22 Burst results for "Reuters Institute"

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"We're very, very lucky to have them with us. Palette, let me start with you. Chile experienced a really deep social unrest in 2019 and today it's writing a new constitution that's quite extraordinary to watch from the outside. What role do you think the freedom of press plays in this debate? Well, a freedom of express and the debate around a free press. It's one of the important topics in debate in the constitutional process. And I think this has highlight some of the ongoing debate in Chile about how much do we need and how much do we need to protect freedom of expression. But at the same time, to reach extend, we, as journalists, we who value journalism should be addressed some of our frauds as communicators of those barriers that have impaired us to fulfill our mission. I mean, in terms of diversity, in terms of exclusion, in terms of being able to really read the needs of our children society and to express them in a way that can really inform the public debate. So I think those two aspects are in the debate today. Freedom of the press and freedom of expression of core has an important role in our constitutional process. And I think it has opened a debate about the need for a strong freedom of press to protect freedom of prayers as the base for other rights in our society. But at the same time, it has opened a conversation and it should be, I think, it should be an ongoing conversation about which are our flaws as media. We are our problems in terms of diversity, in terms of women leadership, in terms of being able to read the needs of society and to be able to express them in the public debate in order to have a more healthy political democratic debate..

Chile
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"So I <Speech_Male> think climate <Speech_Male> a big <SpeakerChange> focus for <Speech_Female> lots of reasons. <Speech_Female> Of course, <Speech_Female> we couldn't <Speech_Female> possibly close <Speech_Female> an interview about transient <Speech_Female> prediction without <Speech_Female> talking about <Speech_Female> what comes next with <Silence> technology and the <Speech_Female> web. <Speech_Female> What can we expect <Speech_Female> in this area? <Speech_Female> Will I be interviewing <Silence> you in <SpeakerChange> the metaverse <Silence> next year? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Absolutely. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> could have done an interview <Speech_Male> on that adverse this <Speech_Male> year. If we put <Speech_Male> our hats headsets on <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I think by this time <Speech_Male> next year there'll be a lot more <Speech_Male> headsets and hopefully a little <Speech_Male> bit more <Speech_Male> a bit lighter and <Speech_Music_Male> more usable. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But yes, I <Speech_Male> think <Speech_Male> more relevant <Speech_Male> to journalism <Speech_Male> immediately I <Speech_Male> think are the other <Speech_Male> probably the different applications <Speech_Male> of artificial <Speech_Male> intelligence, <Speech_Male> different AI technologies. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I think that <Speech_Male> they're relevant <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> recommendations, <Speech_Male> more relevant recommendations <Speech_Male> to engage <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> that's the number one <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> usage <Speech_Male> this year according to <Speech_Male> our survey. <Speech_Male> But also <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> commercial uses <Speech_Male> as well and use more <Speech_Male> automation. <Speech_Male> So we're seeing <Speech_Male> in automation <Speech_Male> we're seeing a lot more productized <Speech_Male> tools <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> around transcription <Speech_Male> around summarization <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> authorization <Speech_Male> or automation <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> text to speech <Speech_Male> as well. And I think <Speech_Male> why that's important <Speech_Male> is it enables <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> publishers <Speech_Male> to package up <Speech_Male> content <Speech_Male> in different ways <Speech_Male> that it can then version <Speech_Male> more <Speech_Male> more easily. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And when we talk <Speech_Male> about personalization, I think <Speech_Male> that sort of format innovation <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and how you can package <Speech_Male> things is going to be a <Speech_Male> key part of the future. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And then finally, <Speech_Male> I think we're going to <Speech_Male> hear a lot more about the next <Speech_Male> iteration of the <Speech_Male> Internet this year, <Speech_Male> so called web three, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so the first iteration <Speech_Male> of the Internet was <Speech_Male> about publishers <Speech_Male> making most of the content <Speech_Male> and make most of the money. <Speech_Male> Web two <Speech_Male> users start to create <Speech_Male> and then platforms <Speech_Male> take a lot of that <Speech_Male> and become <Speech_Male> sort of dominant <Speech_Male> power. And <Speech_Male> in web three, <Speech_Male> the potential of <Speech_Male> web three is <Speech_Male> more decentralized <Speech_Male> approaches <Speech_Male> built on sort of <Speech_Male> blockchain technologies <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> cryptocurrencies <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> theory that gives <Speech_Male> content creators and publishers and potentially <Speech_Male> more control <Speech_Male> over intellectual <Speech_Male> property over data <Speech_Male> over making money. <Speech_Male> So that's <Speech_Male> kind of we're going to hear a lot <Speech_Male> of more about <Speech_Male> that, whether it pans <Speech_Male> out is a completely <Speech_Male> different matter and <Speech_Male> whether it has any relevance <Speech_Male> to journalism as a <Speech_Male> different matter. But we'll certainly <Speech_Male> hear a lot more hype of <Silence> that web three <SpeakerChange> as well <Speech_Male> as. <Speech_Female> Lots <Speech_Female> to keep licking and <Speech_Female> looking forward <Speech_Female> for this year. <Speech_Female> Nick, thank you <Silence> so much for joining us <Speech_Music_Female> today. <Speech_Female> Our guest today <Speech_Female> was Nick Newman, <Speech_Female> author of the <Speech_Female> journalist media and <Speech_Female> technology trends <Speech_Female> in prediction <Speech_Female> 2022 report <Speech_Female> and lead author <Speech_Male> of the digital news report <Speech_Female> that comes

Nick Newman
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

03:41 min | 7 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Of Europe, strong public service broadcasters, for example, offering it free at the point of use. And then there's many others that are following an ad part. It's not just about subscription. So in research that we've done, we know that a lot of people who are not very interested in use don't really come across a paywall, so it's not so much of an issue for them. I think a bigger problem is the one that I talked about earlier is sort of disconnection from news entirely or light connections if you like. And more and more people relying on unreliable sources in social media or through face to face networks. I think that's a more significant problem right now. And you also talk about creator economy in the report and the so called battle for talent in 2022. What do you see happening there? Well, last year was really interesting. So you had the so called substack phenomenon started even before that where individual journalists left mainstream publications with the promise of delivering riches untold riches from directly getting subscriptions and building up these subscription newsletters primarily. And some of them did indeed make lots of money. What we saw last year was some of them actually going back to news organizations because they realized that actually being part of something bigger was also important to maybe there wasn't as much money it was a bit more taxing than they thought running their own business in this way. I think this year we're going to see more halfway houses if you like sort of more journalists collectives. There's one called puck in the U.S. that's just started. And they're trying to get the best of being entrepreneurial and getting some of the rewards, but at the same time being part of something else with these lower infrastructure costs. And I think that that's a really interesting phenomenon..

