35 Burst results for "Respiratory Disease"

Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo reopens to the public

WGN Programming

03:07 min | Last month

Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo reopens to the public

"WGN, the fairly new director of the Lincoln Berg Zoo with the exciting news that the Lincoln Park Zoo is open. You need to make reservations, though, which is true for just about anywhere you go right now. But I'll tell you, you can find them and it's it's worth visiting. Can you go inside buildings or Outside on Lee. I note one point We've been to the zoo several times during this pandemic on and off, and it was only outside. But I has that changed. That has changed very recently. We were given some new guidelines operate under by the state and we are able to open our buildings at a limited capacity. We're being very methodical. We do We use science and everything that we do here at the zoo, and so we're Easing into opening buildings kind of a building at a time. So currently we have two buildings that were opening when we have staffing for it, and then we're going to be starting to open more buildings as we continue to move through the spring. So I love this text that I just received. I happen to know the answer Just a bit, But I'm sure you can do better than me cans. Kines. What was what was that? I said, will be all. Of course you get kids. Ooh! Animals Get Cove. It 19. Uh, yeah. Do animals can get Cupid 19. There's been a few zoo animals around the country that have gotten covert 19. We likely have not had any of the animals at Lincoln Park Zoo. Test positive for covert 19. But we, as all accredited zoos do around the country used personal protective equipment in order to ensure I know we're all familiar with face masks and other personal protective equipment. Because of our own personal use. We use that here at the zoo all of the time, especially with animals touches nonhuman primate center susceptible to many of the same diseases that we are, and it turns out the animals at The zoo's that have been diagnosed with covert 19 are, I think was that the San Diego Wildlife Park where some of the guerrillas were diagnosed lowland gorillas with covert 19? And also Malayan Tigers, and one of the species must been Asian lions at the Bronx Zoo. If I recall also a zoo in either Tennessee or Kentucky had a big cat that had it. But the good news is all of these animals have survived that have have have had it aspires. I know anyway, across the country, And as you say zoos are so careful anyway, particularly with nonhuman primates. Well, before anyone ever heard of covert 19 you you didn't want those great apes to get a cold. Which could be passed on because they can get it except sometimes it turns into a more serious respiratory disease in gorillas in particular, so it's for a very long time. Zoos have been very careful, correct. That is exactly right. We've been careful for a very long time with good reason. We want to make sure that they don't get any cold or flu or any bugs that we have the we've been protecting them by using our personal protective equipment for Decades now, so I said, going

Lincoln Berg Zoo Lincoln Park Zoo Kines WGN San Diego Wildlife Park Malayan Tigers LEE Bronx Zoo Tennessee Kentucky FLU
Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last month

Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

"Your mom probably told you to eat your fruits and veggies to stay healthy. Now there's new evidence showing she was right. The American Heart Association study took about 30 years and 29 countries that it shows those who ate more fruits and veggies reduce the risk of dying related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, potentially respiratory disease. Harvard Medical school doctor and Thorndike says Not all veggies are created equal. For example, starches you want to get these other types of more healthful fruits and vegetables, and then you can also eat the potatoes or corn or Pete. If you choose, study says to daily servings of fruit. Three of veggies could help you live

American Heart Association Respiratory Disease Thorndike Cardiovascular Disease Harvard Medical School Cancer Pete
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | 2 months ago

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

05:05 min | 2 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"In this podcast is brought to you by the canada foundation for innovation. Muscle is a fascinating tissue because as we all know just from our everyday experience. it's it's very malleable. It's very adaptable. In certain situations. The muscle will grow You know if you're lifting weights for example and the flip side of that is if you don't use the muscle. The muscle very quickly gets smaller gets weaker. And of course if Your breathing muscles get weak. It's not just that you can't get out of bed and you can't breathe along the same lines there. Are these diseases Many of them genetically base Such as muscular dystrophy is where the muscle is progressively destroyed at once again. When this affects the breathing muscles ultimately patients either end up requiring breathing machines Or they may actually succumb to the disease. My name is basil petroff. I'm a professor at mcgill university. And i'm also the director of the program for translational research and respiratory diseases which forms one of the main research groups Within our research institute. So i see patients with a variety of respiratory diseases ranging from has marta. Empha- zima Various lung infections lung cancer and ultimately at the end of the day. What we wanna do is develop new diagnostic approaches and new therapies. That will improve the quality of life of our patients and Improve their survival as well what. I would anticipate that there will be an increase in clinical trials with innovative therapies. We know in asthma for example. There's a subset of patients. For whom conventional therapies. Don't work and one of the things that has been identified In in these patients is that they have abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle within their airways that causes the airways to Contract more in and be more narrow in this proliferative response was was identified at the bench in cell culture models and in animal models in what was then done was to develop a therapy based on radiofrequency ablation to actually in a sense burn the muscle and remove the muscle thin the muscle out in open up the airways and saw a special instrument was designed to do this in patients and we participated in a clinical trial which demonstrated that this was effective in some of these patients. So this is the type of thing that were they were trying to promote where discoveries such as this sort of move rapidly longest pipeline To improve patient care. I'm very excited. About the state of the art imaging equipment in the center for translational biology within the animal facility there are sophisticated imaging modalities like two photon microscopy. Which allows you to actually do. Realtime time imaging of cells within that tissue And these things were not Were not available to us before so in in the past sort of the old way of doing research was if you wanted to see what was going on you had to actually Sacrifice the animal. Kill the animal. Take the tissue. Such to analyze what was going on here. What we're able to do is actually followed the disease process over time noninvasive -ly and that really makes it much easier to test different therapies. See what's going on and also because the same sorts of imaging modalities are used in patients. it's much easier to kind of make the leap from the disease model in the animal to the patient and either do diagnosis. More effectively or to Follow the the progress of your your treatment having the research really embedded within. The hospital allows the the trainees. The students residents The sub specialty fellows that they have much more contact with people like myself who are both physicians and scientists. There's really a need for that. Because one of the problems that's been identified for the is that fewer and fewer physicians are actually deciding to pursue research careers. So i think that In an environment like this where. There's a lot of excitement It's very stimulating. This has the really a great potential to turn young physicians on doing research which is of course. Essential for the future..

mcgill university both one canada Empha- zima
Wuhan marks its one year anniversary since the outbreak

BBC World Service

02:25 min | 3 months ago

Wuhan marks its one year anniversary since the outbreak

"A year since the Chinese city off Wuhan first went into lockdown as a result off the coronavirus, marking a trend which would spread to many countries around the world. At the time, the respiratory disease now known as covert 19, had killed only 17 people. According to official Chinese statistics, there were more than 500 confirmed cases of that point. Wu Han's mayor, Eugene Wang told state controlled television that officials may have acted too slowly. The church in pushing. This is a profound lesson at the focus of the epidemic will hand should carry out a strict measures to prevent and control it without missing any detail or link. This shows that we didn't get to know enough about the virus at the beginning. About his heart, and it's spreading some 11. Million people were put under tight quarantine and face masks and social distancing became mandatory at the time. The wider world was shocked by the harsh restrictions and rigid enforcement. Among locals, there was a sense of panic. Since the shutdown happened this morning. I think this has been a bit more panic, you know, especially when you think about food and the tractor. These Chinese New year people are now going to be able to go see family, etcetera, and that you know, in Chinese culture. That's a massive thing. You know, seeing their family at this time of year. So today when the shutdown happened on its side at 10 o'clock this morning, a bit more panicked, kicked him. But at that stage, the World Health Organization hadn't decided yet whether to declare a global emergency because they didn't have enough information about the virus as Dr Ted Ross Adhanom, Gabrielle source, the W. H O director explained. The decision about whether or not to declare a public health emergency of international concern. Is one I take extremely seriously. And one time only prepared to make with appropriate consideration off all the evidence when it was only on the 12th of March After 1000 deaths and 20,000 cases off the disease were registered in Italy, that the W H O did then declare it Pandemic. We're a year on the world still grappling with coronavirus global cases now stand at 98,157,700. The number of deaths 2,106,690

Chinese City Wu Han Eugene Wang Wuhan Dr Ted Ross Adhanom World Health Organization Gabrielle Italy
South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 3 months ago

South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

"South Korea, one of the most successful countries and fighting the pandemic is doing worse now, case numbers are growing during a third wave of infections. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the debate over how to respond. For the past week, South Korea has tried to discourage year and revelry by banning gatherings of more than four people and shutting down ski resorts and tourist spots. But new case numbers and deaths remain stubbornly and or near record highs. Those new infection highs of around 1000 today in a country of more than 50 million are, Of course, nowhere near is bad is the US, nor are they as good as save New Zealand or Taiwan. Dr Kim Woo ju and infectious disease expert at Korea University's Good. A hospital in Seoul recalls that when the first wave of infections hit in February, fear of a new and unfamiliar virus gripped South Koreans, Ah Kitana. Sarah's got so scared. They started wearing masks and stopped going outside even before the government mandated it. But as the pandemic were on, people loosened up and mobility went up. Meanwhile, the government listen to a crescendo of voices of exhausted citizens and struggling businesses. The government hesitated to raise the social distancing level when it should have and was too fast to downgrade it when it shouldn't have. Kim argues that the government has got it backwards. It's not the counter measures that are hurting the economy. It's the pandemic. Experts also point out that the third wave is going to be tougher to crush than the first two. This time. There are more undetected community transmissions, more smaller clusters of infections. China and me, a respiratory disease specialist at equal Women's University in Seoul, says South Korea relied on testing and contact tracing to beat the first two waves. But this time that won't be enough, she says, would you guys how does have a right to take that and that you can only cut the chain of transmission if we cut social activity? The government won praise early on by putting health authorities and experts firmly in charge of the pandemic response. But John says this has changed socially with their table got him over there we go in there. Aside From a few exceptions, most medical experts have been calling on the government to raise social distancing restrictions and warning that hospitals are under a lot of strain E few that our opinions are not reflected very well in the government's decisions. South Korea's government denies that there's any daylight between politicians and experts. Or that it's gone soft on the virus. Speaking on December, 22nd Health Ministry spokesperson Sonia Hong Lei acknowledged that some people are calling for raising restrictions to the maximum. Could you two get engaged with only days ago? Who does those calls are understandable, he said. But regarding occasional claims that the government has violated his own criteria for raising restrictions, he added, We've never done that. Just before Christmas. U. S troops stationed here got the country's first coronavirus vaccinations. Most South Koreans won't start getting theirs until February. The government insists there's no delay. But at Korea University Hospital Doctor Kim Woo ju says the government seems to have dropped the ball. E don't understand why the South Korean government didn't start actively negotiating advanced purchase agreements until November. The government announced Thursday that it's secured more than enough vaccines for his population. And, according to a recent poll, nearly 90% say they'll take the shot.

