36 Burst results for "Researcher"

Fresh update on "researcher" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:28 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "researcher" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"In addition to Baby Sharks, scientists are announcing a new species of glowing sharks. They were found off New Zealand's east coast. Study, published in the Frontiers in Marine science Journal Details the discovery last year of three new glow in the dark shark species, researchers say this is the first time scientists have found proof of Bioluminescence in sharks, the glowing kite Finn, black belly, Lantern sharks and Southern sharks all live in the oceans Twilight Zone That is an area that is between 200 1000 m below sea.

New Zealand Last Year First Time 200 1000 M Three New Glow Frontiers In Marine Science Jo Twilight Zone
Video Conference Fatigue (MM #3632)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 11 hrs ago

Video Conference Fatigue (MM #3632)

"The with kevin mason thanks to everybody working from home for almost a year. Now everybody's been feeling a little fatigued because we're out of the routine. We experienced over the years. Kids going to school parents going to work but also while this new video conferencing thing that everybody's dealing with whether it's zoom or microsoft teams or whichever tool you're using now that more more people are doing more and more video conferencing. They're feeling stress. They're feeling discomfort. Feeling something they can't describe and researchers think about i contact when you're on zoom call ron microsoft teams call. You're forced to be looking at the camera looking at all those faces that are on the conference with you whether it's one two or three or five or twenty five people you're looking at there is more importantly they're looking at you and for some reason we don't like to make eye contact as humans when you're in a conference room and a real conference table you can look at the speaker you can look down at your notes. You can look around. You can look at the wall you can look at the door. You're not always looking at the person. There is a fatigue and it's all not because of the technology but because the eye contact.

Kevin Mason Ron Microsoft Microsoft
Video Conference Fatigue (MM #3632)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 11 hrs ago

Video Conference Fatigue (MM #3632)

"The with kevin mason thanks to everybody working from home for almost a year. Now everybody's been feeling a little fatigued because we're out of the routine. We experienced over the years. Kids going to school parents going to work but also while this new video conferencing thing that everybody's dealing with whether it's zoom or microsoft teams or whichever tool you're using now that more more people are doing more and more video conferencing. They're feeling stress. They're feeling discomfort. Feeling something they can't describe and researchers think about i contact when you're on zoom call ron microsoft teams call. You're forced to be looking at the camera looking at all those faces that are on the conference with you whether it's one two or three or five or twenty five people you're looking at there is more importantly they're looking at you and for some reason we don't like to make eye contact as humans when you're in a conference room and a real conference table you can look at the speaker you can look down at your notes. You can look around. You can look at the wall you can look at the door. You're not always looking at the person. There is a fatigue and it's all not because of the technology but because the eye contact.

Kevin Mason Ron Microsoft Microsoft
Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 13 hrs ago

Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

"In the spring melting snowpack in the rocky mountains feeds the colorado river which supplies drinking water to forty million people across seven states but as the climate warms snowpack is shrinking prompting concerns over water shortages. One technique that can help increase precipitation is called cloud seeding is been used in some areas. Since the nineteen fifties a machine or airplane releases particles such as silver iodide into developing storm clouds. The particles attract molecules of water vapor. And if the conditions are right those droplets for more rain or snow. Mohammed mahmoud is with the central arizona water conservation district which is funded cloud seeding projects in the rocky mountains for years. The type of cloud seeding we're interested in is winter cloud city and what that does is enhance the snowpack so that ultimately in the spring that enhance no pack increase the runoff that water users rely on downstream. The practice remains controversial but researchers have found that cloud seeding can increase the amount of precipitation that falls the storm by up to fifteen percent so it can help reduce the impact of climate change on critical water supplies.

Rocky Mountains Mohammed Mahmoud Colorado River Central Arizona Water Conserva
Scientists found something simple that anyone can do to help beat a coronavirus infection

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 1 d ago

Scientists found something simple that anyone can do to help beat a coronavirus infection

"Scientists at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered exercise increases the production of immune cells in the bones of mice and those cells fight infections, Researchers say. If the same effect is found in humans, it could prompt doctors to recommend exercise as a way to prevent and possibly treat infectious diseases such as covert 19. Study appears in the journal Nature.

University Of Texas Southweste
Stanford Researcher Identifies and Explains 'Zoom Fatigue' Causes

KHOW Marketplace

01:05 min | 2 d ago

Stanford Researcher Identifies and Explains 'Zoom Fatigue' Causes

"Tired, Tired of zoom calls. That's right. Researchers now over a Stanford say we are all suffering from zoom fatigue. For example, you're probably getting tired of looking at your own face so you can hide self you if you are in a little bit of zoom fatigue. Video calls also reduce how much we walk around. So you might want to start moving to be more cognitive, another consequence, missing out on all the nonverbal cues. So what you want to do is start looking at somebody even assume calls start picking up some nonverbal cues if you can, and the fourth consequence leading to zoom for take is excessive, close up eye contact with others. So face is a really, really big and other words. So think about all this next time you have a video meeting with a co worker. The Stanford Research also says that when someone's face is also that close to you Our brains change our brains interpret it as an intense situation that will either lied to mating. Or to conflict. Hmm. That would be an awkward conversation with HR. Either way,

Stanford Stanford Research
Climate Action: It's time to make peace with nature, UN chief says

UN News

00:51 sec | 4 d ago

Climate Action: It's time to make peace with nature, UN chief says

"National goals to tackle climate change. Nowhere close to where they should be to reduce global warming u. n. chief. Antoni guitarist said on friday. The secretary general's comments a publication of the un framework convention on climate change report researchers examined national goals ahead of the climate summit in glasgow in november and. They said that their findings were red. Alert for the planet. Governments are nowhere close to the level of ambition needed to limit climate change to one and a half degrees and to meet the goals of the paris agreement. Mr guitarist said in response to the reports conclusions. He insisted that twenty twenty. One is a make-or-break year to confront the global climate. Emergency scientists clear to limit global temperature rise. We must cut global emissions by forty five percent by twenty thirty from two thousand ten levels. He added before calling for countries that produce most greenhouse gases to hit much more ambitious emissions reductions targets by twenty

Antoni Guitarist Mr Guitarist UN Glasgow Paris
WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about The Mission to Find Ancient Life on Mars

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:57 min | 4 d ago

WIRED Senior Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks about The Mission to Find Ancient Life on Mars

"The place that we landed this month is essentially what they believed to be a dead ocean right a lick a river leading into a lake. It is as researchers said to me not everybody agrees with that but but he said if there's a place that's likely to have the signs that something once lived there. This is that it is. It's a crater that was a the the delta of a river so there was a river that then spread out and came over the sides of these of this can walls and laid sediments down and it's in those kind of sediments that researchers have found the signs of ancient life here on earth and that they hope to find it there in these different colors and layers that they can identify but by texture than by their mineralogical constituent. So adam. What would that science outpost look like on mars. And how how would we build a structure to make it habitable. That's such a cool thing to think about. You'd really you'd like to not have to take everything that you need with you because it's really hard to move things from a gravity well into space costs a lot. Wait is the issue mass. So it'd be really great to be able to use the materials that are there to transform the soil or the rocks. they're into the structure. You can imagine kind of digging down into the ground into the regular. Maybe one of the canyons. Because part of the problem with not having an atmosphere is mars is positively lit up with ionizing radiation like everything from sunburn to cancer. So you wanna be out of that as much as possible be shielded from it be nice to not have to build shielding do it. It'd be nice to have a place where there was already water. There seemed to be places where there's frozen water there now. Those would also be places where there might be living things. You don't wanna mess that up. But if you if there wasn't if they were sterilized but there was liquid water. You could use the ice. That was there. You could use chemical processes to transform carbon dioxide in the regular into oxygen. Potentially that's something that There's instrumentation on perseverance to try to learn how to do. And then all of that would then be studded with with science doing stuff in the same way that like south pole station is or any of the other antarctic stations. That different countries have to study to the weather to study to look outward to have a telescope. there that you could see through thinner atmosphere and not have to deal with bad seeing conditions that happen here on earth you could imagine doing the kind of geological mining for potential resources even again getting them homes difficult it has to be. They have to be so valuable that it's worth sending the rocket and then sending the rock at home somehow. Maybe that's you know. That's possible.

Adam Cancer
Researchers find worrying new coronavirus variant in New York City

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

Researchers find worrying new coronavirus variant in New York City

"Version of the Corona virus has popped up in New York City, and experts reacted to the news with a mixture of caution and concern Tonight in East and West Coast punch of new covert variants. First, a new strain in California and now a homegrown mutation is spreading in New York City Doctor David Hose team at Columbia University was one of the first to detect mutation, noting similarities to the more contagious South African and Brazilian strains. We don't know whether it's more transmissible, but we see it rising in prevalence within our patient population. Dr Ho says The mutation alters the spike protein, which enables the virus to dodge anti bodies that could result in a weaker immune response.