Europe U.S.
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Welcome to future of journalism, a podcast from the Reuters for the study of journalism. They had the leadership development at the institute..

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:32 min | 8 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"So it doesn't happen overnight. The second thing I'd say is that I think there are at least three common features to those who are doing well in the market that's characterized by a few winners and many losers. I'd say good use of editorial talent investment in tech and commitment to use of data. Good use of editorial talent by this I mean that they are committed to producing journalists with valuable for the people who use it and distinct from the abundant range of alternatives that people have access to. Investment in tech by this I mean that they commit resources to ensure that they deliver a good product experience at approximate what people are accustomed to platforms have come to expect. And commitment to use of data by this, I mean that they continually use hard evidence to evaluate and refine their offers rather than be guided mostly by gut instinct or chasing fashions and industry. Now, I realize it's one thing to identify features like this and it's another entirely to be able to pursue them in practice. And it is a very challenging market, especially for local titles and importantly for titles that serve. Some of the least privileged parts of society. But these I think are some of the common features across both the biggest and most visibly successful titles, which are often upmarket national titles like dog engineer in Sweden, demand and France or The New York Times in the U.S. all in high income democracies. But also, even more importantly, I think these are common themes or common features across many of the smaller players and newer entrance, often operating in less affluent and sometimes more challenging markets, whether dynic N and Slovakia, males Cheney or the daily maverick in South Africa. And in that sense, I hope that publishes elsewhere will both recognize that may not be for everyone. But for those who want to pursue it, that it takes time, often years, and thus require commitments of the long term. And that there are some real lessons that have been learned that does involve investing in good use of editorial talent, investing in technology and a commitment to use data in pursuing one's business opportunities and editorial ambitions. Thank you, Rasmus. Before the end of this episode, I'd like you all to make a wish for journalism in 2021. Something hopeful. I mean, we did this last year. Let's see what you would like to see in the new year. Let's start with you federica. I would like to see newsroom really taking care of their talent and really running inclusive newsrooms. So really thinking about how to acquire the talent they need, how to nurture it in order to retain it and having much more empathetic yet operational operationally efficient newsroom within eye to diversity. It's hope for that. What would you like to see in the new year, Mira? Well, to meet you more tough and Maria resta won the Nobel Peace Prize this year with a clear call to arms for the protection of journalists and the safety of journalists. So I would really like to see fundamental shift in society where we respect the right of journalists to at least do their jobs without the threat of harm or worse. Hopefully that will be a bit more true in the new year. Thank you Mira. Richard, what's your wish for journalism in 2022? Well, last year you asked for this question and I said responsible coverage of the vaccine rollout and here we are a year later and this is still my wish..

federica Slovakia The New York Times Sweden Cheney Rasmus France South Africa Maria resta U.S. Mira Richard
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"It's a purely political choice whether we as societies decide to use some of these options. That's for each of us to make up our own minds about a citizens, whether we think this is right, whether we think it's a good opportunity in the society where we actually live in the context in which we operate. But what we can say from research is that if we go by what is currently in place, what policymakers are proposing and what public opinion research can tell us outside of a handful of unusual countries, it's not a very popular choice. So take support for private news media across the 33 markets where we ask the question in the 2021 digital news report, it's just 27% who say that they would support the government stepping in to help commercial news organizations. It can't make enough money of their own. And I think even more acutely, even amongst those who are most worried about the future of the news media, there is little support for government intervention as the solution. And whatever our personal opinions on the matter, I think most of us will be able to understand why much of the public is skeptical of resorting to subsidies for commercial news media. First of all, much of the public doesn't trust the newest media. Secondly, many do not feel that the news media respect represent and reflect them. Or they may fear that news media are intertwined with narrow commercial and or political interests. And even if they don't, they may not want their hard earned tax money handed over to news media that in some cases continues to have double digit profit margins, even as they cut their newsrooms and pull out of covering local communities. So there are a few encouraging developments on the policy front. We are seeing increased scrutiny of competition in the online marketplace. We are seeing a few individual commitments like the U.S. federal government promising 30 million U.S. dollars in seed funding for the new international fund for public interest media led by Maria wrasse and Mark Thompson. But there are also continue to attempt to cut public service media, of course, often cheered on by made a newspapers. And the fact that most governments have done little or nothing to help independent news media, even in the depth of the coronavirus crisis that's so clearly illustrated what a crucial role they can play. I think it's indicative. Of the limited political appetite for a significant public support for journalism. And that's without even going into how frequently what is presented as support on closer inspection may really turn out to be tools for media capture, long exercise by strategically offering and withholding government advertising to ward and punish, for example..