South Korea Anthony Kuhn Dr Kim Woo Ju Ah Kitana Seoul Government Korea University Equal Women's University NPR Infectious Disease Taiwan New Zealand 22Nd Health Ministry Sarah Sonia Hong Lei KIM China United States John Korea University Hospital
Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 3 months ago

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

"Up, we're taking a look back at some of 20 twenties major events and one of the most remarkable scientific advances this year came in our understanding of how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air. Krone virus pandemic obviously made this an urgent question. And NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports that old scientific ideas quickly got thrown out of the window. For decades. The prevailing idea about respiratory viruses was that some were airborne, and some just weren't so back in January, Thea understanding of how viruses spread through the air. Was really primitive and incorrect. Lindsay Mars, a researcher at Virginia Tech, who studies virus transmission, she says textbooks and research papers said an airborne virus was something like measles. It could be breathed out in tiny particles called aerosols that hang in the air. Those aerosols contractual long distances from room to room. All of that was very different from non airborne viruses like flew in the common cold. Those were thought to spread through coughs and sneezes, big droplets that travel just a few feet. Maher says. This whole simplistic picture was just wrong. There were very small number of people in the world. I think who really understood at that time how viruses spread through the air, and these people realize that the new coronavirus might be airborne at short distances. That is if people talked or saying the virus could be in small particles, as well as the big droplets and coughs and in a poorly ventilated space. These particles could build up as the Corona virus outbreak took off. These experts started making a lot of noise about this and people paid attention. Maher says She thought it would take 30 years for more nuanced ideas about airborne transmission to gain widespread acceptance. But it's happened in months. It's been pretty wild to see airborne transmission of viruses become Big news. Scientific studies came superfast Josh than Tar. Pia is a researcher at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. We're not even 12 months in and We know things about this virus that you know, we don't know about some viruses that we've had around for decades. His medical center took care of some of the first people with Corona virus in the United States. Santo Pia recalls standing at the end of their beds with a device that collected air while they talked or breathed his lab, then analyzed the tiny airborne droplets. Looking for the genetic signature of the Corona virus. We were getting positives more than one positive in the air samples, and I can't say the words that I said But you're kind of broadcast this, but I was shocked signs of the virus were in such tiny particles. He worried that nothing less than the most protective masks could stop it. Soon, though, studies showed that even basic cloth masks were able to reduce the amount of virus that gets out into the air and suddenly mask wearing became routine sent our P A was floored and how ventilation became part of the normal daily conversation. You know how well ventilated is the space shouldn't be spending time inside or outside. You know how much all these things it's changed so much about the way we view the world. The question is, Will this be a lasting change? Donald Milton is a research Teacher at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. He spent years showing how better ventilation in dorms or offices is associated with a lower risk of respiratory disease transmission, he says. We need to figure out engineering solutions to improve the safety of indoor spaces like getting better ventilation, using air filters, even using special lights up by a room ceiling to disinfect circulating air. I want to see us understand how it is that you can make her Restaurant, a safe place to be during flu season and during a pandemic. I think it's doable, but he's afraid that once vaccines get this virus in check, people will lose interest at least until the next pandemic. Nell Greenfield Boys NPR news

Nell Greenfield Lindsay Mars Maher Thea Santo Pia NPR Virginia Tech University Of Nebraska Medical PIA Josh Donald Milton University Of Maryland School United States Respiratory Disease FLU Npr News
"respiratory disease" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"That are going on that are clearly high risk A real deep part of people's culture so changing that is going to be really tough In communities in southwest china we asked people about what interaction the hard with wildlife. And we've found that there's a higher risk of people have come with wildlife. Eight wildlife of them getting respiratory disease. Then we've got other other viruses in other parts of the world that are also spilling over at a background rate. We need to look that we need to understand more about that and really start to work with those people on the front line of vulnerable communities is that needs to understand the health risks and we can work with them to try and change behavior slowly and gradually so safer. Part of what. I think is so interesting about the work you're doing is that you're building this case that our whole system right now the way we interact with the environment the economic sort of engine. That's driving us is part of the cause of these pandemics. I never hear it talked about like that on cable news. Yeah why we've got news to this idea that we're in a reductionist strategy to deal with things. We find this virus. We learn everything about the molecules on the surface. We have really cool high tech solutions to design vaccines and produce them. The trump doesn't really work. What can enough to actually deal with an outbreak. These outbreaks are moving now in a matter of days. We saw sars emerge after two months and spread globally. This one took two weeks. We got time to develop vaccines drugs but the public demanded an expects it. Peter estimates there over a million viruses like covid nineteen out there. He and his group if found five hundred different corona viruses in bats alone but it took him ten years to do that work thus we need to do. We need to do that at a scale. So discover all the rest of those viruses. It's charged just sounds like it would take forever if q ten years to find five hundred then just one group. We need many more groups in many more regions doing this work with those sequences into the hands of the vaccine designers..

respiratory disease china Peter
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

02:43 min | 4 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Latinos Who Lunch

"You know because it's like it's it's everybody's thinking like that now it's so crazy i mean is it crazy. I don't think it's crazy. I think it's pretty set up. I mean white supremacy wants to trust no one and just just follow whatever. Follow the leader. I the meal i mean. It's all related. and it is our patron episodes. We might then. I did a whole conspiracy theory episode. there is. There's always like a kernel of truth from those conspiracies but then it just like goes goes all the way wrong. You know what i mean. Yeah it's like but that's why that's why they work because they played with line and once they get through like they can go into the whole like leumi noddy and just aliens and shape shifter's and like it's a slippery slope you know. Yeah and it's like. It's definitely a distraction from the shape. Shifter that are actually killing us like office like a but then the thing. I don't understand the focus on things that don't matter sometimes and you're like well okay. So there's this that live in the forest that steal your scraps and who cares like how is that and then so then. They go distributed through five g. Like i'm i'm like yeah. Of course five is probably bad for us because like there hasn't been enough studies on cell phones and radiation or whatever and whatever. I'm not saying that us. The real thing but like house of corona virus girl a respiratory disease. I'm going to hold my breath for ten seconds. That one okay all right. Let's take a break. Because i'm pissed off but we'll be right back with some listener letters a finger through at least one of them will pray while the run that it did sh.

leumi noddy respiratory disease
David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

TED Talks Daily

04:56 min | 6 months ago

David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

"I've got to stop by admitting that in many. Me Giving a talk about how climate action can help black communities is surprising. I grew up whole black with a single mother in Psalm. One of the most deprived areas in London in the nineteen seventies and s climate change was the last thing on my mind. Representing Tottenham. Its member of parliament for the past twenty years my focus has been on trying to reduce the deprivation I grew up around in the past the climate crisis never featured at the forefront of my politics because it was never one of the most immediate. Constituents facing or at least it didn't feel like it. Rising sea levels feel unimportant when your bank balance is falling. Global, warming is not your concern when you can't pay the heating bills and you're not thinking about pollution when you're being stopped by the police and so perhaps this is why as the black lives matter movement roared across the world that's been so dimension saving black lives from the climate emergency. The too long those of us who cared about racial justice treated environmental justice is that was elitist and at the same time, the leaders who did focus on climate change we usually white and rarely bothered to enlist the support of black voices in their work. Even Progressive Allies sometimes took votes to granted and assume that all community didn't care or wouldn't understand the truth is the opposite is true. Black people breathe in the most toxic air relative to the General Population We are more likely to suffer from respiratory diseases like asthma. And it is people of color who are more likely to suffer in the climate crisis. This is no coincidence. The cheapest housing tends to be next to the busiest roads and many of the lowest paid jobs are the most pollutant industries. People of color consistent deny the bottom of the housing educational and Employment Ladders. This story connects black communities across the world from London to lay goes to La black-americans are exposed to fifty six percent more pollution than they course white Americans breed seventeen percent less air pollution, the May produce. It gives a whole new meaning to the black lives matter slogan I breath we all right. We know the name of George Floyd who was murdered by the police, but we should also know the name of eloquently Deborah. Ella a nine year old mixed race girl from southeast London was killed by fatal asthma attack evidence suggested was caused partly by the unknow fool levels of air pollution near her home. And it's not only urban areas where black lives are disproportionately under threat from climate change. My parents had country of Guyana is one of the most vulnerable countries on earth to the effects of climate. Change. So far, gladys contributed relatively little to the climate emergency, but it's one of the country's facing the most serious threats from it. While the annual carbon dioxide emissions beheaded the United States is a staggering sixteen point. Five metric tons in Guyana is just two point six, it is a patton repeated. The Globe those countries that have contributed least the climate breakdown mainly in the global south will suffer the most from floods droughts and rising temperatures. This is a patent suffering with a long history. The exploitation of our planet's natural resources of always been tied the exploitation of people of Color. The logic of colonization was to extract valuable resources from our planet through force paying no attention to its secondary effects. The climate crisis is in a way colonialism's natural conclusion. The solution is to build a new coalition made up of older groups most affected by this emergency black people in American cities who are already protesting that they cannot breathe. People of Color in Ghana, watching sea levels rise to the point where many of their homes become uninhabitable young people in places like Tottenham London afraid of the world they will grow older and progressive allies from all nations of all races, religions, creeds, and ages on this side. All demanding recognition that climate justice is linked to racial justice, social justice and intergenerational justice to

London Guyana Tottenham London Tottenham Ghana George Floyd Deborah Gladys Ella La Black-Americans United States Patton
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | 7 months ago

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Prevention, Dr Robert Redfield, told a Senate hearing today that a vaccine most likely won't be ready into the middle of next year. But the president says he's confident that a vaccine could be ready before Election Day. And do against news conference today that he heard live here on Coco this afternoon, The president said Americans should start rolling up their sleeves soon for a vaccine. We encouraged Americans to enroll in the vaccine trial. It's not only interesting it will be. A terrific thing for our country. We encourage everybody to enroll as many people as we can. There are nearly seven million Corona virus case is now in the country more than 200,000 Cove. It related deaths in the U. S. Senegal County reported 278 more new cases of the Corona virus today, bringing the total to 45,425 since the pandemic began to new deaths reported today, Raising that total to 767. Dr Arab McDonald with the county Health department, says Corbett 19 is the sixth leading cause of death now and Saturday. Go this year. It's just now edging out chronic lower respiratory disease, which would include things like COPD. So that's you know, really, quite concerning. It's actually rapidly rising on accidents, and that would not be surprised if it comes into the top four by the end of the year. The county said the day there have been 13 community outbreaks over the last seven days, but no new ones reported today the sending a Padres of won the bid due to redevelop the tailgate park area. In the East Village. Sinegal Mayor Kevin Faulkner, announcing the Padres is the winning bid for the five acre site looking to develop what is currently a large parking lot across four city blocks a 1600 space parking garage as part of the new plan that could break ground in 2 to 3 years, the rest to be more than 600 housing units and more than a million square feet of office space. The Padres were selected as the winning bid for tailgate Park over Brookfield Properties, the group that had just won the other bid to redevelop the Sports arena site in the Midway District. Jack Cronin, Coco News and no word yet, But Disney's top theme parks executive asking the state of California and the governor to allow Disneyland to re open the chairman of Disney Parks. Josh tomorrow experience product surge state officials during a stakeholder Webcast of allow its theme parks to resume operations. He said the closure of the parks have impacted both local and state economies. Having a new 70 kid earlier this month, a theme park restrictions could be possibly lifted soon. On Wall Street. The Dow today lost 525 points that NASDAQ was down 330. It's for 33. Let's check out those freeways now with Coco's real time Traffic Yours, Laura Kate. Well, it sounds like Laura is playing Ah, fortnight again..