David Hose New York City West Coast Columbia University California Dr Ho
Cyber conflict between Ukraine and Russia

The CyberWire

05:46 min | 5 d ago

Cyber conflict between Ukraine and Russia

"Security firm proof point this morning released a study of chinese people's liberation army threat actor ta four thirteen. That's deployed a militias fire. Fox browser extension fryer fox in a surveillance campaign directed against tibetans. Ta four thirteen has also used scan box and support your malware in its operation so far this year the units targets include tibetan groups both domestic and in tibetan diaspora proof point assesses ta four thirteen tool said as limited but quite effective against dissident communities. Which after all have what proof point aptly calls a low barrier to compromise the campaign also suggests a shift to more open source tools on the part of the p. l. a. ukraine's national security and defense counsel has accused moscow of compromising a ukrainian government file sharing system the system of electronic interaction of executive bodies zd net thinks. The group responsible is gamero. Don a group widely regarded as a proxy for russian intelligence services. Kamera don has certainly been active against ukrainian targets in the past. But it's an odd duck while often thought of as an advanced persistent threat that is a government. Run operation in some respects. It doesn't really act like a government agency or even a straight up contractor like iran's mob group for one thing gamero don doesn't restrict it's targeting the way government operation normally would nor is it entirely indiscriminate in the way the lower end criminal gangs tend to be for all that gamero. Don is both noisy and aggressive. Research by cisco's talos group suggests that gamero don is also a mercenary player in the criminal. Criminal market talos wrote in. Its recent report on maradonna quote. We should consider the possibility of this. Not being an ap t at all rather being a group that provides services for other ap teas while doing its own attacks on other regions and quote so Kind of contractor perhaps a criminal organization that hires its services out to intelligence services but that also does business with other criminals while its principal state sponsor by general agreement russia turns a blind eye so gamero don is one of the most active and undeterred actors in the threat landscape it does the work of an ap t but it uses a cybercriminals style. It's worth noting that the operation the ns dc describes seems to be a software supply chain compromise as an s. d. c. tweeted. The attack belongs to the so-called supply chain attacks methods in means of carrying out this cyberattack allow to connect it with one of russia's hackers spy groups this is therefore a different matter entirely from the distributed denial of service attacks ukraine complained of at the beginning of the week the de dos attack targeted. Both the national security and council and the sba you security service bleeping. Computer reports and ukrainian authorities did claim that the attack had its origins in russia in as they put it russian traffic networks. The ns dc describes the diaz thusly vulnerable government web servers are infected with virus that covertly makes them part of a button. It used for de dos attacks on other resources at the same time. Security systems of internet providers identify compromised web servers as a source of attacks and begin to block their work by automatically blacklisting them. Thus even after the end of the de dos fix the attacked websites remain inaccessible to users and quote. But it seems that this denial of service harassment was probably the work of the criminal. Gang thought to be retaliating for the arrest of three of its members by the cranium. Participants in a big bilateral franco ukrainian law enforcement sweep alleged members of gregor. We should of course say allegedly engaged in criminal activity. These particular alleged. Hoods seem to have belonged to a gregor's ransomware sub gang french authorities in particular had blood in there is because as france entire reports. A gregor was allegedly implicated in ransomware attacks against hospitals. So paris in kiev. Good hunting. go get him. There allegedly bad guys researchers at mcafee this morning released their study of uc ransomware. A new strain detected earlier this year. It's another entry into the ransomware as a service market whose operators hawkins in both russophone an anglophone criminal the criminal markets. It uses the familiar attack. Vectors common in the ransomware space phishing emails of course but also exploitation of compromised accounts index has gained through unpacked. Systems with known vulnerabilities. Babba criminal customers seem so far to be most interested in hitting victims in the transportation healthcare plastics electronics and agriculture sectors. Their activity has extended to a number of geographical regions and the malware doesn't use the sorts of local language checks often employed to keep the operators out of water in countries whose legal systems tend to be vigilant and unforgiving mcafee's notes on abbott. See an interesting division of labor across its two principal linguistic communities. The operators will use an english language for them for announcements but a russian language forum for affiliate recruitment ransomware updates

Gamero Don Gamero National Security And Defense Kamera Don Talos Group Talos Liberation Army DON Russia National Security And Council Gregor Moscow FOX Cisco Iran AP SBA Babba Kiev
A New Coronavirus Variant Is Spreading in New York City

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

00:44 sec | 5 d ago

A New Coronavirus Variant Is Spreading in New York City

"Two separate teams of researchers say that they have found a new variant of the coronavirus in new york city. And that. it's a little bit worrisome. They believe it's carrying mutations that help it evade the body's natural immune response as well as antibiotic treatments researchers have named this variant. Be one five to six. And it's showing up in different neighborhoods across the city as well as being scattered throughout the northeast. There has been a steady increase in the detection rate from late december to mid february with an alarming rise to twelve point seven percent in the past two weeks now viruses mutate all the time. The more people who are infected the longer they're infected the more chances that virus has to change but if they show worrying properties such as better transmit ability or the ability to evade treatments and vaccines. That's when doctors begin to worry and that seems to be happening with this one.

New York City
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | 5 d ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
A Small Molecule Cancer Drug That Promotes an Adaptive Immune Response

The Bio Report

04:15 min | 5 d ago

A Small Molecule Cancer Drug That Promotes an Adaptive Immune Response

"Matt. Thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure nice to meet you. Danny i'm glad to be here. We're going to talk about fos flatten. Its lead therapy. Which has multiple mechanisms of action and how it works to enlist the immune system to kill cancer cells. Let's start with your lead therapeutic. Pt on twelve. Which is a first class. Harrow phosphate platinum conjugate. Break that down in simple terms. What is it thank you. That's a good question. I think maybe i'll just briefly tell you a little bit about the company and how we got to where we are with this molecule. Pt one to foss platin- therapeutics was founded by myself. And our ceo robert fallon my fellow co founder in two thousand ten and we really built the the company around this family of compounds that we in license at the discovery. Stage which comprise these Family of these first in class pi-rre phosphate platinum conjugates and based in new york. Although these days that that means something different than it used to We have a nice Small office here in midtown with our management team. Of course now are all working remotely and we worked our way through preclinical and early clinical development by running collaborations around the world. We've actually had worked ongoing in fifteen countries Since we started and These are academe amick. A- collaborations contract research organizations clinical sites but also industry collaborators We we have a an existing collaboration with pfizer and their co-development partner. Md serono or merck darmstadt on one of the combination programs that were running and we're still private company in early phase two development with pt. One too so to your question about pt to is a small molecule and actually to our knowledge. It's the first anti cancer agent containing a pirate phosphate and This has implications on its safety. Its pharmacokinetics to mechanism of action. And even on its. It's targeting where it's delivery within the body and i'm sure we can get into that further as we go. I generally think of conjugated therapies is linking targeting mechanism to a- warhead. I take it the way. Pt one to works is a bit different. What exactly conjugated in pt. One two and what to each those components do it's a great question i think we. We certainly are not an antibody drug conjugate. I don't want to give that impression. I think we're thinking of conjugation. As a medicinal chemistry term that goes back to certainly before the advent of of adc's in cancer care Our inventor of the late refunder bose was actually the first researcher able to successfully link or conjugate a pyro phosphate to platinum core molecule. And of course Platinum molecules with platinum in their core have been a mainstay of of cancer. Care for some time now. He was really seeking through his work in medicinal chemistry To find a new paradigm for a platinum containing agents he did so by congregating power phosphate. And what that does is because the para phosphate is so strongly linked. It remains intact for the most part in the body theory differently from cytotoxic agents and certainly from other platinum containing agents Pyro phosphate also benign in the body Native to healthy cells so you'll the respiration so we're not adding something that's in and of itself toxic

Foss Platin Robert Fallon Md Serono Cancer Merck Darmstadt Harrow Danny Matt Pfizer New York
F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

All Things Considered

03:31 min | 5 d ago

F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

"May soon be available in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration could decide as soon as this weekend to authorize a vaccine made by pharmaceutical giant Johnson and Johnson for emergency use. The FDA today released its evaluation of the new vaccine and NPR's Joe Palka joins us to describe what they found Hijo. Hi, Ari. So there were a lot of details in the FDA is evaluation, but bottom line. Was it positive or negative about it? Well, they don't exactly give conclusions like that. But general, you'd have to say that the analysis was positive. The FDA based its judgment on a large study involving some 40,000 participants that was carried out primarily in the United States, South Africa and Brazil. Now, this vaccine only requires a single shot, so participants either got the vaccine or a placebo. And what researchers found was that overall, the vaccine efficacy was about 66% in preventing moderate to severe cove in 19. And 85% against more serious disease. Stacy Schultz Terry is a professor of infectious diseases at ST Jude Children's Research Hospital, and she took a look at the FDA analysis. I did not see anything that would make me pause in recommending that somebody would go get this shot. Joe tell us more about that 66% number because a lot of people have zeroed in on that to say, Wait. Does this mean it's less effective than the Fizer and Madonna vaccines, which reported close to 95% of efficacy? Yeah, The numbers suggest that but you have to have a little context here. First of all, you have to remember that. Initially people would have been satisfied with the vaccine that was just 50% of efficacy. So this is the first vaccine to come. If this had been the first vaccine to come along, people would have been thrilled. Second vaccines behave differently when the rolled out to millions of people, and so there may be changes in the numbers going forward and third variants have popped up around the world. And Schultz Kerry says the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is the first to be tested against those and it did well, African see against the virus circulating in the U. S Good African see against thesis South African and the Brazilian variance as well. And the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is easier to store and distribute than the other two. Tell us about that. Well, yes, I mean, the first obvious thing is that the only requires one shot And that means people don't have to come back. You don't have to chase after them to make sure they get a second shot, so that makes logistic easier. And second of all, it's not as it's easier to store. It doesn't require these special freezers that the modern a vaccine requires. And so what happens next? We said there could be emergency authorization as soon as this weekend. Well, the process works like this. The FDA receives a bunch of material from the company and then they evaluated and that's what they released today and then before they make a decision, they convened a group called the Vaccine Advisory Committee. And they will meet on Friday to discuss and evaluate and two over the data, and by the end of the day, they'll issue some sort of a recommendation to the FDA and the FDA generally follows the recommendations of this advisory committee. And how much of a difference is this likely to make in the supply situation if there are three circulating rather than to now? Well, it's going to make a difference. Maybe not right away. There's going to be a few million three or four million doses released almost immediately if the vaccine is approved or authorized. 20 million. They expect by the end of March and 100 million by the end of June, so it's not going to solve the problem right away. But it will certainly help NPR's Joe