U.S. federal government Maria wrasse Mark Thompson U.S.
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:30 min | 8 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Hold those of very talented journalists every year, listen to their conversations here in Oxford. As a former journalist fellow myself and curious, really delighted to ask, what did you learn from them throughout this very, very difficult year? Absolutely. We learned so much. The key thing is that connections matter. So we've had an in person fellowship and people have really made an effort to come to Oxford, wear masks, get vaccinated and be in the room together. And they have gained a huge amount. We've had journalists from Kashmir from Hong Kong, working with journalists from London and from the United States. And they have all come from in different ways, very difficult environments, and they've gained a lot of solidarity and a lot of strength in being together. What we've also learned from journalists is how much courage it requires to be a journalist and when do you keep your head down stay out of trouble and when do you go into battle to get the story out? And it's a balance that sadly, too many journalists are having to deal with pretty much every day. Thank you. Richard, one of the chapters of the year of this year, digital gear support explains how different gross perceive how the news media covers them. And some of these has to do with politics or polarization or diversity as we discuss before with Federico, which feel unfairly treated by the news media. And what can you tell us about the grievances? Yes, so as you mentioned, this is one of the areas that we explored for the first time in our digital news report this year. So just as a reminder, this is our survey of news audiences across around 40 different media markets. And what we were looking at was whether people think that people like them are covered fairly or unfairly by the news media, and because we wanted to go beyond people's general view of media coverage, we asked more specific questions..

Oxford Kashmir Hong Kong London United States Federico Richard
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

07:14 min | 11 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Who might not always agree with what I say, but I think I think the task is to is, you know, I'm on the younger side. I'm a daughter of West African immigrants. Sometimes I get people who react to me and say, oh, I didn't expect you to be at The Washington Post. That I don't quote unquote. The part, which is very often an older older white male, right? So I think to one big advantage, I think in the opinion sphere now is that we are seeing so many more voices that traditionally were left out. And not just left out, but actively excluded from these institutions and from these pages whose opinions were not sought after. His opinions were in viewpoints and expertise and knowledge board disregarded. So I think that I think in many ways, especially as the U.S. we've seen so much over the last several years with black lives matters with more push for social justice, climate justice, I think there's a realization that, hey, maybe we've been listening to the wrong people for a very long time and, you know, as we have here in the states, you know, people who are looking at what's happening with, say, access to access to reproductive health, again, back to the climate. And kind of jokingly saying, wow, maybe we should have been listening to women of color this whole time and many of us are like, you think? All right, great. Let us have the mic. I don't know. There's something to be said for multiple systems falling apart. And maybe only now, you know, indigenous people, black people, people of color are being given the mic because things seem like they're falling apart. But, you know, that's a topic for another day. But again, I think that there is there is value to the fact that we have, frankly, frankly, a bit more democracy in the sense that there's room for more voices. Does it mean the discourse is as neat and organized as perhaps it used to be when the same gatekeepers were in charge? No, but I don't particularly see that as a horribly bad thing. I again see that the gates are opening up ever so slightly, but I think that's better than basically having one or two groups, the same voices, perhaps dominating our discourse. I mean, I think it's pretty clear for anyone who takes this sort of historical record seriously and has ever bothered to do constant analysis that many news media historically have been produced by affluent privileged white men like myself about affluent privileged white men like myself and for iPhone privileged white men like myself in much of the world. And in case one didn't have enough white men in all the news, then you could also turn to the opinion pages and again another serving of the same types of voices speaking up. And I think you offer a very hopeful but perhaps also quite charitable interpretation of how much that has changed. You've spoken publicly often about the pushback against what I think you've called the interpreter class. Those are the foreign correspondents and think tankers with tasked with explaining foreign events to white Americans essentially. How much progress do you feel that the American news industry in this case is made in giving the mic to other voices on the opinion pages and the ones that are already so prominently featured in the daily news reporting? Yeah. Charitable is a good way to put it. We have a lot of work to be done a lot. There's still so much more to be done. And look, I think and have said and we'll keep saying, just having representation. It's a step, but it's not enough. I would absolutely like to see numbers of writers of editors of color that represent more accurately what are national or global demographic really is. You know, speaking to somebody who's from the sort of more international Diaspora community when I'm called minority I'm like, well, actually, when it comes to the scope of the world. I'm the minority on this call. Yeah, you know, but it's about power, right? It's not about it's not about lack of intelligence or expertise. It's about, frankly, white men holding the power and the keys to these to the kingdom of this discourse. So frankly, there's evidence that actually in newsrooms that diversity has actually gotten worse over the last ten to 20 years. And so now, you know, we've seen since the George Floyd protests and all that there have been a lot of promises and a lot of rhetoric, a lot of restructuring and hiring and which is great. At the same time, what needs to be seen and what needs to happen is that the power needs to be shared. Frankly, that there needs to be a white men who are willing to step back, give up power. Take up a little less space. So that those of us who also have knowledge and also have skills and expertise can help, frankly, can help us do our jobs better. I don't look at it as some sort of luxury. I don't think look at it as some sort of like nice thing to put on the brochure. I look at it, it's a direct impact on the quality of our work. Frankly, news that's produced only for white rich men. I don't think that's a quality product because it doesn't accurately serve. It doesn't adequately excuse me, serve. The readership and to a certain extent maybe some people are turning off their ears because they don't see themselves represented in these pages. They don't see people who've come from backgrounds or they didn't go to Ivy League schools or where they are first generation immigrants. They don't see that. So they're perhaps tired of the pages for different reasons than you are. For the fact that they feel like these institutions.

The Washington Post mic U.S. George Floyd Ivy League
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Welcome to feature of journalism podcast from the institute for the study of journalists amir salva director of the institute and also director of the journals fellowship program in this episode. We're looking at how the news media should effectively cover. The climate crisis is jerusalem fit for purpose when it comes to reporting on perhaps the defining issue of our time. And what can the news media learn from how it has covered other global multifaceted stories notably covet nineteen to discuss this and more. I'm joined by wolfgang. Blau wiscon- was formerly the president international and chief operating officer conde nast international overseeing companies in asia europe and latin america prior to that he was executive director of digital strategy at the guardian and and he was also editor in chief at site online. In germany. assisting fellow the reuters institute wolf has been exploring ways to increase journalism capacity to combat climate change worldwide. Wisconsin welcome. Thank you for being with us today. Thank you hello mira. Hello can we start with the big picture. you've found senior management roles a really significant publications. What did you decide. The climate change was the topic. You wanted to look at more deeply. Two reasons really one is that the topic is so urgent and of course that was asking myself many times including when flying around the world and having a significant carbon footprint myself. What is the most effective thing i can do. Not being a scientist. Not being an engineer and not being a banker which seemed to be three key professions but being a media manager and journalists and then also based on observations. I've made in all these companies. You have mentioned which is that. I found it really difficult to recruit qualified climate journalists which is not the same as meteorologist or a scientists but someone who has a deeper understanding of systemic change understands policy and has subject matter expertise in topics travel journalists more sports or fashionable. Whatever i needed them for and the other one was that many times and this is something. I noticed already back at at side. Online in germany is that there is a mismatch between how many likes and shares climate journalism pieces of content often receive and the actual reading intensity and audience engagement on the site and dismissed it for the longest time as virtuous signaling and. Didn't pay much attention to it but i was very interested in how else could climate journalists function to engage people more..

