8 Burst results for "Return Network"

"return network" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:11 min | 5 months ago

"return network" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All right on the Internet itself only in the network. Part of an idea address is important. Uh, the the Internet machines don't care about your specific computers address. They just need to know what network it needs to go to data will move toward that appropriate network. And once it's there, the host part of the address, then becomes important. It's kind of like once you get the mail to the right state, then you need to start dividing it up by a city and thus neighborhood and that kind of thing. I P addresses can be static, which means they don't change or they can be dynamic, meaning they get assigned. Every time the device connects to the Internet. Most devices in the hands of consumers use dynamic I P addresses, and many are connected to sub networks or subnets. Return networks that share a common network address. A single company might use some nets to share a single network address across all sub nets, even if they are geographically distant from one another, and that helps conserve the number of network addresses that are generally available. Even so, It didn't take very long for the engineering team to realize that 32 bits was a big limiting factor. And so they said about to solve this problem, Otherwise the world would reach a limit on the number of useful addresses and no new networks would be able to join the Internet. It would have hit capacity. So with I P V four addresses again. We have a little bit more than four billion available ones. Once you take away the ones that have been reserved for other purposes. Billion is admittedly a very large number, but not nearly large enough. Even in the late eighties and early nineties, engineers were saying, this is going to be a problem. Things were changing quickly, and it soon became clear that we'd hit a real crunch with I P addresses. For one thing, there was an emerging trend of moving from an on demand connection to the Internet to pervasive connections. By that I mean, in the early days, you would typically use a dial up modem to connect to the Internet. And frequently. This meant that you were engaging your homes one phone line so that you could call up an Internet server and browse the Internet. So you wouldn't stay on it forever because you need that phone line for other things, And frankly, you could end up racking up big charges. If you were on for a really long time, so You would typically hang up when you were done now hanging up meant that you were. You were just freed up an I P address. You didn't need that IP address anymore because you were no longer connected to the Internet. So even if you had more people than you had IP addresses, not everyone was going to be connected the same time and so you kind of fudge things a little bit. But then we gradually began to move toward more broadband connections using things besides just dial up modems, and we also started to make a move toward always connected devices. Now this is even more true today. When you have everything from set top boxes like video game consoles to wireless devices like smart thermostats and home security devices to add in. Then there's an added problem that any device that has multiple ways to connect to the Internet needs a different I P address. For each of those methods. So, for example, if you have a smartphone that connects to an LTTE network, as well as to a WiFi router, it has to have an IP address for each of those, Or if you have a laptop as both wired and a wireless connection, as have an I P address for each of those, so a single device can take up more than one I P address. And of course, the other big challenge was that more of the world was going online. The Internet when it first got started with kind of an exclusive club. Really? Nerdy, exclusive club but still exclusive, but now it was going global. So there were just a lot more people trying to connect and a new method of addressing was needed. In 1995, the Internet Engineering task force developed the successor to the I. P V four. This one was called I p V six. So that immediately raises the question. Why the heck did we jump from 4 to 6? Well, what would have been Internet Protocol Five was an Internet stream protocol that was in development as far back as the late seventies. Ultimately, that protocol never rolled out for public use. It also was never adopted as IPTV five officially but back then no one was really sure how things were going to turn out. And so they went with I p V six to be safe. It expanded that bit number for addresses from 32 to 128. And they don't look like I P V four addresses, either. An IP V six address consists of eight groups of four x a decimal digits. The exit decimal system is a base 16 system. So with the base 10 system, you start at zero. You go up to nine and then you start over right? 10 is just 10. And then you can go up to 19 which is just 19. And then you start over again. Now you go to 20, which is 20. And over and over again now, Hexi Decimal. Goes up to 16. But you really can't show that using just decimal numerals. It doesn't work that way. So with hex to decimal, you started zero. You go up to nine and then to fill in the additional digits. You use a sequence like a B, C, D, E and F. So In other words, in Hexi Decimal, it goes zero to F before repeating each hex to decimal digit in this sequence of 32 represents four bits, also known as A nibble. So while each decimal is an I P V for in an I P V four address represents an octet Each digit, and the hex to decimal address represents a nibble. And now I'm not making any of that up four times. 32 is 128. So that's where you get the 128 bits. What this means is that the effective number of addresses skyrockets. If none of the addresses were reserved for special use, you would have 3.4 times 10 to the 38th power of addresses. So what does that in real numbers? I'd love to tell you But the closest I can really get is 340 Trillion 282,366,920,938,.