FDA Johnson Joe Palka Hijo Stacy Schultz Terry St Jude Children's Research Ho Fizer United States Schultz Kerry ARI NPR Brazil South Africa Madonna JOE Vaccine Advisory Committee
[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

Climate Connections

01:29 min | 6 d ago

[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. The covid nineteen pandemic has changed the world and the work of rebuilding will take more than a vaccine. There's going to have to be an economic recovery from covert you know. There's been a worldwide economic recession. That's robert dubrow of the yale center. Climate change and health. He says his country's rebuild they have an opportunity to accelerate the transition to clean renewable energy. And that would help solve another public health crisis. Climate change warmer temperatures will increase deadly heat waves food. Shortages natural disasters and disease and burning fossil fuels creates toxic. Air pollution that harms people's lungs and can cause heart disease apart from the climate change benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions really tremendous public health benefits. That are more immediate so do bro recommends that has countries past their covid recovery packages. They prioritize climate solutions such as clean energy and green transit. We could make a tremendous kind of down payment on the transition that we need to renewable energy if we're going to avoid catastrophic climate change and therefore catastrophic public health consequences climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit climate connections dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Robert Dubrow Yale Center Heart Disease
Your body as a smartwatch battery?

Talking Tech

01:39 min | 6 d ago

Your body as a smartwatch battery?

"So it's possible wearable devices like smartwatches. Fitness trackers could run without the use of a traditional battery. Instead you are the battery. I did not miss speak there. You are the battery. Researchers the university of colorado boulder developed wearable technology that uses thermoelectric generators it. Convert the body's internal temperature to electric to provide power so no more plugging into the wall. None of that is your body that will charge your smartwatch or your tracker researchers say the wearable can generate about one volt of energy for every square centimeter of skin space which is less than most existing batteries. But it's enough to power. A wearable device of their findings were published in the peer reviewed journal science advances which is managed by the american association for the advancement science. So how does this work exactly technology. They use combines stretchy material called pala mine poly mean. I hope i'm pronouncing that right along with thermo electric chips in liquid metal wires that can be worn either on your wrist or like a ring on. Your finger sounds complicated. We might need iron man to figure that out so how soon before he might actually see this happen. So researchers predict devices using this technology could hit the market in five to ten years and the way they see it is they see this as something that replaces the batteries altogether. So let's say you have a fitbit instead of the regular battery. Have it would have this technology where you put it on your wrist. And then your body he internal body heat would charge it and keep charged all the time. So obviously it's going to be a while before we buy a smart watch power with type technology but i will be grateful to have one less gadget that i have to charge every night here here. This all sounds good

University Of Colorado Boulder American Association For The A
Nearly 40,000 Macs infected by mysterious malware, researchers say

MacBreak Weekly

02:02 min | Last week

Nearly 40,000 Macs infected by mysterious malware, researchers say

"This mauer discovered Last week by a tech you security company Red canary They called it. By the way silver sparrow so maybe they have a thing about birds. I don't know but read. Canary discovered that there was a strange melwert. First of all we. We love it that it's one of the one of the programs optimized for them one so so there's on the bright side there was so much terrible reporting because they were one of the big newspapers a trade papers actually said throw or something. Like i'm gonna throw my m one in the trash now. Let's even the point like apple. Spent and the november antonio easy it was to port code from intel to a to an one and that's all anybody can do is just code and They they read sparrow. Doesn't say whether it's a fat binary. But i but guesses universal right. I don't know us the tools. Oh use the code Odd because it doesn't do anything it has been found according to Red sparrow on thirty thousand max worldwide. How is that is that because red sparrow. They must be offering some sort of antivirus or something. They're working with a malware byte so we're giving data that at least so that's that's the only confirmed sightings so there could be more than that. Yeah twenty yes. So that would have mac users who put malware bytes on their system and then The our buys discovered twenty nine thousand one hundred thirty nine mac. Os points across one hundred fifty. Three countries Mostly us uk. Canada france and germany. But what's weird. It has no malicious payload. It doesn't do anything it just It installs itself. It does set up a command and control server one of the commands. Apparently that it's capable of his race yourself now so there's some speculation. Maybe it's just a proof of concept.

Red Canary Mauer Intel Apple France Germany Canada UK
Why 'Nothing' Matters in Nutrition Research

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:22 min | Last week

Why 'Nothing' Matters in Nutrition Research

"I want to talk about why nothing matters. Most nutrition research studies are designed to see what will happen if we change something. What happens to muscle synthesis if we add more protein to the diet what happens to cholesterol levels. If we increased vitamin e intake. What happens to blood sugar levels if we decrease carbohydrate intake or what happens to our immune function if we add more vitamin d. Well sometimes of course we run these experiments and nothing happens and we often refer to that as eight null result. Now it's easy to see that as a failed experiment but actually it's not joining me today to talk about. No results is greg lopez. Greg is lead scientific editor at examine dot com where he and his team collect assess and summarize a staggering amount of nutrition research. Welcome back to the podcast greg. Thanks for having me back greg. I find the work that you do at examine dot com extraordinarily helpful. And it's one of my go-to resources and not long ago. I noticed that you added a new section to the nutrition examination. Research digest affectionately known to us as nerd and this section is dedicated to reporting no results or research. Wear nothing happens. Why did you feel that. This was important to shine a light on. Well i think the first reason to shine a light on it is just to bring more attention to null results. More generally a lot of people and a lot of buzz on social media and stuff in the world of nutrition focuses on what is happening what people are seeing What affects are and what we wanna do is just kind of bring attention to the idea that null results are out there and also we wanted to help people more subtly learn how to interpret these because they are a bit. Tricky are nerd. Knowles are a just basics. Point summaries of null results but we have a final bullet point that asks how null the result was and that's where some of our interpretation comes in and by repeating that and having readers repeatedly read it. We hope that people will shuttle the over time learn how to interpret study results. More broadly in numbers more specifically better as they read more plus. There's the idea that at the end of the day. People are turning to us in order to find out what works and what doesn't and if there are strung null results which sometimes there are and sometimes they're not then people can rule out things that they want to introduce into their lives so that they don't waste their time and money on ineffective nutrition and supplementation. Well that's right. I mean we do tend to get more excited when we see that there is an effect. But it's just as important to know what doesn't work as it is to know what does work you mentioned the value that this might have for consumers who are trying to decide. Should i do this. Should i not do this. But i would think that also for researchers it would be important to look around for what research might have been done and what no results might have come forward So that they can focus their attention a little bit more effectively. Exactly it's a big deal for a few reasons for researchers as well. One of the big problems is that when you have a whole bunch of small studies like you see nutrition and supplementation you may get quote unquote normal results. Because they're tiny and can't seem medium to small size effects but a few all all these results together in a away call the meta analysis. You can actually kind of treat it as one big pool of people and then you get to see more subtle effects more clearly but there's a problem in that if only positive results are published. Then you're getting a biased snapshot of what the literature is actually saying so meta analytic conclusions. Can't be as relied upon if they're strong publication bias. Plus there's a lot of interesting hypotheses that are being tested in nutrition supplementation and ruling out. Those hypothesis can actually push basic research and translational research forward of it. So ruling out ideas is how science works. If you already knew what the result was going to be. Then you wouldn't need to do the experiment.