institute for the study of jou amir salva journals fellowship program Blau wiscon conde nast wolfgang jerusalem latin america reuters germany asia Wisconsin europe
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Dedicated to diction is report 2021 over six visit we've died into findings of the report to most comprehensive piece of research on news consumption around the world and had to read issue development at the institute and fiscal podcast. I'm joined by the authors or the report for our last episode of the series. We're joined by craig. Robertson research fellow at the institute. Craig help us unpack. What would you think about the ideal of impartiality which took about what people want from the news whether it is in partial coverage or news which takes more of a point of view. Craig welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you for having me. According to bbc defining reality is easy. It means reflecting all sides of arguments and not favoring any sites but we knew that in practice that is much more difficult to implement an insane situation more than on this we've seen for example many newsrooms discussing internally what approach to take ahead of the twenty twenty. Us presidential election in case claims of a stolen election will made and lacked evidence. And whether it was appropriate to argue to argue against this for the news report craig lucas. This issue with a specific focus on four countries. Brazil germany. The uk the us. What did you find out. Well put simply. They're strong evidence that people want us to be impartial That's the ideal people to So we looked at this topic in by survey in forty-six markets and we also dove deeper into the topic with focus groups and interviews in four countries. Brazil germany the uk and the us we put pick those for markets because of their different media laws and regulations audience profiles journalism histories etc. And when you found it across these countries that people hold strongly onto the ideal of impartial journalism. So three quarters of people..

Craig craig lucas Robertson craig bbc Brazil us germany uk
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"This <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <hes> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> debates <Speech_Female> a not hypothetical <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> governments from <Speech_Female> countries like denmark <Speech_Female> france <Speech_Female> off <Speech_Female> stepping into health <Speech_Female> commercial news <Speech_Female> media in different ways <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> others are now looking into <Speech_Female> alternative ways of <Speech_Female> using policy <Speech_Female> to secure additional <Speech_Female> revenue for commercial <Speech_Female> news media <Speech_Female> from the biggest <Speech_Female> platform companies for <Speech_Female> example such as google <Speech_Female> and facebook <Speech_Female> resumes. What <Speech_Female> should policymakers <Speech_Female> be considering <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in terms <Speech_Female> of these changes. <Speech_Female> That you you <Speech_Female> seen in <SpeakerChange> the data. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> that policymakers <Speech_Male> often have a legitimate <Speech_Male> interest in <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in china understand <Speech_Male> whether there is based <Speech_Male> public support <Speech_Male> for policies of. They're considering <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's not the only thing that matters <Speech_Male> but <SpeakerChange> it is eighth <Speech_Male> thing that matters <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know some <Speech_Male> policies that we pursue <Speech_Male> have by support <Speech_Male> some down <Speech_Male> and it's up to elected <Speech_Male> officials <Speech_Male> in whether they believe <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> Things are worth <Speech_Male> pursuing even if they <Speech_Male> aren't supported <Speech_Male> by a wide <Speech_Male> swath <Speech_Male> public <Speech_Male> if there <Speech_Male> is such support <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it of course makes <Speech_Male> it more attractive. <Speech_Male> Policymaker to pursue <Speech_Male> such policies <Speech_Male> politicians <Speech_Male> have their own self interest <Speech_Male> in media <Speech_Male> policy. Making everything <Speech_Male> else and it would be naive <Silence> to set aside. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If there isn't such <Speech_Male> support and <Speech_Male> policymakers <Speech_Male> or for that matter journalists <Speech_Male> than those who care about <Speech_Male> journalism still want <Speech_Male> to pursue such <Speech_Male> policies <Speech_Male> then there <Speech_Male> is work ahead of them <Speech_Male> to convince the public <Silence> that this is the right thing to do <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the absence of <Speech_Male> broad based public <Speech_Male> support. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> do say fear. <Speech_Male> That government <Speech_Male> policies porting <Speech_Male> commercial news media <Speech_Male> risk coming <Speech_Male> across as <Speech_Male> a private for <Speech_Male> profit industry advancing. <Speech_Male> Its own narrow <Speech_Male> self interest at taxpayers <Silence> expense <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and the politician <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Supporting <Speech_Male> that self interest <Speech_Male> in is injuries of <Speech_Male> responding <Speech_Male> to requests <Speech_Male> from private publishers. <Speech_Male> For special privileges. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> will come <Speech_Male> across as if there are mainly <Speech_Male> interested in increasing <Speech_Male> their own leverage over <Speech_Male> institution that is <Speech_Male> offer all mental <Speech_Male> power to account <Speech_Male> and be independent <Speech_Male> of politicians <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Impulse <Silence> <Advertisement> makers <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> presidents. Thank you <Speech_Female> richard. <Speech_Female> Thank you for joining <SpeakerChange> us <Speech_Female> and thank <Speech_Female> you to you for. Listen into <Speech_Female> the fifth episode <Speech_Female> of the digital news <Speech_Female> report. Twenty twenty <Speech_Female> one podcast <Silence> series. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Our guest today <Speech_Female> will reach a fletcher <Speech_Female> senior research fellow <Speech_Female> at the reuters institute <Speech_Female> and leader our <Speech_Female> research team. <Speech_Female> That's a rasmusen <Speech_Female> nielsen. Co author <Speech_Female> of the report and director <Silence> of the institute <Speech_Female> in the next <Speech_Female> episode. We'll took <Speech_Female> about impartiality <Speech_Female> and whether <Speech_Female> people want impartial <Speech_Female> coverage <Speech_Female> on news which takes <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more of a point <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of view. <Speech_Female> Make

