35 Burst results for "Revere"

Virgil and the Funeral for a Bug

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:51 min | 2 d ago

Virgil and the Funeral for a Bug

"Was a poet who lived in the first century. Bc e during the the augusta periods of early imperial room and You might know him best from his most famous work the epic poem the aeneid which is about sort of the founding lineage of rome and the adventures of the trojan hero aeneas who after the trojan war travels from troy and eventually becomes the ancestor of the roman people Virgil is often considered one of the greatest latin poets and he was wildly popular during his own lifetime You know he. He received commendations from from kings and the wealthy. And and you know everybody thought like this. This guy is just got the juice. And i had virgil on my mind A lot last year. Because rachel and i were re-reading dante's divine comedy. And if you'll recall of course virgil is the pilgrims guide through hell and purgatory and the divine comedy so the spirit of virgil. He's been living out the centuries in limbo because Though he was a very virtuous man he's one of the virtuous pagans. He was never baptized as a christian. So he can't go to heaven he's got a hang out in this sort of antechamber of hell where everybody sits around sighing. Because interesting has ever happening to them. I have to admit that. I tend to when anybody mentions virgil. That's the first place. My mind goes is dante's inferno which is probably not fair. It's like if you were to mention the name of socrates and there was someone were to go. Yeah yeah he's in bill and ted's excellent adventure that's exactly eighty nine. That's exactly where i knew you were going with the villain ted. Yeah yeah the that is pretty good because though it slightly different because it's not a it's not at all parodied in the divine comedy. In fact i would say it's exactly the opposite in the divine comedy. He is he is revered. Yeah yes he. He's reimagined as this like superhuman wizard. For for dante he Virgil is the embodiment of wisdom and reason so for the intended readers of the divine comedy. We're supposed to understand that. Virgil is like a ten out of ten platinum level. Cool be st is just like this ultimate wizard of knowledge and about half of the state you remember. How like basically every other time. Dante talks in the first two books of the divine comedy. It's just to say like virgil you are so right. I would never doubt your wisdom. Tell me more you know and it kind of stinks then. Because i remember when we got to the end of the purgatory and virgil does not get to move on to heaven with dante. He has to stay behind and be beatrice takes him on from there. We're really mad. That virgil didn't get to go to heaven. Yeah yeah no. I mean so much so much time is devoted to him. It also much stripped away at that point. You know. it's like if it's hard to follow dante in into paradise just because you know that there aren't going to be any demons playing trumpets with their bombs or anything there's gonna be Monsters so much and virgils not gonna be there. So it's it's part. Three in a series is always tough. Yeah i agree. Yeah the the trilogy is a hard sell to to complete with dignity. And but i think for modern readers that sense of injustice about virgil that is interpreted by the characters in the inferno as you know perfect divine justice. It's the one person version of the dynamic that plays out throughout the whole thing whereas they're going through hell it just seems like wow. This is really unfair. Yeah but anyway long. Before virgil was guiding dante up the mountain of purgatory in his post mortem shade form people were telling lots of legends about his life and one of those legends. Is that once at his home. In rome virgil built a tomb and held an extravagant funeral for a dead fly. Like a fly as in the insect with six legs and wings This story is very probably untrue. And we'll get to why. That is in a bit. But i i wanted to explore some of the details and for this. I was reading an article by george pendle in cabinet magazine. In two thousand seven called virgils fly and he describes the legend in the following way quote held in the grounds of virgils home on rome's esquel line hill. The funeral attracted the great and good of the city. Dirges were sung and tributes read virgils. Patron my sinus delivered. A lengthy and moving eulogy to the departed insect and virgil was himself said to have uttered a few of his exquisite versus over the tiny carcass tomb had been erected and the lifeless body of the fly was placed within it to the whales and moen's of the professional mourners so lavish where the commemorations that the cost was estimated at over eight. Hundred thousand sister. She's so that's the gist. According to the story virgil and his close friends spend huge amounts of money and effort to celebrate the life in memory of an insect concluding with the insects burial in a marble tomb. Why on earth would this be. Well the legend itself also contains an answer to this so to read from pendle again quote but the reason for the funeral was not due to extravagance interest or even emotion. Having defeated julius. Caesar's assassins at the battle of philip pie. The second triumvirate was at that very moment. Engaged in confiscating the states of the rich and dividing them among the war veterans returning from the battlefield only one exception was given if the estate held a burial plot. It was not to be touched by burying his housefly. Virgil saved his house.

Virgil Dante TED Rome Troy Rachel Kings Rome Virgil Built George Pendle Beatrice Bill Moen Julius Caesar
"revere" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:32 min | 2 d ago

"revere" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Dot com and check out some of our sweet merch that we got right now because everybody just did A drawing of us as The scooby doo gang and saw i was actually it was. It's like a double because the ghost apart here was actually a character on scooby. Doo for real. Never real wow. Isn't that what came from. But i learned that alba. We were bad. Yeah wow i'm surprised hanna-barbera or has ensued you yet. Assist right is eisenson thing. Plus don't that out in the world. I don't want that i'm not redacting any paul reveres. Actual goats hasn't suited. Because it actually. What does that behind. What's up behind you. Actually it's me just seven four zero four tap. Oh hasn't college don't worry russet anyone if anyone has worked just a horse lord lord if anyone has a creepy setup russets you because you have like a little crawlspace with the door propped open and i keep thinking that any minute someone's gonna burst through that. No one's bursting through there. There's zip died that rest of the cabinet thing. I know that every human being has zip ties that's brew shapiro shit. Of course. I have some next to me at my desk for management on my pedal boards but also. They're about yea big. Mike camera there it is. Oh the size of roaches in richmond virginia. Yeah they're about the size of roaches. Virginia that's very. That's very astute. Oh nightmare of a person. Kyle griff missy. Man to man is not seen. Everybody i hope we get to see each other sooner than later. Yeah but griffin sherry from the ghost of paul revere their latest release good at losing. Everything is streaming everywhere. You can get that literally anywhere where you stream albums you can also buy it on vinyl at their web site which goes to paul revere dot com. I believe sale at tower records for sure who they go and What else was going to say. Yeah by their merge support them on patriot fan and Thank you for everyone who's bought merch for long. May you young so far. We still got some stuff. Hats and assam. Good shit we still we got. Would you wear one right behind. Sub for sure. I'm hat fiend. Dude text me your address. I'll.

Mike griffin sherry Kyle griff missy hanna-barbera Virginia richmond virginia Dot com paul reveres assam double paul revere one dot com doo scooby paul
When the FBI Spied on Martin Luther King Jr.

Kottke Ride Home

03:39 min | 4 d ago

When the FBI Spied on Martin Luther King Jr.

"A new documentary out today called. Mlk fbi which traces the ways in which the fbi was surveilling. Martin luther king junior towards the end of his life as well as other black activists in an attempt to tamp down the civil rights movements directed by legendary filmmaker sam pollard. This documentary is based on a nineteen eighty one book by historian david garrow as well as documents released by the national archives in two thousand seventeen and two thousand eighteen quoting the atlantic. Mlk fbi arrows attempts to stifle the civil rights movement through coordinated efforts to spy on king with the hope of discrediting his righteous public image with king as with many black activists since the beginning of the twentieth century. The fbi surveillance wasn't an isolated obsession. It was part of a long running effort to keep black americans from acquiring institutional power. Pohlad told me the film traces. Exactly how the surveillance of king started how it was conducted and the effects it had on his life end quote using tons of archival footage and interviews with firsthand witnesses. The film illustrates how. Fbi's surveillance of black americans began as part of fbi director. Jaeger hoover's obsession with rooting out. Communism believing black people to be more susceptible to political manipulation as their efforts became more focused specifically on martin luther king junior and his growing influence. The fbi sought to expose his extramarital affairs as a way of discrediting him to the public and his followers but director sample are noted to npr's fresh air quote would hoover didn't bank on was back in the sixties. The press did not take the bait. They didn't reveal the personal lives of these public figures. They didn't do with john kennedy. They didn't do with others and they didn't do it. With dr king and quotes and while this documentary serves as a needed reminder. That martin luther king junior was not universally revered in his time there could be wearing that paints too negative a picture of him by including personal details like the affairs he had producer. Benjamin heddon said a our approach however quote he wouldn't be d- mythology someone he would simply be portraying him with responsibility and sympathy the way he would subject in his documentaries who was not known to the wider public and quotes and hannah georgia's said in the atlantic quote. Mlk fbi offers an important corrective to prevailing myths about king and his principles of nonviolent resistance. Which were not in fact. Widely embraced as my colleague. Van newkirk wrote in two thousand eighteen hostility toward the civil rights. Movement turned into a cherry. Pick celebration of the revolutions victories over segregation in over easily caricatured gap toothed bigots in the south and quotes and continuing georgia's. The reality was that opposition to king into the racial progress. He symbolized was restricted by region or by political affiliation diplomats and republicans alike had turned against king by his later years especially after he voiced objection to the vietnam war. It's impossible to separate the fbi's decades long commitment to tracking black activists from its relative failure to address the credible threats posed by white nationalists including those that surfaced with last week's deadly attack on the capital the fbi surveilling king and using dubious reasoning to do so isn't altogether shocking for much of the country's history sabotaging black rebellion by any means necessary has been integral to preserving white political power. The new and still contested development is finally accepting black people as active participants in american democracy and quotes.