1995 38th 128 bits 3.4 times late eighties 32 bits 340 Trillion late seventies today each decimal Each digit each early nineties 282,366,920,938 20 first zero both each hex I p V six
"return network" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

07:07 min | 6 months ago

"return network" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"Oil and gas headlines have two stories marked the starch out with and they're both covering some of the politics surrounding oil and gas right now, this past week, Gretchen Whitmer, Michigan governor trying to shut down a pipeline in Michigan. Another story here is on the pressure. The big oil companies are feeling to move away from fossil fuels and go into more, You know, Green energy solutions such as wind and solar mark both of these stories. Shine a light on the reason that oil prices are going up right now, and that it's also a good time to be an individual investor in oil and gas programs, And you know it's kind of counterintuitive. But as the Democrats make it harder to drill for oil, those who are investors in oil and gas get more for their product. When they sell it. It's it's really a good market right now. Absolutely. This is one of the best times to own all in gas wells, and if you don't own it own all in gas wells. It's a good time to become a first time buyer blowing gas wells because of the politics. The Democrats and the news media. They're putting so much pressure to have less money directed towards all in gas that any all in gas that's in your ownership now or in the near future is going to be much more valuable. The Democrats are going to force prices up so that windmills and solar panels compete against all wells, which they don't even come close to competing with. But they need the prices of all to be higher to compete, So it's a great time to have oil and natural gas directly in your portfolio Mark. You know another factor right now that is pushing oil prices up is the fact that there has not been as much exploration for oil and gas over the last several years yet another reason there's less supply, which is therefore driving prices up, and also we're driving up returns for investors. Absolutely, absolutely. So the more that you have in your portfolio, the more valuable it is, as there's less exploration, because just think about it. If in in Texas, we produce about three million barrels a day, So tomorrow there's three million barrels less in the ground. And if nobody is replacing that oil, then the oil wells you own are becoming more and more valuable because the value of all in gas in the ground is dependent on the price you're getting paid and if reserves are not being replaced by drilling new wells Then the reserves that you have an existing wealth are Maura and more valuable, which means more and more cash flow for every barrel you produced. So we have less supply in the marketplace. We also have a marketplace that is rapidly Recovering from the pandemic. Those two things are well. I mean, many people are seeing $80 a barrel by the end of the year. I mean even India. India's had a second A terrible second face of covet. There. Are you opening up the economy and by opening up the economy, you have almost two billion people starting to use energy. All right, Marco, Our third story today is pertaining to taxes. Biden administration has enthusiastically teed up their plan to take income taxes on the wealthy way up as high as they've ever been 62% the new top tax rate in some states, including California. And the new federal cap gains tax will double under Biden's plan. Bringing that tax rate to his high is what 55% in some states marked the oil and gas tax break, which allows you to write off 100% of your investment in the year that you drill in these days of taxes going sky high. This is a way to preserve your wealth and also build wealth. Absolutely. But it's still the all in gas. What we call I d. C tax break has been around since 19. Oh, six. Or, you know the Woodrow Wilson Teddy Roosevelt years And the reason being is American needs energy. So the government gives tax breaks to individuals who invested in all in gas. So you know, just look at it this way. So you're paying to $300,000 here? And taxes. So you make 5 $600,000 a year and you're paying 200,000 or more, Say 250,000 year in taxes. Any investment? Did you make it all in gas drilling or there's a well or natural gas. Well, straight whole horizontal best well in the county worse well in the county doesn't matter. You get to write that off 100% against your income, active income investment income capital gains any form of income. You get to write it off from there wherever you need it. Now, on top of that, when you make it producing well, when it starts producing you only pay taxes on 85% of the revenue from it. 15% you get a tax break on top of that, But you get to write off 100% in the year that you drill so You invest this year? So you're paying $200,000 in taxes. So you put $200,000 and all in gas drilling. It's going to save you if you're in a 40% tax bracket, $80,000 So your true at risk cost is 120,000 on a $200,000 investment. Now you still get $200,000 for oven oiling gas Well, But your true at risk is only 120. Because the government is subsidizing you 80,000 because That 80,000 you would send to the government anyway, so and then you know, it's Robert Kiyosaki says he's you can use all in gas as a mechanism to get down to zero tax. Mark. We have a moment before we go to break. Let's close out The news today with a discussion on what you were doing in East Texas this week. I know you're loving how productive you were. New natural gas program has been you out there this week. Give us a quick update on how the project is going. Ah, project that, by the way, illustrates your strategy of buying older and mature oil fields is still have a lot of oil. And natural gas in the ground by these fields at a big discount, you never over pay because you're finding these diamonds in the rough, and it's working really well for you. Yeah, well, the team I work with we weigh like the sun oil Samson Thom Browne moda of finding all and gas reserves in existing fields that have been left behind. So the last field that we bought well, we studied it and we realize that there's about 90% of oil and gas left in the ground, even though the field have been producing for 20 years. And so we just went toe. You know, virgin zones in existing wells and Of the purchase we made nine months ago. We're already at five times five x of the purchase price. Just in one month, we had a three x Return networks in.

