35 Burst results for "Respiratory Disease"

"respiratory disease" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The findings support other studies that are also documenting the effects that COVID-19 may have on the body. Most recently, in several presentations at the society for neurosciences, annual meeting in November, scientists reported that the inflammation caused by COVID-19 can have lasting effects on the brain, including in children, 14 kids, ages ten to 13 who had recovered from COVID-19 infections, showed changes in the sensory motor regions of the brain on MRI up to 15 months after their infection compared to 35 children who hadn't been infected. And another study presented at the same conference adults who had even mild COVID-19 symptoms also demonstrated brain changes four months after infection. Studies are showing that getting infected more than once, an increasingly common scenario as the pandemic drags on, and variants become more transmissible, may have compounding effects. We wanted to know if you get multiple infections, do they matter? Are these infections consequential or has the immune system adapted because it has seen the infection before and developed a way of dealing with it, says Al Ali. We found that if people are infected a second or third time, those infections certainly contribute to additional health risk, even if they are vaccinated. With each infection, the body's resilient strains a bit more until with enough assaults it reaches the danger zone. Cumulatively, each infection could get you closer and closer to the edge, says Al Ali. That's why avoiding a second or a third infection is important to try to continue preserving health. Repeat infections may also raise the risk of long COVID. It's not clear yet what puts people at risk of developing symptoms that can persist long after the active infection is gone. And any encounter with SARS CoV-2 could trigger whatever process is driving long COVID. Repeated infections only increase the odds. People will say, I got infected with COVID last Christmas. And I didn't get long COVID. That's wonderful, and that person is very fortunate, says Al Ali. But just because you dodged the long COVID bullet one time, doesn't mean you will Dodge the bullet every time. Every time you get infected, you are trying your luck again. A deluge of COVID-19 reinfections could pose a problem for healthcare providers this winter. When rates of other respiratory disease, such as influenza and RSV, could also climb, health systems across the country are already reporting high numbers of urgent care and emergency department visits due to respiratory illnesses, and Al Ali's findings suggest that people experiencing multiple COVID-19 infections may add to that burden. The best way to avoid reinfection is to take familiar precautions. Get vaccinated and boosted, wear masks when in public indoor settings. And avoid gatherings if you are feeling sick. We're not calling for lockdowns or draconian measures, says Ali. We want people to be informed of the risk and take precautions to reduce their individual risk of infection. The health consequences of second and third infections are not zero, as some people think it is. Time

COVID Al Ali society for neurosciences SARS respiratory disease Dodge influenza Ali
What Is Monkeypox?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:08 min | 7 months ago

What Is Monkeypox?

"Is a deadly virus like COVID and a potentially deadly virus like monkey box Is that bad stuff It's bad right Yes Mike is that bad Let's get yes Mike says oh yeah Jim just gave one yeah Mike said oh yeah that's bad Now because this isn't the drudge report panic machine it's be clear Monkeypox is not a respiratory disease It's not nearly as infectious as COVID The luckily most people survive but it is a pretty nasty thing to get It's not the kind of thing like you're sitting there on a weekend You're like what do I see this weekend Do I go see the movie the north bend or I get monkey pilot Let's get monkeypox That's not in my list of things to do on the weekend Even though I watched an nordman let me tell you something I'm sorry but that movie sucked Oh I'm really sorry I know some people liked it but it wasn't as bad as resurrections matrix where every single human being involved should have been in prison and subjected to tribunals to never work again Fact checkers I'm kidding That's a joke fact checkers I don't actually want to try but I actually love liberty and freedom That's your Bill McCarthy Put the pen down Bill Put the pen down But I tell you monkeypox kind of sucks And I wouldn't want that

Mike Monkeypox JIM Bill Mccarthy
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

"Effect against COVID. This was a couple of weeks ago when I was talking to this person about it. But so I don't know if the science has been updated since. So bear that in mind. But yeah, no, it is super interesting. I was like, oh, that's interesting, especially since it's a respiratory disease. I thought it was weird and they were like, yeah, it's super weird because it is a respiratory disease. And we would have thought that it would have gone the other way. Like it wouldn't have provided any sort of protective effects. It because it is a respiratory disease and it affects the lungs. Because you inhale the smoke and things of that kind. So they thought that it would have been the opposite, which it actually turns out to not be, which is interesting. In a laboratory setting, in a laboratory setting, like I said, we don't yet know if this translates to humans for smoking cannabis. But apparently, smokers, too, not like it doesn't work the same with snuff or like cigars. It's with cigarette specifically. If you smoke cigarettes apparently, it also has a similar like protective effect, which I thought was interesting. And my friend made a good point that that means that they're probably putting something in the cigarettes, which probably, but whatever. If you're not gonna cigarettes anyway. What do you care? Kind of a thing. It's fun. I smoke cigarettes. It's okay. And we're not shaming here. But yeah, so that's weird. That's a weird fact that we. I thought it was interesting that we don't really know. So a bit on a lighter note, I would say, but fun interesting. I thought it was a funny and kind of an interesting thing. It's definitely going to be my excuse for why I smoke because I am protecting myself against COVID now. It flip side of that coin is that if you do end up getting it, you end up getting long COVID. And it's really bad. So that's the flip side to that coin, which is not great. But I think I'm willing to take the risk. I'm double back. It's fine. We still need to get our booster shot. We've been lagging on getting our booster shots. Has anybody else been lying on getting our boot? Honestly, the holidays got in the way, and excuses excuses. I just haven't done it yet. We just haven't got that far. Not that far down the list. We're getting there. We're getting there. So. One day, eventually. But. Yeah, so we're about people. Sorry about that. I just wanted to check and see if that construction was going to get out of the background..

respiratory disease COVID
"respiratory disease" Discussed on HORSES IN THE MORNING

HORSES IN THE MORNING

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on HORSES IN THE MORNING

"That way we don't have to insert our arm into the rectum. So, and a lot of times we can do some of those examinations actually trans abdominally. So doing the scan from through the abdomen, not actually happening to go in rectally. Oh my gosh, you put a little ultrasound on the stick. Well, she couldn't get couldn't get kindergartners to volunteer. So what are some of the biggest problems that you see with minis and how can we head those off at the pass? So one of the most dangerous conditions that can happen to miniature horses. Is them to not eat well. And if they don't eat well, they're bodies tend to want to utilize any fat stores that they have. And when they do that, they can develop a condition called hyperlipidemia, where there's a lot of triglycerides and fats in their bloodstream. And if they're not taking in their own calories, their body is going to use up the fats that they already have. But in doing that, what's left over ends up getting deposited in their liver and that can lead to hepatic lipidosis. And those two conditions can actually be fatal in miniature horses. So if anybody notices that their mini is not eating, they need to call their veterinarian right away. This condition can develop within 12 to 24 hours. And it needs to be treated very aggressively. So that, to me, is the most dangerous, the one that needs to be treated the most aggressively. And a mini can stop eating for a number of reasons. Any type of stress, any type of dental disease, obviously any regular illness, a respiratory disease, and pregnancy is also quite a stressor on miniatures. So when they get to be late term pregnancy, they're full. They don't feel like eating very well. So we need to be very careful with that..

hyperlipidemia dental disease respiratory disease
If You Don't Realize What's Good for You, You'll Be Mandated to Realize What's Good for You

The Larry Elder Show

01:09 min | 1 year ago

If You Don't Realize What's Good for You, You'll Be Mandated to Realize What's Good for You

"Biden, Doctor Fauci, on the New York City vaccine mandates. If you don't realize what's good for you, then you're going to have to be mandated to realize what's good for you. No one likes to be mandating for people to do things that they might be hesitant to do. But quite frankly, you have to when you're in the middle of what we call a historic experience of the worst pandemic of a respiratory disease in the last hundred years. I got a question. How do they know we're in the middle of it? Just a thought. We have to put the communal responsibility ahead of individual preferences. So although no one myself included likes to be told what you have to do, sometimes if you don't come to the realization that it is good for yourself for your family and for the communal good, then mandates or requirements become necessary. And note that a higher percentage of blacks have not been vaccinated compared to whites. And one of the reason for this