FBI Martin Luther King Sam Pollard David Garrow Pohlad Jaeger Hoover Benjamin Heddon Hannah Georgia Atlantic Van Newkirk John Kennedy Martin Luther Hoover NPR Georgia Vietnam
Breach of air traffic control sends chilling threat

Michael Wallace

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Breach of air traffic control sends chilling threat

"And FAA are looking into a breach of the air traffic control system tonight. After someone broadcast a threat to attack the U. S. Capitol over the radio frequencies used by pilots. CBS's Jeff Gaze has exclusive new reporting tonight. Chilling threat obtained exclusively by CBS News was heard by multiple air traffic controllers on Monday afternoon in New York. We're flying a plane into the capital Wednesday. Talabani will be avenged. Sources tell CBS News. The Pentagon and other agencies were briefed today about the digitized voice recording. And believe it was designed to suggest hitting the capital. On the same day Congress is set to count the electoral college results recording refers to Qasem Soleimani, the Iranian general killed in a U. S drone strike ordered by President Trump. And came on the one year anniversary of his death. You look over his past his past. He's been called a monster, and he was a monster, and he's no longer a monster. He's dead. But in a rain, Sulamani is revered and Iranian officials about revenge. CBS News has learned that while the government does not believe the warning of an attack is credible, It is being investigated as a breach of aviation frequencies, and the threat would be a crime Experts say the intrusion is concerning because it could affect the instructions Pilots get about how and where to fly plates.

Cbs News Jeff Gaze U. Qasem Soleimani FAA Talabani President Trump CBS Pentagon Sulamani New York Congress
Tony Rice, master bluegrass guitarist, dies at 69

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 3 weeks ago

Tony Rice, master bluegrass guitarist, dies at 69

"The master bluegrass picker who drew fans worldwide for the chance to hear the quick fluid songs he conjured from his storied Martin de 28 guitar, has died. Ricky Skaggs, one of the many musicians who revered rise and performed with him, called him the single most influential acoustic guitar player in the last 50 years. Rice died Friday is at his home in Reidsville, North Carolina. He was 69 years old when

Martin De Ricky Skaggs Rice Reidsville North Carolina
Boston’s Revere Hotel fires more than 100 workers, union says

WBZ Afternoon News

00:28 sec | Last month

Boston’s Revere Hotel fires more than 100 workers, union says

"Hospitality industry continues to get clobbered the local hotel showing more than 100. Previously furloughed workers. The unemployment line for good furloughs turned into layoffs at the Revere Hotel Boston Common the latest in what's been a domino effect for hotel workers in the city, and it follows similar moves by the Boston Marriott Copley Place in the four Seasons Boylston Street. Globe reports. Union workers are gathering steam and protest signing a petition for management at the revered to give them their jobs back when business snaps back

Revere Hotel Boston Marriott Copley Place Boston
1 Killed, Young Girl Jumps To Safety During Fire At Revere Triple-Decker

WBZ Midday News

00:21 sec | Last month

1 Killed, Young Girl Jumps To Safety During Fire At Revere Triple-Decker

"Flames a challenge for firefighters across the area in Revere. Three people were trapped in a triple decker burning overnight. Ah, girl jumped from a window. To escape the flames into the arms of a hero, rescuer below some burns. But okay, One person did not survive that revere fire. We're waiting for names in north reading An

Revere
Free coronavirus testing expanding in Massachusetts as cases surge

WBZ Afternoon News

00:48 sec | Last month

Free coronavirus testing expanding in Massachusetts as cases surge

"Also today, said the state's numbers are going up in his words like a rocket after Thanksgiving. In response, the state is now expanding its freak over testing. Those plan includes three new free express testing locations and framing him Do Bedford and Lynn. This effort will be in addition. $150 million investment we've already made in testing to continue to provide access to testing across the Commonwealth. These new sights will be operated by Project Beacon. The vendor that's currently running the high volume expressed testing site and revere. Their model is proven to be quick and efficient. Is anyone from booking online appointment and visited drive through testing site and the governor said the state is also expanding new free testing sites in Franklin County, Hampshire County and Berkshire and Barnstable counties as well.

Project Beacon Bedford Lynn Franklin County Hampshire County Berkshire Barnstable
Revere Residents Near Boston Wait In Line At COVID Test Site After Thanksgiving

WBZ Morning News

00:50 sec | Last month

Revere Residents Near Boston Wait In Line At COVID Test Site After Thanksgiving

"Experts experts are are now now urging urging them. them. To To isolate isolate and and get get tested. tested. WBZ TV is Paul Burton is in Revere cars lined up as folks get tested for Kobe, 19 and Maria. Just everything. Wait a few people over to stop the spread testing site of a very high school parking lot remain busy for most of the day. The Revere Board of Health is advising residents who gathered with people outside their house. Hold on Thanksgiving. Isolate test and monitor for symptoms. Ah, lot of these residents had to wait about an hour in line but did not complain. They live in the area and I haven't been tested in a while. It's just crazy because it's really out there. I lost. My grandpa to it. Long lines, of course, have been seen it so many of the state's testing sites Governor Charlie Baker says he's aware of it and is working on it. Retail experts say this holiday shopping season could be up more than 5%.

Paul Burton Revere Board Of Health Revere Kobe Maria Governor Charlie Baker
For Napoli fans, Maradona's legend will always live on

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

For Napoli fans, Maradona's legend will always live on

"If there's one place outside Argentina that will likely match or possibly even exceed the outpouring of mourning for Diego Maradona it's in Naples while Maradona was revered around the world is perhaps the greatest soccer player atha in Naples he was more than that thousands of Neapolitans poured out into the city streets to on americana and light candles in his memory despite a cabinet that ban on gatherings Naples resident Francesco Russo explained that Maradona's time paying for Naples soccer team left an indelible mark on the city he creates a GlobalData he created Naples office saying his life story people have changed so I believe he has the most beautiful thing that is out there right now Maradona was treated as a day T. for the way he led Napoli to it's I need to use area out titles in nineteen eighty seven and nineteen ninety and raise the spirits of the southern Italian city I'm Karen Thomas

Naples Maradona Atha Diego Maradona Francesco Russo Soccer Argentina Napoli Karen Thomas
Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona dies at 60

NPR News Now

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona dies at 60

"Legend. Diego maradona has died. Npr's fill breeze reports. Maradona suffered a heart attack. At the age of sixty he was superstar of the argentine team revered for his phenomenal ability to glide past players with these known as the golden boy by his fans he won ninety one caps team. He also won a place in history for two goals in particular in a game against england during the nineteen ninety-six world cup. The first became known as the hand of god goal because he illegally handled the ball the second an astounding sixty six yard. Dribble was later voted. The goal of the century after his playing career ended. Maradona battled with drugs and ill health but continued to be revered in latin america and beyond as a huge soccer

Diego Maradona Maradona NPR Heart Attack England Latin America Soccer
Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona dies at 60

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona dies at 60

"Argentine soccer legend Diego Maradona has died. NPR's Philip Reeves reports, Maradona suffered a heart attack at the age of 60. He was the superstar of the Argentine team revered for his phenomenal ability to glide past players with these Known as the Golden Boy by his fans, he won 91 caps of his national team. He also won a place in history for two goals in particular in a game against England to during the 1986 World Cup. First became known as the hand of God goal because he legally handled the ball. The second. An astounding 66 yard dribble was later voted the goal of the century after his playing career ended, married on a battle with drugs and ill health, but continued to be revered in Latin America and beyond. Is a huge soccer

Philip Reeves Diego Maradona Maradona NPR Heart Attack Soccer World Cup England Latin America
Person killed in officer-involved shooting in Lynn, north of Boston

WBZ Midday News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Person killed in officer-involved shooting in Lynn, north of Boston

"Involved shooting in Lynn Today a suspect is shot and killed by a police officer at around eight o'clock this morning. This all went down on which street Officers chasing the suspect for a reported robbery at a Walgreens in Revere. The suspect was chased into Lynn and allegedly pinned a Revere police officer with a car. That officer was injured, but the injuries are not life threatening. State police and the Essex D A's office are investigating

Lynn Revere Walgreens State Police
Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

Untangle

05:47 min | 3 months ago

Daryl Davis On Healing Hate with Friendship

"Today I have the most amazing guest for you. He is a man that really shows us the possibility of how to disparate sides can come together. His name is Daryl Davis and he's a black man who is convinced over two hundred Klu Klux Klan members to give up their robes by boldly and bravely walking in deep into their lives deep into the heart of the Ku Klux Klan, becoming friends with them and showing them his sheer humanity. Today. We're GONNA hear Darrell Story and learn how it is that he threw his empathy compassion insight in bravery has been able to really embrace a methodology that allows people from opposite sides to come together learn from another become friends heal and grow welcome Daryl. Pleasure. To be here with you. Thank you for having me. It is such a pleasure. You're such an extraordinary human being sorry to embarrass you. I am so excited to be able to share your story and your insights today. My pleasure and I hope you'll listeners will enjoy it. Thank you. Why don't you begin by telling us the back story to how and why you are able to penetrate the clan? Okay. I'm aged fifty, two currently and as a child, my parents were in the US foreign service. So I spent a lot of my formative years starting at the age of three. And on through elementary school traveling abroad living in various foreign countries, you go to a country for two years and you come back home here to the states, and then you're reassigned to another country. So back and forth back and forth during my formative years while overseas my classes in elementary school and things like that were filled with kids from all over the world. Anybody who had an embassy in those countries all of their children went to the same school. So my classmates were Nigeria Italian Russian Japanese French you name it they had an embassy there I was in school with their kids and to me that was the norm that was my first exposure to school. and. So when I would come back home at the end of the two year assignment, I would either be in all black schools. Black and white schools meaning the still segregated schools or the newly integrated ones like. Well I left. CHICAGO. Shortly after I was born but we will come back and we would be like in Washington DC or be in Massachusetts different places for a short time before being reassigned every other two years. So I was back I know I was for part of Second Grade I was back for a fourth grade. I was back in sixth grade and I was back here in eighth grade when I would come back the schools were either all black or black and white meeting still segregated. Or newly integrated, and there was not the amount of diversity in my classroom that I had overseas. So in one case, I was in fourth grade nine, hundred, sixty, eight, I was ten years old and I was one of two black children in the entire school myself in fourth grade and a little black girl in second grade. So consequently, all of my friends were white and many of my male friends were members of the local, Cub Scout Group and they invited me to join which I did. And during a March we had from Lexington Concord to commemorate the ride of a Paul Revere. Suddenly I was being pelted with soda pop bottles and cans and Rawson just debris from the street by just a small group of the white spectators on the sidewalk not everybody most people were cheering us in waving and all that kind of thing. But there were about maybe five people off to my right I remember there being a couple of kids or half a year or two older than myself and a couple of adults who are throwing ends, and when I first began getting hit and looked over and saw this my first thought was oh, those people over there don't like the scouts. That's how naive I was because I had never been to. Before and it wasn't until my scout leaders came rushing over and these were white people, my den mother, my cub leader, my troop master, and they huddled over me with their bodies and escorted me out of the danger. And I realized I was the only person being targeted because nobody else was getting this special protection and I, asked him, I, said, why am I being hit why they're doing this? I didn't do anything and all they would do this kind of shush me and rushing along telling me everything would be okay. Just keep moving. and. So they never answered the question. At the end of the day when I returned home my mother and father who would not at the parade. were, fixing, cleaning the UP, putting bandaids on me and ask me how do I fall down and get scraped up I told him I didn't fall down into the mud happened. And this was the first time in my life that I heard the word racism they explained what racism was to me. And my opinion old brain could not process this definition. It made no sense to me whatsoever I'd been around white people from all over the world at this point and none of them whether they were my fellow Americans my French friends, my Swedish friends, my Australian friends, none of them treated me like this. So my parents were making this up because people don't do things like that. And they assured me that not all white people do this but there is an element of some they do and I just cannot wrap my head around it. So I didn't believe them well about almost two months later. That same year nineteen, Sixty, eight. On April the fourth Martin Luther King was assassinated. And every major city in this country burned to the ground. All in the name of this new word I had learned call racism.

