I felt so sad. Because i felt like i grew up with him. I didn't know koby personally. But we're around the same age. And i remember when he took branding prom so this was a devastating loss to so many of us to community just because of his bright spirit. And so right now. I just wanna soon love to vanessa and to his surviving daughters. I can't even imagine what y'all are going through. Number eight is black lives matter gaining the worldwide attention it deserves to the co creators. Be a limb. At least you garza patrisse cullors and thank you all for waging this fight and giving us this much needed affirmation when trayvon martin was initially killed. We know that you all started saying black. Lives matter and it was an argument. In this year it was finally accepted. The movement gained global attention after nationwide and international protests in response to the killing of george. Floyd brianna taylor am arbery. Blm's approval rating soared National sentiment turned positive and it only took watching eight minutes and forty six seconds of george floyd fighting or his life only to succumb to at the hands of police violence a lot bigger figuratively change but wasn't enough after all the violence on our community. Have we really seen change. And i think we all know the fight has just begun with brianna. It's brianna his law. Going on the books in state legislatures all over the country. The fight waged by until freedom and so many other activists in the streets and for the victims. Brianna taylor manual. Ellis elijah mclean and so many others. We can't name. We will keep fighting until the world understands that. Your black life mattered to number nine. Athletes also took a stand in protesting police. Brutality many finally understanding why colin kaepernick kneeled athletes joined in in speaking truth to power and using their powerful positions of influence to force change in in major league baseball the nba wnba nfl and even the national soccer league. Blm found itself on jerseys on shoes on courts and fields. Wnba players boycotted games nba players in wmu nba players. Were t shirts with the names of victims of police brutality and tennis player of course naomi osaka were mass. Depicting the names of the victims athletes took knees racist one out and even sat out games in protest. The ladder in response to jacob blake nearly dying from police gunshot wounds in milwaukee on august twenty third twenty twenty and then number ten is the response. My dad has always wanted nationally. Ranked high school athlete prospects are committing. Hpc's us instead of predominantly white institutions. This decision will probably result in greater opportunities for the schools and especially for the students. Attending these institutions in basketball highlight was five star senior mature member announcing his commitment to attend howard university over the summer and in football dion. Prime coach prime sanders will now be the head coach for jackson state. University's football program and signed to his two sons who are nationally ranked as incoming players. He's influenced another athlete. Who was formerly committed formerly committed to attending georgia number. Eleven is a growth in nationwide support of black owned businesses. we always respond and lean lenient when crisis strikes. This year was no different under the pressure of three pandemics kovin racism and economic injustice. We showed up. Black folks went right to where the money reside rights to where the money resides according to you support for black owned businesses increased more than seven thousand percent. Let me find our choosen- us all twenty twenty and beyond. We can't talk about bill. Without ensuring we are increasing black wealth and opportunity even beyond say told black is king not just with visual album release but also with a black owned business directory number. Twelve de-fund the police. The very slogan was so controversial. People decided not to listen to what was really meant by said slogan sparked conversations on controversy and whether or not elections were lost on politics but meanwhile we just want to remind you. We're not here to make people comfortable about the saying if only you get that. Same energy to reallocate funds for from over-funded police departments into underfunded areas including black and brown communities education healthcare. In so many more. We're just trying to live so. Pardon my urgency. These words don't hurt as bad as karate holds chokeholds tasers and bullets shift these resources to people who really want to protect and serve black people and that's on period pu never thirteen justice in policing. We didn't just protests black folks legislated at the local state and federal levels. The house of representatives voted on june twenty fifth to pass the justice in policing act. A bill led by congressional black caucus. Chair rep karen bass in the house by senators harris and booker in the senate. The bill of course addressed a wide range of policies issues to ensure police accountability And law enforcement accountability. All the while. We're still waiting on the senate to move mitch. Mcconnell senate joshua column up at two zero two two two four one to one number fourteen is the sars protests in nigeria which of course had a global impact and a global recognition about what's happening with the