Robert Kiyosaki $200,000 $300,000 100% $80,000 80,000 85% Texas 200,000 East Texas Woodrow Wilson 120,000 55% Gretchen Whitmer 15% 40% 250,000 62% 20 years Marco
"return network" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"return network" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Once we've got all this regulatory things out of the way, so play first, The pillars earned the second pillar at the third pillar is actually connect. We want our users to build communities with Anna planned so there will be a ritual coffee shops they can meet and coffee shops that Khun Gather together. Is this whole idea ofthe social networking. But let's say on more micro level so that you can maybe go watch a movie together and virtual movie theater. Maybe after it was over and discussed. You know the movie. What you like What you like? And so this is also very important to us Right now. We believe we want to build a very, very strong community and we already have that We have a very, very community on discord in on telegram. You launch something like Upland country Return network where we have helping other lenders to create content around up lend. That means they can be created YouTube videos They created short films. They find even a rap song. They created a podcast. So really want Teo incorporate the whole community idea into into, uh, planned out the next generation. I tend to say social network, but you know what people actually can meet and exchange it. Yeah, In the reason. Thank you. The reason why I asked about the minister's question is, Of course it's if you have a defined single memories for your platform, then more opportunity to ensure that on the Blockchain everything is the single copy or the single item when the end of T gets get supported over. So that that's good. One of the companies I advise is a real estate Blockchain Cos. Of watching as a technology. There's a parallel here in that wee token ized every property in North America, every residential property. As a placeholder for whatever day that we wanted associate with that, and that was originally started off as a referral platform so that when Military realtor wanted to Teo refer business to each other that you would ensure that you could tell everything to the transaction on that. So it's very interesting that in the game world you're doing something similar, which is ensuring that all the parcels of land or would have you are being tracked accordingly. Yeah, that's that's the most important thing right. So interesting idea what you do that That's what we also want to do Right. You want a partner with lots of other companies would be something that the space right and you know, it's not that you have to invent everything going. That's also the way we wanna build up, Then it's gonna be an open developer platform where people can build on top of it. Go comes down. What Blockchain enables you And this is this? What is this? We used very often is like true ownership rights. So that is really the difference Because when you play a game today fortnight they can always take away your assets. But if you were in, you know, a Blockchain game sits there in the Blockchain. You can always query, you know, prove no third party, You know applications as you leave. They're right. It's mind associated Toe. My wallet. That's what also important billion launch again like a plan. So you stop talking about the cynical Blockchain Lingle, right, you know, like to talk about what damaged early about keys and then ciphering and so on. And most people say what's got into ownership might be all. What does this really mean? Right? So instead of saying, you know, if you only you can sell it, That's what people understand or buy something. They can sell it again. That's interesting, right? So so you have to find other metaphors, which makes Is really for average people easy to understand. You know things they've heard elsewhere. Thank you. How do you people start playing around with upland? How did they get hold of it possibly can go to the land of me website and sign up on the Web. Or you can go to us and enjoyed store on Donald theat from there and creating accounts Very simple. And then you get into this short tutorial. How all everything, Brooks Behind the recommend order to check out our million blocks to join our discord. Community was our community. Super health food got on a plane is no sometimes can become complex because it's the world and, you know, lots of things have been different things happening in different areas ofthe San Francisco already, so you might want to take a experience up lender and they always helpful, you know, Tio, no, ask the questions. You know how to do and how to strategize and Again. Super Simple. Get on border, Right? Well, Dirk Flute. Thank you so much for being on the regular portion of our show. Today. We appreciate learning more about up land. And we don't want you to go away because we come back. We're going to be on the pivot talking about the future. So if you want to learn more about up wind you can email said info. Espionage is you can go to the up on Dutton website. You can also find us on Facebook Twitter for questions or comments on today's program,.

Teo Blockchain Blockchain Lingle Khun Gather YouTube Anna North America Facebook Dutton partner Toe San Francisco Donald theat developer Dirk Flute Brooks
"return network" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"return network" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"So Jerome got a lot to talk about here in terms of artificial intelligence governance, , artificial general intelligence. . The reason I think this conversation will be fun is because you've thought through some future scenarios with with very large organizations for many years. . Very High Level and you've learned a lot in the process of what is the process for pulling together different stakeholders imagining, , what will the future be? ? What should we do I? ? Mean very complicated. . You go about it. . Of course, , one of the first things you do is you gotta find out the state of the art of whatever it is you know is there is, , let's say five elements to it or ten elements, , and you know was the state of the art on this element on this element, , this element, , this element. . Now myself I won't know enough to do that. . So we have a global network of networks sixty five nodes. . Return Network himself within countries, , and so I can say, , here's where we are so far and they tell me what else ought to be considered. . So there's so as global sort of a state of the art assessment finger. . Yeah and then within that <hes> with take a look and say what questions were not asked the authorities have been asked. . and. What . questions were as but answered, , superficial. . That gives us questions to as in a Delphi study, , which is a questionnaire goes around the world. . And the results of that then becomes guts content to create draft scenarios. . We send address narrows back out and everybody hasn't at Pat and presides over, , and then we can say, , okay, , what do you do about this scenario? ? What did you do about it? ? You'll see a good action as well as scenarios this sort of a general approach <hes>. . So you talked about the Delphi study I actually recall you bringing this up the first time you and I chatted I don't remember who has five years ago or something wild like that. . Speak briefly about wooded Delphi study is so I like finger on the pulse what are we missing? ? Pulling, , those ideas together and then there's this kind of dispersion to generate even more. . What is the Delphi study. . Delphi questionnaire. . Whose second round. . Is. . Determined by the results of the first round. . And third round is determined by the results the second route. . <hes> the reason for it was that there were generals and admirals and experts that don't always the same room with each other at the Rand Corporation.