Ku Klux Klan Daryl Davis Darrell Story Cub Scout Group Martin Luther King United States Chicago Massachusetts Paul Revere Washington Nigeria Rawson Lexington Concord
Traveling To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

07:26 min | 3 months ago

Traveling To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do both at the lower part words the transportation for the community you you get a sense of the community and you get to talk to people. It's Kinda cool because you're floating above all of these barriers and then after the top city, stop you sort of plateauing you. Go across this amazing lush forest in a giant National Park and they're the only people still on the cable cars are tourists who can afford that but you get to the terminal point way in the middle of the park and I think the locals will come in there by bus, which would be much cheaper because it is a a wonderful jumping off point for for hikes in this nature reserve. Yeah. So the neighborhood that Pablo built I mean now it's called Barrio Pablo Escobar, Pablo Escobar's. But it was originally called million sin to a jury US medicine without shantytowns and the idea was he was really trying to improve his image in the country and he built about three hundred and sixty six humble homes in this neighborhood for people who are down on their locker many of them were homeless and actually living in a garbage dump area and in that region and you talk about street art they're. So there's a number of murals celebrating Pablo. Escobar would say that most Colombians despised Pablo, Escobar and everything he stood for. However in this little neighborhood and I met some of them. There are people who still revere him as quite a small minority of Colombians I would say, but you see mural several murals right in this borrow Pablo Escobar. Depicting. El Patron the hero, the Robin Hood that you're talking about in and some of those people, and there are some young hustlers there who are very interesting entrepreneurs. One of them has created, which you'll find in in the middle of this neighborhood is a Pablo Escobar memories. Museum now there was another Pablo Escobar Museum that was run by Pablo's brother, which was actually shut down and it wasn't in this neighborhood with the government closed that one down. This one is sort of a homemade sort of museum that some young hustlers in the neighborhood of made, and they also sell visits to the US through some of the homes where you can tour the homes and. It's kind of it's bizarre but yeah.

Barrio Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Museum Columbia United States Murder Rick Steves Medina Cocaine Robin Hood Dave Seminar Writer Medellin America San Francisco New Orleans Saint Barrios A. City National Park
The Importance of the Print

This Week in Photo

06:28 min | 3 months ago

The Importance of the Print

"Able to little something different for you today here with an old friend of mine as in I've known him for a long time not that he's. Data's. Data start is here. He's from Epson a little company that that makes printers that you may have heard about printers and a bunch of other things but we're GONNA WANNA. Have Dental on to talk about printing. From the standpoint of the importance of it in how people that that may be afraid of printing today or somehow said, you know I don't print stuff on facebook and instagram whatever what's a print? I WanNa talk about that and get to the crux of why people should be printing especially if you're an advanced amateur beginner or or or professional photographer. So denno Steinar welcome to the program and how you doing great veer. It's great to see you and you're a game of thrones. Very symmetrical background their employees. Against Green. Screen. Good Yeah. Thank you. This is this is a brand new setup. People have been watching this show no, that normally that's not my background. Normally, my desk is actually slipped in the room is the background. So some different you guys got mix it up every now and So let's let's talk about this. So you're at you're at Epson let's talk about like the your role at Epson what what does Danone do at the company? Well, title is marketing manager my primary responsibilities are. Working with the creative professional markets in the marketing things that go along with that primarily photography certainly work with anybody that's creative professional. A fine artist and illustrator in other markets. I also do video production and amd because of some of the crazy background ahead in the early days of printing I've been I sometimes a pulled into some color science things related to projection because of all the pain we went through early in printing. I consider these long boring international color science meetings and understand what's going on. The. Yeah Yeah Yeah I definitely want to talk about that because. You know we were. We were talking before I clicked the record button about. Just sort of back in the day you know we won't have to go back. You have to put a time stamp on it, but back in the day. The printing experience was, hey, I got this brand new printer gamma. I got my box of paper and you run your first print through it and he came out. Magenta. Okay let me what did I do wrong. Okay and now gotta understand all this stuff. You run another printer it comes out yellow. This was you know. So let's talk about that a little bit. or excellence. Let's let's do that a little bit deeper I want to talk about the history. Of Printing itself you. Touched on that a little bit. Back in the day was enlargers. Remember those you know we had enlargers. Black and white, and then we went to color enlargers, which was a little more involved than a little less tolerance of temperature and all that, and then today you know it's it's file print. So talk to talk about sort of the evolution of where things were in the digital printing world and where they are today. How much time do we have? We have have about three days. So make a quick. To say you know. If you were to take the entire history of photography from nips if I'm pronouncing that correctly, when took that eight hour exposure the French street scene. and to kind of the the beginning of the digital age, you know that is like ninety five percent of photography and digital that term is just this. Let little. Little Flash. Little. Wink of the eye and just in perspective how quickly and things evolved. But as I've been with Epson and a little over twenty years, I was recruited from the Eastman Kodak Company. And this was when Kodak was Kodak. Amazing Kodak Moment. But it was so. Before, that I was a commercial photographer, I used to use a biton view cameras. Shooting. Food for magazines. Cargo, but if you look just a quick thing in the past. The. Printing was always about black and white printing. And it was not an uncommon thing that post World War Two for hobbyists to have dark rooms and advanced amateurs do dark rooms, and if you define yourself as a professional photographer, you always had a black white darker. Color Printing as we know it, we call now the analog world then it was called color print. That slowly came in the kind of mainstream. Sixties seventies, but that was purely big labs big photofinishing houses. It was difficult. You need a big processors he needed temperature control you needed. People Staff and. The Lap And? And it'd be fair to say that traditional see printing. I've never met anyone that said, Gosh I just love the way my seat prints used to. There were revered print processes back there like dye transfer some people remember CPA chrome off of things. But they're just kind of there in the past. It's kind of interesting history lesson in I. I lived at and that's where all this hair went in those darker. Darker. But the first kind of digital printing. started. Really A in the early nineties and I was then a Kodak technical sales representative which was a revered job back in the analog days in my territory to zip codes in Manhattan. New. York City district.

Epson Eastman Kodak Company Facebook Instagram Marketing Manager People Staff AMD Danone York City Sales Representative Manhattan
Interview with Amir Khan

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:54 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Amir Khan

"Dot Com. Thank you so much for for coming on the show. Georgina. Thank you for having me on. Now this is a fascinating book because it's also about your life and the human connections and you speak about the impact, the Sir, your gp Dr George had on your family growing up how important was he a role model for you in your career? Dodger George was was like a really big part of our family life ready because my mom, my mom holds doctors in really high regard. From a working customary, my mom worked away at from a cleaner to a social worker. My Dad was a bus driver and so doctors were really revered. Dr George will issue with the lady she was fear degeorge and. She she was just like the pinnacle of everything my. Doctor should be she. She knew is really well, she knew individually, she asked about those when we went to see her, she's got other family members that nick without really kind of old fashioned family. That we all kind of dream of having which is really hard to kind of get. But. But you know it was really important and I I really I remember really clearly when when Dr George Retired and she had a bit of a tea party in the waiting room. which which again, we never do that now. Kind of infection control Pepsi's but but she had she had a tea party patients mom will have wedding sorry to it was such a big deal and. I remember getting dressed up putting going to erase accuse US really sad but really excited to be invited to this. You know it was that kind of movement that I thought. Wow you know don't just can have a real impact on people's lives particularly cheap please we don't often hear about that side from from General Practitioner we a lot of the drama we imagine happens in hospital and a lot of impact league we imagine happens in hospital, but so much can happen in general position in the community. Absolutely. It's an completely integral part of our day. To Day life is not by my mother was a doctor and she was talking about how things had changed. She was a doctor for fifty years and she said one thing she really noticed now is that that people never touched you she says her main job as GP was to lay her hands on people and for people to feel that contact and cheap felt when she was a patient in her later years that just never really happened. No. No I trained GP's as well at she. I G P now full for over ten years have been adopted for. Sixty years I think now and you know you have to gauge the situation. It's not. We don't touch people complete know if if there's an elderly lady, an elderly person, you're a child. Gentle handle may have this is always you knew appropriate as needed. We go to be very careful of course, and I were give advice to my GP trainees but you're absolutely right things have have changed and there's a lot of pressure on GP's now not just through the volume of demand also the volks ticking exercise and when when it's just the doctor and the patient when it's just me and my patient in the room that coal pot of general hasn't changed in all the years that it's been around but it's everything else around not not puts pressure on that situation and can take away from those nuances are so important. Now you'll book the doctor will see now follows your fifteen years working as a GP from rookie to becoming a partner in one of the busiest surgeries it tell me about the surgery and and you're working. Patton, there, I mean, presumably the numbers are pretty overwhelming. Yes. So so it is the Biz in in inner city Bradford and we have a very kind of multicultural patient base, which is, which is brilliant. It's why I wanted to work. we have twenty, five, thousand patients registered our our our practice is incredibly jaws can. Before then there's always a big cured stations has a big rush on the phones when when the phone lines open and with admits, Yoyo Clinic lists will be full than extras will be added on because patients need to be seen, and so from the moment you get it and it doesn't matter how you getting nearly bad and I get in very early about seven quarter seven the minute you get working flat-out right through to the end of the day. But you I say all of this in my book, the kind of things that that really helps you keep you going mongst pressure is is your colleagues. Michael. Just amazing. I. Asked I went with some of the best GP's and I. Them every day the best nurses again, I learn from them as well and it makes a big difference in friends outside of work and I think that's really helped me because he is so much about GP's bailing out healthcare professionals bidding out and I think that would be a real risk if I didn't have the support of my colleagues in the friendships of my of my colleagues and so that makes a big difference for me,