Dr Robert Redfield Padres Coco president Senegal County Disney Parks Laura Kate Kevin Faulkner Senate 200,000 Cove COPD Josh Dr Arab McDonald Corbett Coco News Jack Cronin tailgate Park Disney
Few companies consider health impacts of their environmental practices

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 8 months ago

Few companies consider health impacts of their environmental practices

"Many companies carefully consider how their products affect human health and work to ensure that what they make is safe. But Debra, gallagher of Duke University's Nicholas School of the environment says companies often do not consider how their environmental impacts can mine those efforts. For example, if you're a pharmaceutical company, you make all this stuff, it's designed to make people healthier but you're using methods of distribution transportation methods that create tremendous amount of greenhouse gas emissions along with other air pollutants that can cause or worsen respiratory. Disease Gallagher Lettuce study for the UN Global. Compact about how companies policies and actions affect the environment and people's health and what they are doing to address these intertwined issues. The researchers found that there were very few companies that we interviewed that had any sort of strategy for jointly looking at environment and health impacts. They'd have not tended to look at their impacts on air, for example, greenhouse gases as having a direct effect on people. So she's encouraging more companies to focus on how their environmental impacts in turn affect human health and take steps to improve both at the same time.

Debra UN Duke University Nicholas School
Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

World Affairs Council

10:02 min | 8 months ago

Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

"States is approaching five million covert 19 infections. We've passed 160,000 deaths. This virus has paralyzed the richest, most powerful country in the world. And we know this was preventable because at the same time and parts of the developing world countries with far fewer resource is have kept infection and death rates remarkably low. Rhonda's carried out nearly 180,000 tests. Since the start of the pandemic, Erica has applied a combination of mandatory social distancing. A strict lock down and wide scale testing. It's a strategy. We can learn a lot from these apparent success stories this week. We're taking a closer look at Southeast Asia along the Mekong River. As of this recording, five countries with a combined population of 243 million people have had fewer than 5000 cases of covert 19 and 72 deaths. The water Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar doing that the rest of the world finds itself unable to do in controlling this virus. Well, I think if we knew that answer for certain there would be epidemiologists and government officials from all over the world lined up on the door, trying to figure out the secret. That's Hannah Beach. She's Southeast Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. Race wars reached her at her home in Bangkok. And she says, there isn't just one reason that these countries have been so successful. I don't think there's anyone magic bullet, but there is kind of constellation of things that countries Thailand has done, which would seem right. First of all people started wearing masks very early, even when the W H O is dissuading people from doing so. Second of all, it's not really a touchy culture when people greet each other. They do what's called a Y, which is when you put your hands together like you're like you're in a prayer like motion. Sort of all hospitals are good health care's not prohibitive. You know, one of the things that people have been looking at that that it might be some sort of Innate resistance that has been built up, particularly in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam to the current virus. One of the theories that the people in Thailand are looking at is the way in which the novel Coronavirus Cove in 19 evolved. And it started off most likely in bats on DH. Then it went from bad to some sort of intermediary mammal, and then from that mammal to humans, there is there is some speculation, looking both that kind of the genetic origins of the current virus, but also looking at something animals that were at the wet market. In Wuhan, where the outbreak seems to have proliferated that the animal that was thie kind of intermediary animal between bats and humans might have been an animal that was indigenous to this part of Southeast Asia. And that it might have been a pangolin which looks like a kind of like an artichoke cross. Listen, armadillo. If it came from this animal, there is the possibility that something a precursor even this novel, coronavirus had been sort of floating around. In the ecosystem in this region for a long time, and that could potentially explain some sort of resistance that had been built up within the local populations here. And if you look at, for instance, in in southwestern China, which is very close to this region in the number of cases of Corona virus were very, very low. Compared to a place like Wuhan. So again, you know is this is this magic bullet That explains everything We don't know. But it's certainly a factor. That is that seemed interesting. That is interesting. Will you live in the region? You cover the region as you watch these numbers and as you watch the toll in the rest of the world Are you at all suspicious? Do you think these numbers of credible all of these places whether it's Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar If the numbers were so cooked if there were bodies lined up at the morgues. If there were mass graves, we would know there is social media. People talk, people whisper, and we would we would have an idea. S O. I think that's I don't think it's fair to say that the numbers are simply made up. I'm in Thailand right now has fewer than I think 3500 cases. Vietnam, which has had an uptick has fewer than 800 cases. This. Maybe it's off by a couple 100. Maybe if given off by a couple 1000 But if there were bodies at the hospital's piling up from a mysterious respiratory disease, we would know you've spent the duration of the pandemic in Thailand. Let's go back to those first weeks. In January, Thailand confirmed what was believed to be the first confirmed case outside of China. Around the same time the U. S experienced its first case is well. What happened in those earliest weeks? Well, it was interesting that this this first case Thailand has a very good kind of geological service, and in mid January, they confirmed that the Chinese tourists coming from Wuhan, China, which is where the outbreaks believed to have started Had had flown to Bangkok for holiday, which millions of Chinese do every year Bank office in fact, one of the world's most visited cities, and it's one the most visited by Chinese. And at that point, people in Thailand became nervous because there was a mysterious disease up north in China, and there were a lot of Chinese tourists arriving and one thing that didn't happen and we can kind of look back at this. And obviously it's hard to say we know we knew that this is going to be The deadly epidemic that it's become. But in the beginning flights weren't stopped two flights captain arriving from from Wuhan from China, and yes, there were efforts to try to much temperatures of people came in, but there wasn't really that much that was done. Fast forward a few weeks people of their own accord with with government advice started wearing masks and you know there's there's no no sense in Thailand that That wearing a mask is anything but good for public health. There was no there was no no sense that that was somehow infringing upon their individual liberties you've experienced since you there with the ties. Six weeks of pretty strict national locked down. Is it getting any easier now? What's day to day? Life like in Thailand? Now, can you send your kids to school? Can you eat a restaurant? Can you go into stores? You know, I talked to friends back in the states and I feel a little bit guilty because we started our lock down in March and then in Early April. Essentially all international flights stopped. Commercial flights stopped. And so we've been sort of under lock down for months. But beginning in June, the lock down started easing. So all the restaurants all the bars, all the massage parlors, all the all the kind of normal establishments, businesses have slowly been opening up. And now my life is pretty normal. Yes, I still wear a mask everywhere. My kids wear masks everywhere. But schools high schools are back in session on their social distancing. Now they have school kids have school every other week. They wear the masks. They have plastic dividers and things. But there's commerce on DH. There's there's kinda semblance of normalcy, which again makes me feel a little bit that when I speak to people in the U. S, because that's very different from From what? What Americans experiences. You know, we've gone more than almost three months without a case of of local transmission, which is remarkable their cases. Every day, but they're all in people who are coming back from ties were coming back from overseas, whether it's the United States or Europe or the Middle East since that strictest version of the lock down ended Did the economy bounced back is AH are some of the worst effects economically of the lock down starting to ease Because people are spending money again, People are making money again. That's the real tragedy of of Thailand. Thailand did a very good job of controlling the virus and making sure that it hasn't spread. But economists absolutely devastated and the reason is devastated. It's because it's a very tourism reliant economy anywhere. Between 20 and 30% of GDP comes from from tourism, and they're no tourists coming in. So you can. If you want to come on a beach holiday to Thailand, you can't do that right now. So that means that anybody who was a tour guide, our hotel operator restaurant operator. Millions of people have been put out of work. And so the Thai government's really kind of facing a difficult decision right now, which is you can open up. But then if you open up and try to save the economy, you might be also allowing the virus to come in and assistant. It's an issue that Many economies and in many countries are dealing with. But given the success the Thailand has had and being able to control the virus, you know, it makes it that much more. On fraud to even consider bringing people back in and

Thailand Wuhan China Vietnam Southeast Asia Myanmar Laos Cambodia Bangkok Mekong River Rhonda Erica Hannah Beach Coronavirus Coronavirus Cove Fraud Thai Government Bureau Chief The New York Times
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The spread of respiratory diseases. Wash your hands. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. Avoid touching your eyes, Nose and mouth. Stay home. When you're sick, Cover your cough or sneeze, clean and disinfect frequently touched objects with household cleaning spray. For more information, visit CDC dot gov slash cove it 19. This message brought to you by the National Association of Broadcasters and this station. In depth analysis. Concise report it need to know global business news around the world and across the market's Bloomberg connects the dots for decision makers Stay on top of today's headlines follow big breakthroughs in tech understand the latest political issues see how the world's wealthiest are spending their money track What's happening in the markets and much more subscribe today. Toe Bloomberg the global standard for business reporting. Get it all in Bloomberg dot com slash subscriptions. Over 19 on days when it seems there are nothing but questions. What about the pandemic Emergency purchase program in Europe? What's the medical side of this? We try to ask good ones. How long until we have an answer on what drugs can help us fight this pandemic? How do you think this has the potential to rattle markets is that we should shut down Bloomberg Radio. The Bloomberg business happened. Bloomberg radio dot com, rather controversial question being asked Bloomberg, the world is listening. The possibility of lung cancer can be pretty scary, especially if you're one.