Greg Lopez Greg Knowles
Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

Data Skeptic

06:36 min | Last week

Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

"Hello my name is native. And i'm a computer scientist. Gay as opposed to grow researcher at ebay university switzerland. I work on distributed computations. Specifically i work on. Algorithms concerning distribution optimization disrupted consensus and distributed collaborations systems soi robotics and online voting and in this particular eighty of research. I mainly focus on darwin's by indeed for owners many avi considered networks. There's some of the notes in the networks are militias adversarial or they're just forty. And how does this affect the oral fixation off the elegant now. This is something that's interesting to me in my engineering part of the brain working for big company. I'd say well we can control all of our nodes about some rogue employees or something. But i guess outside of a company the world really runs on bigger systems. How common are these sort of peer to peer distributed problems in people's everyday lives definitely. I made for example. Just consider our current situation which is the ongoing pandemic. Let's see your these. Scooby trackers right you have these scored trackers on your phones than you. Are gary these records with the sword these strikers in vancouver you go in close proximity to someone else that say who might annette it or who might in recent history being tested positive so this gives you a notification. Hey you know you gaming on equity this person and he was the best positive so you may want to take some precautions. Analysts say based on these kind of trackers companies and government started building policies. Just imagine how difficult it would be if someone starts messing around for example. Let's say be Falsely claimed themselves as high-risk saying that. I just hires Ever i'm a Is also is that would discreet Rice appear to be systems are already there used is just a v are naively ignoring the fact that some of the notes in the systems be malicious authority. Fonte just like internet. You have millions of notes on the net not everything. Not everything is on the cloud on server controlled by big or big komen administration. They are so many of these notes that are spreading misinformation they have destroying to disrupt the internet for example you might have heard of. Thanks like jamming attacks Jammed the settlers despite sandy query. So you know these kinds of notes vais fairly common in our everyday use in suggests we get to hear them band. There's a big disaster. Or there's an actual big down of these systems when i started learning about distributed computing and of course it was called big data at the time. One of the first examples is term frequencies so in a lot of documents you the percentage of times you see something that often gets labeled as embarrassingly parallel because you just want to frequency. You need the numerator divided by the denominator and it's easy to divide that problem up and rejoin it but not. Every problem is so embarrassingly easy to solve. What about your specific research into gradient descent. What makes that one hard to do in a distributed fashion. You had distributed Any one this networks to be useful to the specific problem. Let's say that you are trying to solve for example as you just mentioned either. You're trying to get the frequency of a border from documents spent on the internet or let's take a step forward but apps you are trying to build some kind of image classified so different notes on the have different data sets. Let's say images of their dogs. And you want to use these images of dogs neck so many images of those who could be a very strong image classic fire for dogs something that would dismantle the human ability declassified at all so you wanna less this complicated Now designing image classified using all these distribution data said on the internet different notes having different data points. It's quite complicated even when you have all the data points at one body a machine. It's a headline. more of the. The sets are divided in different machines so to ensure that comes like these like machine learning run smoothly when certain nodes in the network militias spinal challenging not descending. It's very interesting to study. How these types can be done. Smoothly on gedeon descent is specific That is by far the was algorithm used from sheet lending pieces and what happens ingredient descent. Is you have these different. Data sets distributed on different notes. Therefore defend nodes have different loss functions. Now what we are trying to do now in this district. Setting is minimized the aggregate of all these functions are loss functions. Now when you're doing this by nature the most commonly use angry gradients design. Because it's naturally distributed many obligingly send it just reduces at the gradients of loss functions in each round. Or so if you're learning and gordon to when you're adding these gradients together some notes are not going to provide you ladies of los angeles. They may be forty. May be broadway. You re totally incorrect. Greediest maybe designed maliciously innovate to move you. words solution. that famous day goes data points. They may favor. Let's say dogs of a burglary or some other panels notions. Maybe they want to completely rendered the classification problem useless. They want to maybe instead of dog. Trained you the classify so as you can see ensuring that is reputed gradient descent runs smoothly at least within some reasonable dominates in residents of such Notes is of practically at this point vendor. You have all this The algorithms training using data sets coming from all sorts of people on it.

Ebay University Komen Administration Darwin Switzerland Annette Gary Vancouver Gedeon Rice Gordon Los Angeles
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

02:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"This is the physical activity researcher. Podcast a podcast for researchers of sedentary behavior physical activity and sports join for a relaxed dialogue about research designed practicalities. And well anything related to research. Learn from your fellow. Researchers useful and.

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Yeah yeah so. Let's talk about assis qualitative researches. We are very aware of this Relationship that we developed with our research participants and and the difficulty of understanding the other person's world especially if we are in quite different different worlds and one of your articles is also starting with this remark that you as a researcher sitting in your office in denmark and you are doing this interview with an athlete in the us who is living completely different social and cultural context. So how how was it for you to develop this relationship with your participants and trust and having them to share all their stories with you. I think i think that is such a. It's such a good question. And it's something that i reflect and reflected upon a a lot and i think first of all. I will say that without without the experiences that i had in in teaching and coaching in that environment. If if i didn't have that. I don't think there's i could have interviewed converse the way that i did in these interviews with my participants because it gave me it just gave me a comfort a knowledge and understanding of at least what their experiences are like. So what. I what i drop. What the word. I basically come to is empathy. Because you know of course. I don't know what it's like to to wake up in in their shoes. I don't know what it's like to be in anybody's shoes except for my own and but but it doesn't mean that. I can't empathize and feel that. I have a decent understanding of of their experience in.

assis denmark us
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Pm. Gmt and Another thing we started earlier this year. we started doing some polls twitter and we got some valuable feedback for example for how long the episodes should be what would be a good length and and that has helped us planning so we are Doing a few more on twitter. So that's something that we are working on as well. So that's so useful way for us to get some feet quicker feedback in terms of how we are doing. And and what you like and what you don't like so you can see those polls in in our twitter and besides those polls just please get in touch with us whenever you have some ideas for themes we have a few suggestions for themes and topics for next year and we are working on making them come true but we always welcome more more ideas and and comment. yeah and s. Nora was telling you about the publication schedule and about episodes episodes piling up. I think this is a good place to apologize for some of the guests. I have quite a bit of away. Publising the episodes. I haven't had signed to eighty them so apologies for the delay. I hope to find time now to edit them and get them out in the beginning of new year and like norris it before we really encourage you to get in touch so any feedback. Any suggestions are very welcome and it would help us quite a bit if you subscribe for this podcast in your favorite podcast app. So then you see when the new episodes are out. So i think that's the end of this episode so thanks for listening and have a good new year and stay tuned for the first episode of twenty twenty one. That will be out very soon. Thanks for joining us this week. On physical activity research through pawtucket. If you liked the show makes you never miss an episode by subscribing or follow the show on twitter. This podcast is made possible by listeners. Like you thank you for your point. If you found value in the show we would really appreciate rates in apple podcast. Which ever apple use or if you put in a real old school way simply. Tell a friend about this show. It would be great help us. We have a fantastic lineup of guests forthcoming episodes so be search to thank you all for your support. Have a great day..

twitter Nora norris pawtucket apple
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Everyone lisa end of the year and bonus episode eight weeks. We reflect on the past year and reveal. Reveal some new things for the next year. But i would like to start saying thanks. For all the guests in the previous episodes. You make this podcast possible. So thank you for taking the time for the podcast. And i would also like to thank all the listeners. Yeah i would also like to thank all the listeners. You are the reason we are doing this. So we hope that the podcast has been able to share some new research new ideas and and also a little bit of speculations and things that you won't read the research papers and personally. I'd like to say that i also very much enjoyed hearing the stories behind the research. So how different people Started studying these topics. And what are their personal experiences when in relation to what they want to find out about more and yeah just to say quickly the meaningful sports series was something that was new in the pe researcher. Podcast this year. It has been running about four months now and we have received some very good feedback and We are very delighted to hear that it's been something that has been Resonating with with at least some of you listeners. And we are very grateful for old feedback and especially. I would like to thank All our twitter supporters and especially for the discussions and Conversation we've had around a theme so we certainly want to hear feedback and also critical questions and critical comments. That will help us all develop and and come up with better ideas and Especially in relation to the meaningful sports series. I would like to thank a few key. People who have been Sharing the conversations and and sharing the work and and Promoting this dialogue. So i would like to mention on sport. Dicuss craig spencer and and team at the meaningful physical education project soda lamp. That i certainly recommend you to follow all of these people on twitter and the fantastic work they are doing. I'd like to say. I very much enjoyed the conversations we've had around the themes of meaning meaningfulness of sport exercise and physical education in the past few months and yeah back to ali. Yeah so will continue with the meaningful sports series and previously. We have done few episode with our expert opinion and in two thousand twenty one. We plan to perform at on the expert opinion. And if you haven't checked out the basic idea is that we ask one question from many experts and then we combine the two gether and we'd like to hear what kind of questions you would like to ask from from the experts so really looking forward for your feedback with that and we will also have new serious which will be psychology of physical activity. It will be led by new host on our roads and she's from australia and she will be focusing on physical activity mainly from Perspective in terms of theories so really looking forward for that that new serious and we have been all thinking and brainstorming about new new. Serious noriega till more about those. Yeah one of the things. We are now Thinking often and exploring ideas Looking at careers in in physical activity. Sport exercise Research so i mean we have one episode from this year with richard baton which will about mental health in phd students and early career researchers and and we know that doing a phd certainly not an easy task and we have some very alarming numbers in in relation to mental health issues that that many early career researchers are struggling with in their journey and we should certainly be aware that staying in academia is not the only option and most of the phd students. Actually don't work in the academia afterwards so we thought that can discussing these different Steps in your journey working in this field. What different you need to consider. If you want to say nicodemus if you don't want to stay in academia thinking of pathways and and reflecting on on journeys and also hearing from Those who have made an academic career. What are the key things that they are Thinking of what turning points. What are the things that you need to figure out in in your in your academic career and also broader work life balance and all these things that are sometimes challenging for four people working in this field. So this is something. We are thinking of starting a series on on careers. And we would love to hear your feedback. Whether that's interesting for you and what kind of things you would like to be discussed it in that series. Yeah so new serious coming for defense serious but we are also open for suggestions from you. What would be good serious would be good guests and we are even open for new host if you want to host lis lis. Send emails to ask the. Let's discuss of this possibility. And now also we have had just meaningful sport and then the kind of physical activity research saran. It's been quite many many episodes so maybe we look to make them under some serious that they will be more structure already in our youtube channel. We are creating different lists of the episode. So it's a little bit easier to find different themes and we are also looking to populous in new website where the episodes would be would be classified within different themes and and also. It's quite a bit of things to do hosting the podcast youtube in different podcast applications. So if you liked the show and you would like to help. We are looking for intern. It could be many kinds of tasks we deflects polls schedule so please be in contact. If you are interested on internship possibilities yeah and then moving to the new year twenty twenty one is almost here and our publication schedule for episodes for next year We decided we'll have a juice. Stay at ten. Am and friday. Ten am which are the standard times they are both gmt when we have a new episode out and in times when we have more material a little bit more piled up than we will have an extra episode which will be sundays at two.