General Practitioner Dodger George Dr George Retired Yoyo Clinic United States Bradford Pepsi Nick Michael Patton Partner
Eddie Van Halen: Revered guitarist dies at 65 after cancer battle

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Eddie Van Halen: Revered guitarist dies at 65 after cancer battle

"His his long long battle battle with with cancer cancer this this morning, morning, and and he he is is well well known known for for his his innovative innovative and and groundbreaking groundbreaking style style on on the the guitar, guitar, which which propelled propelled the the band band Van Van Halen Halen to to superstardom superstardom along along with with his his brother, brother, Alex on drums. Singer David Lee Roth and bassist Michael Anthony Van Halen rose to prominence in the late 19 seventies and was considered one of the top acts in the world. And he was born in Amsterdam and raised in Southern California. And Helen was born in 1955. That's

Van Van Halen Halen Michael Anthony Van Halen David Lee Roth Alex Helen Southern California Amsterdam
Understanding Complicated Female Friendships

The Chalene Show

05:21 min | 3 months ago

Understanding Complicated Female Friendships

"To start, let's break down the purpose of friendship. Now the first person to do this that I'm aware of anyways or perhaps the most famous person to really break down the purpose and meaning of friendships was aristotle. Couple things that we do know that friendships provide I the first of which is affirmation. So we like having friends because it makes us feel affirmed we like to have people around us who make us feel important make our ideas feel like they're normal. It's a relationship and relationships. We use relationships to know that we are significant that we matter there were doing things right? There were normal. This I very basic level of Wyatt is we desire friendships can also give us some indication of why friendships can often become toxic or why friendships are often revered or looked at in such a way like they have more power than what they really should have because I mean before we go much further if we're looking to another person. For affirmation, if we need to know the worst significant because of how we define our relationship with somebody else we're already in big trouble we've moved way too far away from God's Love I mean it's really we don't need affirmation. From anyone else to be worthy to be significant to know that we're lovable and I. Know That's easier said than done. It's hard to feel as though you are lovable. It is hard to feel as though you are worthy if it doesn't feel like other people are giving you that assurance but the bottom line is the more you need that from other people the more. Desperate, and needy. You are going to be in friendships. All right. Let's move on. We also have friendships because they're fun. I mean friends can provide us with. Certain things like your romantic partner cannot of fun. Friend gives you the opportunity to step outside the things that you feel like you have to be in your romantic relationship or the person you have to be on social media or with your children or with your family like it's a way to just kind of let go and have fun and be who you are. Sometimes friendships are the place where we can reconnect with our childhood. You know we can laugh and giggle and be silly and literally have fun. We can step outside of our adult selves for a moment. Friendships can also provide us with clarification guidance. Note some friends actually do that. It's like the place where we check in to know if in fact, our own virtues and beliefs make sense. It's a place for some of us some friendships where we can go to kind of ask questions of ourselves or to hold up a mirror to our own beliefs and our decisions friendships can provide some accountability they are. A way for us to know that we're on the right path, and that is why with some of our friendships, they can from time to time take on almost a mentor ship rule. But when that does happen, the friendship isn't always equal. Now, there are friendships however where the mentorship does go back and forth, and that's what we're GONNA do is we're going to talk about the different levels of friendships. Now. Here's the rub with the different levels of friendships you might define. Insert name of friend. You might define that friendship as being on level one, but that person may define your friendship as being on level three or four, or you may be in flux and you also want to keep in mind that not every friend that you have is going to stay on that level like these levels are pretty organic and that shouldn't say anything about you or them. It just is what it is. So, let's start with the first level of friendship and that is just someone that you know they're not a complete stranger. It's not some was just driving by you their car it's someone you maybe see on a regular basis you wave maybe even know their name new nod at them. When you walk past, you might say, hello, it's the person that you see at the gym. It's the neighbor that you walk past. You know their names you say, hello, how are you today you change pleasantries but you really don't know each other not an intimate level now ps will complicates all of this is freaking social media. I mean, there are people who it's weird I follow them. And I feel like I know them and I actually do know a lot about them and they've written vulnerable posts and they share every part of their life and I know I do this to right and there are people who I follow and I think if I were to see them. They recognize me because I see them all the time. I, follow them on social media. My listen to their podcasts I watched their reality. TV. Show. What have you now if I were to see that person for a split second I think Oh, I, I know that person But. In their mind I'm in the stranger category I'm a complete stranger. I've put them in a different category because I've invested more into knowing that person and they don't know me at all. So there is a perfect example of two people being in two very different categories.

Wyatt Partner
"revere" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:21 min | 10 months ago

"revere" Discussed on KTRH

"Dressed up as a Paul Revere liberty other patriots are unbelievably heartwarming this became it's own little subset of the program and its right there all there at rush revere dot com with the free boxed icon while supplies last we're summing up order this no no no no this is not we're not selling a Martin this is not a sales pitch at all although the publisher is thinking that we ought to re issue summoned paperback but we haven't decided what is this why is was a labor of love for Catherine may were thrilled to be able to share these adventures with you it was it was so much fun to write these work and by the way I did the audio version of every one of these things and it saw it was just so much fun it was such a delight to take a stab at the opportunity to teach a twelve year old the truth about the founding of America wants everybody to love this country we want everybody to understand how special and blessed it is not because we're better people that's not what American exceptionalism is American exceptionalism is not that we are better people by our DNA a special that we're brighter smart that's not what American exceptionalism is you American exceptionalism is you know the history of the human condition of the world as folks I don't know how many of you ever stop to really think about it the history of the human condition is misery the vast majority from the beginning of time whenever that is whenever that was the vast majority of human beings have lived lives of poverty they have not lived lives of plenty they have not lived lives of what we consider creature comforts most people never know about electricity most people never know better plans most people never knew about automobiles most people never knew about the internet combustible engine most people knew nothing but manual labor most people know nothing but tear running is the former government most people had nothing most people have very little because they were not free they were born free the natural yearning of the human spirit is created by god is free but there are people on this earth you want to deny that freedom and control that freedom the United States is exceptional because it is the first nation in the history of mankind which constructed itself around the premise that the citizen runs the show that the citizen is intrinsically free alienable rights that government cannot deny because they come from god they are part of our creation the constitution of this country limits what government can do the first ten amendments the bill of rights limit what government can do not limit what the people can do the first ten amendments spell out what the people are free to do that the government cannot stop that has never happened in human history that's the exception and that's why everybody wants to come to America because of the freedom the on leash to freedom that then unleashes opportunity and potential first time in human history we wish that the Brits got close with the Magna Carta magna Carter was one of the foundational building blocks but never has there been any where in the world everything like the United States of America it's a blast it is special your kids need to know what if they haven't been taught the truth about it that's why what's happening now is ripping my heart out shutting down the twenty two trillion dollar economy with stories today that the two hundred and forty thousand that's why we don't know where that came from one of those numbers those numbers are different one of my daughters gave us the number the health people gave us the number take a break we'll come back and continue rush revere dot com make sure you look for the free box icon.

Paul Revere
"revere" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:11 min | 10 months ago

"revere" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Dressed up as a Paul Revere liberty other patriots are unbelievably heartwarming this became it's own little subset of the program and its right there all there at rush revere dot com with the free boxed icon while supplies last we're summing up order this is no no no no this is not we're not selling a Martin this is not a sales pitch at all the publisher is thinking that we ought to re issue summoned paperback but we haven't decided what this is why is was a labor of love for Catherine may were thrilled to be able to share these adventures with you it was it was so much fun to write these what I did the audio version of every one of these things and it saw it was just so much fun it was such a delight to take a stab at the opportunity to teach a twelve year old the truth about the founding of America wants everybody to love this country we want everybody to understand how special and blessed it is not because we're better people that's not what American exceptionalism is American exceptionalism is not that we are better people by our DNA is special that we're brighter smart that's not what American exceptionalism is you American exceptionalism is you know the history of the human condition in the world as folks I don't know how many of you ever stop to really think about it the history of the human condition is misery the vast majority from the beginning of time whenever that is whenever that was the vast majority of human beings have lived lives of poverty they have not lived lives of planting they have not lived lives of what we consider creature comforts most people never knew about electricity most people never know better plans most people never knew about automobiles most people never knew about the ending the combustible engine most people knew nothing but manual labor most people know nothing but tear running is the former government most people had nothing most people have very little because they were not free they were born free the natural yearning of the human spirit is created by god is free but there are people on this earth who want to deny that freedom and control that freedom the United States is exceptional because it is the first nation in the history of mankind which constructed itself around the premise that the citizen runs the show that the citizen is intrinsically free in alien abor writes that government cannot deny because they come from god they are part of our creation the constitution of this country limits what government can do the first ten amendments the bill of rights limit what government can do not limit what the people can do the first ten amendments spell out what the people are free to do that the government cannot stop that has never happened in human history that's the exception and that's why everybody wants to come to America because of the freedom the on leash to freedom that then on leashes opportunity and potential the first time in human history we went to the bridge got close with the Magna Carta magna Carter was one of the foundational building blocks but never has there been any where in the world everything like the United States of America it's a blast it is special your kids need to know what if they haven't been taught the truth about it that's why what's happening now is ripping my heart out shutting down the twenty two trillion dollar economy with stories today that the two hundred and forty thousand deaths in a while we don't know where that came from Warren and White House you know those numbers those numbers are different one of my orders gave us.