Jerome Glenn Millennium Project Daniel Fidel AI Red Cross founder Korea
Forging International Consensus About the Future of Intelligence - with Jerome Glenn

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Forging International Consensus About the Future of Intelligence - with Jerome Glenn

"So Jerome got a lot to talk about here in terms of artificial intelligence governance, artificial general intelligence. The reason I think this conversation will be fun is because you've thought through some future scenarios with with very large organizations for many years. Very High Level and you've learned a lot in the process of what is the process for pulling together different stakeholders imagining, what will the future be? What should we do I? Mean very complicated. You go about it. Of course, one of the first things you do is you gotta find out the state of the art of whatever it is you know is there is, let's say five elements to it or ten elements, and you know was the state of the art on this element on this element, this element, this element. Now myself I won't know enough to do that. So we have a global network of networks sixty five nodes. Return Network himself within countries, and so I can say, here's where we are so far and they tell me what else ought to be considered. So there's so as global sort of a state of the art assessment finger. Yeah and then within that with take a look and say what questions were not asked the authorities have been asked. and. What questions were as but answered, superficial. That gives us questions to as in a Delphi study, which is a questionnaire goes around the world. And the results of that then becomes guts content to create draft scenarios. We send address narrows back out and everybody hasn't at Pat and presides over, and then we can say, okay, what do you do about this scenario? What did you do about it? You'll see a good action as well as scenarios this sort of a general approach So you talked about the Delphi study I actually recall you bringing this up the first time you and I chatted I don't remember who has five years ago or something wild like that. Speak briefly about wooded Delphi study is so I like finger on the pulse what are we missing? Pulling, those ideas together and then there's this kind of dispersion to generate even more. What is the Delphi study. Delphi questionnaire. Whose second round. Is. Determined by the results of the first round. And third round is determined by the results the second route. the reason for it was that there were generals and admirals and experts that don't always the same room with each other at the Rand Corporation.

Delphi Jerome Rand Corporation Return Network
"return network" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"return network" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

"Sunday night at eleven o'clock both on facebook and on Youtube your cup of paranormal soup every Sunday night. Skeleton Gee this mystical shop found exclusively on facebook is stationed in Blossom Texas. purchased all of your very own unique, religious, spiritual, and metaphysical items to include to begin alter kits find them today on facebook remember. You've always had the key. Or Chicago tomorrow. Msci Talk. We now bring your mom. Your. Things. Millions of and I. Can Fairly. Without a she. News. How were you doing this evening? Welcome to this episode of the Orion Ethic podcast right here on the ripped radio podcast network. We are joined here tonight without returning network producer Kimberley dayle Ohio. We got it back. We've got our Kim back I am the. Well talk surfer himself the Hitman along with. John Cat I didn't add the quintessential at an ad of that starts like why are you doing I'm like 'cause it's fun and and Knowledge Joey Styles. But this is GonNa be really wonderful show. We WanNA think I all those tuning in to facebook live right now all those who are listening. Thank you and welcome to the show. It's GonNa. Be a great show. Every be talking about Mathews. County Virginia. Pretty. Interesting location here in Virginia with a wonderful lady who is a historic of that location that being? Kimberly. Moxley. So we're looking forward to bringing her on in just a minute. But. Course. We always start with just talking a little bit about what we see the experiences in a lot of great is taking place now on the positive side, and we want to make sure that we change your thoughts to move to the positive. We change our own thoughts we change Arab position and how we think and how we feel yet, it'd be positive. Or negative. We can souls into a positive place and take ourselves out of the negative we WANNA make sure do that and that's what we're seeing. We're seeing a lot of people coming together a lot of good individuals getting with new individuals and grading new stuff. So that's awesome. Z. I want to make sure to say also if you missed it, check out. On details from no rocking chair with Christina Spencer that was now an archived at seven pm ensure tune in tomorrow night with Sheila Gain Kirby depre- at nine PM Eastern, Standard, time for another wonderful episode.