special anti robbery squad. Sars is a special anti robbery squad that was created to eradicate violent crimes. Instead the unit turn violent on nigerian citizens so a movement began called in hashtag in sars demanding the removal of the squad and overhaul of the corrupt institution the government reacted to peaceful protests. By deploying nigeria's military killing at least twelve people while it was dismantled on october. Eleven twenty twenty. It's been replaced by the special weapon tactical team and on the twentieth of october. The last known protests day nigerian military opened fire on innocent protesters murdering a number of notable protesters again. We are black throughout the diaspora. So we've got it like outbreak other number fifteen murder hornets as if covid racism in donald trump wasn't enough murder hornets. Monsanto these giant hornets definitely freaked me out. Especially i'm scared. But especially because they be lined pun intended right to my home state of washington lord help number sixteen and impeach. Donald trump gets a second chance after he's acquitted by mitch. Mcconnell senate on february fifth twenty twenty. The senate voted to acquit donald trump on two articles of impeachment. This vote of course was held after not really having it. Real trial was a bogus trial. Not calling any witnesses. And then the senate determined trump was not guilty of abuse of power or obstruction of congress despite being impeached by the house of representatives last year number seventeen we lost rpg and gained. Amy connybeare it. I don't really know if that's a game. We knew the impact the death of you would have on the supreme court and that meant that a fight was coming for us to to keep her seat. She held on as long as she could. She's always been a fighter. Her last wish was that her seat should be not be filled until the new president was elected. You know kinda like what they with garland and obrock obama although way way way further away from the twenty sixteen election donald trump disregarded that and appointed. Amy conybeare it anyway. ruth bader ginsburg of course was the one hundred. Seven's confirm court justice when she was nominated in on august tenth nineteen ninety-three. She was the first jewish female and second female ever nominated to the supreme court. She was known as the great dissenter died. On september eighteenth twenty twenty and her death led to the confirmation of amy. Conybeare it on my birthday. That's not the gift i wanted then. Of course we lost a hero champion. A mentor to me. And so many others. John lewis congressman. Lewis was elected to represent. George spit district in congress on november in november of nineteen eighty. Six he served until his death. He died of cancer in july. Twenty twenty this year was so tough especially for voting rights. So i can't imagine what this was like for him. Knowing how much was at stake he wasn't just a civil rights. Hero or voting rights hero. He was truly the conscience of the country the country and the congress as he became known by so many of his colleagues. I love mr lewis and we miss him dearly but we will continue to get in a good trouble and we did a special tribute to him in partnership with title in this podcast. I hope you all will check it out there. Some great memories from his colleagues in congress From reverend jackson and many others number nineteen donald trump about the lose his job get this dance biden harris next jar. Trump is out boy by hinted. Be the next. President of the united states is over at all. It's over it's over. It's over and shout out to everybody who lifted a hand who tweeted who posted urging people all over the country to vote in the middle of a pandemic. You all this was for you. You really showed up. You put your lives in your body's on the line. It was free. You shadow to lebron james for all the work. He was doing to ensure poll workers to all of the stadiums that converted into polling centers to ensure that voting would be say for the whole of america. Shot to elect justice in my good partner. Mike dealer shift or All the work we got to do in partnership with black and brown communities to make voting easier for us into all the folks in georgia. Wow you flipped it blue. We've got a little more work to do. And we're gonna get to that next. But i also want to recognize the congressional black caucus as you get ready to go into your fiftieth anniversary year and under the incoming leadership of the chair the next chair joyce beatty from ohio the caucus will have its largest membership in history with a record fifty seven members and will only making the house of representatives even more diverse last. But certainly not least is number twenty. I saved the best for last. This is not recognizing. Ls black women. You save democracy again from itself. They try to take down. But we just keep going. We're always rising. We showed up. We showed off for us. And that led to a historic biden harris victory. It led to the house being preserved. It led to flipping georgia blue and on that note to make blue. Her folks needs certain to turn out for the runoff on january fifth. Early voting is happening right now. In georgia goal. Vote if you have a cousin on a friend of former boo Enemy telemalta vote on january. Fifth is so important. We can't really enjoy the victory of kamla harrison. Joe