Paul Revere
"revere" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"revere" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Paul Revere eighteen today for one seventy five I laments now a lot of numbers that famous day year always about marking history using time on December eighteenth house of representatives impeached the president of the United States an impeachment that will last forever since December eighteenth there been comments about what are we going to send the articles over well we had hoped and that the currency would be extended that we would have seen what the process would be in the Senate short of that of that time has revealed many things since that time has been our friend in all of this because says review yielded incriminating what did you half expect her to break into time is on my side what is she talking about who did not ride of Paul Revere one all right let's go back to Nancy later new email show that ninety one minutes after trump's phone call with other presidents Lansky a top office of management and budget aid as the department of defense to hold off on the roof caved route you crane eight on December twenty ninth revelations emerge about the OMB director and acting chief of staff Romanies role in the delay of the effort by lawyers of the intended ministration to justify the delay and the alarm this is very important at the alarm that the delay time of because within the administration on January second newly unredacted Pentagon emails which helps the painted on the president's loft raise serious concerns by the trump administration officials by trump administration said they were concerned about the legality of the president's hold on aid to Ukraine on January sixth former trump national security adviser John Bolton said he would comply with a subpoena to testify in that he has new relevant information on January thirteenth reports emerged the Russian government hacked the returning gas company charisma as part of their ongoing effort to influence US elections to support it in support of president trump and just yesterday the house committee two of our chairman here chairman German Nadler judiciary chairman and chief of intelligence a German Eliot Engel of foreign affairs and your woman alone is of the government reform they release new evidence pursuant to a have subpoena it it it left harness you know who that is an associate really drive me that further proves the president was in central player in the scheme to pressure Ukraine for the own benefit in the twenty twenty a lot this is about the constitution of the United States and its importance to the the president can now and put into now the American voter voters in America should decide who our president is not that in the Clinton who came in Russia so today I am very proud to present the managers we'll bring the case which we have great confidence in terms of impeaching the president and his removal but this further evidence insist that and we wouldn't be in this situation having not waited insist that there be that there be witnesses and that we see documentation and now you see some of that change happening on the Senate side I hope it does for the good of our country and to honor our constitution so today on the floor will pass a resolution naming the managers as I mentioned appropriating the funds for the trial and the transmitting the articles of impeachment of the president of the United States for trying to influence of foreign governments for his own personal and political benefit here Adam Schiff of California lead managers kept chairman chef is as you know chair of the permanent subcommittee on intelligence is serving his tenth term in Congress his name before Congress Mr Shipp was a California state senator and served as a federal prosecutor in the US attorney's office in Los Angeles for six years most notably prosecuting the first federal FBI agent to be indicted for espionage chairman Jerry Nadler terror of the house Judiciary Committee is serving his fifteenth term in Congress Mr rather served as the top Democrat on the judiciary subcommittee on the constitution civil rights and civil liberties for thirteen years before Congress Mister Nadler served the New York State Assembly for sixteen years now here's the Lofgren there's a lot of friends here the health committee on house administration which has jurisdiction over federal elections is a senior member of the house Judiciary Committee ms Lofgren is serving her thirteenth term in Congress this is Joe woman Laughlin's third impeachment as a gesture of committee staffer in the Nixon impeachment as a member of the Judiciary Committee the Clinton impeachment and now as a manager in this impeachment of president from your hub came Jeffries of New York chairman hacking Jeffries is the chair of the house democratic caucus and is currently serving his fourth fourth term in Congress is a member of the house Judiciary Committee of the four being in Congress he served in the assembly of New York for six years an accomplished litigator in private practice before running for elective office Mister Jeffrey Jeffrey's church for color for the honorable Howard bear junior of New York District Court for the Southern District of New York I was one of the al downing Deming's of Florida congresswoman dal Deming's is a member of both the house permanent select committee on intelligence and the house Judiciary Committee Mr Mays serving her second term in Congress before Congress and standing service Orlando police department for twenty seven years part of that time as the first woman police chief in Orlando congressman I was in Jason crow of Colorado is a member of the house Armed Services Committee Mister Crowe served his country our country bravely as an army ranger in Iraq and Afghanistan before coming running for Congress Mister crow was a respected litigator in private practice in Colorado congresswoman Sylvia Garcia of Texas congressman Sylvia Garcia is a member of the house Judiciary Committee before Congress miss Kahn miss Garcia was served in Texas state Senate previously of she was the director and presiding judge of the Houston minutes of a system and was elected city comptroller miss Garcia was later elected the first Hispanic and first woman to be elected in her own right the Harris County commissioners court as you can see of from these descriptions of the emphasis is on litigators the emphasis is on comfort level in the court room the emphasis is making the strongest possible case to protect and defend our constitution to seek the truth for the American people I'm very proud and honored that the seven members distinguished members have accepted the serious responsibility again to protect and defend for the people defending our democracy all right that's about enough of that I think before she named impeachment manager is Nancy Pelosi needed to name a few speech managers I honestly questioning whether she's okay that was one of the most stumbling bumbling speeches I've heard in quite some time especially given the stakes in the gravity she could barely get a word out the impeachment manager is if you were unable to decipher what it was hello she was saying as I said no surprises the lead managers are chef and Jerry Nadler Zoe Lofgren is the chair of the house administration committee Hakeem Jeffries member of the Judiciary Committee Val Deming's who serves on both the select committee on intelligence and the Judiciary Committee chasing crow member of the Armed Services Committee and Sylvia Garcia a member of the committee on the judiciary as well hello she said that she wanted to have people who are comfortable in a court room who had prosecutorial experience you could present the best possible case which is going to go absolutely.