facebook Virginia Orion Ethic Sheila Gain Kirby depre Moxley Chicago Kim Kimberley dayle Youtube Blossom Texas. Joey Styles Christina Spencer Mathews producer John Cat Kimberly Ohio
"return network" Discussed on Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

14:22 min | 2 years ago

"return network" Discussed on Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

"Customer experience as a primary driver for digital transformation efforts in our research. Do you see that or as as in still kind of focus on cost. Containment is a goal and sometimes call that customer experience. Well I think the cost containment both an achievable and reasonable goal to go after while you doing to transformation and if you do it right then the cost containment and the idea of coherent client. Experience do much along. But if you just go after cost containment you can make some of those mistakes of of frankly locking yourself into more silos. And that's where I think some people lose the away so it goes back to being able to have a strategy. Have a picture in your mind of how your organization wants to evolve over time. When you turn about cost containment you know we sometimes avoid what. I'll call the elephant in the room. Which is the branch situation you know. The biggest cost that most organizations have in their distribution network. And even though those are being used less and less. That's one of those untouchables that create the biggest amount of difference between a traditional bank and a digital player. How you seen organizations addressing that in the marketplace is your reach out to your customers. Well you know it's interesting. You mentioned chase which privileged to have as a client for a Lotta years you know. They actually are adopting an active branch strategy because they recognize that you can contain the cost particularly with a lot of automation and and perhaps with branches designed differently. You can contain costs compared to what you used to do years ago but boy there were times. Somebody's life. Were being able to actually go in and talk to a person makes all the difference you know. Take a look at Amazon opening stores. The idea that you want to be a purely digital organization can make sense for a brand new startup but if you're an organization is looking to retain a reputation retain a customer segment. Then I believe you need a mix of channels to be able to engage the customers and the way they want to be engaged or you'll just driven business by the people who probably do the stuff more effectively we brought it up earlier is that and then more than just providing more channels these channels have to talk to each other. I would actually say it's even more important than talking to each other that they're designed so that the logic and the processes which at the heart of everything that happens in banking does that logic that processes don't get buried in any of the individual channels because otherwise the world's ossified into complex. We we talk about thinking from the middle out from being able to have an engine customer engagement engine which is for example. What Komo Stralia calls? The way they use the way I'm describing being able to do it engagement engine. That's going to drive consistent. Coherent personal engagement across all the channels tied to a workflow engine. That knows how to deal with the different back ends exist which in the future the bank may not even own in the world of open banking. That back end is somebody else's loyalty product. Somebody's else's credit instruments. You're just bringing it together and presenting it as a bundle thinking from the middle from the heart of your business out gives you a completely different perspective than than trying to think from the channel in or trying to do that sort of you know. Bs cost containment in little point solutions in the back office and we've seen organizations that are really starting to have meaningful impact my understanding. It's the way they draw the picture that makes a difference. It's interesting we'll take Amazon example. Again they realize that one of the pain points for consumers was returning things. Now Mind you. There's no place better than Amazon to return things because they continue to deliver whatever you need returned back to you in form you needed if it's different sites different color whatever they'll deliver it to you before even returned. Whatever it was that you need to return. But now they've worked with a different company in many cases. Kohl's being one of them where you can now return items purchased at Amazon to Kohl's and it'll be it is better than building a bunch of stores just returns but they're the using an outside retailer to provide a return vehicle. How great is that when you consider the fact that they want to build a bunch of stores to do that? They're building bind stores as well returning network. I think that is terrific. And you see evidence in other industries for example A tremendous amount of telephones sold through third party. Channels that onto the brick and mortar stores. That are over is. At and T. Might create it might be the best buy or some other channel and you know. Even in the banking industry we've seen banks pair up with supermarkets and other places to create much lighter touch personal interactions. But what we think is critical. Is that across all those channels? There's a coherent client engagement that the way the client is engaged. Your knowledge about the customer. What you tell the customer that you'd think they should be doing the needs to be just a wind and needs to be sensible needs to be real time. That's what we see the difference. Frankly regardless of industry you know the Research. We did on behalf of peg on digital transformation. We found that not surprising as we've seen in other research we'd done for the Digital Bank report that there's less than a robust use of a and advanced analytics and pretty much. A lot of it is still in the area of risk and security as opposed to personalization and more our facing allegations. Is this going to be an issue for the industry going forward? Well I think there's a lot of confusion about what is and when and how it should be used you know we have a an AI. Customer engagement platform that's used by one of the top three banks in the US. You know is using this literally millions of times a day to make that personalization happen for its clients and to do that. You're not just thinking about a I in a theoretical sense. Like how do I find patterns in the data you thinking about? How do I deliver that to the desktop to the call center to the ATM? How do I deliver they? I in an Omni Channel Way that his coherent and means that have a customer as an experience in one channel. Well the bank knows about it and can influence what happens in the next channel about it and that sort of thing to my mind is true in practice so much of what we see going on is kind of A and B S. A lot of it. A lot of it is really really just I think mis categorizing and in some cases involving risk to particularly a bag around some of the sensitive issues. We're hearing about around sometimes