biden. If they're not able to get anything done they can't get done if the senate is not flip so shadow for the work. You did it november. Let's make sure it continues so january fifth is a good day. This year may have been a lab but we definitely got a release do entertainment. Let me just shout out. A few things that made this year awesome viral sensations where the money resides. And you about to lose your job. Both which have been cited in twenty twenty at least in my commentary. We had movies and television shows like hair. Love jingle jangle lovecraft country and we had albums like black king d. smoke a black habits chloe chloe and halle ungodly hour kierra. Sheard kierra dazzling sullivan. Came back with two bangers these these singles she's released last one and pick up your feelings. I cannot wait for that album to my sister. Friends who are killing it in tv. Land tiffany cross with the new. Show the cross connection. Joy reid with the readout who is the first black woman in primetime on cable news in primetime slot. I'm so proud of you says to male. He'll and carry champion killing in vice with stick. Sports amer shida jones who was just named the next president first. Black woman president of msnbc's this question from kevin chrome on facebook. How do you feel about the notion of african american communities only being policed by african american officers. I think all skin folk and kim book and just because somebody policing you is black. It doesn't solve absolve of the issues like at the end of the day. What has to change is the system and the fact of the matter is it was created to return fugitive slaves back to their owners. A system that was designed that way is likely not ever going to serve us properly. No matter who's doing it it could be you guys remember alf. Tv show al. You might not and somebody watching this and the point is that alf could be police in you and if the system of training is what it is you still end up with the same problem. S on what period okay. The next question is where do that please or is it. Where does the money was that. The question of anthony good question. The money resides in the pockets of the green Really to share. We do sharing his. What kerry boom thanks. This question comes from tigris underscore three seven seven two right. I can't tigris i. let's work on a new handle for the. Hey let people walk in. They chewed somebody. Will you take the kobe vaccine. Oh this is a debatable point. Right now i'm nervous. I wanna see if y'all start climbing on sealants versus bride price bride. Take the vaccine. I'm nervous gotta admit in here. I just need to see what's going on. Because i don't know what this virus is. I just. I have to be honest. I was raised by. Let me ask my daddy. Go take it. But he takes flu shots. I'm scared to push it I don't know i'm really torn. What what i'll say is the responsible thing for me to say yes. We must all be safer. We have to protect ourselves. But i don't feel that in my spirit shit. I need to get there. It's gonna take a minute. It's been scary. Just my truth. I agree with you Second question. that's rare but on what would decide what should biden tackle in the first one hundred days that would benefit the black community. Who so definitely dealing with colvin. I think that is disproportionately as talked about earlier. I think I love what congressman clyburn said breakfast club when he said that there needed to be commissioned immediately stood up to address the impacts of the nine hundred ninety four crime bill and all the cryer crime bills prior Which joe biden participated. I think the other thing that is a must is there standing up Some racial Equity and social equity Initiatives in the white house type really love to see them get off the ground and really be implemented across agency Across the federal government and then copycat modeled on the state and local levels What else policing. I would like to see him pivot immediately on his position than he had during. The campaign on policing is not safe for us. And i think that is a position of privilege to say. Oh we'll just hold folks accountable The twenty th century counseling policing under barack obama did great work from a write paper standpoint and from a research standpoint but when it comes time to implement those things they are not There moderate shifts an incremental shifts around. Survival don't really work because that means somebody still going Revolutionary change from all revolution enough. I just think it's one thing to point out that a lot of times when things look good on paper. They don't always look the best reality some boyfriends then. Yeah growth Shout out to be recommend. Be my look real good on paper on the ground when you walk. Walk back out to lost some audrey for that question. I'm sorry this question comes from missed it our guard. I know the answer to this but the people would like to know. Do you put sugar in your no. I've put cheddar cheese in marguerite them ninety. No dairy right now Dairy but i just. I don't know that i can never ever really she it. But you got him could better ingredients. And then you gotta have a little pepper. Maybe a little. Tony's you gotta hit a little spicy low low savory shrimping magritte's those funny. I wasn't expecting it okay. This question comes from that. Byu period k j this too. I don't know