Doctor Fauci Biden New York City Respiratory Disease
"respiratory disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"It's here and now Unless you've lived in the southwest you may not be familiar with valley fever But here in Arizona and in parts of California the fungal respiratory disease sickens thousands of people each year It's even more common in dogs And now for the first time researchers at the university of Arizona say they found a vaccine that can prevent the illness in pets and maybe someday humans can use it too Catherine Davis young from KJ Z reports Walk into any veterinary clinic in central Arizona and ask about valley fever and you're likely to get a response like this At our clinic at probably would say anywhere from like two to 20 cases a month That's Scott Hoffman He's a longtime vet with a clinic in central Phoenix And I would probably say if you would interview other veterans they may actually give you a higher number For dogs valley fever can mean coughing weight loss even seizures The illness typically means months of suffering for the dogs and months of veterinary bills for dog owners Arizona dog owners spend about $60 million on the disease each year and Hoffman says there's really no way to avoid it The Broadway you can prevent it unfortunately is not live here in Arizona unfortunately Valley fever comes from a fungus that's found in desert soils when dogs or humans inhale airborne fungal spores their lungs and other parts of the body can be infected It can be a grueling disease and it's more common in Arizona than anywhere else but it also shows up in California and other parts of the Southwest Valley fevers considered an orphan disease because nationally it's a very small problem That's Doctor John gal giani director of the university of Arizona's valley fever center for excellence He and other.

fungal respiratory disease Arizona Catherine Davis Scott Hoffman fever university of Arizona California seizures Phoenix Hoffman Southwest Valley John gal giani university of Arizona's valley
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"And they're also elderly and they're living in a setting where they get frankly suboptimal risk factor management. So many were also hypertensive, but many of them were under treated in terms of their dead blood pressure levels. And this just reflects the level of care that is available and that is sought in these settings. I guess the key point is that we did the study in rural China because there is this huge burden of stroke in rural China. But also because it's a very changing people's salt intake is a very difficult thing to do. So in rural China, most of the solders consumed is consumed from salt that is added during food preparation at home, and therefore you can actually change a large proportion of sodium intake if you provide a salt substitute. So the reason I mentioned all that is that as you inferred, we did the study in this particular setting because it was a great opportunity to address a problem for a high virgin population, but also a great opportunity to address the scientific question that we wanted to. And we might come back and talk a bit more about that in terms of generalized opportunity later. In terms of the magnitude of the effect, when we designed the study, we projected that the salt substitute would lower systolic blood pressure by at least three millimeters systolic compared to just continuing to use regular soul. We actually thought we might get a bit more than that because we've done a prior pilot study. But we powered it conservatively on that basis. And we believe that that 30% of our three millimeter lower blood pressure would drive a 13% lower risk of stroke. And you could work that out from the observational epidemiology. So that was the underlying assumption. What we actually got was we got a 3.3 millimeter reduction in systolic blood pressure with the salt substitute and we've got a 14% reduction in the risk of stroke. So everything fitted pretty much exactly with what we expected. And we're pretty sure that the benefit in the study was driven for both stroke, major cardiovascular events and mortality, primarily by the blood pressure reduction. You'd expect to get a little bit less for major adverse cardiovascular events than the stroke because heart attacks are typically not as strongly associated with blood pressure as strokes are, and particularly not with hemorrhagic strokes, which are the predominant type of stroke in China. And again, mortality, obviously comprises some vascular debt and in this case about 60% of deaths would you do a vascular cause and therefore would be affected by blood pressure. But of course, the others would be deaths due to things like respiratory disease in cancer, which you wouldn't expect to see any protective effect against from a salt substitute, mostly there are some exceptions to that. But that's probably why you only saw a 12% reduction in mortality because you were only affecting a precaution of all of the deaths that occurred. At this point, I do want to bring up the potassium issue because this one to me is quite interesting because there are some people who often in a strange defense of sodium for some reason, say that data, not necessarily this study, but data like this is simply down to increase potassium. And then it's the effect of added potassium that explains this reduced risk of stroke, not the lower sodium intake. What is your typical response to that type of interpretation of the thing? Yeah..

China stroke stroke because heart attacks hemorrhagic strokes respiratory disease cancer
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"When a new respiratory disease cropped up in Wuhan China in 2019, it took a month for the warning to go up. It took another month for America to ban flights from China. This time around when a worrying new variant of the coronavirus was identified in South Africa, the response took just days. We take this omicron variant very serious, and we know that we are now in a race against time. We need to slow down the spread of this variant here in the UK. If you're not vaccinated, get vaccinated if you're fully vaccinated, get boosted and get the children vaccinated also. America, Britain and the European Union have banned flights from a handful of countries in Southern Africa. Japan, Israel and Morocco have shut their borders to all foreign travelers. It's no surprise that cases are already being confirmed far from where this new variant called omicron was first spotted, but beyond this initial period of extreme caution, the best policy responses to a Macron are still to be figured out. It's with any new variant, it's going to take time to learn just how transmissible and deadly omicron is. And it will take us perhaps even longer to learn how well vaccines protect against it. Slovenia chunk of art is The Economist's healthcare correspondent. What we do now so far is that acting early to stop it from spreading widely and rapidly, pays off. If you wait to learn more about exactly how transmissible or deadly it is, you will probably be too late. And so what do we know about how a Macron actually emerged? So the first signs of a problem emerged in South Africa where scientists saw a very rapid increase in cases, particularly in the area around Johannesburg, which was unusually high compared to the rest of the country. Initially, it looked like it was just some cluster outbreaks, maybe gatherings and so on. When they went and looked at genomic sequencing of samples there, they found this new variant indication came from our scientists colleagues indeed they were observing what looked like a new variant. Which has a very large number of mutations. That's how they put it in the data. This combination of a rapid increase in this high level of mutations led them to believe that this variant is going to be a problem. Some of these mutations are known from past studies of other variants to be correlated with higher transmissibility with making the virus better at evading immunity either from the vaccines or from natural infection and combined, of course, with the epidemiology of what we are seeing in South Africa, things are looking a little scary. In the sense that high transmissibility is kind of an echo of the delta story a highly transmissible variant that eventually kind of took over the world. Exactly, yeah. That's the biggest fear. And because has been the predominant variant in South Africa, there is an indication that this new variant army crown is actually supplanting delta. Now whether this is going to happen around the world, is a very open question because we have seen in the past variant in South Africa, the B the variant, which never took off anywhere else. And also we saw the alpha variant, which was known as the canned variant, which took over in Europe, but it never took over in South Africa. So it's far from guaranteed that this variant is going to supply and all over the world. And the bigger question even while we wait for a clearer picture on that is how protected people are with the vaccines that they may already have received. We won't know the answer for a couple of weeks, possibly longer researchers are working around the clock on laboratory studies just to see how this virus behaves when you test it against serum from people who have been vaccinated or have had infection in the past. You know, they're also looking at the data in South Africa of how many vaccinated versus unvaccinated people have been infected or have gotten sick. But for now, most scientists think that the vaccines are still going to be effective, even if they may turn out to be somewhat less effective and particularly for preventing severe disease. We've seen that with other variants, the vaccines have been quite effective when it comes to preventing the worst outcomes. But in order to get to the kinds of protection that we've seen against other variants, does that mean that new vaccines might be needed once we know more? That may turn out to be the case, we may need to update the current vaccines, which have been developed originally against the Wuhan strain. And in fact, several vaccine manufacturers are already working on that. For example, Pfizer and BioNTech are already looking into that. They've said that they can ship the first batches of an army crown of data vaccine within a hundred days. Of course, that's a massive undertaking, you know, changing your production line to produce a very new vaccine and shipping it all over the world. So it's not going to happen very fast, even though theoretically they can develop a new version very quickly. And before you do that, of course, you want to make sure that you really do need one. You don't want to wait to see whether on the ground is likely to replace delta worldwide. Because for now, the vaccines we have are quite effective against delta, stopping the line to start producing something else will slow down vaccination against delta. So with the knowledge that we have and knowing what knowledge we still need, what are the good policies here? It seems that the world has been quite reactive this time around and broadly, that's a good thing, right? Yeah, so I would agree so. I mean, with Delta, by the time we realized what was happening, the virus has already spread all over the world in large numbers. And now we have a little bit of lead time because South Africa has a very good sequencing capacity, there are scientists have been just excellent really in warning the world about this. Of course, countries not happy because now everybody has banned travel from South Africa has isolated the country, we've seen South Africa's president serial ramaphosa said yesterday that travel bans against his country are unjustified. The prohibition of travel is not informed by science, nor will it be effective in preventing the spread of this variant. The only thing the prohibition on travel will do is to further damage the economies of the affected countries. But this is really the only thing we can do right now. I mean, we won't prevent this virus from spreading. This is about slowing it down so that countries can prepare for its arrival in large numbers. What's an open question is how far the virus has already spread. We already saw more than a dozen cases on just two flights from South Africa that the right in the Netherlands. And we know that just to Europe in November, there are more than 300 flights from Southern Africa. Those have capacity for about a 100,000 seats. If indeed, it's already spreading border closures may be too late. Of course, not every case will spark a chain of transmission or a super spreading event. But the more.