denmark france facebook google china richard reuters
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Our podcast. It's dedicated to the digital news report. Twenty twenty one over six episodes where diving into the findings of report which is the most comprehensive peace research on news consumption around the world and the head of leadership development at the institute. And for this podcast. I'll be joined by the authors of the report. Our guest today is richard fletcher. Senior research fellow at the reuters institute and had our such team with richard. We'll talk about whether people think they are covered fairly in the news coverage richard. Welcome and thank you for being with us today. Biking so diversity is now a key priority. For many newsrooms across the world and although improving diversity is being a decades long process for some news organization that political shocks like the election of donald trump and the us brexit in the uk prompted some to ask whether newsroom premier li stuff by relatively wealthy oven liberal minded journalists could ever really understand people who think vote and leave differently from them in the last year. Also the topic has been reignited by the black lives matter. Protest couple for example. We've claims made by meghan markle in high profile interview with oprah winfrey and that has pocketed additional debate. And we've seen especially in the uk..

richard fletcher richard reuters donald trump li meghan markle uk us oprah winfrey
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Not have the same editorial principles or who might not have the same editorial principles and values like objectivity or impartiality Like some influences are very vocal about certain issues. Like you would not find the same Same personality in maybe the same editorial principles dots Organizations have a but given the time that people spend on social networks and also the dangers of misinformation political propaganda. I think it it still seems very important. That journalists sons are news organizations. Find ways to adapt to these more informal spaces especially if they want to engage people with low interest in news on also young people. I mean these are group's rarely go to go directly to new sites on apso so I think it's so important. That news organizations adopted these These networks and we also see that some good examples of this for instance the guardian is active on instagram. There's this uh segments called fake or for real. I also follow a whether very young journalists goes over the week's claims using the platforms quiz quiz. Tweeter try more connecticut. Protest for instance the washington post tiktok guys the prime example of this has larry about serious issues ranging from co with vaccines to elections. Bbc's sofi estimates gala are also has really Really interesting storytelling examples. I mean there are many good examples. I think that the numbers are growing which is great. I mean of course that said we should also be a little bit cautious thing because the the toll on the format young people and others use especially on these newer networks. I mean it doesn't does not always come naturally to some journalists or news organizations and i think the success of these experiments if you call these experiments It depends on the target audience the network culture the algorithm features of the social network. And it doesn't always have a very clear direct form of monetization for news organizations at Some networks such as snapshots has a they have a separate space for news but on instagram and tiktok News stories have to blend in with us images that other us users share and given algorithms are mainly driven by popularity and relevance content on On these networks need to be highly engaging to reach ovide audience. I mean this is perhaps even more important for newsrooms were actively using or are planning to us tiktok. Because it's this app is where users spend the most time flopping through hundreds of videos on the for you page and i mean yes these networks are mostly centered around entertainments But this again this does not necessarily mean that young people are on willing to talk about serious issues on these platforms on the contrary.

instagram Bbc hundreds of videos washington post tiktok Tweeter tiktok News
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"All that last year drama a but i mean they're mostly used as a fun and entertaining way to pass the time as we also In the reports but will we also witness. Is these newer networks. They're also they've been central to new wave of protests by younger people across the world from the us with black lives matter protests are to peru with anti corruption protests. We see that these instagram tiktok. They've been used by younger people in like these political events and when it comes to news Our research shows that many of the conversations on these networks are actually at the moment not framed by journalists but rather by internet personalities or ordinary people died. that's users follow. What do we mean by. This would mean by these personalities. Internet personalities are that people say that they pay attention on on these networks The definition we used in our survey is rather broad on we combined celebrities such as actors and musicians place of social media influencers on our reality stars and what we find is that for instance forty percents off Under thirty five year old. Who used to tiktok for news. They say that they pay the most attention to these internet personalities So i guess to wrap up in in in networks with their younger audience such as tiktok snapchat and instagram. The space that's usually covered by journalists me organizations in other platforms like twitter and facebook is currently filled with information. supplied by these internet personalities Ordinary people in singapore social media are complex speaks for mainstream media organization to navigate based on the research for the people who are like the journalist and immediate people who are listening to us. What advice would you give to. Journalists on what approach they should be on social media. Yes a very difficult question and As you said this is that a challenging space for the news media and also independent journalists. I mean there are many different platforms with different functionalities on audiences and me organizations have to share his face with a range of other content creators..

facebook twitter forty percents singapore instagram last year tiktok Under thirty five year old snapchat peru
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Facebook is more of a new destination. Where twenty two percent of facebook news users say that they go to the platform for the latest news. Singa soup interesting. On social media we find information and opinions shared by lots of different actors that could be ordinary people brands but also activists groups politicians and of course news media that i use us. Follow or that the platform recommends to you. What do we know about who different audience. Groups actually pay attention to across networks. Yes so To figure out who up people pay the most attention to this year we ask our gave our respondents a range of options that we usually see on social media and basically asked them to tell us why they place the most attention when king to news again specifically and once again we found some Similar patterns across some countries on also also differences to give you an example in the united states. Avi find out on both facebook and twitter the largest proportion of social media news users. Say that's their most likely to pay attention to mainstream media and journalists and this is good news for the for the news media however many users also appreciate the alternative perspectives that they find in an some platforms for instance Among social media news users. Again attention on. Youtube tends to be evenly split between a range of sources of news and entertainment including celebrities politicians and also ordinary people and when we look Looked a bit deeper into audience. Characteristics be found. Find out a movie. Find some differences Groups for instance younger groups tends to pay most attention to internet personalities on platforms such as instagram snapchat. Tiktok we also found out. In general for instance there are differences between those who have high levels of trust in the news sources those who have lower levels of trust in the news. What we find. His dad's at those with lower levels of trust are more likely to seek out alternative sources and less likely to say that. Stay pay attention to mainstream news outlets and this particular particularly the case on youtube in the us where we see. All these are main partic- voices That found a good following on you to find that it's in the us on youtube. Those with lower trust levels are actually five times more likely to say that they pay attention to alternative sources on youtube past few years. We've also seen documented in vision. News report how younger users of adopted move visually based social networks. Like you were saying like instagram snapchat. Now tiktok what findings can you share with us from these years report on younger audiences and they behavior on social media when you come to news Who day.