if the diet. Sometimes i period of debt will caja sometimes yesterday. Finish your real names like this question from so and so from such such age. Such as a lot of people live online these days. So everybody How would you respond to someone who says we as black people cannot progress because we have a victim mentality rather than a big tour mentality. Well that's complicated. i would say that We all have an obligation to live our best lives and we can't do that without releasing trauma addressing trauma in releasing it Forgiving and walking in forgiveness and love and peace. And i think that whatever we do for our sales will be manifest in the world. however they're all there are structural systems in place that are designed to oppress marginalized people particularly those that helped build this country. Four hundred plus years ago. And i think as a result of that i'm not going to take the responsibility of what the oppressor has done as my victimhood right. I think that the reality of it is there have been consequences of systemic oppression and those things have to be uprooted just like the trauma that may exist in. So i think they're both things can true and both things can be addressed at the same time This real i'm just you know. Come on preach preacher etre sometime say they serve. I don't know about that one. Always true that guy I think it's in. The bible is okay. This session comes from ed brother. Mark brother. I'm campaigning in georgia. For ossoff in were not. How can i utilize my platform as a non celebrity to get my georgia followers out to vote. Ooh there's so much you can do. You know i think Being in georgia and being a registered. Georgia georgia voter has far more impact than People using their celebrity to help drive attention to what's going on You can knock on doors safely colder the conscious canvassing. We call that on. You can call people and text them you can make sure. People are aware of deadlines. You can start a phone tree days have boundaries back today you can detect trees. I guess to New apps clubhouse get on there and talk about why it's important in wet folks can do if you know someone who's on the fence about voting really spinning time talking to them about the importance of this election it would it could mean for them Especially with kamala harris Becoming the vice president. What we know is now. There are only two black senators. One is republican Forgets about us a lot of the time especially when it comes time for judicial appointments. So you really only have cory booker right. So then that leaves you with on raphael warnock. And then i would also say john is pretty doggone conscious then i'd love to have him In the senate. I got to work with him in congress and he's dope a reveal warnock is also really dope. So please do all the things then. Take you beat a celebrity. What happened to one small form. i quit with. He should give him do some. Mr bud is an influence bring out of slavery. He lives in georgia. Maybe he was taking a break. We ne- ended tap-in hat tabby. And ooh okay. So weighty chat to sweetie okay. I have a few more questions please without season. A monroe girl. Dc is comes. We'll get it. Who do you believe is the best. Pick for the next tiny general in. Why what would you like to see. Is that person's top by objectives. Okay so here's my truth. I would love to see tony west as the next attorney general. I don't think that's gonna happen. Because commonly harasses brother-in-law tech into him i would say is a tie between Air colder again and loretta lynch again I would also love to see a sheridan eiffel. Make a move over. There you know or kristen quark Both incredible vanita gupta in some rollover. They're like they're all super dope Yeah like we have so many powerful amazing black lawyers. You know what else to be fresh if we have being crump but there so many amazing lack lawyers and our hope some of them go in that role or in nova need is not black. But you know to shut onto. The coach didn't hold things down for the culture. And i'd be the races all good But you know we just have so many. And i'm frustrated by hearing about like doug jones. You know who was confused. I remember i did a panel with him and challenged him on whether or not he was going to vote for trump supreme court pig. And it's like. I don't want anybody that feels torn about where your morality should be. Maybe now that he doesn't have that pressure of being in the senate he would do something different but i just. I don't want to take that risk. I don't want a lukewarm person. In that role it has to be someone who is a you know a prolific fighter for justice in a committed to that i know he prosecuted the killers of the little girls on the bombing In the sixteenth street baptist church. But it's just like. I wanna know what else he's done since then Sally yates is dope. Especially because of how donald trump treated her with be great to see her uplifted in some way. But i just think this cabinet still needs a lot more diversity So those are my pick split the top things. I want them to address Figuring out how to adjust the federal standard with legislators. So that police can actually be held accountable. Criminally held accountable for killing black people in addition to that standards around sentencing need to shift a really addressing this death penalty at this