Paul Revere
"revere" Discussed on The Hustle Project Podcast

The Hustle Project Podcast

14:02 min | 1 year ago

"revere" Discussed on The Hustle Project Podcast

"To jump around a little bit. I I I get into the city council kind of but my head against a mayor my predecessor and we kinda gotTa have added a bunch and I decided that I'm just going to run against this guy and I'm Gonna I'm GonNa go for it before we go there. I just want to quickly tighten it up a little little bit because I don't want anyone to get lost here because you and I know the story maybe but hold on a second. Let me just go back to win. You ran for for a city council. You one that you can only have so much impact as a city council but must have helped fuel your fire and sort of reinforce a lot of the ideas and sort of help you understand how the more local politics happen in your town. The next step after that was you went into the private sector my right so I was. I was working in the private the whole time town council. It's like part hard time so I was able to work in my job. Only because we've spoke prior to the to the podcast like I do all my guests but while you were ward councillor you you were also working fulltime job which is typical of a ward councillor. What what field where you in so I was working in consulting so for a little bit and and I had worked for the NBA for a little bit too? And so I still had the the Eh to my toes into some of the political is right but then had had another job brown and There came a certain point. Were I said okay. I need to kind of take a leap of faith and and run for mayor. Because I'm I know I'm equipped to do the job. I know I have the ideas and I know. Have the opportunity to to to make this happen and fortunately I got I was like enough to get elected and you mentioned the being at the apex and being a having this opportunity to to essentially make make change happen immediately I had a whiteboard full of ideas of what we're going to do all like everything anything that I had. You know you talk about shopping and shopping in the blade. Those are all the ideas a brain dump of all the things that we WANNA do. Why all right thank you weren't just don't discount because they were just ideas? I'm sure that they were all sort of. They'll have plan as well right well. They've yeah it was it was. They're all connected right. It's all like connective tissue right so it wasn't an idea board. It was more like I have a plan like this is a plan. He's like these are the things we're going to tackle. It went from jotting them down to he didn't like to to take them and saying okay. How are they connected? How do we how do we phase them like what? What do I do I it was first priority was kind of lower on the on the priority list? How do they how are they all connected? And how do we make them happen. You know essentially how you kind of road map out and then and then deal with all the other this is just you know these are just planned right. What about all this stuff? That happens that you have no control just normal day to day of being elected officials so so tell me about it so now you you get elected and immediately you you You start working hard right away. Tell me a little bit about what you've managed to do in the past couple of years as the mayor. 'cause I know there's some big things but go ahead. Yeah so we EH highlight. We set out to do three things really and and it was professionalized. Some of the city services this is that we provide professionalized empire city services that we strengthen neighborhoods and punch of different ways but mostly making investments in the neighborhoods and we wanted to build an economy and because the dog track track had been shutdown around suffolk downs. Horse Track of shutdown was lost on the on the edge of shutting down and NETCO with the property at when I walked in to office. NEKO's property that had been kind of on the edge and we know how that ended so you have these three places that were really the economic engine of the city that are essentially no no more and so like I wanted to do those three things and there were a small division right. That's the big Sir and then you're like how do you get there right. So we to professionalize and modernize the city we upgraded the city's website we we've implemented through one system which makes it really easy for residents to kind of answer any question nearing hearing aids with City Hall. We did you know things like like a financial review that found two million dollars sitting around in in. Tell me about that because we talked about that briefly. But so you you. You're an artist so we do. We walked in wanting to do a real like deep deep dive of the city's finances. I knew that there had to be some fresh eyes. That look at it. And I've been talking about this for years and kind kind of fell on deaf ears so we went in and we had a financial review. Don and I like it's like the technical technicalities of calling in and audit. What'd I do but we were is technically a financial review we dug in and what we essentially had somebody look at every single fund and account in the cities? You know on the balance sheet and find out. I like the way it started. I said I WANNA see. I WANNA see every account that has money in it or every fund that has money that has has had no activity in the last four years so money like for four years. If there's no activity probably a good chance that there has been activity vity for you know so. There were two eighty six different funds and a total of two point two million dollars that had been of unused anew of essentially on US money right and not not not sitting in any interest bearing hiring funds or anything. It's just like money either. That had been appropriated both city council at some point or money that the city God from a seek- grant Iran or a federal grant. Money had had has been sitting there that that was I touched so we found that we were able to put that into work. We did more street and sidewalk repairs like any other so you guys took that Verney immediately. Started reinvesting hell you said. Do you know we're GONNA put some of its reserves right but then we also put some of it wanted to put the majority of say reserves. You mean just for future gangs hangs right now just to hold for security which is a big difference because that means moving forward you guys as the city will sort of have your eye on different opportunities where you can. You can invest stop that capital but that three one one system assuming is from a product of that. Yeah we well we take grant to do that and that was something that I knew do that. We that I wanted to implement and so we sought out of secret. That would allow us to do it. We're able to operationalize it and in subsidize. The project right so there have been. There have been so many things that we've been able to do parks and playgrounds. We've we've renovated probably close to nine the nine recreational facilities. He's or playgrounds park after yourself yet I have not will now. I only ask that because I want to compliment you on the lack of ego you go you have because it's it's pretty easy when you get the level that you're at and to be an elected official to kind of feeds most people. If you have any go and be become an elected it feeds the ego so said downfall doubt. It's just not a good look. I don't want my elected officials to have. It's just not what I look. I'm well it's about the community dates it's about it's all about the residents when we're talking local like we're talking local like this is. This is my community time with federal. We're not talking about state at the state level to a local local. These people living in the same community as you. We don't need to see Brian. Regan's name all over apart so anyways I just want to compliment you really quickly before I forget so go ahead and A. and so then in terms of building economy we. We've been really really intentional about making sure that there are things like restaurants on the beach you know. Hopefully in the very near future there will be the first new restaurant new building with a new restaurant on the beach in like in decades. I just saw actually on facebook pretty I got my. Why is there for other for other potential Hustle Project podcast guests and I noticed that I became friends with a guy who who's who's opening opening the restaurant if he's called drift? Is that correct dre and that was actually something. I really wanted to get into tonight if we have the time. Is that revere like so. Many communities on the north shore a has has its gem sort of it has but it just needs to be polished so lynn that downtown area and the waterfront property there. There's a there's a renaissance going on there. You you know there. It looks beautiful. They're they're really sort of shining that part of the town which used to be their diamond and you know things got pretty ugly. They're growing up you you and I both-both leanest both witnessed it and then Salem for example you know they have that downtown area growing up in the area in the nineties. You wouldn't be caught dead downtown Salem. But now it's bustling locally Congress driving arriving beaut- it's literally beautiful. Revere also has the potential to do that with the beach with the revere beach area which growing up in the nineties was sort of wasn't looked at the best place to be. But what you have in plan in store sort of to help revere beach sort of get. It's it's shine back because I know that there's drift opening and hopefully I can have him on because I from what I understand. You probably know better. This guy's an amazing restaurant or an amazing businessman. This man and he's taking he's making. He's blazing a huge trail right now by opening up on Revere Beach I wish him the best luck but what do you see. What's your vision for revere? Beach Charles how do you get that luster back. Yeah so I think it's already. It's getting there right. So we've we've seen the investment that's been made by the federal government see government local government to to kind of unlock the potential especially around the wonderland station. And that's where we're drift will be opening up and it's really pushing for those spaces that can be you know that can be amenities for the community. Any right there are a lot of people. Who are you know hesitant to embrace any kind of development in the community because they worried about the impact learn about different well more the impact on the school system or more impact on traffic right and and you know trying to educate folks vote like those are valid concerns valiquette service but like trying to educate people on the fact that you know if you look at was happening especially on the beach is a lot of development and a lot of building happening? A lot of that was in the works for years. You know we. We're doing a master your plan now. But the last time the city had a match fluids like the seventies and the the whole idea was to have the beach developed the the master development agreement. That is kind of that. We're seeing happen now on at Wonderland that's been like ten twelve years in the making so we're seeing it happened. Finally we're pushing for some of the amenities but but people get frustrated because they think oh you know this is going to have an impact on the school system which we know that the majority of people who are living on the beach the vast majority and they're very few kids. It's coming out of those buildings. The housing stock is is built to ask family family. Young professionals professionals the retirees retiree he'll retirees empty nesters. They're smaller you know sing a studios or one bedrooms. That are you know eight nine nine hundred square feet one thousand and very few two bedrooms but but the the concern is valid. And we just I have to kind of work through them and educate folks and have them understand that we don't end of the day we can't just say nothing happened because that doesn't really not now from the outside looking in you don't if you're not involved in in the city of revere then you would know you would just see what the current state of the beaches and you would say. Oh well well I mean it. Looks like they have made some significant improvements but there's a lot of commerce down their best. They cleaned up the the environmental looks cleaner..

Revere Beach official revere Revere Salem NBA brown suffolk downs City Hall US facebook NETCO NEKO professionalize Charles Don Verney Iran Regan Brian
"revere" Discussed on The Hustle Project Podcast

The Hustle Project Podcast

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"revere" Discussed on The Hustle Project Podcast

"A little bit about your history. So you're from revere. Yeah born and raised grew up in the Oak Island section revere which is for those who don't know is right by Kelly's roast beef Kelly's roast beef of courses sources world famous you know and if you've been to revere beach you've probably been to Kelly's roast beef and grew up a neighborhood right behind Kelly's roast beef and have the opportunity to grope and a great household. My Dad was a printing pressman for the Boston Globe. My mom mom for the most part with see at home she helped with the Housing Authority cooked some meals and I went to public school in the city. Got The opportunity to go to Suffolk University. Tell me a little bit more about your parents. Were they involved at all in the city. Because you feel like you know you. Don't I just dream to become mayor out enough. Yeah Yeah so my dad. My Dad was a city councillor he got elected when I was a Seven years old roughly and so that was my first exposure to public service and city government and all that so he he was a city council for a few years absolutely hated. It hated. It hated the fact that Hill the fact that people play politics he loved. He loved getting stuff done. He loved helping people he hated. And for the Sydney counselors. They meet every Monday night. He hated Monday nights because one he was on working. So He's losing money to he would He felt like he was banging his head against the wall and he was doing things for what he felt. Were the right reasons and there were a lot of people who weren't doing in right things for the politics of the Paul hit the politics politics right so so he got involved and it's funny because he got involved when my sister and I were pretty young we were in elementary school and he was involved in the PTA in it was like his his first exposure like he just wanted to be involved in his kids education and so he helped up to a couple of events and help them be pretty successful and they made him the president of the PTA and then this open seat kind of came up and he was like you know what do you think and he talked to a few of the other parents and they all kind of said you need to run for this would be great right behind item. And like I said he he didn't he didn't enjoy much but so he served one term and he served. He ended up serving. I think to he did two terms or three terms. You did six years and then he left just he didn't have an opponent he just he just quit. And there's a funny the article that I keep in my office that is like after. He's leaving a hindsight article and he talks about how he was like the only politician who would have a fundraiser and lose money because he wasn't really interested in selling tickets Gordon interested in having a having a good time and having people so he would order way too much food. Make sure people left left with food. You know so when we would have like now now flash forward. I kind of get the Bug through going to college knowing. Some of my dad's history not like campaigning. With my dad not knowing all the reasons why he hated it so much but knowing all the good stuff that he loved about it and knowing that people really respected him because of what he did because he was a man of principle and because he was somebody that cared so deeply about the community that that that's what I saw it I was like. Yeah like this. This city is incredible of a beautiful beach. We have public transportation. We're really really close to Boston. Strong locally struggle economy like and the opportunity to build even more and And we would have big fights about about the city in about what's going on that. Yeah so this is when you probably realize that you were are meant for politics. It was it was when he said I'm not. You know we would have blow fights or Sunday Sunday afternoons football gravy. My mom threat. My grandmother made would make homemade Raviolis. And we just you know I'd be over the House all day and we just ended up fighting and it was like we can't. We can't talk about this anymore and my dad said I'm not talking about this anymore until when you put your name on the ballot. That's we'll we'll be able to talk about politics so it was like in other words he was telling you plainfield right. You can't talk about this stuff. Oh interesting so interesting so that like I was like all right. This is what I want to do. And he's like don't do it. Don't do it you know then as no I'm gonNA run like this is what I want to do. This is like my game plan. This is how I WANNA run. He's like I'm one hundred ten percents hold on one second. So how old are you at this point. Twenty four so take me back a little bit. You graduate from Revere High Go Patriots And then you end up. Going to Suffolk University. Go to Suffolk. So what did you study at Suffolk. And so I'm studied government. I had I wasn't really sure what I wanted to do. You know graduated high school kind of went in. I knew that I enjoyed the conversations. I would have my dad. I knew I enjoyed enjoyed the news of the day. It was either for me. It was either going to be journalism or war government one insiders and and it ended up being like I say I really like the I love the fact that my dad made an impact on people's is lives and actually helped was able to help people and even though you're saying he didn't have a grand success in there but the the the passion was still obvious there were people who would come in like. Oh Thank Your Dad's doing public service right. I mean there are people now still in revere that will say your dad helped me with an issue. You know you gotta help me with something. And that's one of the coolest things being listening. That's a coolest thing so so that really made an impression on me and going forward. You know I I went to Suffolk. You know I'm not without fault. I screwed up my first my first year and kind of it took a took a little bit of time off my dad. Majed said I'm not GonNa let you waste any more money doing what you're doing. You know I kind of you know. Just enjoy myself a little too much and And I went to work. He made me go to go to work in a paint store. And now when you say your dad made you help because there's a lot of young kids not young kids but younger people that listen to this when you say like your dad made you go work. Cricket a paint store. Explain please because I know what that means but there's no is obviously illegal whether it be but all you with my dad all I needed it was a look right. I didn't he didn't raise his voice for like it was more like just raise discipline for me and for having having little boys. Now it's like it's like Kinda crazy right because you try to instill that discipline but also not impede you know exactly other things so so having that like like you know having the respect and having the discipline instilled like a young age and I think there's a lot of reasons that partial my parents. I've studied karate kid through you've probably so it's like practices practice so knowing unlike conversation like this is what you're going to do and it was like okay. I'll like you knew that. His the best inch like he had your best in mind and he knew that that involves sometimes eaten shit from a little bit. Yeah because he knew that if you did you would gain perspective right and and so I feel like I had the same similar situations growing up. Is that you have this idea of what you want to do. And your parents will give you the freedom to do it. But when it doesn't work out it's not just always L. L. Brush shoulders off and just keep going no well. Now you gotTa feel a little bit for that you got a few that. I think that that build strong character definitely definitely build strong character but go ahead. So you graduate from from Suffolk and Savic and I decided that I got a full-time Gig in the private sector around the same time. I decided that I WANNA start getting involved in politics. Yeah and I thought it would be a good idea to go to Grad school so the project gas because you're hustler so I always think like of of that time my life I had essentially Crossroads right there are three pads in my life I had the nine to five. You know consulting gig tonight heated heated I had Grad school and then I had campaigning. Walls walls the endgame from from Grad School was it still sort of. Was it going to end up being politics and or was it going to be probably more private sector after it probably would have been Right right right and and you know I went to. I think I went and started Grad school because it seemed like that was just a logical maxine. Do it was like. I didn't want to didn't want to go to law school because I got advice. That unless you WANNA try try cases in court. Don't go to law school. You know. Don't don't incur that debt you don't and if you're not going to be a lawyer and practice and don't bother didn't know if I wanted to be you know be an attorney so I said to myself you know you have these options like I like. I enjoy learning so I thought Grad school make sense and kind of at the end of the day those kind of three pads. It was so clear where the passion was right and it was like it was revealed like essentially shiver right it was like politics but also just kind of leadership in the city. That's where I wanted to just being an active the community member right right right and and you know I would. I would go to school being class or I'd be at work and just all I could think about was revere and what I was doing for the campaign or you know what area area the city. I was going to go hit or you know what needed to talk to. And it was driving me each and every day I'd sit around and you do my job but I'd be like okay. Mind would like let me let me. When is it five zero one so I can get out of here and go do what I really WanNa do? I remember member doing in fact I remember my year in College. I can totally relate to this my senior in college outside my first business and I remember being in some of those you know those last semester of of college year classes which are really not like the most the toughest glasses that road but just not even being there really just checked out the whole time just writing it down business ideas in my in my book and I can see. I know exactly what you're talking about and and good for you to be that young and to be able to say you know what no no. No something's pulling me like the logical rational national long-term choice would be yes go to Grad School. Polisher resume get a good job. Climbed the corporate ladder. And you'll live a good life. You would would live a great life right but something was pulling you towards and that's more that entrepreneurial spirit that hustlers mentality. I'm talking about like you just. Can't you just know that the regret of not doing it is so big that you'll never get over it right so you had to dive in. So what was it. What what did you end up doing that? That that you that allows you to sort of get your feet and hands wet for the first time or not so it just it started with just running a campaign right and it started was saying okay. I'M GONNA put my name on the ballot and dive in and I don't know what I'm doing so running but for as an elected official. Yeah it's a run for the city council. You're right out of college so I'm going I'm going. I'm I'm going to run for city council knocking on doors and introduce myself. I'm you know what people don't know about me. I'm pretty introverted..