South Africa Wuhan China respiratory disease America Southern Africa severe disease Morocco Slovenia European Union Johannesburg Britain Japan Israel UK Europe Pfizer ramaphosa the Netherlands
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"And they're not even doing it. And i don't even think their argument is that they want to know that information and there wasn't ethical complaint about the trials even an adult saying. You're not giving. These people informed consent for these experiments because they aren't even aware of the very real risk which is very real for kids. That's what happened with why they. Don't have the retrovirus. Rsv or whatever it's called vaccine is because when they gave that to little babies to toddlers died in the sixties because of vaccine enhanced respiratory disease. And that's a real risk with coronavirus vaccines and they didn't tell people that in the trials. There's certainly not telling people that now. This is a big ethical problem because informed. Consent is in the nuremberg trials. And they're not not only they're not giving them the information that they could glean. They're not even telling them the risk they already know. Yeah and they probably cut off that number low purposely so that they wouldn't get that data absolutely when they do. I think that The big pharma chemists the british guy who is making the rounds there for awhile haven't heard from him lately but he said you can't have a two three hundred person trial for a rule out. That would be that big and have side effects in a large number and this is why there's always been a much higher standard for vaccine drug testing then other drug testing testing for two reasons. One is other drugs. Are there to treat a disease that you have so you can make. The choice of the side. effects are worth it. The population that takes them experiences those side effects but the other reason is it's a population wide exposure which means at that point. You're exposing seven. That's why you could have twenty seven hundred kids in the hospital with car titus if you give it to seventy three million kids but if it's just a very small number the chances are no maybe your eyes are the same but the actual injuries would be much.

vaccine enhanced respiratory d
"respiratory disease" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"So I was explaining in the prior segment about how you either believe in freedom or you don't There is no middle ground okay The freedom by the way you can believe it until you start restricting on the freedoms of others in the left is using that argument saying well if you decide not to get vaccinated you could spread COVID to me and therefore you're taking my freedom away That's absolutely false That applies to vaccinated people as well who can obviously now spread the disease But they don't apply that logic to anyone else So the logic is if you have an infectious respiratory disease that could potentially kill someone if you don't get a vaccine you are infringing on my freedom Is that your argument and a lot of leftists I assume Andrea who had responded to me you'll shake her head and say yeah that's my argument Okay well what about influenza That's a respiratory virus Does it apply there No no no it doesn't apply there Well why Maybe you may say yes yes yes I should force you to get that too As a condition to be employed and to make a living and survive and feed yourself Okay maybe you said that And then I stated things that the people like this one does that apply to sexually transmitted diseases too Don't wait Oh my gosh now it gets uncomfortable Jim now the whole conversation the leftists are like where's he going with this He may make a point And if he exposes us to phonies we're not going to like this There are a lot of sexually transmitted diseases too they're not just respiratory They're a diseases transmitted by mosquito vectors insects water the waterborne illnesses If you have someone with a sexually transmitted disease it could be fatal to someone else do we Do we stop them From having sex with other people Well why not We don't We don't we don't stop them from doing it But they get that could lead to a fatal disease It could kill someone Why don't we do that Now the leftist all of a sudden like oh my gosh Right again What do I do It's a contagious disease which can be spread by sexual activity It's fatal in many cases and far more cases than it is with coronavirus a lot of these some of these pathogens And yet notice we don't stop people from diseases that can be spread via sex from Having sex we don't make it illegal We don't We just tell them hey you have to protect yourself And hopefully others right But you're free to do what you want You notice how that argument changes with coronavirus with the leftist A disease that's far less fatal than many sexually transmitted diseases One specifically you know what I'm talking about but you know when the left they get grossly uncomfortable when you start bringing up hard realities to them So why doesn't that logic then apply to coronavirus Yes you could get sick Yes you could infect someone else We ask you to be cautious don't call them people's faces If you're sick stay home If you have symptoms stay home don't stay around other people but ultimately we live in a world in freedom Within a world where free people granted body sovereignty over their own body by God will live freely And with that freedom comes some sense of responsibility.

infectious respiratory disease influenza Andrea mosquito Jim
 US health experts urge flu shots to avoid 'twindemic'

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

US health experts urge flu shots to avoid 'twindemic'

"Health experts are urging Americans not to forget about the flu during the cold with nineteen pandemic I get it we are all tired I'm not talking about vaccines but even as she keeps pushing people to get the covert vaccines the CDC cheaper shovel Lansky tells the national foundation for infectious diseases flu shots are doubly important this year the low level of flu activity last season could set us up for earth's been severe season this year things like masking and social distancing help slow the spread of respiratory diseases last year but officials are worried because a virus called RSV that usually hits the young kids in the winter came roaring back in the summer as

FLU National Foundation For Infect Lansky CDC
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Will buy tickets for you. Dnv names and everything now figure out the best way to make it happen. Now here's where the variation of the four words. Dangerous words comes into play. The fan was interviewed by buffalo news and he said that he had kovic so he has the antibodies and he thinks they're just as good as the vaccine. He said the vaccine came out rushed. He doesn't know all the information in his opinion. There's such little information it's all one sided. That's a variation of this and so that is the type of behavior to look for and then the player himself beasley recently spoke out against the. Nfl's back vaccine policy saying that. He's not anti vaccine. He's pro choice and with that. The issue at hand is information being withheld from players in order for a player to be swayed in a direction that he may not be comfortable with and when dealing with a player's health and safety there should be complete. Transparency regarding information that is vital to the decision making process without having all the proper information a player can feel misguided and unsure about a very personal choice and it makes them feel unprotected. This is that concept or that mentality of do your own research that they do not like and the article goes on to say that his tweets. This players tweets were responded with a tort of people who are angry at him for not only encouraging unvaccinated fans but telling them to travel places and they ceded throughout the article the cdc stats ensuring how safe the vaccine is now dangerous. unvaccinated people. Are i say good for this guy. I'll say also say good for the seven hundred seventy buffalo bills fans who returned their season tickets when they implemented this policy. That is great and it makes me sad that they it's clear they want. I mean there is a bill in congress to stop on vaccinated people from getting on planes even domestic. I mean it's really messed up and but it's funny because the fda approval document which applies to community. Which isn't even available here. But the they say it's the pfizer approval is not technically the visor approval. But in there is a call for like seven studies long-term multi-year studies on myocarditis pericarditis and vaccine enhanced respiratory disease. So he's right. The information is not known and he's not doing his own research. They're doing the research just waiting for it right. Forget to our last big story of the free thirty. Your papers please. What the facts. Mandates really are more. I wanna tell you about what we're talking about in the.

kovic beasley buffalo Nfl buffalo bills cdc myocarditis pericarditis vaccine enhanced respiratory d congress fda pfizer
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"We know about schools. That are doing this identifying themselves as slaves to these mandates the better because the next time when the mandates collapse in the next time something like this comes around we'll know which places in organizations will be the first ones that are gonna have been in the future. I think it's good to know what organizations what schools are doing. This and i have a feeling that the schools that have not created a mandatory vaccination thing we're gonna have a disproportionate number of applicants kosei half the country is not vaccinated but more than half. The universities require vaccinations. Those other schools are going to get more competitive now. That's not great because it's going to be hard to get into but it hopefully it'll increase their stature status so around here. We have one of the schools. My kids go to said that they were going to mandate the vacs after it was fda approved. So i was waiting for that to happen. Because you gotta deal with it and then we had all that pressed the fda approved it and then we had people. Many many people have said no that ti did not a proof eiser they just extended the emergency use use authorization and that what they did actually approve was that doesn't exist. It was the comber. Not which is like a different brand of pfizer straight out of the biotech partnership they have in germany. Now i read all the documents and it does appear that the fda paperwork on pfizer is an extension of the emergency use authorization whereas the actual approval letter was for the biotech community products which is considered legally distinct although biologically and chemically similar so i just dismiss sat as like a red herring like you said because i figure they're gonna do what they're gonna do. They've been saying it's basically approved since before. That was even a rumor. However this school did not yet mandate it. so i'm wondering if some people are taking seriously may be legal departments or whatever are taking seriously the fact that that the fda has not it does. It appears that has not technically approved even pfizer despite all the mainstream media headlines to the contrary it's a little tricky and another thing that's interesting about the community approval is that it requires years of additional study for known side effects such as card and vaccine enhanced a respiratory disease vaccine enhanced respiratory disease like what they're experiencing apparently in israel so. I just wanted to say kind of correct. The record was that again not correct record but refined my position saving the city enhanced. There are two letters one. The fda emergency use authorization extension letter and then the other one which people are saying the pfizer approval from the fda is actually the biotech comber not approval letter from the fda and that in that in that it highlights few things including that further study needs to be done even after they unroll this to identify and quantify the risk of pericarditis and myocarditis which appeared to be or definitely identified potential side effects of the vaccine but also vaccine enhanced respiratory disease which is actually the subject of an objection. That was filed against the trials alone. Not even the role app the trials because trial participants were not in any case aware that all corona virus vaccines of any platform so a protein sub unit viral vector. Mr rene any of them any of them for decades now been known like s. v. that little baby respiratory disease that vaccines can actually make you more susceptible to even slight variations. So you actually get sicker. If you've got the vaccine and there are slight variations out there. And that's really what they're experiencing in israel or certainly. That's a concern. And that's what these letters are saying. You have to continue to study these things despite the fact that we are giving you approval..