craig spencer richard baton twitter lisa noriega ali lis lis nicodemus australia youtube
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

06:32 min | 2 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Your feeding Whatever may be an often. I think for me from running perspective on probably not pushing the pace that much when i do experience it on tends to accomplishable mind tension is quite different. Soon i am may be focusing more on the external world not necessarily focusing on how my legs are feeding how eggs are moving are just how i'm running. Say i think there is. I think that's a rate interesting when actually to to mix more more in terms of the nature of those activities in high high got would impact on Yeah i think that the idea of marsh lights really interesting actually have that that could play a role in terms of exploring new range of motion even like thinking about something like yoga. You know when you're exploring some new skill And the interactions between that that idea of of leading and but also maybe sometimes making it happen. Subtle differences. I would say in between those two syria be interested to know how that resonates with other experiences. Yeah absolutely but so. You've now quite recently completed. Two reviews of of research from flow in exercise and physical activity unused sports. So you probably the most up-to-date person when it comes to this line of research. And so i would be quite curious on on we. Let's do like fairly brief overview. How do you see like hallways this field or this line research. What are kind of the big trends. And how is our Our ideas and thinking around flow changing. What's happened over the years. I think it's really interesting because race in adult sports. Some of the i work would have been done in the early nineteen nineties. By season jackson systems. We have almost three decades of work in that area. There was some early working on youths that included physical activities nations in the main Were probably working with the by three decades of research in sport exercise and i think if we look at the first two decades there was a almost general acceptance the nine inches framer can how we thought about flow. Waugh's exactly what was like sport. It was almost a a general acceptance. I suppose is experienced in accordance with nine dimensions are what the may be. I think the second key thing if we actually In that first twenty two twenty three four years since this idea that flow is the state of optimal functioning and that essentially suggests that there is only one st people when experience when they're out their best. If we look at a lot of that work. I think it certainly has helped to shape our understanding. It's definitely improved. This is a field but what's been really interesting. I think the last five years in particular is that this idea that though is the only state underlying excellent performance in sport in particular has started to be questioned somewhat in terms of if we look at some of the work in particular swan on subsequent studies. That have used what we call the vent focused into us. Essentially the findings are suggesting a flow. Might not be the complete picture and that may be there are. There is another experience that has some overlapping aspects with flo. What also has some quite distinct elements on dodd has been referred to his much state and so the clutch state. If we think. I performance under pressure term clutch performances off neasden. It's this idea that we r- able to achieve. Our goals are increase our performance in a pressure situation and suppose the original originated from some swans work with fresh Offers in twenty sixteen. This idea they spoke by was that sometimes we perform matt. Our best were landing it happen however there other occasions when we are making it happen in subsequent years that has started at his also evidence in terms of athletes describing this idea that when their impression situations under elevating their performance. It is quite intense. It is quite characteristics which we don't necessarily associate with flo it's also stayed in which the concentration is quite intense so inflow what we often talk about these idea effortless attention so even though you are focused on activity in folks sunday task or whatever John it's not taking that much effort and contrast quite substantially what people say when Clutch clutch performance because in his quite hard for them to to focus or actually and demanding a lot of the cognitive resources. In order to be able to do that. I think from that because soon as threes event folks studies that the idea of a state and social differences between that and flow begun to emerge. Were questioning whether or not a flow is the only state that underlies excellent performance and also the only optimal experience. And then secondly do we need to know more backflow as a result doing to actually refiner understanding and that also goes back. A little bit too is nine. Dimensions frameworks typically conceptualize flow based on cheeks. Nine dimensions framework. And i think if we look.

jackson systems syria Waugh dodd matt John
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

05:42 min | 4 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"And well anything related to research learn from your fellow researchers useful and relevant information that does not fit into formal content and limited space of scientific Publications. And here is a ghost researcher and entrepreneur only ticketed. Welcome everyone. I'm very excited about today's episode as we are going to talk about extra metric and activity tracking Our Guest expert in the team is working as an assistant professor of Integrative physiology and health science Alma College in Michigan us home. He studies the accuracy and reliability of various physical activity monitors and also uses them as incidents and tools to help individuals become more physically active ladies and gentlemen, I'm honored to introduce Our Guest assistant professor Alexander. Montoy. Welcome Alex. Thank you Alan great to be on the podcast fully my plessure. So you've been looking quite a bit activity-tracking among athletes or Sports specific context. What do you mean? CS the most promising things is it for for research purposes or do you see that the athletes would actually benefit from them in their training? What do you see as the most potential things? Yeah, that's a great question. So the the research we've been doing I would say eventually the goal is to help specific athletes or help coaches to understand when they're athletes are ready to return the sports safely or what restrictions they should have in practices or maybe how many minutes they should be limited to in a game setting off. Certainly. That's the that is the future goal with our work. We are not there yet. Although a lot of your more commercial type companies have have moved into that realm of activity tracking and and feedback that specific to the individual. So just for example a couple of brands that come to mind catapult is a system that I know are are my research birth. Or collaborators at Michigan State use in a lot of their athletic teams. So catapult is a it's a chest worn accelerometer and I believe it has heart rate as well. So it's a multi-sensor device and then catapult does a lot of the outcomes derivation I guess so they you know, they they're not like Thursday. It's not looking at the raw data catapults got some proprietary algorithms for Translating that into activity intensity or they'll report outcomes such as volume or training load and both coaches strength conditioning specialists can look at that data then and then for specific players see who has the highest training loads, maybe try to scale training or practice. This is that the the training load you're getting in a practice is similar to the load that you're getting in a game situation or they can make sure that people aren't so let's say, you know, you're coming off the summer. Especially this summer. It's been bad in terms of at least here at Alma very low engagement in practicing and the offseason cuz they're just is not access to gyms right now with everything closed and so we could look at a training volume for individual when they come in.

assistant professor Alma College Alma scientific Publications professor Alexander researcher Michigan Michigan State Alex Alan
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:34 min | 4 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Which focuses and understanding how tender informs meaning in sport. I feel that this is such an important topic that it should have featured in this podcast already a long time ago indeed sport is a very gendered institution and although there has been a lot of effort to tackle gender-based inequalities in the past few decades a lot of work certainly remains to be done in today's episode. We explore how gender identity intersects with athletic identity with the focus on women's martial law. We discuss what this course is dominant in the sporting spaces and how these impact those who are unable or unwilling to accept and live according to these courses. We then move on to exploring the possibilities of alternative meanings discourses and practices of sport and finally discuss whether and how sporting spaces that are not based on a binary understanding of gender can be organized as well as the ethical imperative to organize sporting spaces that are inclusive safe for all our guest has completed several interesting research projects on gender in sport. She completed her PhD in sports Sciences at the University of Georgia Line Finland, which focused on understanding woman's identity negotiations in competitive Judo cultures after defending her PhD she continued working. Postdoc researcher at the University of a scallop in a project that focused on tackling discrimination against gender and sexual minorities in sports and physical education contexts off. She then move on to the school of sport and service management at the University of Brighton and currently works as opposed to researcher in a project titled transforming gender boundaries in sport, which is funded by The Finnish cultural Foundation. Welcome doctor onychophora and thank you so much for joining me for today's interesting and very important discussions. Hi Nora. Thank you for having me. I'm delighted that we are we are now here discussing this and we have talked about this already along a long time ago. And so now we finally get going and I cannot emphasize enough how much I feel that this is a very important topic to address and and for us to understand meaning in sport, we always have to be thinking about this gendered element of meaning and and how are cultural practices also shaped those meanings. So I'd be very delighted to hear a little bit about how you have become a nurse color and Willa sport Sports color, of course as well. But your research in the past ten years already has always been addressing these gender issues. So perhaps a little bit about the background story of of how you became a gender research. Yeah. Sure. So yes, I am always a little bit hesitant to call myself a gender school because as you said my background is in sports science and majoring in sports psychology, and I think it was sometime during my towards the end of my master studies when I started realizing that this focus on performance alone thought sometimes like mainstream sport psychological theories are all about especially when it is done in a way that neglects that context and the situational characteristics of Faith dividual such as gender race class religion and and so on like this way of work does not in English. Ask me that Matt and I became especially interested in gender. I think my interest like also comes from my personal experiences my experiences, for example of being young and female athlete in the mail domain of martial arts. But also experiences that go way back before that experiences of birth of a girl growing up in the patriarchal culture of Greece. For example,