Grad school revere Suffolk Suffolk University Kelly Oak Island Boston Globe Housing Authority Hill Boston plainfield Cricket Sydney Gordon Paul Majed president official
"revere" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"revere" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"From revere was killed by a shark. Arthur Medici was Massachusetts is first shark attack fatality since nineteen thirty six ABC's areo Reshef says life goes on at nukem hollow beach people seem resilient and undeterred by this tragic event. In fact, we've seen several people coming to the shores and looking as though they want to try to get into that water. But for now, the restrictions remain in place and people are heating the warnings. The beach will remain close to swimming until further notice an aunt onto the men killed in a shark attack on the Cape says she begged him not to go in the water. WBZ's Bernice Corpuz reports the revere man was attacked while boogie boarding with friends in Wilfley. That's Marissa Medici talking about her last conversation with her nephew. Arthur just before he went to nukem hollow beach with friends on Saturday. She warned him about the shark infested water, but she says he just brushed it off. It's not me. To say that the twenty six year old was boogie boarding about forty yards off shore. When a shark pulled him under. He was later pronounced dead at the hospital Medici says Arthur had been planning to propose to his girlfriend and had already bought the rings. Claim to be take ago fund me page to help pay for his funeral has already raised over twenty six thousand dollars, Bernice Corpuz, WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty eight. WBZ news time is eleven twelve. It's time now to check sports. The patriots are off to a one and one start and Tom Brady certainly hasn't been bad. The Forty-one-year-old quarterback has passed for five hundred eleven yards five touchdowns and an interception. But the future hall of Famer isn't putting up the historic numbers. We're seeing in the heart of America. Let's get more from WBZ's. Adam Kaufman in the ticket dot com. Sports studio quarterback Patrick Mahomes appeared in one game as a rookie last season with two hundred eighty four yards and an interception, but without Smith. Delta Washington, January Mahomes is now Kansas City starter and he has thrived five hundred eighty two yards and a new NFL record ten touchdown passes through two weeks including six and yesterday survival. The steelers. Ten touchdowns at this point in the season. But I knew what this offense and the weapons that we had in this scheme countries drawing up that we had a chance to be really really good that the possibilities are. I mean, there are endless Peyton Manning. Drew Brees and Charlie Johnson chaired the previous record with nine a piece doing chiefs coach, Andy Reed's impressed. But knows Mahomes job will only get tougher in the weeks ahead. The more these coordinators have have time to study at uky pastoring that bell is challenge right now. And so he's very willing to do everything and more Mahomes six scores tied lend Dawson's nineteen sixty four franchise Mark chiefs were in the American football league. Then twenty three year old former first rounder will face the Niners Sunday. Oh, and it's mom's birthday today. Plenty of reasons to celebrate Adam Kaufman, WBZ.

WBZ Arthur Marissa Medici Adam Kaufman revere Bernice Corpuz nukem hollow beach areo Reshef Patrick Mahomes patriots steelers nukem hollow Massachusetts Peyton Manning Tom Brady Niners bell Drew Brees ABC
"revere" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"revere" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Welcome back I'm Jerry Kyle and we. Are talking cars while we started last week this top car commercial jingles and To kind of fun fun we did Baker one last week and in an old Chevy one we're going to roll right into nineteen sixty nine Pontiac and. It was. Paul revere, and. The raiders created Canada's catchy little jingle to promote the, the Pontiac g. t. golden, session Call from Pontiac For the job Jackie Paul revere and the raiders had to be one of the earlier uses of maybe I band Of a pop band that was big at the time and I just think it's comical because they were dressed in some of the costumes that they used to use and everything Which is really something because the cool commercial it's a cool and I do think that You know like I said I talked about that the other jingle I talked about last week where that's there was all these different ways that they. Went with at some news like classic jingles. That you were just catchy to your ears like McDonald's only. Bought up up up up I'm like that other ones use those famous bands and everything, and then some people had these ones that were. Just like some local band or something put it together forum and it was very cool I remember they used. To have contests the, jingle contests and people would submit jingles and they would pick one and that would be which is also a great idea to get a lot of people watching. It ensure absolutely keep an interest in it and know that helps build the excitement be I thought this was kind of a neat one just because it was kind of one of the early ones that you get a really big name band to do your advertising because they accuse hitting. All the different, pieces parts of the GTO I just thought I thought it was odd because I thought that because of the accents kind of and everything else it was a little. Difficult to understand so this was a TV commercial at the time could watch it and I'm sure people got a kick out of seeing Paul revere and the raiders on and everything but I question how well that would. Have worked on radio That's true You're right there were was it was also on the same since it was a. TV commercial it had words on there as well sing. In it, so yeah. That's. True definitely there's. An accident I thought they. Were, a little. Hard to understand in some of it I mean I got the GTO part and. I I thought it was kind of a cool song. And everything, very very. Sixties. Psychedelic psychedelics yeah The, judge judges in here comes the judge no it's a different deal, flipped season we're going. To Oh good roll right, on this be very appropriate with today's show we're going to do it, an old Ed Volynets commercial and you get to hear his. Voice a little in, this one too which is kinda cool and. And, him him talking in,.

Jackie Paul revere raiders Pontiac Jerry Kyle Chevy Baker Ed Volynets McDonald Canada
"revere" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"revere" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"We'll go back there here and there. Oh yeah. I was just back there a couple of weeks ago. Fourth of July. Oh, cool. Yeah, it's good. I still have my mom and dad is still my mom and dad. My dad still, you know, he's still fed. He, you know, he walks on his late seventies. It used to lift. Oh yeah, he was a big. Yeah, he was a big. Yeah, that's how we got in training. He had weights down in a cellar in our basement. That's great. Yeah, my dad had a great story. He grew up in the projects of revere reveres the city just north of Boston, and he didn't have a dad, but my my grandmother was this fiery redhead. You know, typical Irish lady that this big mafia boss dated. You know what I mean? Like his my grandma's. I was aside piece, you know? So he kinda Dopp did my dad as his son. So my dad grew up in this crazy mafia lifestyle. You're just, you know, he, he has stories upon stories. It's it's just unbelievable in our where we grow up. We grow up in a triple decker right off. It's all right off the freeway and revere, right from the boss it right from the airport. You know what I mean? So those two empty units. And it was me my two brothers, my mom and dad. We had the top floor of this just radio house and underneath was just all gangsters shit. And they just in this when we were kids. You know what I mean? You go to the roof Caniza any of this stuff too. Young. I didn't get it. You know what I mean? My brothers, four or five years old so they they had they had a blast. You know what I mean? They're running Cadillacs seven and eight. You know what I mean? Just wild, but underneath what? To empty units? Yeah, to the to empty Eunice, but they would just use them to book bets. So it's nothing, but all phones lined up this of course way before the internet, everything. So he had a phone, you had a call, New York yet a call, Sarasota yet a call, all these race tracks in what we would do from where we lived..

revere Eunice Sarasota Boston New York five years
"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Iraq's with a local a theory of note lousy to read data estimate transactions all of that job was script is a pretty big what his language so naturally lotta people will be comfortable using jobs script even if they're not writing smart contracts themselves they can install web three with node in an pm and write a normal jobs script uh script or application that uses web three to communicate with in theory of note there is a similar libraries in other languages like aleman java python who knows how many but that is the off chain code the interface with the theory of node can happen in any language and web three is is the one for web developers and java scrip developers awesome and missed is a browser that we can use to browse any use smart contracts how would i interact with missed as a user yes so missed is of browser lets you it renders htm algis like a normal browser but it has an interface with a builtin wallet so that web applications can use web three to have a smart contract functionality integrated into the application in this could be a whole other conversation but the reason this is important is that it's completely different paradigm from the server client relationship so in the typical web world the conventional web world were really used to clientserver architecture and the browsers the client in in the servers running you know on some hardware somewhere on the internet and we are trusting that serb were trusting nasser with our data and were trusting that our data gets their securely in were trusting that the server code is gonna be executed as expected but there's a lot that can go wrong in that process in the main benefit of algeria is that.