fda pfizer respiratory disease vaccine en pericarditis germany respiratory disease myocarditis israel Mr rene
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Pressure. Impair your ability to do exercise which can make your blood. Pressure continued to rise from living a sedentary lifestyle. There are so many ways that we can help people to stop. The underlying chronic inflammation that is leading to metabolic disease on some level and ultimately prevent outright manifestations of of metabolic disease like overt diabetes like cardiovascular disease heart attacks strokes heart failure. We also see major reductions and things like breast cancers and other endocrine cancers as well as a reduction in one of the types of alzheimer's disease which is metabolic alzheimer's disease and alzheimer's disease. I think we we think of as one thing. But one of the things. I've learned on my podcast and learned through doing the metabolic over summit is there's many different types of alzheimer's but one of them is out right caused by metabolic illness. And so what happens to these patients. Go to the doc. They've got a couple extra pounds around the waist. Bloodpressure couple extra points elevated cholesterol. Ldl's a little bit. high people. Go home and i think about my patients that i would send home after having a heart attack oftentimes for metabolic disease. They're going home on one drug for cholesterol typically. Staten going home with one to two to three anti blood pressure. Medications.

alzheimer's metabolic disease cardiovascular disease heart a endocrine cancers metabolic alzheimer's disease breast cancers diabetes heart attack Staten
"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"That it could be that they warn of varied vaccine enhanced respiratory disease. Like it could be all that. So just gonna i think one of us needs to cover this the main stage. It's interesting you say the the magic reference. There's a book that was written with mahala. Think magicians name and he where he worked with the cia and he taught the cia magic so magic is about telling a story narrative to engage the audience so that they don't see what the other hand is doing and very perfect way to realize quite exactly that is literally thinking of magic shower. Was that we're watching and literally reminded me of that of a magic show so we talked before probably about a year ago. I think even maybe even a little bit before we got off of wsb about homeland the television show because homeland this was on. Showtime was known to be predictive and they would do a storyline and then that storyline would kind of play out usually kind of around trump and russia. And i did a little research on it and it turns out that basically the cia was writing the scripts for homeland entirely starting from season three. And this is admitted in interviews with the actors and actresses the director the producers. What they would do is during the when they were filming after the season was over before the next started they would go to a cia camp. It would bring the director there. Bring the writer there. Break some of the actors. And i would tell them the plotlines to the point of where starting at season three one of the i think the the director or producer said that the writers would just show up at langley with a blank notebook and a pen in the cia would tell them the plotline. They wrote the entire thing starting from three going to season eight. That's the sense you get that you know. That probably is what i mean. I can't say probably. But i remember seeing the river the pilot episode of lone gunman the x. files spinoff where they literally was like hijackers or something crashing planes into the world trade center. I mean it was just ridiculous. I mean six months before nine eleven and i saw an interview just a little article from one of the authors and he said like i was worried that we were the ones who gave those guys the idea pie. I was assured that. That wasn't the case and i was like yes i can. I can assure you that is not the case. Didn't bush at one point. Nobody's ever thought of flying a plane into a building before. Didn't you see that episode of the gunman egli and also yes and of course. Those buildings were actually built to withstand that exact thing down to the airplane body type and it actually happens the empire state building now right whatever so homeland i decided to go back and look at it because we originally talked about it in the context of trump because the show it was filmed in twenty nine hundred started our season. I was filmed starting in february. Twenty one thousand nine hundred and aired starting in february of twenty twenty so it was is when trump was talking about pulling out of afghanistan..

cia mahala respiratory disease wsb Showtime russia langley world trade center bush trump afghanistan
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Trumpcast

"One way of cutting through the noise is look for folks who have been doing this stuff. You know respiratory disease virology immunology and epidemiology before the pandemic hit. I can tell you. I have drawn so many times from previous experiences. That have stopped me from making sort of rash editors in judgment. I haven't been buffet and there is disagreement between experienced people so the reason why everyone respects twenty-five doctor fauci it's his first name is dr but is not because he's always right and he was be the first person to admit that but he comes from a place of experience the second thing is look for the cumulative wisdom of experts like the cip and so these are some imperfect but useful days of sifting through the noise. Saad says that for now. If you're vaccinated don't panic. There's no need to try to finagle. Third shot let the advisory panels do their thing and the next few weeks should bring more data and with it more clarity so if you watch this announcement this week wait i would say even the announcement said with the plan to roll it out on september twentieth. I would say a wing. Don't feel answer this time unless you are immuno-compromised then by all means go and get it. Even you're on the fence about it. If you think maybe your immune compromised maybe you're not go out and talk to your physician but for a general recommendations. Even the yesterday's announcement said that they plan to rule out around september twentieth. Saad omar thank you very much for your time. Saad omar is the director of the yale institute for global health. And that is our show for today. This episode was produced by leads were edited by tori bausch and allison benedict at least montgomery is the executive producer for sleep. Podcasts and tbb is part of the larger. What next family is also part of future. Temps a partnership of slate arizona state university and new america. And i wanna take a moment and recommend you go back and listen to thursday's episode of what next hear the stories of afghans worked with the united states and enough stuck trying to get out. Mary harris will be back next week. I'm lizzie o'leary thanks for.

respiratory disease virology Saad omar fauci Saad yale institute for global heal tori bausch allison benedict montgomery arizona state university new america Mary harris united states lizzie leary
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"How they affect the central nervous system. After graduating he worked at a drug and allergenic research lab in the uk for a few years and then in one thousand nine hundred five he began working for pfizer uk and by two thousand six. He did become the chief. Science officer and vice president of the allergy and respiratory are indeed apartment so not not phaser as a whole the specific small department. But that doesn't really matter because when you talk about this like in media you can just stay the former vp of pfizer. And then you're like. Oh wow the former vice president is saying that vaccines are killing people. We should listen to him. He didn't he the unit he worked on developing drugs to treat asthma respiratory obstructions he. He was like the head of the allergy unit. Most of the reporting about phaser and him say that he that he left in two thousand eleven. It's technically true. But i think painter slightly different distorted picture. There was there was there was an old forbes article written by one of his former friends back in thousand seventeen that talks about Talks with yin and his his is a break off from visor. A quote dr michael in the seventeen year old veteran and pfizer's are in d. An head of answers are indeed unit for the allergy section in sandwich england. Okay again not a real place sandwich england. Now they're fucking with us to fucking with no one game with us but anyway mike was told in the fall of two thousand ten that pfizer was closing the allergy and respiratory disease program and his own role as the chief. Science officer of the group was being eliminated rather than seek employment elsewhere. Mike had other ideas so he didn't like leave pfizer. His whole branch got dissolved. He like he has his job got eliminated and instead of trying to find new work adviser..

pfizer asthma respiratory obstruction uk dr michael yin england respiratory disease allergy mike Mike
Older Adults Face Higher Risk of Heat-Related Illnesses

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Older Adults Face Higher Risk of Heat-Related Illnesses

"Sticky. Summer weather is uncomfortable and dangerous. It can cause heatstroke and if people have underlying health conditions it can even trigger crises like heart attacks when we look at major sheet waves. You see that lots of people died not just from heatstroke but from cardio respiratory diseases and it's because of the strain. The heat puts on various organ systems. That's christie e by of the department of global health at the university of washington. She says senior citizens are especially vulnerable because they often have chronic health problems such as or heart disease and they may not notice the warning signs of heat related illness. Many older adults don't necessarily feel well on a good day so she says it's important to check on neighbors and family members when it's hot cue have your windows and doors open. If you've got air conditioning air conditioning on are you. Drinking sufficient fluids cities can help by issuing early warnings about he waves and opening cooling centers as the climate warms. Many parts of the country will see more extreme heat so e by says it's urgent that communities take action to keep everyone