Coronavirus also affecting the heart

The Daily Dive

03:09 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus also affecting the heart

"Was two studies that came out recently about how covid nineteen damage the heart and how that damage can linger for some months. Even after people recover Erica tell us a little bit about that. You're exactly right. So you know very early on this was thought to be just a respiratory disease, but we've learned well, I say we what is actually the doctors and the nurses on the front lines they've learned so much about how coping nineteen Can impact the body in. So many ways you know it's been six months since that first case was diagnosed in Washington state here in the US. So now they've learned that it can also impact the body and other ways. So there were two studies that came out this week that you refer to Jimmy. They were published Tuesday in the journal Jam a cardiology. That the virus can actually linger in the heart. For months even when people feel like they, they've recovered they're not necessarily in the hospital. There are otherwise healthy adults in their thirties, forties and fifties. But what happened was doctors in Germany, they took 'em are is of these people's hearts to three months after they were diagnosed after they felt better. Seventy eight of those people, a majority still had signs on those. Mariah's at the virus had some kind of impact on their heart. Sixty of those people had signs of inflammation of their heart muscle. Now, we're talking about the heart muscle. It's more about like if you're thinking about a home, you're thinking about the screaming you think about it computer it's it's the mainframe is what sort of holds all of those heart cells together, and that's where they were seeing the information. Now, he didn't necessarily translate into any ongoing symptoms and it's still unknown what that kind of inflammation what those signs might. Mean long term clearly, we're still only six months into this pandemic, but once you have some sort of heart damage there the potential for further damage down the line. Unfortunately, we still don't know what that damages Oscar and one of the other interesting things that they found out in that study was that it didn't really matter the seriousness of the illness. Some people had been hospitalized with cove in nineteen others were able to recover at home completely, they ran the whole course of it at home. So it didn't really matter how bad you had it. A lot of people were still getting heart damage. Yeah. There was another study also from Germany they were looking at autopsies unfortunately, people who were older. They died of Covid nineteen. There were all in their eighties they found evidence of the virus in the heart tissue of twenty, four out of those thirty nine patients, and in a few in some of them, the virus was actually replicating in that her tissue so. These are all pointing ways that seemed to suggest that the virus is somehow making its way into the heart. Again what Little unsettling is that doctors still really don't know. Oh that me.

Germany JAM Covid Erica United States Jimmy Mariah Washington Oscar
Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:48 min | 9 months ago

Dogs Can Sniff Out Coronavirus Infections, German Study Shows

"Kicking off today with some potentially positive covid nineteen news from our canine friends. Dogs being trained, to sniff out. Drugs, weapons, and diseases like malaria, and even cancer is nothing new, but a new study shows that when trained dogs are able to sniff out code in Nineteen infections, quoting CNBC a new study, which was piloted by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hanover the handover medical school in the German armed. Forces found that if properly trained dogs were able to discriminate between human saliva samples infected with SARS COV to and non infected samples with a ninety four percent success rate overall, the hope is this method of detection could be one day used in public. Such, as airports, sporting events and other mass gatherings in addition to laboratory testing to help prevent future covid, nineteen outbreaks, according to researchers and quotes. The study was conducted using eight dogs from Germany's armed forces. They were trained for a week, using thousand samples of both infected and uninfected saliva, also neither of the researchers, nor the dog handlers new, which was which. Marin because black widow, who conducted the study says the dogs can probably detect folic change which occurs when a person is infected the one issue, the dogs apparently can't differentiate Kovic nineteen from other diseases like influenza yet, but the research team says that is the next step and the Hannover Medical School in Germany aren't the only ones conducting trials on trained dogs. Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and tropical medicine are also training and studying dogs to see if they could detect covid nineteen from person's body odor, which they say is altered by respiratory disease, and as for the canines welfare quoting CNN. Dogs are known to be. Be Able to contract cove nineteen, but there is no evidence that the virus can spread from dogs to humans, the team, medical detection, dogs or sure CNN that the dogs are well looked after and will be kept safe from infection, our dogs we trained on a dead virus, and then have no contact with the individuals. They're screening, but will sniff the air around. The person says representative Jimmy Butler and the dogs will only be permitted to be touched by the handler, which therefore means there will be very low risk of spread of the virus from the dog to their handler or to the people they live with and quotes. While this might not replace the uncomfortable diagnostic tests it could, certainly as the article said be a boon for public spaces where you need to test large numbers of people instantaneously and where fever scanners would only catch symptomatic. Assuming that is that the dogs could sniff out positive infections in a symptomatic. So, we'll have to see how accurately the dogs can be trained, but sounds like a promising solution so

CNN Germany Hannover Medical School University Of Veterinary Medic London School Of Hygiene Malaria Jimmy Butler Cnbc Fever Representative Marin Kovic Cancer
"respiratory disease" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:39 min | 10 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on KCRW

"1900 people are currently lying in hospital beds. All across l. A county. Because of the Corona virus. About 1/4 of them are in intensive care, hooked up to monitors receiving life, preserving medication, even oxygen. Maybe, you know one of them. Maybe you're among the family members and friends hoping Crane. They'll survive. Surviving is really only the first step after leaving that hospital bed, many seriously ill Covad, 19 patients begin a long and often difficult path to recovery. Dr. Isabel Pedraz is the director of Cedars Sinai Sze medical intensive care unit. She's been treating some of these patients there at the hospital. Doctor. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. I think most people think of Cove. It is as a bad flu wrongly. So by the way, if you get sick and you're very unlucky, you die. It's a terrible thing or Most likely what will happen is you'll get sick. You'll survive, and that's that, but but surviving Khun B. A little more complicated, right? Yes, Absolutely. And I'm actually glad that this is coming to light. Because it's something that I've been talking to patients and their families about since the beginning of this pandemic. How do you explain what comes next to patients and their families as they as they prepare to get discharged from the hospital after a long bout with Cove? It I think of critical illness, as you know, a battle that or a war that your that your body is waging against. And you know, sometimes wars have casualties. And so you're left with the casualties to deal with afterwards on DSO, you have survived thankfully. But you can be left with a lot of residual effects of fighting that battle what patients tend to develop, and we know this from studies on other critically ill patients. Is that they developed on the called post intensive care syndrome. That's basically a conglomeration of physical, mental and emotional disabilities that are brought on by the critical illness by this fight. When we think of Cove it again. People think that it's some sort of respiratory disease that we have lung issues going into it, But But this also is a vascular disease, right? I mean it attach is and attacks blood vessels, yet appears to be so in studies looking at patients. It really does seem like this virus does affect the vasculature. It predominantly in the lungs, But it really seems to affect the entire body. Early on. We were noticing the noting that patients were developing blood clots at a much higher rate. Than routine critically ill patients do. There have been reports of an increase incidents of strokes increase incidents of pulmonary emboli so definitely appears to be a vascular disease on DH. This may be part of what contributes to its severity, especially with the damage that it does to the lungs. So let's talk about obviously the severity you mentioned the intensive care syndrome. That comes from, you know, being in the I C U for so long and all the ramifications of that, but also that this is not your regular respiratory disease that it is indeed vascular than how do you tell Patience to deal with that when they leave. I mean, what specific problems do they experience after leaving the hospital? I think the predominant one that people are not prepared for is the physical de conditioning that can happen. You know, fighting a critical illness really takes a lot out of you. And that means that you start using up you know your energy stores, and a lot of that involves using up muscle, so really, within days of being in the intensive care unit Patients can start to, you know, dissolve muscle and become incredibly weakened. The longer your stay in the EU and the more severe your disease. The higher the likelihood it is that you will develop this muscle weakness. And this Khun B. Things as mundane as getting dressed in the morning will result in you know, will be very difficult for patients being able Tio shower being able to feed oneself being able to swallow all these things can be affected. This can often take a year or more or sometimes years to recover fully. If it all some patients are left with some permanent muscular deficits because of this In addition to that, and I think more disturbing to a lot of patients is that they can develop what we call cognitive deficits. So this is problems with thinking so disorganized thinking problems with mental processing speed. Think of things like they'll have difficulty driving. They'll have difficulty Going shopping, cooking for themselves being able to manage medications being able to manage their finances and especially things that they were doing in there. Work can be very difficult to do because of this cognitive impairment that they're left with. And the other thing that I warned them about is that a significant portion of them will develop PTSD. We don't think of being in an I C U As being something that can give you PTSD. But in studies looking at critically ill patients, the incidents of PTSD is on par with that with combat veterans, which I always found to be remarkable for sure. We're worried about this with Cove in 19 patients, because in addition to that this this virus may also affect the brain in ways that we don't yet understand. On DH so that that may lead both toe worsening cognition as well as worsening PTSD and anxiety and depression. It's crazy, because something some people, it doesn't affect it. All right. Some people are asymptomatic. They carry it. It moves on right. Some people get it and they're sick for for a week or they have a fever for 10 days, and then it subsides and they move on. But for for a tiny percentage of people They get the serious on this. They're in the I C u there, you know, hooked up to oxygen, or maybe even intubated. Or they die, And I wonder, because that's out there because people see it as well. It's just another thing that I'm going to get sick from. I'm really not that worried about it for I mean, this is something unlike anything that we've seen in a long, long time. Yes, I often wish I could walk people through the intensive care unit and show them what can really happen to people. Andi think one of the fascinating things about this. Virus is the different effects it can have on different people and will still well, we're still learning about why that is. We think that there's there's some risk factors that are coming out. As faras who was going to be who are the ones that risk for developing the severe disease So certain chronic conditions diabetes, for example, coronary disease and hypertension, you know things like excess weight. All those things appear to put a person at an increased risk of severe Covad disease. So what do you say to people than you know, as they go about their days, you know, be careful. Wear a mask. Don't get close to anybody and stay away from public gatherings. Things like that. I mean, how do you tell people took to cope? When you're dealing with this kind of a disease. Well, I think understanding that it is re allow and that if they themselves may not get sick, they could potentially Get other sick and really leave them with a lifetime. Of disability. The fact is, it doesn't just affect the patient. It affects their family and their caregiver, often more than the patient because They are having too often give of jobs. There's always financial stress. There's a higher risk of depression and caregivers, So I mean, it's really the effects are long lasting and Can affect many people beyond that one person that got sick Which is why I have such a hard time understanding the opposition to it's just wearing a mask seems like a relatively small price to pay to protect others or even yourself from a really a lifetime of problems and disability and impairment. Dr Isabel Piedras of the medical director of Cedars Sinai Intensive Care unit. Thank you so much for sharing your experience with us. Okay?.