Youtube youtube twitter Facebook facebook twenty two percent instagram five times Tiktok united states snapchat both this year past few years Avi
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"Which are the groups that feel that the news media cover them unfairly. I think this is a topic. Where against the important to stress. That what we are dealing with here is public perception. So we're asking people about whether they feel they're being fairly. Represented and views differ as to what extent a people's perception and judgment of this are backed by empirical reality You know i can feel aggrieved and have a grievance and i can feel aggrieved with something that others might not think of as a legitimate grievance or lack of empathy with how other people treated in society that set i think some of these patterns are well aligned with analysis of actual news contin. The news coverage would suggest so women. In particular young women often feel less fairly a covered by the media than men in particular olbermann in the country suburbia data on this most importantly the united states Ethnicity and race matters greatly. So black. Americans latina americans feel less fairly represented and covered in the media than white americans and there are regional differences that i think are also well aligned with You know what outside analysis might suggest about the media coverage so states in the former. Ddr in east germany Positive south the united states and the northeast in the uk are areas where people don't necessarily feel that their region is well represented fairly represented the median. But there is another access of this which is politics Which often shapes of the media and we find that political partisans are often the most discontent if you will typically on the right in many countries in the united states discontent on the political right But also a number of other countries germany spain elsewhere and then there are some countries like the uk. Where actually it's people on the political left of who most unhappy with how their cover to perhaps that reflects in the uk case situation. Where of course. Historically many of the major newspapers have been sort of center right or right wing in their aditorial..

uk east germany latina united states olbermann germany spain Americans americans
Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

"Joining us today sneaky. Asha the case associate professor at the university of illinois at college of media. Journalism department keeps work focuses on news production in a changing digital environment blending inside for media sociology in political communications a festive award winning book making news at the time so space a month spent in the new through observing daily conversations meetings and journalists at work. And it's a real study of both the dynamics of a newsroom and power structures within it a second book interactive journalism hackers state-run code focused on the rise of programming and data journalism and her next to be published later this year. It's an incredibly topical. One news for the rich white and blue have placed empower distort american journalism and it examines the challenges facing journalism in terms of place power and crucially inequality while committee. I thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having year for that lovely introduction. I'm so delighted to speak with you in your global audience. So thank you thank you. Let's the end. Well the in your new book needs for the rich white and blue touch. Keep touch on a key problem in journalism in that. Sec say large national international outlets of pivoted observing readers. An-and will choose to pay for news and if he end up skewing coverage towards the wealthy white liberal audience in the us and wealthy white publicly less liberal. But i know or the uk could just a bit more about the consequences of that. So what. I really worry about. Is you see essentially The news that's most likely to survive is coming from these extremely large institutions and organizations that help global france right. So you can think of. And i think this is particularly the case when we look at what might be formerly called a newspaper because i don't think the guardian or the new york times of the t- Resembles anything close to a newspaper anymore. It's just kinda archaic name that we call it but what ends up doing. Is that people who can pay for news. In the people producing and writing the content thinking about the content are all members increasingly so of global

University Of Illinois College Of Media Journalism Department Asha SEC UK France United States The New York Times
How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:29 min | 1 year ago

How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

"Read many stories about news innovators in europe and the united states. But what is it like to lounge digital bone outlet in the global south. What are those challenges and opportunities for funders who take the plunge in those countries. Our guest today is one of those founders. He's name is tiny gut. He was editor chief. John one of argentina's newspapers and in two thousand seventeen. He laughed to find rhodesian one of the most innovative examples of digital newspapers in the global south today china will talk about membership human journalism and social empathy and how to measure success of audience participation chine- welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you very much thirty for this invitation for having here. I'm regulatory audience of this podcast. So pleasure and a privilege to be thanks. Thank you so much. So i want to start with a personal question. What did you do. Why did you leave a good secure job at an established newspaper to lounge a small new startup. that's a person in question and to make the long story short. I would say i when i was twenty seven year. Old longtime ago any flow very particular path. Down there are a decider graphic. satoru Decided rector innovation director and finally eighteen chief and twenty one is at the company and for years eight chief. I decided to step down And i would say sort of to change the nature of of my challenges. Of course it was a big and beautiful challenge to lead that talented newsroom of almost two hundred people And we work and we do have a lot of fun and success in bringing into the twenty first century Great media brand Born in the nineteenth century But on the other hand today i feel that is also an enormous and also beautiful challenge to create a new media bencher from scratch So to bringing a small but also very talented team That by building this this new media we are trying to answer some essential questions to to our craft journalism and also to me. So how can we acknowledge the the media fatigue And media avoidance phenomenon for example. Or or how can we cover the most pressing social issues we face as society and covered in a different way and probably the most interesting question. A how does this. But equally experience of the twenty first century people's participation can affect journalism. So i would say that the coral of of We are trying to hook like the broadcast. One way or the model per line that was born with us media And he's one of the challenges. Our industry spacey facing. I'm sorry it wasn't short. The the answer but i have two more things to say. There is almost no secure job now. Our industry I think everything is at risk An acknowledging daddy. I think it's a good thing on the other hand. I believe that in the end. I guess That why i step down being there to of great media. Well i guess it has to do a lot with a very personal calling on that I read a sentence which i found very very interesting. What you said. Human journalists can rebuild social empathy. Can you explain to us what it means Yes we believe that the problems we are facing us society. The challenges are very complex and of course Demands complex many times complex solutions and we are not going to find those solutions without an open dialogue between institution politicians and citizens So pariah station. For example. it's it's it's almost the name of the social conversation today at is preventing us to find those solutions. An in-depth sense. i believe. Journalism has an important role in terms of showing Other words helping us understand other opinions For amd we'd take this very seriously advocates axiom. So we been trying sort of new full matz that help how to help us our own To have more empathy with different lives people that lives in a different way of thinking in a different way than myself So it has to do with how we build a more robust set citizenship. That helps that public dialogue to evolve and on find real solutions. Gus dose dilutes might should have at the end semaine back in personal and institutional decisions