Cardio Respiratory Diseases Department Of Global Health Heart Attacks Christie University Of Washington Heart Disease
Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Charlie Kirk Says COVID-19 Is Not the Leading Cause of Death

"The right thing to do. How big of a threat is the chinese corona virus. Well every single day in the united states according to data that is publicly available as of two thousand nineteen one thousand eight hundred people die of heart disease. Why don't we lockdown burger king mcdonalds and wendy's and not locked down businesses of people that are trying their best to get by in fact. Why would we lockdown gymnasiums when people are actually literally trying to get healthy by the way this is daily. Let me just reinforce this. This is daily. One thousand eight hundred people die. Every single day of heart disease one thousand six hundred forty of cancer four hundred seventy by accident four hundred thirty of chronic lower respiratory disease. Four hundred ten of stroke their three hundred thirty of alzheimer's and now cova deaths are below three hundred twenty four. In fact yesterday there was seventy one confirmed cova deaths. Seventy one confirmed cova debts. And if you look at category by category last year included zero to seventeen years old three hundred and forty people died involving with one thousand nine hundred and alex berenson says that that is almost immeasurable. Statistically fifty one thousand two hundred thirteen people died from all causes from ages. Eighteen to twenty nine two thousand four hundred ninety three people died from coverted and ninety six thousand six hundred twenty five from all causes from thirty to thirty nine years old. Seven thousand one hundred forty five people died from cove in nineteen allegedly and one hundred thirty seven thousand people eight hundred forty nine from all causes you go category to category. Do you know that cova was not the leading cause of death for any single age group including last year including eighty five years and older including seventy five to eighty four. It was not the leading cause of death for any category or any group.

Cova Heart Disease Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Alzheimer's Mcdonalds Alex Berenson Wendy United States Cancer
Naomi Wolf on How Big Tech Won the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Naomi Wolf on How Big Tech Won the COVID-19 Pandemic

"I see and i've seen evidence that about. Three giant interests are aligned. That doesn't mean you know in my husband's a a former soldier military intel. So he you know when i go. Oh my god. How can we ever fight against this. Giant interested are so aligned. He points out that even really powerful interests that are line can have between themselves. And so you know in shalah from our mouth to god's ears but having said that clearly big tech is a global entity it transcends nation states and they are the big big big big big winners and they were also some of the coordinators of the messaging early on. So i think i may have mentioned the in nineteen response project which launched to like april twenty twenty. Who was that. That was before we knew what this disease was. It could have come and gone. You know because practically it really doesn't show up in the top. Ten causes of death in the united states right there hadn't been a giant messaging campaign over the last year and a half. It would have been bad. A bad respiratory disease average age of death. Seventy eight to eighty two right in some cases older than the average lifespan. But it would not have been thus psychodrama if there hadn't been messaging on your computer on your phone on google maps everywhere. You go about cova. Nineteen who is covered nineteen response. Bloomberg microsoft amazon. Zoom nintendo right of all these igli facebook as part of it not twitter all these big tech companies and a year and a half later. They are up double digit billions for their ceo's revenue and in the case of amazon triple digit billions right. Why would you ever ever like. It's almost like unfair to your shareholders to end your influence on policy to extend the pandemic extend the lockdown extent distance learning. If those are the kind of results you're getting for your

Intel Giant Respiratory Disease Cova United States Amazon Bloomberg Nintendo Google Microsoft Facebook Twitter
"respiratory disease" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Need a card built for business. Why the respiratory disease. Rsv is having an off season. Surge by jamie ducharme. Dr james antoon an assistant professor of pediatrics. At vanderbilt university medical center often goes an entire summer without diagnosing a single case of respiratory sincil virus or rsp the common illness which typically results in mild cold like symptoms but can be severe infants and elderly adults usually goes along with the winter flu season. But this summer are. Sp cases are spiking particularly in southern states. Around two thousand confirmed cases were recorded across the us during the week of july tenth. Twenty twenty one compared to less than a dozen during the week of july twenty fifth twenty twenty. The actual number of infections is likely higher since clinicians may not test sick children for rsp outside its usual season. The us centers for disease control and prevention said in a recent advisory. The spike is somewhat logical. Even if the timing is unusual when the pandemic hit sending people inside and behind masks respiratory illnesses like circulated at historically low levels. The cdc said in a report published today. Now that people are easing up on cova nineteen precautions. They are also coming back into contact with pathogens that have existed but weren't spreading much throughout the pandemic are spf infections began to tick upward in april twenty twenty one. The cdc says in the us are case counts are incredibly high for the summer and tune says but it's about on par with what we see in the winter that suggests cova nineteen prevention delayed. The normal rsp season a similar rsv. Spike happened during australia. And south africa's summer seasons but what's harder to explain and says is why are s via circulating widely while some other respiratory viruses like influenza art though infection rates for para influenza which causes croup and children are also rising right now he notes. Rsp is quite transmissible more so than some other viruses but one reason for the surge may be that children who typically wouldn't be susceptible to rsp are vulnerable this year human immunity builds up over time. You're likely to have the worst reaction to a pathogen. The first time you see it after that your body knows what it's up against and is better at fighting it off. Typically the cdc says almost all children catch rsv and their first two years of life but babies who were born during or shortly before the pandemic may not have encountered rsp as they usually would have meaning their extra susceptible to it. Now these viruses don't disappear in the summer. They're just much much lower in frequency. Explains dr richard molly. A senior physician in pediatrics at boston. Children's hospital coming off a year when few children got. Rsp during its usual season infections may spike at times when they would normally not be present presumably because a little bit of the immunity in the whole community was not reinforced by exposure. He says that's no reason for parents. To panic and tune says all the instructions we give the parents winter after winter apply this summer. He says at the top of that list is monitoring symptoms. Mild symptoms like a runny nose. Coughing and sneezing aren't calls for alarm. He says but if a child has trouble. Breathing is very lethargic or can't keep down food or water. They should see a doctor adults infected with. Rsp usually develop nothing more than cold like symptoms but elderly adults should be on the lookout for more severe issues like dehydration or trouble breathing. Beyond that and tune says parents should teach the same disease prevention practices they did prior to the pandemic like frequent hand washing covering coughs and sneezes and staying home in someone in the.

us centers for disease control jamie ducharme Dr james antoon flu vanderbilt university medical dr richard molly Children's hospital us south africa australia boston runny nose
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

Future of Agriculture

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

"Each step in in all of that adds up to about three billion per year and in terms of market opportunity that the treatment market for bovine respiratory disease. It's one of the largest single treatment markets that exists in animal health in in north america. It's getting close to about a billion per year in in treatment opportunity in that's largely because today treatments with vaccines antibiotics globally. That's much larger potentially twice as large it. Really represents a massive opportunity in animal health which on average or or commonly animal health treatment markets for individual indications are diseases. They can be fairly small. A lot of those add up to you know revenue as as the big companies are found but but individual communities. Small respiratory disease in cadillacs. Actually one of the biggest ones out there. And i don't know if you have ambitions to kind of go outside of just bovine respiratory but i'm just curious where would be the easier leap. Would it be to go to respiratory system in another species or to a different system within bovine. That's a great question. So we're we're actually in the process of building on our portfolio now and our conclusion is that it would be really easy leap to to cross species with a a respiratory microbiome solution so our next step is developing a similar product for swine production. Right now and we're actively working on that. As in the reason that we think that that that approaches is good in in in effect following the the respiratory health problem across species is because we've developed a lot of unique knowledge around the the respiratory tract microbial pathogens that can be present in the respiratory tract microbiome. And there's a lot less myllaeri. A lot homologated Between species between mammalian species and the respiratory tract microbial in so the solution that we're building for cattle. It actually is not that big of a step from a solution that we would develop for swine. Or at least that's the prediction right now..

bovine respiratory disease respiratory disease north america
"respiratory disease" Discussed on Sandy K Nutrition

Sandy K Nutrition

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"respiratory disease" Discussed on Sandy K Nutrition