bug at how many black people have died. You know how many people have been on death row in in killed under executed under the trump administration while people are like. Oh he's criminal justice reform. No he's ninety people on death row and when there shouldn't be a death row so like some of that reimagining not just policing but The criminal justice reform system altogether would be my things and then prosecuting some of these folks in corporate america who have looted and stolen from people in ways way more so than posted on the streets in the summer. They want to talk about looting. Rioting what about the looting and rioting of mortgages and homes in the predatory lenders like take them on. I want somebody in there. They will take on. That was probably more than five apologize now. That was good though the people need to hear it. Thank you okay. Two more questions at school okay. If you could instill piece of advise into a newborn child's memory that they would never ever forget what would it be this comes from palo pablo pablo pablo A the piece of advice i would give is foundational maybe like you are worthy. There's a affirmation Recently from black liturgies It was inhale. I am worthy exhale. I will not prove it owns it. I would tell them in that good. That's good. that's not my butt black. Shot the black widow right that on desperately someone mirror something. I love it good. Yeah Okay i need answer this for the people before this comes from at arc lay fifty. Everybody numbers today. I think so if you add this is comes from eddie nausea makes if you could add a number to handle what would it be definitely now. You cheated 'cause deleted anywhere question came up. This is authentic to the conversation. Back to late fifty. What made you interested in politics. When did you realize that you needed to be involved for our people. I don't think i ever had a choice about being involved. Eighty rise. my dad and injury arise bye-bye there so i'd never had a choice about being involved. I think politics My position posture disposition towards politics change with my interacted with congresswoman maxine. Waters clean maxine. Shoutout to the clean or shifting how i saw the interfacing of politics and activism and the fact that those two things can peacefully coexist in one body for want people to change the world. Yes and i think a lot of people have line that this year to political act via. Oh yeah they haven't seen it before gotta do yeah We love to see a bessette. Praise the lord okay. So from the beginning to the end of twenty twenty the on one podcast has been having transformational conversations and powerful moments. Take a look at these highlights from the podcast much. Genetic back into game of start not granny's free style game. I'd say start light start license dr. Seuss okay. I was born on the same day as biden. The grades right. So i'm sam i am. I am i. You learn literally said that if we don't remember dax i can do reverend jackson to what got you involved in it ablaze. The heat think got me involved is i saw. They were doing And i just really liked what they do. And i actually became a vote for b investor with them to help encourage people to go out invoke. It was really great with that experience. And i became quarrelled with my local chapter with using college division. I'm like probably they're young. The youngest for a lot of things black shit like paper towel absorb oil. You have to possess labor with a during the same vision for under our I heard from some dj friends that the most frustrating thing like winger in the middle of a set and then people start requested songs. Is that true is a caffeine of yours. That is fine because what happens or both. Dj's you are literally five songs ahead of audience If i'm claire record like save claim saw has hundred and but i wanna get down to whatever the lead is which would be around ninety five ninety five so you you need songs to get you down like some diesel scratch their way irna dance to get this group going in somebody tracks though song Different tempur so does so. Usually on saturday because china gate so different lasers and rain break down slowly so someone taxing as a sop is like you're interrupting blow. Wrap john Gesture in the. Hey come marcha. It's been interesting. I'll say one of the instructions you gave me or like the saul bass which i probably of overdose Entered it everything else. That overdone a lot mass. I mean i've done for new four field emotional. Say i feel really good. There was my first one You talk to you about two relationships. In like i still don't feel super clear about one of the things i needed to sit through but one of them was a woman associated where i felt like there was tension in what kind of came to me very clearly. Like middle of the back was my assignment is To love in protect black women whether they love it protect themselves or not or they extend that back like that was very clear on it was like okay. Got it working toward each out of you haul back in my leg. But i think you're right here that work. I know something called. Turkey made easy to teach you. Hey listen answer like i'm gonna be forty in december. I'm already bored when i come all. But when i started teaching. I start to eight years now. Yeah i didn't know how poor younger will come to my class and they would like torpedo down so