Nora school of sport researcher University of Brighton University of Georgia Line Fin Greece Finnish cultural Foundation Matt
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Or even a side-to-side movement they're likely to do for a couple seconds overall or if they're running on the court. They're likely to be doing that for several seconds at a time. So those all seem to have a high-profile pretty high time dependency to them. Whereas other activities especially instantaneous type movements jumping or these cutting from side to side will happen very very briefly in our unlikely. I proceeded or succeed with another bout of that same thing. And so those activities do not have a strong time dependency to them in terms of what happened in the previous or 16th successive interval. And so what we find is that our time sequencing models like a hidden Markov model can dramatically improve our prediction of when people are walking or running or maybe shuffling in a sports team, but they don't do a lot for us in terms of improving our capacity to predict when people are jumping or when people are doing the side to side cutting type movements. Yeah, interesting and it makes makes sense. So how how can researchers utilize this? I think not not too many physical activity researcher are using machine-learning. So how how could they use use this one? Yeah, it's a good question. So I think in general implementation of machine learning models is an issue. It's you know over the last I would say ten to fifteen years. There's been a lot of interest in the field of accelerometer e in improving the way we drive meaningful outcomes from our accelerometer data, the first method was you know, translating accelerometer data in the steps or activity counts and then using fairly simple techniques to to change or drive those like activity intensity metrics from Counts machine learning models are quite a bit more complex both to develop but also to the month Temptation and so you really don't see on any kind of scale people using Advanced analytic approaches for analyzing data. So, you know, your your question is a good one. How do we do this without machine learning? I think. As a researcher, it's pretty easy to look at your data to get an understanding of if your data seems to have a time a strong time dependency to it. For example the way we did it was pretty crude. We would just take a given in so we would just look at walking and we analyzed the number of times, you know, the number of instances in.

researcher
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:25 min | 4 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"And well anything related to research learn from your fellow researchers useful and relevant information that does not fit into formal content and limited space of scientific Publications. And here is a ghost researcher and entrepreneur only ticketed. Welcome everyone. I'm very excited about today's episode as we are going to talk about extra metric and activity tracking Our Guest expert in a team is working as an assistant professor of Integrative physiology and health science at Alma College in Michigan us he studies with accuracy and reliability of various physical activity monitors and also uses them as instruments and tools to help individuals become more physically active ladies and gentlemen, I'm honored to introduce Our Guest assistant professor Alexander. Montoy. Welcome Alex. Thank you Ali. It's great to be on the podcast. So what kind of things you are working at the moment? Sure. Well as I'm sure everybody is affected by covet data collection here is is dead. Pretty Limited at the moment. So what we're really doing and what's actually been a really nice Silver Lining to all this is often times. We find that we collect much more data that we have than we may need time to fully analyze. You know, we will be working on projects and will be able to address our main outcomes and and work on those related papers, but then we have these very rich data sets with all kinds of secondary outcomes that we can sometimes look at and that's always in the back of our minds but you lose time among everything else that's going on. And so with data collection being so limited right now. We've had a chance to bring back revisit some of the data that we have and some of the study questions that we ask in able to start addressing some of those secondary outcomes and so mostly data analysis and writing down right now, which are are two of my favorite things. And so it's it's been a productive summer. It's been really nice to feel like I'm getting caught up and that we're doing full Justice to the to the projects that we have a game. Completed over the past few years. So yeah work on items from a number of areas some we have a number of accelerometer data sets that we are trying to page Drive meaningful outcomes from so I'm sure we'll talk about it as the podcast goes but looking at things outside, you're just traditional measures we've done a lot with looking at activity intensity. So, you know light moderate vigorous and even sedentary Behavior with accelerometers, but also trying to start looking into sports specific movements things like can we detect jumping can we detect sidewards side movements what we call shuffling or cutting type movements from an accelerometer? And what does that mean in terms of understanding what happens in the sport context in order to be able to quantify training load and even when people get injured can we look at those data and compare them to people who aren't injured. First and how close injured individuals are to being back to full full capacity or being ready for return to sport..

assistant professor scientific Publications researcher Alma College professor Alexander Ali Alex Michigan
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

07:35 min | 5 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"But I. Think it is worthwhile. To, talk, to a pump Russia, academic publisher. First about your ideas. Because they will Will they'll soon tell you what they're interested although. Yeah. No I like your black your ideas and I think they a little bit. Different than many people would say, maybe other would say that you go first to the populist end guys negotiate what kind of book they would need ten. So I like like kind of fresh ideas from from your side and you have the experience you have written more than ten books. A. It's always good to talk to publisher at just my do is is is when do want to talk to? I think it is useful certainty. That I, just have this view. If you really want to write a book. Just go ahead and write because you want to write the book. And that's. One. Advantage of my approach is that. If you just to yourself you absolutely free. To exactly the way you want. Whereas if you can gauge with the publisher very early on they they the publisher is interested. Will, send your ideas out to potential uses. They will come back with comments and immediately longer free. Yeah, I I see your point. And, and you describe on your website yourself as a researcher consultant than teetering human factors and ergonomics what what are you most at at the time and how do you share your time and if people want to collaborate with you in some form what kind of collaborations you interested in? Well, I'm open to all ideas open to Doing a part time lecturing teaching I'm open to Consultancy on Dixon consultancy consultancy work at the moment that's in a different area. Online main areas of consulting is in human factors and safety. Reduce helping organizations to investigate safety currencies particularly accidents. In health care the moments hum on. Incidences where Things have gone rolling the treatments patients pretty that way on the part of the efficient investigation. On my job to provide the. Safety investigators with human fights guidance. some very much open to that kind of work in terms of consultancy I'm also open to consulting logano makes very, very Open to doing Short. Talks Seven AUSE for companies on active office. Work. With one a while back. In London before. The the lockdown. So there isn't much. Public speaking going on at the moment to dancing anywhere. I think. Many of us who involved in a events have found ourselves some. Well. Excuse the PUN but. Business has been overtaken by events in the form of COVID. Nineteen. But I. I'd be interested to universities well about how will I could support them with any. Hosts work or. Training Courses Research that they wanted to. Assistance writing. Grants applications that sort of thing I could do that Another area where I've been talking to a company is in the area of research ethics. Because when I worked for the Navy, I was a member of the Bowl Navy signs of the Advisory Committee which did scientific ethical scrutiny over search protocols, and this was in old areas from by mechanics through to to psychology. And I'm I'm on standby. To help company that protocol to. An ethics. Committee. In defense domain in the UK. And my job is to be there. Is is to be there if explained. Was To help them to negotiate research ethics. The protocol scrutiny process that can have to go through. Basically to hold the head, helped him through it. With. Very many research protocols myself. I've been through that process also. Acted as an aside, the several review process as well above the five hundred protocols submitted to political. Scrutiny. So I know that game quite will. Basically have quite very folio in consulting teaching. And Research I'm those undertaking any research at the moment, but I'd be very interested in doing some of something that. If. They could be helpful and. Provide support. Also. Helpful. Available to assist with. Writing Writing, papers? Or? Wants applications particularly from. If if you need them an English speaker to help. Yeah. So lot of different collaboration posssibility. So, it has been really interesting discuss since I think it was very good points in kind of fresh ideas. From studies from the eighties but anyway so ideas from an old man. Yeah. I first ideas based on eighty s studies done in eighties but what what would be your final remarks for this very interesting episode. My final remarks for the. I think I think my final remarks would be that. Women looking active office work my final remarks would be. The age of high entry of his work is dead. And we need to move on. and. Being active working. Will, be doing of an Also began. The age of hypothesis daintree office work is a Rennick of the twentieth century on it's time to move on an active office work is the way forward. I. I liked it. It's very good. So so thank thank you for this episode what what? What are the plans for the rest of the day for you? Well, I'm going to Be True to full of good practice for preach. So I'm going to have a cup of tea. and. Then, I'm going psycho down to the tennis club grand have forty five minutes in the gym working out. I DIDN'T WANNA get over by. Soundscape, Tucson's how to suit the it was closer. So thank you for taking the time. Thanks only pleasure talking to you. Thanks everyone. Thanks for listening and feel free to.

publisher UK London logano Bowl Navy Tucson researcher consultant Advisory Committee
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