"And so what they did was they used six peptides here over a period of a year Six peptides the immune system the brain blood vessels the respiratory liver cartilage. They use those six. There were eleven thousand some odd people in the main group that was using the peptides and in the control group. There were three thousand employees who were just using. But they call multivitamins number. Two the non peptide or face is pretty large study. yeah Fourteen thousand people. Yeah it's a big study and they have the russians. Have several of these big studies like this. So here's the results. What we see over here on the left is the control group. Okay and it doesn't show the statistics but it shows you sort of the magnitude of sickness is what this is with the For acute respiratory The period of time the observation perverse one year by the way also all only in one year. Yeah that they tracked it for one year never what they went to grasp gazprom and they basically said to gas from look we want to create a clinical study where we have Some of your people a large number of your people using some peptides those six peptides and then the control group is the three thousand. That didn't use anything right. We wanna see during the course of a year. Basically how many people got sick in the control group. How many people got sick in the peptide. So what they found was that in acute respiratory diseases that there was a decrease of two point seven times the amount of sickness while in this case acute respiratory disease in total morbidity total sickness because these are people that if they're sick they're not working okay so gazprom was very interested in this total morbidity illness of all kinds of the peptide group had two point three times less more mobility than the did the control group. I'm a huge decrease in sickness basically and over short period of time like meaning like the the bile regulators obviously begin working relatively quickly..

gazprom acute respiratory disease
US Hitting Encouraging Milestones on Virus Deaths and Shots

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

US Hitting Encouraging Milestones on Virus Deaths and Shots

"Coated nineteen deaths have hit a level not seen since the pandemic's early days after topping out at more than thirty four hundred daily deaths in January Johns Hopkins University says the average is now about two hundred ninety three the first time it's been below three hundred since March twenty twenty last year the CDC says only heart disease and cancer killed more Americans now data suggests more are dying each day from accidents chronic lower respiratory disease strokes or Alzheimer's there are about eleven thousand four hundred new cases daily down from more than a quarter million in January the nation's approaching another vaccination miles still one hundred fifty million Americans fully vaccinated that's about forty five percent of the population Sager mag ani Washington

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Johns Hopkins University CDC Heart Disease Cancer Alzheimer Washington
Gunnar Esiason on Patient Advocacy

DNA Today

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Gunnar Esiason on Patient Advocacy

"Thank you so much for coming on the show. Thank you. Thanks for having me on. And thanks for following fibrosis over. Yeah it's fantastic to have you just share your experience with cystic fibrosis the patient advocacy that. You're a part of before we jump into all that for people that may be jumping into the series. And don't have a background on cystic fibrosis. What is your elevator pitch when someone says well. What is cystic fibrosis. How can you educate our listeners. Yeah start by saying cystic. Fibrosis is pretty complex It is a recessive. genetic disorder That is most generally associated with restore declined or or or way these But the truth is just if affects just about every single organ in my body and and really what the the problem is is that thickest builds up not only my lungs but also my pancreatic and a few other organs but The the real trouble is is in the lungs. I you know. Classic respiratory disease sticking. You is the perfect medium for Expectations take hold and create any number of issues for people with the aso right now. We we see that. The median age of data for people. Who is early thirties We do expect that that number will increase as be bad. You know had a number of significant Therapeutic breakthroughs over the past years. Think we'll talk about a few minutes But things are looking pretty. Good right now for the cystic fibrosis kennedy. I think they're on the up and up and You know just really What i've long said is that it's probably one of the most significant medical monitoring medical miracles Always be surpassed by the vaccine development over the past year. So we had. We had our moment in some air. But i'm certainly happy to yield. That's why like to the public health success that we were starting to see here.

Cystic Fibrosis Fibrosis Cystic Respiratory Disease Fibrosis Kennedy
Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo reopens to the public

WGN Programming

03:07 min | 1 year ago

Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo reopens to the public

"WGN, the fairly new director of the Lincoln Berg Zoo with the exciting news that the Lincoln Park Zoo is open. You need to make reservations, though, which is true for just about anywhere you go right now. But I'll tell you, you can find them and it's it's worth visiting. Can you go inside buildings or Outside on Lee. I note one point We've been to the zoo several times during this pandemic on and off, and it was only outside. But I has that changed. That has changed very recently. We were given some new guidelines operate under by the state and we are able to open our buildings at a limited capacity. We're being very methodical. We do We use science and everything that we do here at the zoo, and so we're Easing into opening buildings kind of a building at a time. So currently we have two buildings that were opening when we have staffing for it, and then we're going to be starting to open more buildings as we continue to move through the spring. So I love this text that I just received. I happen to know the answer Just a bit, But I'm sure you can do better than me cans. Kines. What was what was that? I said, will be all. Of course you get kids. Ooh! Animals Get Cove. It 19. Uh, yeah. Do animals can get Cupid 19. There's been a few zoo animals around the country that have gotten covert 19. We likely have not had any of the animals at Lincoln Park Zoo. Test positive for covert 19. But we, as all accredited zoos do around the country used personal protective equipment in order to ensure I know we're all familiar with face masks and other personal protective equipment. Because of our own personal use. We use that here at the zoo all of the time, especially with animals touches nonhuman primate center susceptible to many of the same diseases that we are, and it turns out the animals at The zoo's that have been diagnosed with covert 19 are, I think was that the San Diego Wildlife Park where some of the guerrillas were diagnosed lowland gorillas with covert 19? And also Malayan Tigers, and one of the species must been Asian lions at the Bronx Zoo. If I recall also a zoo in either Tennessee or Kentucky had a big cat that had it. But the good news is all of these animals have survived that have have have had it aspires. I know anyway, across the country, And as you say zoos are so careful anyway, particularly with nonhuman primates. Well, before anyone ever heard of covert 19 you you didn't want those great apes to get a cold. Which could be passed on because they can get it except sometimes it turns into a more serious respiratory disease in gorillas in particular, so it's for a very long time. Zoos have been very careful, correct. That is exactly right. We've been careful for a very long time with good reason. We want to make sure that they don't get any cold or flu or any bugs that we have the we've been protecting them by using our personal protective equipment for Decades now, so I said, going

Lincoln Berg Zoo Lincoln Park Zoo Kines WGN San Diego Wildlife Park Malayan Tigers LEE Bronx Zoo Tennessee Kentucky FLU
Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

"Your mom probably told you to eat your fruits and veggies to stay healthy. Now there's new evidence showing she was right. The American Heart Association study took about 30 years and 29 countries that it shows those who ate more fruits and veggies reduce the risk of dying related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, potentially respiratory disease. Harvard Medical school doctor and Thorndike says Not all veggies are created equal. For example, starches you want to get these other types of more healthful fruits and vegetables, and then you can also eat the potatoes or corn or Pete. If you choose, study says to daily servings of fruit. Three of veggies could help you live

American Heart Association Respiratory Disease Thorndike Cardiovascular Disease Harvard Medical School Cancer Pete
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | 1 year ago

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
Wuhan marks its one year anniversary since the outbreak

BBC World Service

02:25 min | 2 years ago

Wuhan marks its one year anniversary since the outbreak

"A year since the Chinese city off Wuhan first went into lockdown as a result off the coronavirus, marking a trend which would spread to many countries around the world. At the time, the respiratory disease now known as covert 19, had killed only 17 people. According to official Chinese statistics, there were more than 500 confirmed cases of that point. Wu Han's mayor, Eugene Wang told state controlled television that officials may have acted too slowly. The church in pushing. This is a profound lesson at the focus of the epidemic will hand should carry out a strict measures to prevent and control it without missing any detail or link. This shows that we didn't get to know enough about the virus at the beginning. About his heart, and it's spreading some 11. Million people were put under tight quarantine and face masks and social distancing became mandatory at the time. The wider world was shocked by the harsh restrictions and rigid enforcement. Among locals, there was a sense of panic. Since the shutdown happened this morning. I think this has been a bit more panic, you know, especially when you think about food and the tractor. These Chinese New year people are now going to be able to go see family, etcetera, and that you know, in Chinese culture. That's a massive thing. You know, seeing their family at this time of year. So today when the shutdown happened on its side at 10 o'clock this morning, a bit more panicked, kicked him. But at that stage, the World Health Organization hadn't decided yet whether to declare a global emergency because they didn't have enough information about the virus as Dr Ted Ross Adhanom, Gabrielle source, the W. H O director explained. The decision about whether or not to declare a public health emergency of international concern. Is one I take extremely seriously. And one time only prepared to make with appropriate consideration off all the evidence when it was only on the 12th of March After 1000 deaths and 20,000 cases off the disease were registered in Italy, that the W H O did then declare it Pandemic. We're a year on the world still grappling with coronavirus global cases now stand at 98,157,700. The number of deaths 2,106,690

Chinese City Wu Han Eugene Wang Wuhan Dr Ted Ross Adhanom World Health Organization Gabrielle Italy
South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 2 years ago