Cove critical illness Covad PTSD Khun B. Cedars Sinai Intensive Care muscle weakness Crane EU Cedars Sinai Sze Dr. Isabel Pedraz Dr Isabel Piedras flu diabetes asymptomatic director fever Andi
Teyana Parties Despite Lockdown

Nightly Pop

01:51 min | 10 months ago

Teyana Parties Despite Lockdown

"The. Lockdown is over or at least apparently, it is for a lot of famous people for example, Cardi B. and offset just hit up Tiana. Taylor's packed album release party, which by the way offered, has met suits upon arrival, but not much social distancing. Going on here one of your guys. This thoughts on this not a lot of mass happening. I think less than half of the party had masks on, but never had. Done so in the invite to the to the event. It says like we will provide mass and has met suits look I love Yana think you know the album is going to be amazing, but I do feel like this party was kind of irresponsible especially. She just announced that she's pregnant. And there were kids there. It just seems like so many people in one place. And the lockdown isn't lifted yet. It just seems a little irresponsible to me. Yeah! I also think that if you wearing the has met suit half open so that we could see your cleavage or sculpted chess is like riding a bicycle holding your helmet under your arm. It's just it does nothing. Cardiac. Odell Beckham was there were a ton of people there and I did it like people are itching to get outside. There have been some things that have been lifted, so you wanted to get out there and feel normal again and I'm I'm sure that she's so proud of this album, but I think like you know when you're newly pregnant and being around all of these people I just don't understand the logic with this lean awake. was there like every Winnie Harlow like? I'm so confused on this money. Make you a new. The album is called the album which is short for the album that gave everybody respiratory disease, so make sure. Chance congratulations on download the album, but I'm not going to parties like house parties. That's real aggressive. A great guys pay attention

Taylor Cardi B. Yana Odell Beckham Winnie Harlow
Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

Cyber Talk Radio

03:16 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus May Be a Blood Vessel Disease, Which Explains Everything

"Story the corona virus pandemic is still with us and we'll cover it nineteen was initially thought to be a respiratory disease many of the symptoms have another thing in common poor blood circulation and blood vessel damage forty percent of deaths from corona virus related to cardiovascular complications for more on how this disease is starting to look like a vascular infection instead of a purely respiratory one we'll speak to Dana Smith senior writer at elemental I mean it's a really bizarre infection and I want to be clear you know it's definitely still in fact in the long people do still have pneumonia like we initially thought they did but like you said there's a lot of really bizarre other symptoms that have emerged things like strokes and blood clots a lot of cardiovascular complications that you don't typically see with a normal respiratory disease fell if I merge and I laugh mother Jill that it could be that the virus is not only affecting fell in the longer the respiratory tract but also infecting blood vessel cells and that's really unique not many buyers to do that and we don't think there's any other respiratory viruses apparently know that did it all felt felt the original hardwired influenza viruses don't infected blood vessel cells so it's really unique for Kobe to the novel coronavirus in particular and it could explain a lot of these really strange and really deadly complications that we're seeing so let's talk a little bit about how it progresses through the body sars Kobe to go through the body and connects to these AC E. two receptors that are usually in the nose and throat and from there what happens it can start destroying some lung tissue and it can break open some blood vessels and then it started catching to all these other cells that have to do with the blood vessels are called endothelial cells and and then it creates this immune response and then everything starts going haywire but it seems that all these other side effects seem to be kind of coming from the blood vessel problems we know that it could be to get them out of Iraq have to latch on to these these two receptors and there a few weeks after the all through your nose in your respiratory tract in your long thank you all for your body there the company and have been there some even in the brain and they're also on the bloodbath well we think that just like we've always thought about the virus gets into the body through the nose and throat which is why you still need to wash your hands don't touch your face the boy being around people who are coughing all the standard recommendations are critical it's still the same with this new development but we still get infected through the respiratory tract and then the virus travels down into the long wait is still causing damage and and ammonia but then the unique part is the final step where it does actually get into the blood vessel felt still activating on the H. two receptors on the bloodbath without editor there it can travel everywhere in the body and for that but you start being these really bizarre things that would like to call the toes that people are talking about that could be a problem with circulation all the way to you're good at your fingers and toes it's why you start being of the blood clot it's why risk being potentially damaging the intestines and the liver and the kidneys really furious diseases because a lot of information and can cause organ has shut down to the part of the body's overactive immune response which is what we thought was happening with Kobe nineteen to begin with and that still could be the case but the evidence is mounting that there's this kind of other route that the virus is using two is fast and caused damages other organs that

Dr. Deborah Birx on effectiveness of social distancing measures in the US

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

04:03 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Deborah Birx on effectiveness of social distancing measures in the US

"Governors are working to get back to some semblance of normal but key questions remain one. Alaska mayor has captured the dilemma. So many are facing my worst nightmare is with. We have to go if I go from phase three four back down the phase one. How do you do that already? Let everybody out. How do you CA? Catch him and put them back in for more on this. White House Corona Virus Response Coordinator. Dr Deborah burks joins us now. Good Morning Dr Burks. We now have. All fifty states gradually opening up but Saturday. North Carolina reported the highest one day number of Cova cases with one thousand one hundred seven they call it a notable and concerning increase Arkansas. Also reporting a second wave in Minnesota is reaching capacity in its. Icu should these states now. Scaled-back on relaxing the rules given these statistics. I think it's really important and thank you for the question to really understand what's driving those outbreaks and we've been working with every county and state and local officials both through the CDC and through the governor's through the governor's calls to really encourage proactive testing. So some of this is increased testing in areas where we know are the highest risk whether it's nursing homes whether it's areas where people work and sleep and stay together transport together and really getting proactive testing out there to find cases before there's community spread. I think you know from the Arkansas case. A lot of that was associated by a social gathering. And that's why we really made it clear that during this reopening social gatherings should not be more than ten people even if they're outside because you still need to maintain that social distancing but but exactly as you said Freddie that people can go out to beaches. This weekend is as long as they stayed distance. But when you look at images of these large crowds at beaches on Saturday at outdoor restaurants water parks not keeping social distance. Does this still make you confident that reopening beaches and parks was the right call? I think it's our job as public health officials every day to be informing the public that what puts them at risk. And we've made it clear that there's a symptomatic spread and that means that people are spreading the virus unknowingly and this is unusual in the case of respiratory diseases in many cases. So you don't know who's infected and so we really want to be clear all the time. Social distancing is absolutely critical. And if you can't social distance and you're outside you must wear a mask. These are items that are really critical to protect individuals. We've learned a lot about this virus but we now need to translate that learning into real change behavior that stays with us so we can continue to drive down the number of cases but I guess that's my point you're not seeing it across the country. You're not seeing those speeches and I think that's our job to continue to communicate and I think we have to communicate through different venues making sure that our generation sees our millennials can help us get that message out there of how to be together socially yet distant and I think there is a way to do that. Americans are amazingly innovative. And I think we really just need to have better. Continuous communication on how important that is and then highlighting these issues that. Come up like in Arkansas with this pool party. This is why it's really important that you maintain those distances and again to speak to those who the vulnerabilities Komar both in phase one and phase two of openings. We had asked you to continue to shelter in place because we know that those co morbidity put you out of greater risk for more significant disease and so those two pieces need to continue to happen where people who have commodities are continuing to shelter while those who don't are going out but for maintaining social distances. So they're not spreading to others

Arkansas Dr Deborah Burks Dr Burks Alaska Coordinator North Carolina ICU Cova CDC Freddie Minnesota
"respiratory disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:33 min | 11 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Respiratory diseases that I will use other you are along this is for a lot of these with the order or high level Asian including having this it's not it's not you are clear to anyone paying attention those really hello this is the eighth this is we'll be here for Texans you are acting on a no I what are ladies I'm higher he.

Coronavirus antibody testing, explained

Science Magazine Podcast

10:43 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus antibody testing, explained

"Antibodies. What exactly are these? And how are they different from things and people may have heard of like convalescent plasma? Yes so convalescent. Plasma is the idea that you had the disease he recovered. And you can pull the plasma out of someone that has a commissioner of antibodies. And then give that to someone else. the monoclonal idea is select the best antibodies out of that commission. Or you can make those antibodies in mice or you can make them synthetically. Monoclonal means one clone one thing. We're going to just make a bunch of it and give it to people. People typically just an antibody is a thing. Well you know more so than I scream. Store has ice cream you know there are lots of flavors. Antibodies and and some are far more effective than others and some can even cause harm. You have to be careful right and this is not like a vaccine. Where you're you're actually injecting a person with a piece of a virus or the virus killed and then the body is producing antibodies. Right so whatta vaccines doing. Is it's artificially teaching your immune system how to make an immune response including antibodies. With a vaccine you get the vaccine. Your body then knows how to make the antibodies and other immune warriors with the monoclonal antibody treatment. You have to keep getting it. You can use it either as a preventive like a vaccine or as a treatment. If you're going to use it as either you have to keep getting it because it wears off right. How do you administer monoclonal? Antibodies to a person for treatment. You have to do it. Iv IV DRIP for preventive. Where you would get it before you got the disease you can do it. As an intramuscular injection has been used to treat people for other infections or other disorders. There's a huge industry of monoclonal. Antibodies for cancer and for Autoimmune Diseases. But there are very few monoclonal antibodies that have made it to market for infectious diseases. The rarely used to of Mer for anthrax for example. Which just isn't a big problem. Right and another one that's on the market is for HIV infected. Who FAIL ALL DRUGS? And then there's one other on the market for respiratory virus for a certain subset of infants but that's it so this is something that's been done and that people have taken but it's not why lease for infection at this point not yet but we're right. On the precipice of an explosion of monoclonal antibodies for infectious diseases. Several have moved very far in clinical trials and we just had this great success story in the Democratic Republic of the Congo with Ebola where everything failed all these drug treatments failed. Convalescent plasma failed but monoclonal. Antibodies two different monoclonal antibody. Preparations worked. Well let's talk about how this is going to be applied to corona virus. Actually before that we should take a little detour to neutralizing antibodies. These seem to be the goal of lot of the research. That's going on. Can you talk a little bit about those? Yeah they're the superstars of antibodies. Basically what neutralizing? Antibodies do is when they latch onto the virus they prevent that virus from infecting a cell. In this case the virus that causes Kovic nineteen has a protein on its surface called spike. And you have a region of spike at the tip that is really and needed for the virus to get into a cell because it binds to a receptor on the cell surface that small and that small region of spike has to hit the receptor just so so the neutralizing antibodies by-in-large target that small region of Spike. You know basically. It's like taking a key. That's heading for a walk and putting chewing gum all over it. So he mentioned what an antibody that is not neutralizing monoclonal antibody. That's not neutralizing would do to prevent infection. Antibodies combined all over spike. They can also bind to the human cell when they bind to the human cell they can tell the immune system to turn on a separate arm of the immune system that brings out T. CELLS. We have a mop-up system of t-cells that can identify infected cells and clear them. And you really want these two things working in concert with each other. There are lot of approaches that you investigated in your story. Lots of researchers going down different has to try to get this treatment working. What are some of the things that they're trying to optimize about the antibodies? There are about fifty. Different efforts underway to make monoclonal start with the simplest thing. Find Somebody who's recovered and then try to pull neutralizing antibodies out of them. And then you can actually optimize their neutralizing antibodies. You can you can mess with that stock of the antibody to give it a longer half life so it lasts longer in the body. Another thing you can do. You can take the spike protein and injected into mice that have human b cells in them and they will produce antibodies. That you can then fish into the pool you've made and find the best ones that are neutralizing whom you can then modify those by making their half-life longer. Lots of fishing going on right lots of fishing going on you can also create a library of antibodies with a completely synthetic system. These are not naturally made an animal. You can then stick your fishing pole in there. I mean you. Basically stick bait into their like spike protein or just the region of the spike protein that the neutralizing antibodies attached to. That's Your Bait. That's your worm. And then the antibody jumps on that you can have two at about that. Both find the spike protein but different parts. See you kind of have the backup. In the case of one of the Abullah monoclonal antibody treatments in Congo. That worked that has three in the cocktail. There's no real limit to how many antibodies you can have. But there is a limit because of cost and manufacturing rights. There's there's one other limit. That's interesting Sarah. That's I mentioned. The spike protein has a small region on it that is where the neutralizing antibody wants to attach. That small region can only handle probably two different. Antibodies don't overlap with each other and as you mentioned there are what fifty different teams chasing this but now there's an organizing force out there. This is a consortium started near near you. Yes so the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has funded Erica Omen Sapphire here in San Diego to try and sort through all the different. Antibodies being made in help prioritize triage with one's look best. These consortium ideas make a lot of sense in practicality. They're often hard to run because not everyone's cooperative. I'M OPTIMISTIC BECAUSE COVA. Nineteen has led to more cooperation than I personally have ever seen in the scientific community that you know these are companies. That are competitive. But they're all pledging to work together so we'll see a lot of what we talked about so far as a mechanism so we know where it should bind. We know how to improve the life span of these antibodies. What about translating these ideas these experiments into the clinic? How optimistic are you? And researchers about this working in people so antiviral drugs are a big ask when it comes to respiratory diseases. We don't have a lot of them that were in fact for viral diseases in general. It's it's tough to make drugs monoclonal. Antibodies hold great promise. We know the structure of spike protein. And how it attached to human cells. We know how to make monoclonal much better than we ever have. Because the technology has improved greatly through and autoimmune diseases and we have some hints from convalescent plasma. That can work if used early enough so I think there's high hope that these monoclonal. Antibodies will prove their worth and the Ebola experience where everything failed other than the monoclonal adds to the enthusiasm I'm GonNa keep picking at this a little bit longer so you mentioned that. Ebola had three monoclonal treatment but that people are aiming more for two in treating corona virus because these are expensive. They're not necessarily easy. To produce is going to be a problem if this does prove to be a really good treatment. Yes or no of first of all in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A second MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY. That worked was a single monoclonal antibody. Okay yeah so it's not necessarily better to have a cocktail It might be better to things like resistance that could build but both of those work the triple Combo and the single against Ebola. Are THEY EXPENSIVE. They have been in the past but the cost has dropped. I've been told tenfold in the past ten years. Just as manufacturing has improved. We also are seeing a rush internationally to provide support for treatments and preventive for Cove. In nineteen and my hunch. Is that if something does work. A lot of money will pour out of wealthy countries. Will there be a problem. Getting these out equitably to poor people and they're also hard to deliver yes inevitably inevitably. It will be a problem and there's also the risk of rich people getting it. I right so I think these issues are very real the bill and Melinda Gates. Foundation's consortium is trying to address this upfront. But these are always sticky. Sarah you know back historically if we look back at what happened with pandemic flu vaccine. They're the rich countries of the world. So will will donate ten percent of our vaccines to the poorer countries. That's not the real solution to the problem. You talk about a race with vaccine so if a vaccine comes to clinics for the antibodies do. Is there any call for them? At that point so the antibodies can be used both as a preventative and as a treatment in theory. Antibodies are going to enter the clinic in June. They probably will have an easier time proving whether they work and are safe than a vaccine so in all likelihood if antibodies are effective they will prove themselves. I necessarily who knows? But that's how it looks to me today and on May first. That's how it looked. Thank you for putting the date in there. Yeah Yeah 'cause you know this is where we're living in corona virus. Dan Our everything is so accelerated. Who knows you know weird? Things happen every day. Now Yeah and it could be that we never have a vaccine