06:01 min | 5 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Ns of resources on that Sir. Thanks thanks for those resources I also from your whip, Bates at you have written. Quite many other books would you like to tell a little bit about your your other books? Yes. While my main other book that I've written. Is My textbook that is a book called. Introduction to human factors and economics. And that's published by CRC press. And that's now in its fourth edition I wrote the first edition in Nineteen Ninety five and the fourth edition came out a couple of years ago, and that's mainly used as a textbook by universities who want to who courses in human factors, the economics or you have a cool seeing something else on want to put on. Some modules makes that book is also available from the publisher or from. Amazon. or any of the Internet booksellers but that comes with at instructor's manual that is full of lecturers kind of. Professes to help them prepare, lectures and details demonstrations. This is also gone answers tool with all of the questions in the book is the textbooks questions at the end of every chapter. There's also. A guide to to. Me a guide to toil tutorials seminars a book which is. Basically, to help lecturers come up with discussion topics seminars with their students. and. Also a package of five hundred powerpoint slides on his comebacks which could be used to support to the basis for for lectures. and Co Academics Universities to take the book as coolest text. Ole The artwork is a electric from the publisher. Sells some. Sounds. Cells all over the world it's in, it's in English and in Chinese. Chinese business. That's that's interesting. Any E said that it has like five hundred powerpoint slides that he can use. Yes. But. You have an academic adopted as a as a cool tex. Who's the publishers get something for nothing you know. Yeah. I I can see that and maybe related that you have been an academic researcher and you have moved more to consultant work and writing books. How do you? How do you feel the process of of writing books as soon as academic person? Well, I have A. I have a a view on that in that. People don't write books books than. In other words. The book already has to be inside you. So to speak and so when you write, it is just coming out. Might sound a bit strange but that's the way. That's the way I experienced it. So, when I think about the book, it's like you can see it in the distance through a telescope this around the room way, and you can see in his jail is complete. It just don't very clear. So you have to just sit down. A start writing? And as she sought writing, you just woke. Mentally, walking closer and closer to its is done. NASA. Yeah I I liked the idea and I think I understand what you mean. This podcast is sponsored by Fabian. FIBIA is an accurate sitting on physical activity tracking device and analysis platform is a great tool for projects that aim for behavior change and sedentary behavior incidental physical activity. fithian provides easy to understand PDF and web browser reports for participants. Other. Features include comparisons to recommendations, linking results to health risks, achievement cards, and interactive goal setting tool. In addition, fithian provides an API that allows for easy integration to other systems and applications. Learn more about Fabian at. Fabian DOT COM slash research. Fabian from researches to researchers. and. What would be your tips for academics who are thinking of of writing maybe a little bit more popular Academic Cook. Think of the title. So that's the only. Give tinky about the title. You cut the title. You'll have the book. If it's there, you'll have it and you'll just right Yeah I I like it I do have one of the popular books. Always distinguish supreme writing a book, Publishing Book. They're not to say. I have never written a book in order to publish it. Britain book to write it. And then I'll be fortunate in been published. But if people come to be insane published a book on that is an I would say full have you written it? Now. Okay well, go ride the book. So so did it's your voice that it really ride it before even before when you contact the publisher that you have it ready and then you approached the population. But when I wrote the first edition might textbook read the whole book. And then I sentenced publisher never released because most people don't do that..

publisher Fabian CRC Co Academics Universities Bates fithian NASA Britain Amazon. researcher instructor FIBIA consultant
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:21 min | 5 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Keystone College, a small Liberal Arts College in northeast Pennsylvania in the USA. I obtained my master's degree piece in sports psychology from Liverpool join us. Moore's university. I mainly Research Culture and cultures and sport on organizational contexts. I. Accident Heavily from answer apology sociology course studies. Organizational Management Studies on critical scholarship in the social sciences and management to grown on developing ideas analyses armed applied practicies. The volume of qualitative research in the spacey's that I research working is a qualitative research helps me stay quite close to ground which is. Pretty vital in the area of culture since cultures concept uniquely concerned with people. Live on refers to the way people make sense of anti-trump meetings and therefore the world's. On the only to be invaded onto the physical activity researcher podcasts to answer the very intriguing question of what is most interesting fancies and qualitative research or physical activity. And truths of founders surprisingly difficult question to answer, which is perhaps an indication they're. They're actually l lots of possible onces. Such as the very good responses from previous guests adopters from Chechen Chung Guards Wiltshire on happy months for. I'll know Sir shamelessly boiled from my own response to the question. ABSO- commentary and a heard across each of their contributions was qualitative research. In all of its forms. Has To do stuff and buy stuff mean practice applied work. Social Transformation so call it what you want a qualitative research should ideally. Affect. Positively. Affect. The world that we live in. I think it was really tailing the each of the guests in their own way identified this characteristic of Quality Research As something. That has been a significant advancement to her field. And is increasingly showcased in qualitative work because I think. I'm probably speaking. Extensively from my own personal experience. That sometimes, it's very easy as a qualitative researcher to get caught up and. The analysis in the process of qualitative research. The careful. Description of people's lived experiences within perhaps pain as much attention as we could to the possibility for explanation or doing something. Beyond the research that contributes to? The world beyond the research process. And I think that's a trump that is particularly easy to fall into. In what is comparatively a fairly small and tight knit community of spore qualitative researchers..

researcher Chechen Chung Guards Wiltshire Keystone College Pennsylvania Moore Liberal Arts College USA. Sir
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

03:49 min | 5 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Finally the use of Gopro camera also made me reflect on my presence and my interaction with the petitioners. It able to look at myself as a researcher in the feel and. Ask critical questions too much to my presence is actually spotted post. Ask More Critical Christians. But I didn't. So you can say that this footage triggered reflection about my role and my intuitive action and thereby it it helped me develop as a research. Of course I I also learned some. Good Lessons Using Disco Profile Generating Empirical data. socially. Even, though the Fish Islands captures this white panoramic image, it is quite important to have continuing attention to put the camera. At one point I accidentally put myself in front of the Lens Wide. I was talking to to petitioners about a move that another petition wanted to do, and we were standing in looking at that. But I'm in the way of Lens is so it's not possible to see anything except my but in the picture. Secondly, I also experienced that it is important to be aware of the condition you have to keep a continuing attention to noise from win. For example, the camera has quite good microphone and it was actually quite easy to hear the speak on the footage, but also very sensitive to win this microphone. I also experienced cold. Actually drained the battery. So to salt at problem, I tried to attach the camera to a small thermos with hope Hubka Cohen in cold weather ended actually worked in that way I I was able to keep a full battery during fieldwork and the the good thing was I own also had a hot cocoa much report so I can recommend that trick. So the relevant ending question is now. If this is a good method for generating empirical data in sports research at I believe it is, but they also believed the use of the GOPRO camera has said the biggest potential in lifestyle because they are familiar objects in other fields, they might disturb much as I experienced that the notebook did in my case. is also important to note that the obvious using the gopro camera as implementary method, it helped me remember the practice it enables different sedation of the practice. And helped me to become more reflective about my rollers researcher and to develop more critical distance as a an cultured participants in the field. But the had used to which as my only method. Or if I used the petitioners footage. A lot of other important mythological consideration would have been necessary. So I hope you enjoyed it a piece feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions and comments. Ideas for collaboration I'll be happy to hear from you. And thanks again to the PODCAST. Forgiving me this opportunity to share my work. And the finest thanks for the excellent with the PODCAST. Hello I'm Dr Mike macdougal. I'm an assistant professor of Psychology.

researcher Dr Mike macdougal assistant professor of Psychol GOPRO Fish Islands Hubka Cohen
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

02:29 min | 5 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"When? Practicing the petition they move around in the city all the time. They find a good spot stay trainer for some time before they move on to a new spot. Ended the spots most often consists of just a coppola wolves or a couple of rails. And therefore, most of the time, this fish islands was actually able to capture the whole spot and the whole practice. So I put it on the top of a wall or something else and it kept everything was said and done in the practice. And after each training session I started by writing my film stop from memory. And after that I saw the footage trench gripping significant situation on talks and a noted down questions for further exploration in in my field. So the radio said enabled me to. In and out of my observation, watching the videos made me ask new questions to the situation that experience. And after that, I was able to follow up on that in my field work all in the in my follow up interviews with the participant. Besides advantages of letting him in out in my observation. I also experiences some other methodological strengths. It did make my presence as a researcher list disturbing. As I intended. Ended, also enabled me to actually absorb deeper into practice and research because I shouldn't worry about dating fill notes written down all all remember things seem Sheku David note down afterwards I didn't have to stress about this. But instead I could focus on the non miserable and the more bodily aspects of the practice. If? I. Had some important thoughts are experienced. I just went to the camera rarely closer and then I whispered my thoughts to the microphone and in that way there were also Saiffuddin. Use of Cameron. Also made it possible to supplement my analysis, which screen shots from the field. Work. At. It made it easier for me to give the reader of the PhD ticks the obstacles and idear off do physical setting and situation that I described analyze..

Cameron coppola researcher Sheku David
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