when I see two groups I say you know we've got to stop doing analytics for just better reports internally. We needed to do it for better experiences. And the challenge. I have is I use to top six banks one for business one for consumer side and go the fact that the banks really really really know me as not enough. They gotTA show me. They know me which isn't done very well if I went to. Let's say wells Fargo and said. Tell me everything you know about me. I'd probably be scared by all. They knew. The problem is on a daily basis. I don't get the sense that they really know me. So they don't deploy as you mentioned through the channels the way you'd hope that they would do. Well there's a big difference between being able to theorize and being able to operationalize and I think that's a gap that. Ai has fallen into and We're seeing some customers. Come through the other end of it. In Boise. Getting amazing returns. Yeah Yeah so we. We look at the changes happening in every industry. Not just in banking. I think one of the biggest again elephants and ruined referring tat phrase again is the lack of talent to really move organizations forward. Not only. Is there a gap because my son goes to university right now and he's taking digital analytics business analytics? Marketing and logistics egos is hard to find the teachers that can teach us now because so many of them have gone to private industry. How do you believe that organizations need to address this challenge going forward? Well I think they can rely on industry you know. I don't want to my own horn. But you know with the work that we've done and with our teams of experts and software experts. We've worked to make this real time a consumable as opposed to so much of the AI. That's out there. The Google or Amazon web service. Those things don't plug in to actual business solutions which you know in the banking industry. We understand what the key elements. Are that make somebody decide whether they need a new credit card or not or how they should divide their credit portfolio. And then how do you bring that to the customer in real time? What do the agents customers talking about in real time and if it doesn't work if that wasn't the right thing how do you learn from that and stop annoying the customer with the same offer? They don't want those are what I would describe as the linkage between the highly theoretical which of course you have to do to get started and the highly operationally I which ultimately is the difference between that sort of personal success and personal interaction. You and frankly it's obviously in the interests of the banks that are serving you as well when you look at automation. Also and you're looking at a lot of rules that are traditional banking roles at some managers may have had for fifteen twenty years as those change. You see organizations have to take it upon themselves to upskill reskill maybe transform towards an ongoing learning process to address this challenge from a standpoint of jobs are definitely gonNA be changing. Well I think that the opportunity here is to actually uplift and improve the technology that is now central to pretty much every job that exists in a financial services institution. And when you take a look at for example. Some of the problems that some banks have had around accounts. That shouldn't have been opened a lot of that is because the banks have rules and processes in roles that are not connected to a technical background. And there's a great opportunity to actually create tooling that makes it easier for people to change jobs and to do. New Processes engage with their customers but also puts the guardrails around that so that you know it's crazy to think that a computer system allowed somebody to sit down at the end of the day pounding in Kinda applications. That's a perfect example of where people try to layer on top of inadequate systems manual processes. That frankly didn't work and you see the time after time. That's why I think it's the perspective that these organizations have that needs to change and that will put them in the right mindset to digitally transform not digitally transformed the little transactions digitally transform the actual end to end customer experience what we call the micro journey that organizations with their clients all the time you talked about the micro journey we talk about implementing the technology. You know one of the things that we've discussed and we found on the researchers that is more than just buying the technology and it's more than just great partnerships around the technology they're still got to be a deployment and in discussions with peg in a lot of the other players out there. You know we keep on hearing the fact that as big of an issue as by the technology is really internally understanding how it needs to be deployed in the culture necessarily to give it a a platform for growth in for implementation. How are you dealing with the whole challenge of changing of culture in and getting people to really understand the power of what you're selling? Well I think there are two parts one is. We're looking to build. What's called design thinking concepts the whole way that you think about using and deploying that technology. We're actually building that into the technology itself so the technology guys you and walks you through the workflows that you need as an implementer to help make sure you're hitting your business objectives and we're really excited by the progress and the speed with which we have. We have clients go live with major systems in ninety or one hundred days that are game changing for them but let me say one thing the comment about you know. It's not just the technology it's more than that on one hand. That is absolutely true but on the other hand I see that being used as an excuse by companies. Whose technology isn't actually that very good. You know we have a bunch of companies out there. Now that are just amalgams or what? I call Franken stacks of dozens or more other. Companies that have been bought glued together had the power points merged but actually under the covers. It's a collection of technical data and a mess and I hear those companies sometimes talking to customers saying. Hey it's not the technology will help hold your hand. Well if the technology is wrong as we've learned in lots of industries you know there's a reason the windows phones don't exist right. The technology is wrong. You can be as big or successful or historically smart as possible and you will fail in the future and we actually see a lot of that happening. You know. It's a little bit like that old CBO promise just by. Siebel and everything was going to be better. Lots of new sables out there. That are just glued together. Frankly messes one other thing. That's interesting is and you mentioned how quickly you can get an implementation in place today. Agility and flexibility in the marketplace. Where do you see that plane a role? We didn't really ask it. In the survey we did about 'cause it's hard to define how somebody's going to self determine agility inflexibly how important is that in today's marketplaces opposed to lift.