i had to learn how it's worked. I started working easy for both of us. Don't move that way because now working with e. i out rate banal. Hey speaking he goes up up to you by okay so now says your use liar ally Now burn under your eyes localish. Right sister texted last night. That my eighty five year old. Grandma lives enhances driving neuralgia. Trying find toilet paper disinfecting wipes 'cause people have been voting it right. I was gripped with fear right immediately getting online because i could have been sending her supplies for weeks. It didn't occur to me to like reach out you know. I didn't think she. I didn't realize she wasn't going to reach out until she absolutely desperate to reach out to the elderly because they should not be out looking for supplies right there michigan making sure that the lifted since then even though stores are opening up these hours. It's still unsafe for them to be outside. Reach out to your friends who are disabled who have chronic illness. Make sure they have what they need. You know shelton's. I've definitely heard from shelters. We shall consider being really completely for this crisis and a lot of you know. I a friend of mine who Whose partner works at a shelter for young women. A lot of these young women are incredibly new compromised because the situations they faded and the volunteers can't work with them safely right and so they don't have any mouse. They don't have any cleaning supplies. They can find glitch so we look at look your storms. You know if you have if you artistic person shits. I have some blood from my have a masculinity right i just have it can do in my own nails to box masses arms. Send those out to shelters on reach out and ask people what they need. Be proactive about it. The need is great but a lot of people aren't asking because they're used to being told but they have to figure it out themselves so look around and see what she got. You feel you know comfortable and safe in share if we get to. That point will be enough for everybody but we gotta look out for the people who not only are asking but also don't have the access infrastructure a lot of our utterly don't have the ability to order things online and have it delivered so i know what their addresses have over to them. Dropped teasing at her door. You know don't don't people with more precarious situations. You have to go find things. They maybe should be at home. I'm like literally it Hearing about your grandma in now. I'm just like i'm sitting here partially i just inc guilt about haven't reached out to like even neighbors and i know i have elderly neighbors worried about my appearance in like super emotional about it because i know is women across the street like her husband died at. I haven't even checked hurry. You know like in part of it is like oh you don't wanna go anywhere. You don't wanna like compromise anybody and you also like again. I'm a germaphobe. Wanted to like talk to anybody or not unindo or whatever but like i should and Again just like our first conversation ever like thank you for that accountability. Because it's like dang if we all just checked on one person at least we could really probably make a big difference So thank you. That was a hard truth. That wasn't ready out. I was not prepared for that listener. Greatest west the greatest stretch. You've had so far in acting like with the character relax Really like i found my comfort zone. Probably seven pounds was was a pretty big big stretch for me The hardest work was ali mom but he wasn't. It wasn't a psychological stretch for me and believed similar things right so it wasn't a big stretch that way but it was definitely the hardest transformation at as an actor More physical body dialect learning how to box but but in terms of understanding what someone is thinking right. And that's really what acting is is. How much can you step into someone. Else's shoes and the beauty about that as acting is that is the human skill for successful relationships. How much can you put aside what you think and what you feel and what your dreams are and what your needs are how much can you put them aside and deeply and completely understand and have compassion for someone's opposing point of view and read all of these things. How do you like preventative. Like is there any way to really isolate yourself enough to be safe. Hypochondriacs us later. I like being time out is based on a us as always i always mines. Were the older now at a one out. The most you know that they're not in. The past is located knicks like that is that after elderly and all in a needs of that. Were on in a blind at robin just or lead. You mentioned the name of george floyd and of course You led the charge with senator booker in the congressional office on the house side. The george floyd just is increasing. Act is that a bill. Senator harris issue would urge vice president buying into sign into law in his first thirty days for example as president so the justice in policing acting. Yes cory booker. my brother in the senate We let it on the senate side and but then got a lot of senators to sign onto it in the house. Side are fellow members of the congressional black caucus and brought together. Bipartisan group supported and it does a number of things was joe biden has without any Said that that he will do in our administration including banning