07:01 min | 6 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"That. Along the lines, someone doesn't think of their own. Their own behaviors as I'm GONNA go sit for eight hours or oh, I'm going to take a break from sitting to get up and changed my posture. Really do that when we get stuck in our little researcher perspective where we want to isolate behavior into one characteristic of it posture in reality people are not in that perspective in their daily lives and I think that's Those lines of research really important and reminding us that when we go to intervene with people where we try to understand the outcomes, FM K. behavior, we need to remember that when someone is in a certain posture whether that be standing lying sitting being active, can the person doing it? It's not about the posture and I think that were the person is mentally and how they represent what we think of as sitting is really important for considering motivation and the outcomes of sin. So I'm really excited to see where the research goes in terms of okay. Now that we remind ourselves that most people. Break down there days in ratios of sitting, standing lying and being active we need to input that back into the science we need to. Consider, what people are doing and how they're feeling and whether they're enjoying something or not. We consider the motivation for cemetery behavior and along those lines, we also need to consider that when we're intervening with behavior in understanding the outcomes are Megan and Ben's work along with several others. Remind us that we always want to isolate variables because in make science easier in more straightforward. But sometimes when we're dealing with humans, it's just not that simple. So I'm really excited to see how people who study sedentary behavior go about contextualising again and putting it back into the perspective of people's Daily Lives and talking about you know instead of intervening center behavior intervening behaviors. TAT's involves sitting that are detrimental for physical and mental how in really figuring out how to a motivate people to change those things and being how. To isolate the outcomes depending on what people are doing while they're serving and how they're feeling. It's really important that we understand behavior amongst a person's life instead of trying to isolate the pager regardless of what people are doing and how they're feeling during during engagement in behavior. So to me, that's the exciting thing this happening center behavior research, and I can't wait to see what experts out there come up with to saw that what I consider a relative a major problem in the field just in summary to try to. Make it more clear. What I'm trying to say is I think it's important to remember that cater behavior is not a thing to most people in their daily lives are not thinking intentionally about some to. And I think it's important and exciting to see the research. Goes beyond considering, Sunkei behavior is one thing but rather to contextualize it within people's lives where we look at people's motivation for being sedentary Andy How comes up and thanks. This podcast is sponsored by Fabian. Fabian is an accurate sitting and physical activity tracking device and analysis platform. It is a great tool for projects that aim for behavior change in sedentary behavior and incidental physical activity. fithian provides easy to understand PDF and web browser reports for participants. Other features include comparisons to recommendations linking results to health risks, achievement cards, and interactive gold setting tool. In addition, Fabian provides an API that allows for easy integration to other systems and applications. Learn more about Fabian at FIBIA DOT com slash resource-rich. Fabian from researches to researches. Hi this is horrible. pestle pro active life. Based in Finland University of Applied Sciences on Fithian Inc.. In my opinion, the most interesting things incendiary behave research at the moment. Or many. for example, there are many interesting things happening in how we can measure around reconized different aspects of our daily behavior during the day and my time. they're also pretty Lawrenson. high-quality interventions of they're showing health benefits of read using sitting time. All senator grew time more champion early on this very important in in understanding. kind of the real life potential afraid using seating. On I'm sure we'll. We'll see more of such interventions into future as well. While there's much to learn from the. Underlying mechanisms wise sitting hunt unhealthy. I think still the most interesting things and also the most meaningful things for the public are happening into behavioral side. So I'd like to see new things and ideas how radio's setting or perhaps if one could for the same time, if see our he too quick access intensity or or modified once diet and so on. So understanding these interactions between different behaviors for health outcomes is important. I'm Serbo Sales progress on kind of produce level for example, how we could modify our living environments at home at schools and workplaces but also on city infrastructure and policy levels such moment would be easier for us This could mean for example, designing public transit or active transport infrastructures on police for example, and I think one very important thing to consider as Wallace that's. This chains for an individual can be conscious or unconscious, and actually usually we don't even think about kind of to act of sitting down. So how we make activity just happen without thinking about it. So there's a law potential to design our life as south of people would kind of end up being more active with their lives running for about smoothly without needing to kind of consciously fight fight against our laziness, and this can be very difficult but but there's a.

Fabian researcher Finland University of Applied Serbo Sales Fithian Inc Megan senator Wallace Ben
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

07:43 min | 6 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Learn from your fellow researchers useful and relevant information that does not pay into formal content limited space of scientific publications, and here's your host researcher and Entrepreneur Ali An. I they. You listening to expert opinion in this format, we are asking just one question from many experts and compiling the answers together. Questions we in this form a mainly about the current trends, future perspectives and what these experts find most interesting and exciting in a specific subject matter. We would love to hear your feedback and suggestions. So please feel free to suggest questions and also experts you'd like to hear in this podcast series. We welcome any researcher to provide their opinion non-dependent of Academic Title Age Gender Ethnicity Geographic location or anything like that. You can either record your opinion on an existing theme or suck chest near seem to be included in the expert opinion series. So if you are interested lease message us and we will provide you guidelines how you can record your answer. It simple and can be done whenever you happen to have time. Also I wanted to mention here that physical activity research report cast is now available also youtube and facebook. We publising episodes for review before they are published elsewhere. So beezer to subscribe and follow this podcast also on Youtube and facebook youtube also provides automatic subtitles on every languages providing possibility for more people to learn from crate experts of this podcast. So. If you know any people who might find this feet through useful, we appreciate you sharing this information with them. Hi, this is professor David dumps some from the Baker hot and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne Australia. In my opinion. Two key aspects that I think are the most interesting things incendiary behavior research at the moment. One relates to the evolution of public health guidelines around the world with the contemporary recommendations. Now, emphasizing integrated most simplistic message of targeting. Sitting, end moving more. Interesting aspect relates to some fascinating experimental work that has put forward a new hot papas. Est. that prolonged sitting may lead to a state of cold exercise resistance. I to the progression of the public health and clinical practice guidelines. As a researcher involved in sedentary behavior, research for more than fifteen years now. He's been so reassuring say leaving health agencies including the World Health Organization acknowledging the extensive evidence Bison as being generated on the health risks associated with didn't tear behavior. The, the development obese new guidelines which integrates sitting into the. Boss alongside saw the long standing in Voss on physical activity. Specifically over the past. We've seen the proliferation of Harley informative evidence from prospecting Ext.. Epidemiological Studies documenting long periods of time spent sedentary behavior adverse health outcomes. quickly. So for cardiovascular disease. And and she's cute off to to catch my colleagues wanted it took the most comprehensive review today of the tier behind the evidence for the two thousand and Nineteen Fifty TV Advisory Committee for the second edition of the physical activity guidelines for Americans. and. And this is pivotal for synthesizing the evidence regarding relationships between sit and Tempe High Latin based on self reported measures and health outcomes. Notably that the group led by Peter, concluded that there is strong evidence that hard at that exposure to high volumes sitting time significantly increases risk, of course and caddy of mortality, and also the incidence of cardiovascular disease and talk to Dr Beattie's. For Oakland's mortality, this is been reaffirmed in a recent systematic review and hominoid met her Nelson accelerometer assist sedentary time and live by Hicklin showing that high amount higher amounts of didn't Terry Time are associated with increased risk while intuitively higher levels of total physical activity. Regardless of the intensity level are associated with lower risk. And importantly, the group led by pay cuts. Nazi also shed light on the interaction between. Into behavior and physical activity on health outcomes in the key conclusions being. One evidence full association, but the Association Between Center. Behind Mortality can be more pronounced in those who are also physically inactive or not making recommendations. to those who spend large amounts of time sedentary require higher amounts of physical activity to achieve similar levels of mortality risk reduction as those who are listen very and three. The greatest mortality risk is an in those who sit the most and also do the least amount of moderate to vigorous physical activity, and conversely the loss risks associated or changed for those who say the least and and do the the most amount of moderate to vigorous physical activity. And in recognition of the interplay between sincere behavior and physical activity one of the key God of the two thousand Nineteen USPA. Guidelines. Adults to move more and seedless throughout the date. And emphasizes that some physical activity is better than none and that adults to sit less into any amount of moisture biggest physical activity may gain. Some health benefits? And this has been reaffirmed and. Now extended. While the findings of the systemmatic review, not mentioned before using accelerometer assisted to return by Glenn and colleagues. and. This work which is published in being Jay last year. Shows that emancipatory Tom Associated with increased risk? Well, intuitively Har- levels total physically today regardless attention. Associated with low risk but in in the company bloke will fickle and CO author Tom. highlighted that seems sedentary behavior in physical activity seems to the interrelated. Simple public health message would be to.

researcher youtube World Health Organization facebook Tom Associated Ali An systemmatic review Australia Association Between Center Voss Melbourne Jay Harley Oakland Terry Time Tom. professor Dr Beattie Glenn
"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:29 min | 6 months ago

"researcher" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"By definition dot cannot be meaningful. So I think that's more like a question of there are so many things that. Are Interesting and. Should be explored further. Over sure for sure I think in your introduction you you made it very evident that there's a lot of work to be done in this in this on this topic for sure Hopefully we'll if getting spire anyone to join forces and do it that would be a good a good very result of this podcast. And then from your research I was also wondering that when you are talking about this age related differences in meaning in life that for example, young people would be more. A kind of oriented towards the head on his stick can achievements personal growth? Type of approaches or meanings if put it that way and an in your research, your arguing that it's these kind of meanings that are more readily available in in sports or that's why it would attract young people. But what about the older participants? What about the musters athletes or kind of? What are your thoughts on that? There are so many questions Nora I. I can't confess you dead if the current state if I was in an academic institution or research. If I was in a position in my life right now, where research was the predominant thing defer study I would do is exactly with master athletes because that sort of defeats. how I tried to defend two micrometer I. The scientific community later that this is worth investigating I mean as you mentioned, one of the ways in which I-, I- justified. The importance of meaning sport is that the researcher meaning live shows that more achievement oriented Seem to provide meaning to young people. by there's all sorts of athletes of all sorts of age and. I be really really curious to do even just like a some kind of like maybe start qualitative like we interviews to you know over seventy s committed athletes and see. What their sport east to them, which were mentioned yet but to me, that's the critical question. He's not really why do their sport because the sources are that if we can if we can. If. We can conceive that there are sources of meaning sport. You can see how those might also be like motives like it they could cross but to me that the question of what is your sport to you seems to be more directed towards meaning and Abi. So curious to us that to a sizable group of Master, athletes? Yeah? I guess just to say like in Ny P. H. D. Research I was I was interesting. The main concept I was looking at spirituality but from abroad perspectives on not just. Religious spirituality, but kind of involving this more humanistic understanding of that and so I wasn't starting out with the focus of looking into aging. But actually that came a big part of my research because when you get older if if you're a runner and now you realize that I'm not running any faster actually I'm slowing down I'm running slower than last year and probably next year I'm running even slower and then it comes like almost an existential crisis like what's if I was driven to do personal bests or win? Well most likely I'm not going to do either one of these. So then it comes to question like what's the point? For sure for sure and this resonates so well with me because. Water skiing as very akin to snow skiing is very approachable at all at all ages you can start a two or three a you can start at seventy five and still water ski or Snow Skiing. And, certainly we'd..

Snow Skiing Nora Ny researcher