Satoru Argentina Europe United States China John Matz
"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"reuters institute" Discussed on Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

"In this half is it will dig into the most important transit will shape journalists in twenty twenty. One here are some of the questions. We'd like to answer in episode. Is it true to. The pandemic is accelerating the shift digital in the news industry which full matz and technologies. Hold the most promise for january twenty one and we try new streams will publisher exploring the next few months. We'll talk about this with our guest. Nick newman who's senior. Research associate editors institute and the author of the report journalist media and technology trends and prediction. Twenty twenty one which you can find on the reuters institute website. Nick welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you federica is so this is a report. You've also for a few years now. And it's based on a survey of two hundred thirty four senior executives from forty three different countries around the word which finding all findings surprised you. The most about is year import <hes>. I guess i guess. I should the optimism of the people we asked in the survey <unk>. Expecting to find given everything that's going on a huge amount of of of gloom and doom. But actually i think seventy three percent said they were optimistic about that. Companies specs and <hes>. Pretty much hof said. They were optimistic about journalism. In general which which actually is higher than this time last year and i think to some extent that reflects the fact that although the pandemic has been extremely difficult economically <hes>. Very distressing personally. It's also <hes>. It's also has taken away some of those barriers to change of sort of frustration. People on the one hand. And then i think secondly it reflects sort of confidence that somehow on the pandemic people what coming back to journalism but the product itself was really valuable to people and i hope that maybe we've turned a corner where we can again sort of distinguish journalism from from the massive information. That's out there on the incident. You mention change and a vast majority of the people you surveyed say to a pandemic accelerating to shift to digital. Do you know why they really mean by that <hes>. In which ways we'd say. The pandemic is transforming journalism beyond the. It's showtime fact. Right i think the the sort of accelerator effective specifically share. What was really good about the surveys. We had people talking about the different ways in which they expected that business to be different. Oh johnson to be different than twenty twenty one. And i think a couple of things. One is obviously working practices. So we so for the first time whole television output pink done from from people's homes using zoom for q. And this would have been on head of a year ago. We also <unk>. Newspapers being outfitted with literally nobody in the office so the whole thing was remote jenna sort of holding against many of these technology trends were forced to work in a different way embrace these new tools and i think you know talking to people this year. They say we're not going back to how things were. You know the museums of the future going to be different. They gonna be hybrid. That gonna be in person and remote together and this is really going to be about working out how that happens and that's partly about tools but it's also about trying to find a balance between efficiency remote working which people like by the way they say they want to go back to the office but also do you get the creativity. How'd you avoid the sort of lack of human contact which people find very difficult. So that's the first thing. And then i think the second sort of theme is really around gems self again. During the crisis we saw that there was a sort of renewed focus on on facts. Because that's what people wanted. The value specialist jones really came out with you a health journalist or whether you were answering this questions that was a huge theme. And i think we're all set so we're going to see specialism. I think it's going to be more valued answering questions. These full mats are gonna be used more invalid more. And then i think we're gonna see more coverage of certain areas like a mental health. Obviously it's gonna be huge theme more reporters covering those kinds of subjects wellness and also trying to find more positively in journalism as well so these are all themes that people talked about and so of course that's about the newsroom operation and the journeys site and what about impact of covid on the business of journalists right so i mean that's that's clearly being changing for some time and again covid nineteen has accelerated that shift towards subscription pay content. So when we asked people what was the most what would be the most important <hes>. Business model for that company in twenty twenty one subscription is now at the top. So what we've asked this question before it's been advertising. It's now subscription. So we're gonna we'll have more payables that's wh- more barriers to to content for some of us for example. We're gonna get quite irritated by that. I think the message is really revenue diversification so everyone is focusing on not know. There's no silver bullet is not subscriptions or advertising. It's kind of both of those. And then on top of that on average <hes>. Respondents said the full different revenue streams. We're going to be important to them this year and that included things like events which is a huge interest in e commerce animals said direct payment from platforms is going to be much more significant this year because google and facebook planning to roll out. More <hes> will goblins where they pay content directly licensed content directly. That's can be a real really interesting stories. Washing twenty twenty one. I'm curious about that e commerce <hes>. What has do journalists. that's a really good question. So so i think i think in in some ways this goes back to the fact that during the pandemic with much more used to buying things online and so therefore this old sort of chain of how you get interested in a product in the first place and then go on to complete it becomes much more critical so in the uk for example it was twenty percent of the beginning of the reach. A economizes percentage of to retail was twenty percent is now thirty five percent so massive increase in our familiarity with that impoverishes of thinking. Well how can we get involved with that. And so i think of two things one is you've got <hes>. Publishes toronto crate recommendations. If you like independent right recommendations the independent in the uk does not with its best buy section <hes>. You have the new times. A separate cycle walkouts <hes>. Where it's basically recommending in an impartial way different products and making fees from the but then you also have the opportunity to brand things directly so buzzfeed's been doing this for some time with a tasty ice cream for example based on it's tasty brand <hes>. And they are planning this year to <hes>. Focus on wellness and sex aimed at millennials and so they're selling things like sex toys and working with the manufacturers to actually sell physical goods online as well. So you can go. Jones will you can call it <hes>. Information but these are ways in which publishes thinking maybe we can get a share of that growing market before we move onto other topics you also mentioned events and has some one who pass was used to go to many events myself now of course moved on zuma online but were sorts of events. Might we see more of this year. What do you think. Yes so i think this is fascinating. I don't know how this is going to work out but again what we've seen is this. Enormous change was suddenly a whole you know millions of people have got confident and comfortable with going online and the paying for things and consuming things video so previously events very much about physical networking relatively small numbers of people high value increasingly. You can create an event you can invite you know. Hundreds of thousands of people to it'll millions in the case of sean michelle jarre. Who did his new concert. You can stream it. You can create a whole load of interactive content around it quite how this could work on decides ation terms. I'm not sure but publishes definitely looking at events and thinking about what is a physical event strategy online event strategy with us just to create an email addresses. And maybe how do we combine that and make it hybrid. So i think it's gonna be a lot of action in that space