Congo Ebola Commissioner Flu Vaccine Melinda Gates Corona Melinda Gates Foundation Kovic DAN Cova Foundation Sarah San Diego
COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

Outcomes Rocket

08:15 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Question Answer Session with Dr. Amy Baxter

"So let's chat cove in nineteen. You know what what? What are some of the myths out there that you want to help us bus than you know? Guide us through that. Sure well I think the scariest myth was one. That was introduced to me by my bank teller. I put on a mask. She had on a mass. And we've known each other for years and she said confidentially. Is this really a thing? Because I've got a friend in Brooklyn says he drives by the hospitals in no one's there. Is this really happening? So the biggest myth is that coveted is not a serious disease that it's the same as flu. A study. This week showed that there actually are twenty one times more fatalities from Kobe in New York were from flu so the biggest Smith is is this going way and is is really a thing and the answer is no and yet Yeah no I. I definitely appreciate that. And it's real you know and a lot of us in the healthcare space Definitely feel it but there might be that out and so as we as we think about it. You know What what are some of the questions year getting and seeing that that you feel? The listeners could benefit from knowing around the around this virus. Sure I think that the interesting things are how this virus is different from other viruses and some of those attributes we could leverage for treatments and for care and some of them may get really scary because we don't have One of the papers I read yesterday said this virus is unlike any other and I think it's true. This pathogen is doing things that other viruses haven't so first of all the biggest difference is in infectivity by age. Usually we have what we call A. You're a where the very young ages we have a lot of infections in morbidity which means bad things happening and at the old ages we have a lot of corporate entity mortality. And we don't see that this one is very much a a along J. It's very very low. At young ages goes way at the top other than it. Strange about. This is how long it takes to become infected and how precipitous drop is when people have a problem so. I think that you probably know that. From the time of infection until you show symptoms can be five to seven days so that incubation is very long the scary part is that forty four percent of infections come during that a symptomatic face. So it's very easy to spread without knowing you have it. Which makes it harder to track. Hard to trace and hard to know who detest. Yeah it's It's different and and so how about the ideas of like where it came from and and you know why any thoughts around that sure well. It turns out that bats are natural reservoirs of grunted irises. So for example a Bola was initially in a bat in a cave. That a young boy outside the incident town was playing with. And that's where the virus team from as habitats change as the climate changes. Bats go out of their normal territories and they happen to have grown viruses as a very common infection. It doesn't kill them so it can be transmitted directly to humans now. The certainly the time that this virus started wasn't Wuhan an was from a back but it looking at the strains and the genetic typing of it it seems to be mutating fairly slowly and it makes it very easy to see when it started where it came from so the wet market in China is still the most likely it came from but no matter what. This is. The kind of virus that comes from that directly to humans. I'd heard that and I wasn't sure if it was true or not. I'm like is it. Is it really from Batson mean and then I also hear people saying it came from a lab somewhere? It's a chicken egg thing or a Atlantic yet. There was a there is a lab in Wuhan because of the risk of corona viruses. It had been studying. Bats heavily said SARS and Moore's so both stars and moons are Corona viruses and there had been increased studying bats in that lab. But it's because they're dangerous and because there are risks not because they're trying to create run irises or create infections. It's the fact that somebody was looking at it in researching yet because it was dangerous not that it became dangerous because someone was researching fascinating fascinating. I didn't know that connection. Thank you for that. So as we as we explore this J shaped curve. You know. I'm curious right. I mean I've got a three year old and I've got you know aging parents will tell me more about that and and particular things that you'd recommend for safety and and You know just things that we need to keep on our mind share it. Will I have a couple of theories about why the J shaped curve is typically the U shape curve has to do with mutagenicity so how well your immune system protects you and young? People don't have very weldon alter union systems so they tend to be more vulnerable to respiratory diseases and older people also have decreased immune systems so the the very heavy incidents on people who are over sixty five which seems to be where the cutoff is to have a dramatic increase in risk. That probably isn't due to decreased. Immunity one of the theories is that due to increased immunity. That there were the two grown viruses virus alpha and Beta cuddling named that were circulating in the late fifties and identified sixties. And so it may be that those people were alive in the fifties and sixties before it. Kinda petered out has some immunity that was developed that point which causes an excessive immune response in older patients. Now the other possibilities are this. Virus doesn't seem to enter the body and then get into the bloodstream and spread everywhere. It seems more like this virus comes into the body and marches a bit at a time. Almost as if the the troops come in and they set vacations and it's like World War Two and so the battalion's multiply and spread on a time. So with that being the case the interesting thing is that paper nature last week determined that tissues that this viruses attaching to before the lipid fatty layer of the virus. Fuses with the cell. Can the news in the nose? There's something called an ace two receptor. That is where the little spiky protein hops onto and holds on and their ace two receptors. All over the body but the ones that were interested in the nose and children don't have big noses they also don't have sinuses. You don't get a false at sinuses teenager interesting so because of that. Maybe that's why they they're less less at risk to to get this. Yeah absolutely if what we're talking about is something called viral load which is literally hell many virus particles. You have That is going to be difficult to accumulate in a small child. One of the interesting things I found out was that the nasal cavity size is dramatically. Increased over the age of seventy and it's Moammar nails. Oh is that right. Yeah certainly we've seen that males can be more at risk of catalyses more at risk of catching the virus than females. The ratio is about five to three some studies on about sixty percent of males. Were the ones who are affected by an only forty percent cements

Wuhan FLU Sars Kobe Brooklyn Batson China Smith New York Moore
The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

Science Friction

09:22 min | 1 year ago

The astrophysicist and immunologist who've dropped everything for COVID19 - Science Interrupted Part 2