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"return network" Discussed on Startup Talk Toronto's Startup Podcast

Startup Talk Toronto's Startup Podcast

12:57 min | 2 years ago

"return network" Discussed on Startup Talk Toronto's Startup Podcast

"Who've made a difference. Now, the host of startup talk the founder of Toronto starts the startup coach. It's the start of coach here and I'm talking to the co founders of clippers Neil and harsh welcome guys. Thank thank God for having us. So first of all, tell me about clippers clippers marketplace, where we connect users and the hairstylist and a users get Johnston Buchen has status through the app and the hepatitis delivers up when meant to your place, and most importantly, they clean up the mess after the appointment and our has status are background check so you don't have to worry about safety. So there's no sketchy people to come in my home. And everything's clean in, it's a nice experience. Absolutely amazing experience. I would say so before we get back to clippers, I always, like to talk about, you know what, who the entrepreneurs were before the start up. So how did you guys meet? What would like growing up rate handful your for your parents? What happened there for me? I was like an injured guy, I I'm not much into studies. I have never been much decided, but I'm more often Advantis boats. I like scuba diving have done that. Sometimes I play tennis. I've been a into state championship off tennis like pain billiards. Sometimes he has hits me. It's funny I just interviewed the one of the co founders of all close. He was one of the top seeded tennis players here in Ontario for awhile. You know, you don't talk about tennis together. And you'll have what you. So I was never study studio students, I would never like to go into his much I was more of an art student. I would say so right from the school, I was into keyboard playing, and I played professionally keyboard for four years, and then I got into dancing and I had couple of stage shows in back in India as well report forming and then I used to play table tennis, which will I was pretty good at it and billiards are used to videos at which was fun which you kind of figure out which is very fun. And I am kind of adventure person I will say, I never into studies. I never have been industries. So, so how did your parents rack, do not being into studies in the being into arts rather than the vote, you know, ever overhear, people want everyone to be a lawyer doctor something, my fans very interesting because few few times, my dad used to not support me, but my mom used to support me, and she would let you do whatever you. Want to do is like use your life. You can enjoy my by my dad was, like study first and then do what you want. But I was my head can never be wrapped around books. I to read books, but that's not the studious are at exhaust object books. I like to read other books, which is needed to enterpreneur ships and everything like that. That is interesting for me. But my mom was very supportive. So how did you guys meet? Yeah. So the men back when me were four years old. We are four years old. We met in kindergarten actually be have been friends since kindergarten school, college university, and even over here. We ended up together so yeah. That that's our story. Did you have a different universities while you went to the same universe by sounds, what did you take different courses of the same programs? Same programs. The same though friend. Yeah. Together. But after that, I hear from entrepreneurs that they wanna find cofounders at the opposite of that, but sounds like you guys are finding each other as best of friends, but are the same not know the opposite via I'm yet completely different than him. He's completely oh. I would say when we were growing up, he was more of introvert. I in a lot of time we have difference of opinion all the time. All the news we used to argue a lot on that small small things. But now similar thing was that we used to discuss business all the time that when we were in dealt grade. Women plus in the college, we used to discuss business any businesses around us. We used to discuss about them high would they are growing how we are interested in those business. And we used to say that we will side business of our one once we are done with the studies, but we had a part, we fired over ways in one year or so. But now we are here doing together. So what? Brought you to Canada. Opportunity back in India. I wasn't able to be unable to pursue our goals, you know, so over here, we have that opportunity. It is really growing country full of opportunity, so that the are rod as like minded people. Oh, you don't. I mean, I never found people tend big in India, which I annoyed grown around people like that. And I did not like I was always a person who was dreamer who can think big and stuff like that. But did not find people around my idea that this is depressing for me, I would always want to grow it on those people. Why does the good spirits slide now which is able to weaken grew Canada? So you've come here for opportunity, you found your network. You found a bunch of people who think and dream big. So how long have you been here for four years? So when did the idea of clippers come to mind, you're like not before not after you're wandering the streets seeing? Hey, look at all these scruffy people allowed. So what happened was back in two thousand eighteen I was going through jobs and I was getting my permanent residency, then and I was always thinking, what is neck because I think I'm not a job person. So I was at what is next? What do I want to? I want to be stuck for fifty years in the same environment, and I always used to I used to have different ideas, I used to mention write it down as evaluate them and see what is what can be done. And one day, I had instant meeting the next day in the office and I was looking very messy. I was I called my hairstylist and he was not available. And I was very frustrated. I've had a meeting tomorrow. I'm not able to get a haircut, and I don't trust a lot of people out there bit my hair. Some seems to be a common problem. Yeah. He asked what if somebody can come to my place and