Nick last year reuters institute today johnson two hundred thirty four senior seventy three percent forty three different countrie a year ago Twenty twenty one first time federica One twenty hof twenty one
What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:17 min | 1 year ago

What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

"The public. Understanding of newsgathering and verification practices is persistently low. What does mean for the issue of trust so one of the things that we aired quito frequently from journalists and senior managers and newsrooms and talk to you for this report Were a lot of efforts around Communicating with their audiences about their newsroom standards journalistic practices emphasizing You know their conflicts of interest policy their crashes in various policies around the way that they collect news in information unfortunately most of the public meet but we know from a lot of existing. Research must've does not understand very much at all about newsgathering says much less The details Along these lines and so we want to. If what we know from enormously perspective what we think is organised for audiences to disarm differentiate between different news sources available them on the basis of the quality of information or the the rigor of the reporting You know we. We'd hope that they'd be able to Know a little bit more about what what's actually going on behind the scenes and basically we. We know that that doesn't really happen. People just don't have a basis of knowledge of what what goes on in terms of journalism and reporting information is is really really low in. That's most of our understanding of that is based on a full countries. And so we really don't very little at all about how this plays melissa's like India especially as brazil. And so you know. I think that's as a starting point for this product. Is you know for for news organizations for him This is a core part of their strategy around addressing trust They have to really be more cognizant of the fact that people are starting from a place where they really just don't have very much understanding about what goes into What differentiates their source from. All other information that they might be seeing in their social media feeds versus

Quito Melissa Brazil India
French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

podnews

02:51 min | 1 year ago

French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

"Key coup is a new french children's podcast platform which has just launched it features curated children's audio content from a variety of publishers curated by age group theme or time of day. The company says it's good to the mid screen time sprouts have released. Their platform stands for october and will publish these online. Every month from now on apple is now forty seven percent and spotify twenty four point four percent of all the data includes podcast apps episode generation downloads over the first seven days and lots more. The reuters institute has published a new report about daily news podcasts. The research points to them being very successful in terms of total downloads and highlights four types of daily news. Podcast currently available as recline is leaving. Vox the company. He co founded and joining the new york times as columnist and podcast host. He starts in january and leaving luminary. Your lander sang when he is now senior director for programming at npr. Google podcasts third. Most popular podcast app has now reached fifty million installations on android the fat. Mary's podcast is a podcast from australian restaurant. As jake smith and kenny. Graham who in recent episode described their employee's whining and self entitled according to the sydney morning herald podcast producer. James atkinson says that ad-libbing is a risky approach to content curation and business insider writes about your stralia in podcasters who are quote earning thousands of dollars a month for decades a quiet and remote australian country town nurtured a world-class monster. A man who often more than half a century is only now coming into focus as possibly this nation's serial killer his name. Is vince dempsey. Psychopath gangster child killer rapist. That's one of queensland's best known investigative journalists matthew khandan. He's launched a new true crime. Original with bush ca studios ghost gate road examines vince so dempsey a multiple murderer who claims to have killed thirty three people. Though it's thought the real number is more than one hundred. How i found my voice banquets third season. Samir ahmed hosts and talk. Show host graham norton based guest and focus on foot has won the gold award and the people's vote best arts and entertainment. Podcast at the lovey awards season six. We'll start on december. The eighteenth with an extended episode with richard thompson.

Jake Smith Sydney Morning Herald James Atkinson Spotify Reuters Vince Dempsey NPR Apple New York Times Matthew Khandan Kenny Graham Vince So Dempsey Mary Google Samir Ahmed Queensland
Reuters Institute publish smart speaker report

podnews

01:54 min | 4 years ago

Reuters Institute publish smart speaker report

"Google what's in the news? Nobody asks me for that the Royces institute of published a smart speaker report focusing on news consumption, which discovers that news. Isn't yet. A big thing on smart speakers, many listeners want shorter news bulletins study suggests it also says that podcasts aren't used by many smart speaker owners NPR has announced their student podcast challenge. Students and teachers can take topic a lesson or a unit they're learning about and turn it into a podcast between three and twelve minutes. Long winning podcast will be featured on NPR's morning edition and all things considered. The Australian podcast awards have announced a partnership with Stitcher who is sponsoring the investigative journalism and true crime podcast category early bird entries and now open and podcast. Producers have until the fourteenth of February two thousand nineteen to enter their podcasts ESPN podcast report that their downloads and unique listeners are up by thirty one percent. Year on year microphone manufacturer Rhody has announced their Rhody Kosta pro podcast production studio, a new mix. Oh with some ideal. Features for podcasters features include bluetooth for flawless telephone calls using your mobile hot keys and enough input. And headphone outputs for four people speech kit is a service using text to speech technology to allow news articles to be turned to speech or even a podcast too soon. As they're published crisp may have applications for podcasting. It's virtual microphone that blocks. Background noise from your phone calls. So nobody else need know that you're calling from the coffee shop or kindergarten or bar and in opinion. No, people aren't skipping your podcast ads says Christopher Lawson. He says, quote, it was suggested that podcast advertising doesn't work because the large majority of the listeners skipping over the ads, but the truth is that's categorically false,

NPR Christopher Lawson Royces Institute Of Google Stitcher Rhody Espn Thirty One Percent Twelve Minutes