South Korea Faces Third Wave Of Coronavirus

"South Korea, one of the most successful countries and fighting the pandemic is doing worse now, case numbers are growing during a third wave of infections. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the debate over how to respond. For the past week, South Korea has tried to discourage year and revelry by banning gatherings of more than four people and shutting down ski resorts and tourist spots. But new case numbers and deaths remain stubbornly and or near record highs. Those new infection highs of around 1000 today in a country of more than 50 million are, Of course, nowhere near is bad is the US, nor are they as good as save New Zealand or Taiwan. Dr Kim Woo ju and infectious disease expert at Korea University's Good. A hospital in Seoul recalls that when the first wave of infections hit in February, fear of a new and unfamiliar virus gripped South Koreans, Ah Kitana. Sarah's got so scared. They started wearing masks and stopped going outside even before the government mandated it. But as the pandemic were on, people loosened up and mobility went up. Meanwhile, the government listen to a crescendo of voices of exhausted citizens and struggling businesses. The government hesitated to raise the social distancing level when it should have and was too fast to downgrade it when it shouldn't have. Kim argues that the government has got it backwards. It's not the counter measures that are hurting the economy. It's the pandemic. Experts also point out that the third wave is going to be tougher to crush than the first two. This time. There are more undetected community transmissions, more smaller clusters of infections. China and me, a respiratory disease specialist at equal Women's University in Seoul, says South Korea relied on testing and contact tracing to beat the first two waves. But this time that won't be enough, she says, would you guys how does have a right to take that and that you can only cut the chain of transmission if we cut social activity? The government won praise early on by putting health authorities and experts firmly in charge of the pandemic response. But John says this has changed socially with their table got him over there we go in there. Aside From a few exceptions, most medical experts have been calling on the government to raise social distancing restrictions and warning that hospitals are under a lot of strain E few that our opinions are not reflected very well in the government's decisions. South Korea's government denies that there's any daylight between politicians and experts. Or that it's gone soft on the virus. Speaking on December, 22nd Health Ministry spokesperson Sonia Hong Lei acknowledged that some people are calling for raising restrictions to the maximum. Could you two get engaged with only days ago? Who does those calls are understandable, he said. But regarding occasional claims that the government has violated his own criteria for raising restrictions, he added, We've never done that. Just before Christmas. U. S troops stationed here got the country's first coronavirus vaccinations. Most South Koreans won't start getting theirs until February. The government insists there's no delay. But at Korea University Hospital Doctor Kim Woo ju says the government seems to have dropped the ball. E don't understand why the South Korean government didn't start actively negotiating advanced purchase agreements until November. The government announced Thursday that it's secured more than enough vaccines for his population. And, according to a recent poll, nearly 90% say they'll take the shot.

South Korea Anthony Kuhn Dr Kim Woo Ju Ah Kitana Seoul Government Korea University Equal Women's University NPR Infectious Disease Taiwan New Zealand 22Nd Health Ministry Sarah Sonia Hong Lei KIM China United States John Korea University Hospital
Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

All Things Considered

04:19 min | 2 years ago

Pandemic Advances Scientific Understanding Of Viruses' Air Transmission

"Up, we're taking a look back at some of 20 twenties major events and one of the most remarkable scientific advances this year came in our understanding of how respiratory viruses can be transmitted from one person to another through the air. Krone virus pandemic obviously made this an urgent question. And NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys reports that old scientific ideas quickly got thrown out of the window. For decades. The prevailing idea about respiratory viruses was that some were airborne, and some just weren't so back in January, Thea understanding of how viruses spread through the air. Was really primitive and incorrect. Lindsay Mars, a researcher at Virginia Tech, who studies virus transmission, she says textbooks and research papers said an airborne virus was something like measles. It could be breathed out in tiny particles called aerosols that hang in the air. Those aerosols contractual long distances from room to room. All of that was very different from non airborne viruses like flew in the common cold. Those were thought to spread through coughs and sneezes, big droplets that travel just a few feet. Maher says. This whole simplistic picture was just wrong. There were very small number of people in the world. I think who really understood at that time how viruses spread through the air, and these people realize that the new coronavirus might be airborne at short distances. That is if people talked or saying the virus could be in small particles, as well as the big droplets and coughs and in a poorly ventilated space. These particles could build up as the Corona virus outbreak took off. These experts started making a lot of noise about this and people paid attention. Maher says She thought it would take 30 years for more nuanced ideas about airborne transmission to gain widespread acceptance. But it's happened in months. It's been pretty wild to see airborne transmission of viruses become Big news. Scientific studies came superfast Josh than Tar. Pia is a researcher at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. We're not even 12 months in and We know things about this virus that you know, we don't know about some viruses that we've had around for decades. His medical center took care of some of the first people with Corona virus in the United States. Santo Pia recalls standing at the end of their beds with a device that collected air while they talked or breathed his lab, then analyzed the tiny airborne droplets. Looking for the genetic signature of the Corona virus. We were getting positives more than one positive in the air samples, and I can't say the words that I said But you're kind of broadcast this, but I was shocked signs of the virus were in such tiny particles. He worried that nothing less than the most protective masks could stop it. Soon, though, studies showed that even basic cloth masks were able to reduce the amount of virus that gets out into the air and suddenly mask wearing became routine sent our P A was floored and how ventilation became part of the normal daily conversation. You know how well ventilated is the space shouldn't be spending time inside or outside. You know how much all these things it's changed so much about the way we view the world. The question is, Will this be a lasting change? Donald Milton is a research Teacher at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. He spent years showing how better ventilation in dorms or offices is associated with a lower risk of respiratory disease transmission, he says. We need to figure out engineering solutions to improve the safety of indoor spaces like getting better ventilation, using air filters, even using special lights up by a room ceiling to disinfect circulating air. I want to see us understand how it is that you can make her Restaurant, a safe place to be during flu season and during a pandemic. I think it's doable, but he's afraid that once vaccines get this virus in check, people will lose interest at least until the next pandemic. Nell Greenfield Boys NPR news

Nell Greenfield Lindsay Mars Maher Thea Santo Pia NPR Virginia Tech University Of Nebraska Medical PIA Josh Donald Milton University Of Maryland School United States Respiratory Disease FLU Npr News
David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

TED Talks Daily

04:56 min | 2 years ago

David Lammy On Why Climate justice can't happen without racial justice

"I've got to stop by admitting that in many. Me Giving a talk about how climate action can help black communities is surprising. I grew up whole black with a single mother in Psalm. One of the most deprived areas in London in the nineteen seventies and s climate change was the last thing on my mind. Representing Tottenham. Its member of parliament for the past twenty years my focus has been on trying to reduce the deprivation I grew up around in the past the climate crisis never featured at the forefront of my politics because it was never one of the most immediate. Constituents facing or at least it didn't feel like it. Rising sea levels feel unimportant when your bank balance is falling. Global, warming is not your concern when you can't pay the heating bills and you're not thinking about pollution when you're being stopped by the police and so perhaps this is why as the black lives matter movement roared across the world that's been so dimension saving black lives from the climate emergency. The too long those of us who cared about racial justice treated environmental justice is that was elitist and at the same time, the leaders who did focus on climate change we usually white and rarely bothered to enlist the support of black voices in their work. Even Progressive Allies sometimes took votes to granted and assume that all community didn't care or wouldn't understand the truth is the opposite is true. Black people breathe in the most toxic air relative to the General Population We are more likely to suffer from respiratory diseases like asthma. And it is people of color who are more likely to suffer in the climate crisis. This is no coincidence. The cheapest housing tends to be next to the busiest roads and many of the lowest paid jobs are the most pollutant industries. People of color consistent deny the bottom of the housing educational and Employment Ladders. This story connects black communities across the world from London to lay goes to La black-americans are exposed to fifty six percent more pollution than they course white Americans breed seventeen percent less air pollution, the May produce. It gives a whole new meaning to the black lives matter slogan I breath we all right. We know the name of George Floyd who was murdered by the police, but we should also know the name of eloquently Deborah. Ella a nine year old mixed race girl from southeast London was killed by fatal asthma attack evidence suggested was caused partly by the unknow fool levels of air pollution near her home. And it's not only urban areas where black lives are disproportionately under threat from climate change. My parents had country of Guyana is one of the most vulnerable countries on earth to the effects of climate. Change. So far, gladys contributed relatively little to the climate emergency, but it's one of the country's facing the most serious threats from it. While the annual carbon dioxide emissions beheaded the United States is a staggering sixteen point. Five metric tons in Guyana is just two point six, it is a patton repeated. The Globe those countries that have contributed least the climate breakdown mainly in the global south will suffer the most from floods droughts and rising temperatures. This is a patent suffering with a long history. The exploitation of our planet's natural resources of always been tied the exploitation of people of Color. The logic of colonization was to extract valuable resources from our planet through force paying no attention to its secondary effects. The climate crisis is in a way colonialism's natural conclusion. The solution is to build a new coalition made up of older groups most affected by this emergency black people in American cities who are already protesting that they cannot breathe. People of Color in Ghana, watching sea levels rise to the point where many of their homes become uninhabitable young people in places like Tottenham London afraid of the world they will grow older and progressive allies from all nations of all races, religions, creeds, and ages on this side. All demanding recognition that climate justice is linked to racial justice, social justice and intergenerational justice to