"So most of what I did was a combination of data software and statistics. This is astrophysicist. Dr Sam Hinton from the University of Queensland in January Hey submitted his PhD so I worked on Supernova cosmology and that's essentially taking exploding stars somewhere in the universe and using that to figure out how far away they and once you figure out how far away something is and how bright it is you can try and map out the history of the universe. Obviously things that are further away are further back in time because it takes time to get to us so the idea was if we can map out the last fourteen billion years of the universe ended expansion that hopefully we can try and characterize the nature of dark energy and dark Meta. That's my main eight right and obviously that's a problem. That's all about modeling and Statistics. So I created Asian hierarchical models and other sorts of models try and encapsulate all the nitty gritty details. That happened in the universe. In some statistically robust way so just a little way project just a tiny one that managed to consume years of my life. And whether that's because I just wasn't smart enough or whether it turns out that the Hamid actually really is complicated. Well I have opinions on both if only I was smarter. And if only the universe was simpler okay so taking on the entire history of the entire universe right there. So how is this? Astrophysicist and software engineer now suddenly found himself working on another big but totally different problem. The cove nineteen pandemic today on the show too young scientists who have had to rapidly retrofit and translate talents in an unprecedented moment in history. Sam Foreign doesn't shy away from a challenge. If he's name sounds familiar to you. That means you might be a fan of this stamp. Tonight's GonNa play out that I wanted to crunch the numbers for this other man to do it. There's computer I don't know if he's going to go hunt. I didn't even know. Cross was going to play his idol. New Sam was a popular contestant in the twenty eighth season of survivor Australia but bravado aside what use is an astrophysicist in fighting a global pandemic after all as far as we know now corona virus has made it into space yet and that's a relief as poor people on the International Space Station. There's no ICU. Up there what essentially happened was once I started getting serious. Everyone just put out feeling the same. We need help looking at a whole bunch of these tasks and this happened at Uku. Enriches where I work and through the grapevine. People said. We're looking for someone with all these skills and then Sam supervisor happens to be the acclaimed dark energy astrophysicist and TV presenter Professor Tamra Davis She's also passionate about astrophysics people using their research knowledge and skills in non astrophysics domains. So Tamra put Sam's name Ford The first thing was surely there are people that are better suited than me and salmon just accepted a job offer in the US at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. That's a big deal. But when Sam was told more he went back to Tamra and said. Are you all right if I just take months off from my actual normal astrophysics project to work on? This and her response was absolutely fine. Don't worry about it. We'll figure something out. Get on the project and do what you can. It was there was no chance that I was telling this down. It was a way to make a real contribution and astrophysics You know we don't make significant contributions every day to society we may every now and then invent something like the digital camera and was like yes. This is amazing but covet is a right here right now. One hundred percent immediate problem so there was absolutely no hesitation jumping into it so just like that. In a matter of moments Sam's life has suddenly turned upside down. Oh yeah if I thought I had long hours before. There's nothing like the current hours that we have to deal with. Sam is now the lead daughter analyst on a really crucial international project rolling out in real time in intensive care units across the world during this pandemic. And if you've seen the footage coming out of those units you'll know that this is a hellish frontier and what we need damage. Dice seeing young patients patients people of all age ranges. Who are just incredibly sick. And you can even hear now as. I'm walking through patient rooms in the hallway. It just your oxygen the sound of the pulse ox this ventilator later. Dan has joined. What's called ECO car? The global project headed up by trail-blazing intensive care specialist professor John Fraser from Prince. Charles Hospital in Brisbane AIKMAN COD is a mighty Akron Rod. It stands for Extra Corp. membrane oxygenation for twenty nine thousand nine novel Corona Virus Acute Respiratory Disease a card so when your heart and lungs can't do the job of oxygenating your blood and it. Komo machine allows that to happen outside. If you body. We want to know essentially. How can we best help as many people as possible? So we have very finite resources with this outbreak. We don't have an infinite amount of nurses doctors and ventilation equipment that we can just put everyone on so we need to know. Hey if if patient x comes through the door and they look like this but is the best sort of ventilation can give them if we just give them a mosque. Are they going to be fine or is this a patient that needs something more severe because a nurse can generally do around ten c-pap mosques so the very easy ventilation but if they have to actually mechanically ventilate someone help out the longest mechanically and it's essentially one nurse per patient and we don't have that many nurses when we have so many patients coming in so we really want to be able to say when someone walks in the door that they're probably going to need this outcome will be x? Y. Depend however retreat them. So when someone comes in we take the age we take their weight and then we need to know what other things do have do. They have high blood pressure Do they have diabetes? Are they smoke I? What is the condition of their lungs? There's so many things so many different data points that you can gather in the medical world ten thousand different questions that you could ask but what we have in our data time series so for two weeks after people. Get to the ICU. How are they red blood cells evolving? How of their platelet counts doing what we want to do is compare their outcomes and Dan data with other people other healthy people or people that have different afflictions so that we can say this is the thing that's unique about Karina buyers. This is one of the predict is here. That's different from anything else. And it's very hard to get that sort of time. Series data doctors and nurses are working around the clock to keep people alive. They're exhausted so around the world. Medical students are stepping up and being recruited to help collect the data every day. You need to be updating the data. And that's why we need for example medical students to come in because it is such a large burden if anyone is trying to also treat patients on top of that. We have around five hundred different variables from the different patients. And about a hundred of those we have information hopefully essentially every day that they're in ICU. So that we can see how they evolve over time. I can't say too much mall because whilst I have a huge list of variables in front of me things like pro calcitonin. I don't know how they used in a medical context all that I can do generate the reports and then worked with the clinicians in real time to say. What do you want to see? What would you expect to see? And how can I best present these models and this information to you so that you can draw conclusions from it? The urgency of the situation means. This is being taken very seriously. Clinicians are working in the dark right now with this new virus so they'll benefit from a Biegel clearer picture of what's happening for patients around the world. Oh Yeah it's absolutely unbelievable. I've never been involved in a project this lodge and especially in the current predicament. All the usual blockades and the bureaucratic slowdowns that you encounter have just been removed. So we have fifty countries now from Estonia to Kuwait to the United States is coming online the UK Italy Spain strategies coming online now two tons of countries and then each country also has all the hospitals in it. So we've got around two hundred fifty hospitals and that number grows every day.

Dr Sam Hinton ICU Professor Tamra Davis Sam Foreign DAN University Of Queensland United States Hamid UKU Software Engineer Cross Biegel Extra Corp. Diabetes Brisbane
"respiratory disease" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The spread of respiratory diseases visit CDC dot gov slash co the dash nineteen brought to you by the national association of broadcasters and WGN radio the corona virus emergency continues to evolve we want to ensure the safety of the public and state employees as we are all avoiding groups and following social distancing recommendations to prevent the spread of cove in nineteen we encourage the public to access DHS services remotely using a phone or a computer instead of visiting a local DHS office if you receive snap Medicaid or tennis or think you may be eligible for government nutrition or medical benefits please call one eight three three to find help or visit Abe dot Illinois dot gov please keep yourself safe please stay at home call one eight three three to find help or visit Abe dot Illinois dot gov to secure the benefits you need this message is brought to you by the Illinois department of Human Services the information station for the great Midwest is it seven twenty on your radio and all smart devices by play WGN Chicago always local always here for you star media group station it's thirty four degrees at six o'clock good morning everyone I'm Steve percentage that news is sponsored by joint relief institute governor Pritzker says people need to be thinking.

"respiratory disease" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Now to sleep through the night and not worry when it's just my children are here with the securities the original security suite is at our show room or schedule your free in home demonstration that security three masters dot com that security three masters dot com ten talking with bill floor group twenty five thousand dollars for an injury claim might sound good but what if another lawyer would recover two hundred fifty thousand dollars many people get ripped off by the insurance company lowball by their own lawyers we fight to get you every single dollar we recovered five ten even thirty five times more than the church companies first offer and in the last twenty six years we recovered over seven hundred fifty million dollars for Arizona clients numbers don't lie demand builds log group six oh two two two two twenty two twenty two respiratory diseases wash your hands avoid close contact with people who are sick avoid touching your eyes nose and mouth stay home when you are sick cover your cough or sneeze clean and disinfect frequently touched objects with household cleaning spray for more information visit CDC dot gov slash covert nineteen this message brought to you by the national association of broadcasters and the station listen on the radio dot com app and desktop live anytime anywhere go to your apps store for radio dot com slash download and listen to KCA are and over three hundred other stations Chad Benson here with doctor bag I'm the CEO of novocure stock a lot of people's passions in life get derailed by pain low back pain sciatica leg pain they're probably the worst right you're right and.

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"A disorder of respiratory disease obviously that sort of makes more sense but then you look at diabetes hypertension the washer does make people more likely to contract it and also to get severely ill from that so that remains to be figured out again sciences are definitely still on going but what might be happening is that although people are not dying from cold at nineteen it's some help making their underlying conditions worse and the reason I suggest that is that researchers in China found that in a number of cases the immediate cause of death was not mamanya which is what is causing most of the code that nineteen tax but instead of heart disease stroke high blood levels of potassium which reflects a kidney failure so somehow this virus might in already sick people C. exacerbating existing disease turn vaguely senior science writer at stat news thank you very much for joining us thank you Oscar and with all these new cases on the rise public transit agencies across the U. S. are ramping up their responses the big secret weapon is bleach and other disinfectants in New York alone there are four thousand three hundred and seventy three buses and six thousand four hundred and eighteen train cars these will be disinfected every seventy two hours the risk is still low over getting it on public transit but it all depends on how crowded it is and how long you ride for more on this we spoke to Andrew Hawkins he's a senior reporter at the verge of the cleaning there's a lot of bleach and even brought out from supply closets across the country and be collected by the transit agency they use in the whole place the static that should to make sure that both the transportation our subways or buses are commuter trains are being cleaned and a more frequent pace than they typically are so for instance the MTA says that they're going to be clean every single subway and bus and commuter train that they have every seventy two hours that could change what's more cases emerge right now they're sort of sticking to the schedule other transit agencies like bart in San Francisco visited February between efforts they need I haven't noticed any sort of dip in ridership as of yet but that could change also when we started thinking in public life yeah I think cleaning is sort of like the number one thing that these agencies are doing to respond as well as providing a lot of protective gear and supplies to the workers the cleaning workers the train and conductors of the bus drivers were really kind of on the front lines of the thing as it continues to spread.

China writer Oscar New York Andrew Hawkins MTA bart San Francisco heart disease
"respiratory disease" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Immunization and respiratory disease is listening information and perspective Twin Cities news talk dot com the coast insider club is a must have feature for all coast to coast AM was supposed to close A. M. dot com to sign up today you'll sleep like a baby knowing you'll never miss your favorite guests or topics ever again remember a one year subscription comes out to only fifteen cents a day sign up today close to close to a dot com the to talk to Ian Punnett call the wildcard line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk tool free from east of the Rockies call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five.