chokeholds and crowded holes. Let's be clear george. Floyd would be alive today if those it and chokeholds had been banned. Who are armed between when la hires house denver. How is how has that been freed. Allied you have your routine down there still some things. I want to adjust. Because he doesn't build just perfect. You know what. I am learning about life the moment that you start to feel like you have a rhythm rhythm powered by you know what we're going to change this song together except the online. It's like we just figured out technology that would allow us to go back and forth and kind of by eating our congregations to adjusted his technology. Everyone's on board they've adjusted to announce our now. Everyone's stay at home in the only option you have is to watch online I think that. I am constantly learning who i am from season to season. I think one of the greatest mistakes that we can make is longing for who used to be a season that it's obviously changing but it required by surrendering to like who am i now like you had to go from being likes and will an impact database. Now you're the cnn commentator in your all over and then you have to ask yourself. I'm sure he had to ask yourself at some point okay. This is who i was five years ago. Who am i allowed. And i m ask myself that you know every day really. I think it used to be like. I waited you months. But because the world is changing so quickly and our response to the world has to change as quickly as the world changes to really not get lost in the pace of what's happening around me in the astronauts. Who am i what do i need. What does this moment required of me. And do i have what it takes to stand up to it or do. I need help and tools and resources. So i would say that we had adjusted and now we are adjusting to now breaching an empty roman allowing the online community to really build community within their own holds. I never stood in relation on a black fight. Definitely pro black. But i'm not anti anybody else and if we win we all win roy and i think the sooner we get there the better it is for everybody. That was such a profound point about getting back to the hole every corporation operation with putting black lab and and even nfl goodell says. I like by roger goodell. The nfl rituals black people have made his league. That's time out. How much business. You guys do black vendors you know. How many again. How many people on your executive. Why i mean if you go down to cnn walk. Walk through the building. Walk through the bills in the corridors of power. You know all this mess. Same thing in every corporation. That's okay but i want dis about words. How do we. How do we get to demand that i guess that's the next level it also trick it also trickles down to the players and to us. The black people in general are we are are people who have wealth hiring black law firms or black writers. Haven't this you see crazy okay. So you do all the edges as you go. Take a little fear. I got food. Ultra defiling diva. Jim and i can put it on the edges bugs and luman betting on mining or. Sound like that you can do it. You come off as you got it Own oh lord okay. Well maybe we can start with. One is a little more basic from other here. You look like you saw those two week. Buying a league start bike unraveling from that like that is truly in our dna. We are postured to martyrdom as you talked about your posture to be taken from. Just say that's just how. I folks are heavily shift data that in this year. That's a great great. Yeah i'm gonna try to be very brief because that's such a brilliant question. Look they've been stealing us from the very beginning when you talk we are. We are the of your imagination. We are the bounty the booty b. o. Ot y that you chew stole from another nation from another country and you stole from us you stole. Our futures. appropriation is a form of theft. Right when you still our culture that beautiful dr dre beats commercial. You like our culture. But you don't like us. We've been saying that from the getty greg. Tate the critics said you want everything but the burn of blandness domo diverg. You won't everything else and so for me They have been stealing our futures from the beginning stealing. Brianna taylor's future is is is literally a metaphor for what's been going on from the get go do wanna take a moment to just recognize all of the lives. We've lost this year again or than three hundred and eleven thousand people in america have died to cove it. We want to recognize you all and your families and we take a moment hold space for other lives. We've lost this year including charley pride. Quinn coleman jazz. Waters natalie read. Alex trebek's the reverend robert greats. Supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg chadwick boseman. The black panther. Nyah review rivera betty. Right little richard. Bill withers joseph lowry katherine johnson. Kobe bryant congressman john. Lewis and the reverend c t. Vivian though this year has been rough. I hope that this podcast has allowed you to remember some of the triumphs and victories of twenty twenty though there were some dark moments there shimmering of hope we must hold onto hope as we head into twenty twenty one. Thank you for writing this hour with me. This is online with angela rye. cbs frames.

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