London Guyana Tottenham London Tottenham Ghana George Floyd Deborah Gladys Ella La Black-Americans United States Patton
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
Few companies consider health impacts of their environmental practices

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Few companies consider health impacts of their environmental practices

"Many companies carefully consider how their products affect human health and work to ensure that what they make is safe. But Debra, gallagher of Duke University's Nicholas School of the environment says companies often do not consider how their environmental impacts can mine those efforts. For example, if you're a pharmaceutical company, you make all this stuff, it's designed to make people healthier but you're using methods of distribution transportation methods that create tremendous amount of greenhouse gas emissions along with other air pollutants that can cause or worsen respiratory. Disease Gallagher Lettuce study for the UN Global. Compact about how companies policies and actions affect the environment and people's health and what they are doing to address these intertwined issues. The researchers found that there were very few companies that we interviewed that had any sort of strategy for jointly looking at environment and health impacts. They'd have not tended to look at their impacts on air, for example, greenhouse gases as having a direct effect on people. So she's encouraging more companies to focus on how their environmental impacts in turn affect human health and take steps to improve both at the same time.

Debra UN Duke University Nicholas School
Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

World Affairs Council

10:02 min | 2 years ago

Why South Asia's COVID-19 numbers are so low

"States is approaching five million covert 19 infections. We've passed 160,000 deaths. This virus has paralyzed the richest, most powerful country in the world. And we know this was preventable because at the same time and parts of the developing world countries with far fewer resource is have kept infection and death rates remarkably low. Rhonda's carried out nearly 180,000 tests. Since the start of the pandemic, Erica has applied a combination of mandatory social distancing. A strict lock down and wide scale testing. It's a strategy. We can learn a lot from these apparent success stories this week. We're taking a closer look at Southeast Asia along the Mekong River. As of this recording, five countries with a combined population of 243 million people have had fewer than 5000 cases of covert 19 and 72 deaths. The water Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and Myanmar doing that the rest of the world finds itself unable to do in controlling this virus. Well, I think if we knew that answer for certain there would be epidemiologists and government officials from all over the world lined up on the door, trying to figure out the secret. That's Hannah Beach. She's Southeast Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. Race wars reached her at her home in Bangkok. And she says, there isn't just one reason that these countries have been so successful. I don't think there's anyone magic bullet, but there is kind of constellation of things that countries Thailand has done, which would seem right. First of all people started wearing masks very early, even when the W H O is dissuading people from doing so. Second of all, it's not really a touchy culture when people greet each other. They do what's called a Y, which is when you put your hands together like you're like you're in a prayer like motion. Sort of all hospitals are good health care's not prohibitive. You know, one of the things that people have been looking at that that it might be some sort of Innate resistance that has been built up, particularly in Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam to the current virus. One of the theories that the people in Thailand are looking at is the way in which the novel Coronavirus Cove in 19 evolved. And it started off most likely in bats on DH. Then it went from bad to some sort of intermediary mammal, and then from that mammal to humans, there is there is some speculation, looking both that kind of the genetic origins of the current virus, but also looking at something animals that were at the wet market. In Wuhan, where the outbreak seems to have proliferated that the animal that was thie kind of intermediary animal between bats and humans might have been an animal that was indigenous to this part of Southeast Asia. And that it might have been a pangolin which looks like a kind of like an artichoke cross. Listen, armadillo. If it came from this animal, there is the possibility that something a precursor even this novel, coronavirus had been sort of floating around. In the ecosystem in this region for a long time, and that could potentially explain some sort of resistance that had been built up within the local populations here. And if you look at, for instance, in in southwestern China, which is very close to this region in the number of cases of Corona virus were very, very low. Compared to a place like Wuhan. So again, you know is this is this magic bullet That explains everything We don't know. But it's certainly a factor. That is that seemed interesting. That is interesting. Will you live in the region? You cover the region as you watch these numbers and as you watch the toll in the rest of the world Are you at all suspicious? Do you think these numbers of credible all of these places whether it's Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar If the numbers were so cooked if there were bodies lined up at the morgues. If there were mass graves, we would know there is social media. People talk, people whisper, and we would we would have an idea. S O. I think that's I don't think it's fair to say that the numbers are simply made up. I'm in Thailand right now has fewer than I think 3500 cases. Vietnam, which has had an uptick has fewer than 800 cases. This. Maybe it's off by a couple 100. Maybe if given off by a couple 1000 But if there were bodies at the hospital's piling up from a mysterious respiratory disease, we would know you've spent the duration of the pandemic in Thailand. Let's go back to those first weeks. In January, Thailand confirmed what was believed to be the first confirmed case outside of China. Around the same time the U. S experienced its first case is well. What happened in those earliest weeks? Well, it was interesting that this this first case Thailand has a very good kind of geological service, and in mid January, they confirmed that the Chinese tourists coming from Wuhan, China, which is where the outbreaks believed to have started Had had flown to Bangkok for holiday, which millions of Chinese do every year Bank office in fact, one of the world's most visited cities, and it's one the most visited by Chinese. And at that point, people in Thailand became nervous because there was a mysterious disease up north in China, and there were a lot of Chinese tourists arriving and one thing that didn't happen and we can kind of look back at this. And obviously it's hard to say we know we knew that this is going to be The deadly epidemic that it's become. But in the beginning flights weren't stopped two flights captain arriving from from Wuhan from China, and yes, there were efforts to try to much temperatures of people came in, but there wasn't really that much that was done. Fast forward a few weeks people of their own accord with with government advice started wearing masks and you know there's there's no no sense in Thailand that That wearing a mask is anything but good for public health. There was no there was no no sense that that was somehow infringing upon their individual liberties you've experienced since you there with the ties. Six weeks of pretty strict national locked down. Is it getting any easier now? What's day to day? Life like in Thailand? Now, can you send your kids to school? Can you eat a restaurant? Can you go into stores? You know, I talked to friends back in the states and I feel a little bit guilty because we started our lock down in March and then in Early April. Essentially all international flights stopped. Commercial flights stopped. And so we've been sort of under lock down for months. But beginning in June, the lock down started easing. So all the restaurants all the bars, all the massage parlors, all the all the kind of normal establishments, businesses have slowly been opening up. And now my life is pretty normal. Yes, I still wear a mask everywhere. My kids wear masks everywhere. But schools high schools are back in session on their social distancing. Now they have school kids have school every other week. They wear the masks. They have plastic dividers and things. But there's commerce on DH. There's there's kinda semblance of normalcy, which again makes me feel a little bit that when I speak to people in the U. S, because that's very different from From what? What Americans experiences. You know, we've gone more than almost three months without a case of of local transmission, which is remarkable their cases. Every day, but they're all in people who are coming back from ties were coming back from overseas, whether it's the United States or Europe or the Middle East since that strictest version of the lock down ended Did the economy bounced back is AH are some of the worst effects economically of the lock down starting to ease Because people are spending money again, People are making money again. That's the real tragedy of of Thailand. Thailand did a very good job of controlling the virus and making sure that it hasn't spread. But economists absolutely devastated and the reason is devastated. It's because it's a very tourism reliant economy anywhere. Between 20 and 30% of GDP comes from from tourism, and they're no tourists coming in. So you can. If you want to come on a beach holiday to Thailand, you can't do that right now. So that means that anybody who was a tour guide, our hotel operator restaurant operator. Millions of people have been put out of work. And so the Thai government's really kind of facing a difficult decision right now, which is you can open up. But then if you open up and try to save the economy, you might be also allowing the virus to come in and assistant. It's an issue that Many economies and in many countries are dealing with. But given the success the Thailand has had and being able to control the virus, you know, it makes it that much more. On fraud to even consider bringing people back in and

Thailand Wuhan China Vietnam Southeast Asia Myanmar Laos Cambodia Bangkok Mekong River Rhonda Erica Hannah Beach Coronavirus Coronavirus Cove Fraud Thai Government Bureau Chief The New York Times