Iraq nasser algeria
"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The input parameters or the hash function signature is in the data fields when you're calling a function the entire contract bite code is included in the data when you're first deploying not function so consequently deploying functions candy quite expensive but hopefully you only have to do that once you pay the cost to have everybody on the network you incentivize the network to take this bite code that you've sent out new transaction and sign it a unique address and than its living on the block chain where anybody can invoke functions okay so there's a set of tools that we are going to want to use in smart contract development so a couple tools that come to mind our web three and missed so let's talk about whether three j s so weather j as is the a theory of java script api if i developing and theory 'em smart contract why would somebody want to interact with that contract through job a script so there's a distinction here between the code that's running in the contract at people refer to that is on chain in the code that's running on a normal web server or on a machine online and offline line but but there's code this interacting with a smart contract calling functions on a smart contract and that code is off chain so the off shane code can can initiate transactions can read from the block chain than the on gene code is that edm bytko that's being executed so off jane you can use any language you want the interface is jay sonn interface that use when you submit transactions they're it includes data in a specific format to its protocol and you can implement that protocol in any language so web three web three died j s ease the javascript implementation of that jason rp see protocol that allows you to in.

jason rp three j
"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daly is brought to you by consensus do you think blockchain's technology is only used for cryptocurrency think again consensus develops tools and infrastructure to enable a decentralised future built on a theory him the most advanced block chain development platform consensus has hundreds of web three developers that are building decentralised applications focusing on world changing ideas like creating a system for self sovereign identity managing supply chains developing a more efficient electricity provider and much more so listeners why continue to build the internet of today when you can build the internet of the future on the block chain consensus is actively hiring talented software developers to help build the decentralised web learn more about consensus projects and open source of jobs at consensus dot net slush s e daily that's c o n s e n s y s dot net slash s e daily consensus dot net slash se daily thanks again consensus brain revere is a smart contract engineer and a cofounder at maidan you also formerly worked at shape shift where he worked on the prison project rain welcome to software engineering daily thanks so much glad to be here we've heard about many exciting ideas that smart contracts could eventually be used for what are the smart contracts that are in production today let's see it's a great question i mean the project and i worked on is one of the examples i am most familiar with i helped to build the prism smart contract system which is portfolios of cryptocurrencies all stored on the theory unblock gene and they're in a private beta right now about to open it up to an open beta and is running on the main net via theory a main net has access a.

blockchain cryptocurrency contract engineer
"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Smart contracts are programs that run on the theory unblock chain a smart contract developer pays ether to deploy the contract and when a contract is deployed every full note on the a theory unblock chain has a copy of that contract code in their address space every full node needs to hold a copy of every smart contract and this allows every full note to process every call to any smart contract if you want to call a smart contract that contract will execute on every full note when you call a smart contract you are initiating a transaction like bitcoin transactions these ethereal transactions get bashed into blocks a theory on full nodes compete to solve the cryptographic puzzle associated with a block but instead of mere financial transactions these are computational transactions that are associated with a smart contract rain revere is a smart contract engineer in the cofounder of maidan and she joys the show to describe smart contract creation and deployment this is a great introduction to some a theory on fundamentals but if you wanna find are older episodes about cryptocurrencies we've got plenty of shows you can check out our apps in the iowa s or android app store they have all seven hundred plus of our episodes with recommendations and related links in discussions and more it's all opensource as well and if you're looking for an open source project to contribute to please come check us out at get hub dot com slash software engineering daily we welcome all kinds of contributors new developers and experts engineers and nontechnical folks and i don't really like the term nontechnical but if you're in sales and marketing or design or whatever we would love to have your help with the project we've got a big vision and would love to have your help.

developer contract engineer iowa
"revere" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Other direction with paul revere so you would prefer to get credit for an idea that never happened than someone else get credit for an idea that does happen this year's like you'd rather your idea never happen as long as someone else doesn't get credit for it well how i don't like the this yes yes yes what it is he wants car plunged this is the monster this is what i'm telling you about the frankenstein monster that has been created by still got he wants a different set of rules for him than everyone else and his army is here for the army is here to lock like they are throw it this ivory tower that rich eisen and we'll bonner living it that thing's going up in flames you guys get all the gluttonous things you can get now from fame and celebrities through god's army is common and they want your gas or just getting started and they don't know how to they don't know how to topple it but they're just going to keep running at it with their heads first a we have no plans what i love the idea of god's is the general leading his army let's go guys never reach of roaming in different directions already knows what are we finding over i let some of his army in minneapolis on radio rally and they were short if i can say that but just screaming still god's do god's i wouldn't just hear them yelling at meese do god's and i'm like well that's what they do in when they are in attack like when the locusts moving across the cornfields they do just shout never direction throughout so god's lagoon it's like what are we run into learns eisen let statham.

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"revere" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"That for our veterans lingle moms people going back to school to get retrained where where everybody in my opinion is struggling everybody i see is struggling for housing health care for education and um recently in you may or may not appreciate this on public radio they finally did an honest thing about gang members it was about nantucket mentioned revere in east boston so i'm i've i wish i had the quote but sandra day o'connor who was um in our united states supreme court said people don't learn about civics an american life without being taught in what tied for me is one folks have coming in in this way they're coming in not understanding how it works and if you're coming in and the legal way you have to pass the citizenship test and you have to learn all the things that make this system work three and we need everybody to have that education i know the system doesn't work well but we're all kind of being on the same page in that it has a vested interest in being a good american and freedom isn't free and everything isn't free and it doesn't work that way there's a limited budget and i feel bad for the city of limbe i know we've talked about this before but lynn got a lot of people coming in and their budget just is and and people say if you're not for the people coming in illegally you'll sure um not being fear but i think they're just saying hey we only have so much money rate oh no dc yes there apologised in the desert they are their apologised they say look what you just said if you're not four at the year cruel oh no oh no i say that they're.

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"revere" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Channel i had to do my own social science are that flow not long ago no it's it's it's crazy it's it it it it was and you know and and you know the people the other people knew about a cops okay that's who that's very about it right and so and and here's i'll tell you one story from that thing which is at an insight into the world is not as you know it doesn't have the dimensions you'd think it does all the time and there's something to be said forgotten experience so jury selection on the case uh i'm in the courtroom as like a an assistant in our own than my brother michael is my father's cocounsel at on the case by this time right and there's a woman whose husband is a revere police officer revere revere uh next door a boss an my father doesn't challenger let's her go and we are sure he's going to use one of his challengers for the wife of the cop you can't let the wife of a cop on this jury deciding whether these cops murdered agai you can't do that and we think he's not s he's an and he lets happen bank she's on the jury and then they break for recess i jump up out of my seat in the audience member the michael goes right to him of what what are you doing letting the wife of the cop the wife of the revere compain the jury mailman like it totally one hundred percent confident as if this is absolute fact and not there's no guesswork of involved he says uh nobody hates boston cop slick review cops nobody.

michael officer revere boston one hundred percent
"revere" Discussed on News/Talk 710 KNUS

News/Talk 710 KNUS

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"revere" Discussed on News/Talk 710 KNUS

"To clients in colonial publications in that to me makes me think power veers one heck of a guy you know in one of the pioneer dentist and it is nevertheless else but fisher says that revere had an uncanny gift for being at the centre of events and he says this is one of the great american scholars whether we all be in seed several other books when the fateful night arrive april 18th seventeen 75 more than sixty men and women joined him on his task of a larma an operation revere himself helped to organize into set in motion so revere you he wasn't just like some dentist or some silversmith i mean this guy was he was applause engaged and they did not say by the way the british your cummings british are coming because these guys even re would have thought of themselves as british time right but um that night april 18th 17th 75 paul revere had many other adventures this is an interesting thing he was captured by a british patrol but he was freed in time to rescue john hancock and john adams twice and also revere helped save these secret papers of the revolution and then at sunrise the next day he was present on lexington green when the first shots were fired so i mean revere was all over everywhere and of course you know how the poem goes one of my land to if legacy to light and the when the articles says a number one if by lin number two if bicycle out house number one number i'm just trying to work in a little levity and i did not even get i got kind of a grimace from captain kirk on that one and jan weli wasn't about to start laughing on that one but will since apparent and you brought up the pound mm eric metaxis did a skit with a bunch of children and they peace it altogether it's on youtube i have to do is is look that up paul reveres ride you can look up eric mc taxes and you can see all of these cute kids playing out that palm that might be key your chilean by the way since you bring it up let's hear just at least a stanza of long fellows poem paul reveres ride here we go listen my children and you should here of the big night ride of paul revere on.

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