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is an exceptional mortality among infectious diseases and especially among respiratory disease this is high up the thinking what stops the sauce virus is so lethal because it uses a receptor molecule ace to so a C. E. minus two that's the abbreviation for the receptor it's a molecule that across deep in the long and because the virus has to go deep into to the long to start replicating it will immediately affect the long tissue where the gas exchange happens and where a lot of immune tissue recites and this will all together because the situation where high pathogenicity the way it docks own too the sales using these cut protein connections means it is eight if it's to replicate if it's to survive as a virus it goes into the most sensitive parts of the human body for example deep in the lungs exactly so the idea is and what's the ops normal respiratory viruses will also attacked the throat and the nose and replicate their which doesn't affect the human body that much her to the long and this virus has to go directly to the lan which makes it highly diesel on one hand but on the other hand because it has to go into the long and out again so it has to grow inside the long to a concentration that is then contagious it will also make it difficult for the virus to be transmitted on watch is very similar between this new version and the old version saws or on here we can only speculate we can only conclude by analogy and we now how first scientific data coming out suggesting strongly that the virus uses the same receptor site was Christine dressed in Jenny this is quite an interesting point for me so for example the twenty oh nine flu virus moved very very fast but wasn't very virulent so there's an interesting thing about in the terms of health risk about how fast as we were saying things move and actually the way that we react to them absolutely so the seasonal flu is a huge killer you probably seen the numbers it makes it makes the will on virus like a bit wimpy that's simply because of the sheer number of people the flu and fax every year and if the will hunt virus started spreading like that and and going all over the world you would see a lot of people dead this is what people are worried because even though it's it's at the moment doesn't seem to that affections we're not really sure we don't quite have the measure of this lease coronavirus walls an animal virus it was in that and at some point to came to us absolutely so viruses if you look and take the long term view when they jump into a human host they're in a completely alien environment they have no idea what's going on they have to quickly shuffle around there if there are mutations they'll be selected rapidly if you can sort of become more comfortable by becoming this mutation or that mutation it will happen it's like a crucible this alien host and it is very possible that the virus could mutate so what we're seeing now may not be what we're seeing next week having said that it doesn't seem to happen with sars or mers as far as I know it's been pretty stable so we can hope that this won't happen but we can't be sure because if a virus can find a way to change it well and that's a point that Christian dressed and made to me in mind to be with him last week and it's one which is important because it can affect the way that we approach treatment corona viruses don't generally mutates asphalt us influenza viruses do they lack the whole mechanism of mutation that we see an influenza viruses but not in corona viruses which is connected to the ability to shuffle the segments of the viral genome in influence how well this is not possible and coronaviruses in the case of the twenty three sars virus that they do do you should come from backs into civets in from civics into humans when these transmissions from the animal kingdom come very occasionally into humans is that because the contact is very rare or is it because the virus has mutated just enough to become accessible to humans actually we should say about what humans go out in two thousand and three walks like a sample from a broader diversity of viruses it is very likely that there was no particular mutation involved but the viruses just ask the existence were already capable of infecting human cells about time humans just got the right sample and this seems to have happened again Chrissy interest in one piece of music came out early this week will sit in Australia where there's been a patient doctors there who managed to obtain virus from those patients and grow them in a lab so.

respiratory disease
"respiratory disease" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Talk an iheartradio station. I'm Mike Hamrick. The FBI is looking into an officer involved shooting that happened in Wilson early this morning. It was just before three o'clock when two officers were in their patrol car where they were approached by thirty six year old Jason Woodall report stated what all punched one of the officers through a car window the officer then got out of his patrol car. And that's when Woodall allegedly took out a hammer and charged at both officers. What are the officers fired? It would all hitting him in the shoulder. The suspect had non-life-threatening injuries. More county may be dealing with a hooping cough outbreak yesterday county officials announced that they had five areas students who had been diagnosed this is a highly contagious respiratory disease trademarked by violent coughing fits that can make breathing difficult. The affected students go to West End elementary southern pines elementary and pine crest high school. President Trump is set to deliver the annual state of the union address tonight. Night. Peter Alexander says the president will talk about border security, President Trump's expected to his demand for a border wall amid threats he'll soon declare a national emergency if congress doesn't deliver. So yet is reporting that Saudi Arabia has given American made weapons to Al Qaeda linked fighters. Mike Bauer report CNN has found that the Saudis and their coalition partners are reportedly using US arms as a way to buy loyalties of militias in Yemen, and possibly even Iran backed rebels giving military equipment to third. Parties is against the terms of Saudi Arabia's arms deals with Washington and US defense official confirmed to CNN that there's an investigation into the situation. CNN's report comes as congress is mulling whether to challenge the Trump administration support for the Saudi coalition that relies on American weapons to conduct its war. Mike Bauer reporting stay connected. Follow us on social media. Go to one zero six one FM dot com to connect. Grand.

President Trump Jason Woodall Saudi Arabia Mike Bauer officer CNN Mike Hamrick congress Saudi coalition FBI West End pine crest high school president US Wilson Yemen Peter Alexander
"respiratory disease" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Die the dive other things like hepatitis. They dive respiratory diseases or they waste way not to mention their lives ruined. Especially young kids and children who are still exposed to opioids from family members, or from people who are selling drugs to get other people have which is a huge amnesty still yet in America, so pieces Ron Ronald Ronald appreciate that very. Let's let's some of our people discussing this with us address that Kate. What do you make of what Ronald had to say about those who get get sick and get addicted as opposed to those who simply die. I mean. I think you know, death is the end result for so many people who are addicted and I completely agree. I mean, my sister was dictated for twelve years. We're talking about her now after her death, but she lived that addiction for twelve years, and she did have hepatitis C. She did, you know. I mean, I think among the many things we have to talk about his treatment. We need to talk about people keeping people safe so harm reduction meeting people where they are in their recovery process or in their use. But I completely agree. I you know, the that number is staggering fifty thousand people last year dying from opioid overdoses alone. And it doesn't include my sister's death, and it doesn't include you know, so many people who die from causes related to their use. And. It doesn't include all the people who struggle every day as a result of this obituary. My family has received an huge outpouring of letters and emails and comments on my sister's obituary from people who have daughters, and mothers and sons and brothers and uncles who are struggling every day. You know, it was just one year ago today that President Trump declared the opioid epidemic national public health emergency under that designation. No, federal funds were actually automatically directed to the crisis. But federal agencies were encouraged direct more grant money to combating the epidemic. Here's what he had to say. Our current addiction crisis in a specially the damage of opioid deaths will get worse before it gets better. But get better it will it will take many years and even decades to address this scorch in our society, but we must start in earnest now to combat national health emergency. You've been hearing this hour, and we'll.

Ron Ronald Ronald Trump America Kate President twelve years one year
"respiratory disease" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Respiratory disease produces severe coughing that can linger for up to ten weeks. I'm Mike Macklin WBZ news. The following broadcast is a commercial presentation paid for by SHP financial. No statements made during the retirement roadmap radio show constitute tax, legal or accounting advice. You should consult your own legal or tax professional in any such matters information, presented this for educational purposes. Only and does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sailor. Purchase of. Any specific securities investment or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and unless otherwise stated are not guaranteed. Be sure to I consult with a qualified financial advisor and or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed here in individual results will vary. Matthew, peck, CFP Derek Gregoire in Keith Ellison. SHP financial are licensed to offer investment advisory services through SHP wealth management LLC, an SEC registered investment advisor offices in Woburn. Westboro in Hyannis, our offices of convenience and only used for client meetings. You're tuned to SHP financials retirement roadmap show with your hosts Derek Gregoire Keith Ellison, Matthew, peck, they know that the road to a successful retirement is paved with consistent care into commitment to guide the families. They serve Matthew is a certified financial planner professional, and author of mind the gap the cracks in the American retirement system Derek's been recognized by Boston magazine is one of their top wealth advisers and together with Keith co-authored victory. Winning in health wealth and success. They've been featured in major publications like Forbes and the Wall Street Journal, but they're most at home talking to people just like you about who living out.

SHP SHP wealth management LLC Derek Gregoire Keith Ellison Matthew coughing Mike Macklin advisor solicitation peck Wall Street Journal Westboro Forbes Boston magazine SEC Hyannis Woburn ten weeks
"respiratory disease" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Acetyl aided salicylic acid to produce a CDL salicylic acid by eighteen ninety. Nine Bayer had patented the drug named it aspirin and begun selling it around the world consumption skyrocketed with aspirin, then used for controlling pain, fever, headache, arthritis, and other diseases. It was not until nineteen twenty two that respiratory disease exacerbated by aspirin was first described after an oral challenge with aspirin, a female volunteer with all the hallmarks of underlying respiratory disease had an. An asthma attack profuse Reiner area and Erta caria. The same reactions occurred after oral challenges with anti Piran, which was the only other available non-storage anti inflammatory drug end said at that time, aspirin, exacerbated respiratory disease a. e. r. d. is characterized by mucosal swelling of the sinuses and nasal membranes formation of polyps and as MMA. But unlike most patients with identical clinical features, patients with a. e. r. d. also have respiratory reactions after ingesting aspirin and other end sets these reactions typically involve the upper Airways and lower Airways, less commonly gastro intestinal symptoms and cutaneous symptoms occur, but are almost always accompanied by some degree of respiratory involvement. Symptoms may be managed with glucocorticoid antihistamines and aspirin, desensitization. A thirty nine year old man with episode, axes, pain, and era Thema of the forearm and Penn site opinion a case record of the Massachusetts General Hospital by Cristiana IS, airy and colleagues. The thirty nine year old man was admitted because of EPA stacks is and era theme of the right forearm and pan site a Pena six months earlier episodes of spontaneous prolonged EPA stacks developed two months before admission. The patient noticed spontaneous bruising of the arms and legs for days before admission pain swelling, and era Thema of the dorsal aspect of the digital right forearm developed without any preceding trauma. The same day fevers chills and nights sweats developed along with nausea and frontal headache. On examination, he appeared to be relatively well, but had anemia thrombosis, subpoena and profound, neutral. Pena imaging studies were notable for splint omega Lee and. Lymphatic apathy examination of peripheral blood smear was remarkable for Penn site opinion. This previously healthy man presented with two distinct, but related disease processes a several month history of episode axis and easy bruising and a superimposed, acute event with fever pain in the right arm and symptoms that were consistent with localized infection..

aspirin Penn site Pena Bayer easy bruising Erta caria CDL a. e. r. d. EPA asthma fever Massachusetts General Hospital nausea glucocorticoid thirty nine year six months two months
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Yeah that's talking about with the microbes violence is obviously a big threat but they say that a bigger threat are these people that these tribes lack immunities to these awful diseases that that twentieth century man has twenty first century man skis me sure it's the future living fast yeah the there's actually that favorite book of mine fourteen ninety one char seaman talks about how there's an estimated hundred million people living on in the americas in fourteen ninety one and then i think ninety percent were wiped out by smallpox thank you like within a few decades and josh didn't just happened way back then he said in the eighties the some christian missionaries made contact with the zoe tribe in brazil and pretty shortform fortyfive members of that tribe died from the flu malaria and respiratory diseases just like that and more recently in nineteen ninety six half of the maroon hooah managua maroon a who tribe i think in brazil they were contacted by illegal loggers and half of the tribe was wiped out from respiratory illnesses i think awful so it's not like to bring up one of our favorite movies again it's not like bringing orange soda to the weapon woo joe versus the volcano oh yeah it's not like that in real life i thought you were talking about the gods must be crazy now another good one though but it's not like the joe versus volcano it's not all happy go lucky they usually make contact with them and even in the case of the christian missionaries they were trying to do good i guess and ended up killing a lot of them and the brazilian government stepped in and actually kick them out the religious group and said now you gotta get out of here.

brazil malaria josh fortyfive managua ninety percent