I, I can we're gonna -pointment come to my place delivered appointment? I don't have to go through all the hassle calling people out. And, and this is how the idea was born. And apparently he was in India that. Yeah, I, I tell the story from yours. So I was back in India. I actually went for my wedding. It was on my wedding day, I go to car. I get a call from Neil. And he I the first thing seen what? Okay. He's calling to congratulate me on my wedding day forcing game out ROY have this huge idea. I'm like can you stop? It's my wedding day. Like we can talk after two days, then we had a talk today. Then here we are. Did you actually tell them your idea on their wanting their did you stop by, like, I was I was more more of a selfish on that day? Yeah. I'll talk to you a couple of days. But let me tell you that. Yeah, I was overenthusiastic, but I also understood with daddy come from his thing to do. I'm like, okay, very dot. Little yet, literally on my wedding night. I in my dressing room and. So a couple of days later, you talk and what happens of you had a dog couple of days later than he told me, this is the idea in the how we can skated. And I'm like this really sound good envy, should work on an end after a month. I come back to Toronto, and we started working on this early relate our detailed plan. What will do I like interview hairstylists how to get to the customers and stuff? Yes, than we are here. So how long did it take you from y'all? Let's do this to launching their platform today. So it took us six months from like a month off, like Bain storming arguing and then recited the initiation off deal off clippers than it took us, six months. And he had we villa platform it in six months. But the thing is we outsourced our because we are not technical background. We don't know a program, we're not programmers. So we outsource the. Brought up Billy and I took a six month to build a product because we were outsourcing, I hope it would have got easier, which it if it was your. But now fortunately, we have ID team it's the snow over here in house. The we are fortunate enough to now so you outsource most of it, and then, you know, halfway through three quarters away throughout the end, you've got in, in house, as well as external people know, Arlene house. Yeah. We got rid of excellent people because we did not find it interesting enough to work excellently. It's always a challenge. I work with a lot of nontechnical startups. Like how do I get this platform built? So how did you choose this team? And then why why did you outsource and then moved in sourcing? So why did we outsource vase because they are unaware? We didn't knew anybody who here, and it would would have taken a lot of time to learn coding, and to start working on this. And we're like, no, we can we can out so we can try out so we can see how it is working. So we find a company from. India, and we've found a couple of companies from India, we talked with couple of companies than we gathered around with one company, and we, we had a deal with them. But then we will not really happy about their quality of work because they were not really working as a partner or as emotions, they are really working as getting paid employees. So then we figured out, nobody will work like that. We have to get somebody who return networking over here. And then we found two people right now which are debating which have arrived Emec wound. I and I agree with you. I find them I like working with startups. I don't like working with employees and there's different between working with a small group he will try to build something great designate, then working for an employee him. Really? Yeah. As are working with them. It's just completely different mindset. What's the unmet problem? Yeah. Great. You couldn't get your haircut like that half hour that you want. But yes, so what we found out was when we van recited, researching and talking to people, and we found out was it's not only me, there are a lot of people out there who are time, constrain, loon hell time, because, now it is time there's money, so they don't want to expand out and go and spend hours of their time. So this was the problem and there are like different age groups. We are going to like moms, they have way to parliament. They don't wanna go with goods into the salon. They're elderly people who cannot go outside, clearly, they have physical problems, and they're also business professionals enterpreneurs. They are busy lot busier than we can imagine. And so he wanted to fill that space, we wanted to feel wanted to give them as inexperience in their own comfort of their home office, our heartfelt. So this is how we came of it's. Clippers how started, so you're platforms live. Now how did you get your first customers? So he will send me that Saturday. We did a lot of pitches. We game to start up during the week, Emily. We came here, we met you. It was good. Opportunity me. Do we, we species? You are drinks. Yeah. And that is very got a lot of good feedbacks. We went to collision. We got more feedbacks. We did sort of media strategy and that from social media. We got our plus customers, and it was actually Sunday day before yesterday. We gotta reflect Glenn congratulations. Thanks a luck Yanks. So let's talk about collision for. You guys were part of start alpha down collision. How did you find it and what we're expecting? And what did you get out of it? So collision was a really great experience. It was really insightful. We met a lot of motivated, fellow co founders founders, who are working in the same environment. V expected to. Get the word out off lupus lupus is out of the be wanted to meet everyone in person, and let them know award is clippers how can help them and solve any question debts that they have any concerns that they have. We got a lot of positive feedback few negative ones. But mostly it was all positive. And, like we got an opportunity to meet other mentors investors. I've media people who can who maybe potentially can help us grow flippers more further. That's great. And so your role.

clippers India tennis Toronto Canada founder Johnston Buchen Neil billiards lupus Ontario Glenn Arlene house Billy Bain Emec partner Emily four years