35 Burst results for "Research Fellow"

Who Is Richard Morrison of the Competitive Enterprise Institute?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:11 min | Last month

Who Is Richard Morrison of the Competitive Enterprise Institute?

"Richard, before we get started, to sort of tell us about your background, how did you, what your involvement? How do you got with, you got to have an interesting background. I've read you're a little bit of your bio. So what did this tell us, you know, where you came from in this regard and how you just where you're at today with some of these things. Oh, thanks. So I'm a research fellow now here at the competitive enterprise institute and I've been here most of my career in Washington. I was here for a while as a communications person. I used to book interviews on radio and TV, so I've been on the other half of this as well. And then I worked for the tax foundation here in Washington, D.C.. It's just like it sounds about trying to enact good sound tax policy. And then I came back again. I'm one of CEI's boomerang employees, people who have been there left and come back. So now I focus on things like the SEC, corporate governance, what we call ESG, environmental, social, and governance, which is a lot of, I would say a lot of left wing activism coming together with business and issues like that about capitalism in general. You know, why do we have a free economy? Why is it free economy good? How can we keep it free? That sort of

CEI Washington, D.C. Richard Washington SEC
Suga Bows out of Party Vote

TIME's Top Stories

02:15 min | 9 months ago

Suga Bows out of Party Vote

"Japan's prime minister you shahida suge is resigning. Here's what that means by amy guna. You'll shahida suge is bowing out. As prime minister of japan amid increasing anger over his government's handling of covert nineteen in the wake of the tokyo olympics. He announced friday that he will not seek reelection as leader of the liberal democrat party or ldp at the end of september suge age. Seventy two became prime minister just one year ago after long-serving prime minister shinzo ave stepped down over health concerns. He said during a party meeting friday that he wanted to focus on the corona virus pandemic instead of continuing on as the head of the ldp with a general election upcoming in the fall. Sagoes resignation paves the way for a new leader of the world's third largest economy. Here's what the know about subas resignation and what it means for japan. Why is suge stepping aside after just a year in office. Soukous popularity has plummeted over his handling of the corona virus. Pandemic japan is currently battling its largest wave of the virus since the pandemic began subas insincere and ambiguous comments and actions on containing the pandemic every single day have may japanese citizens very frustrated says yoshikazu cotto a research fellow at the racquet insecurities economic research institute in tokyo. The public nowadays basically does not trust the government at all suka hoped the olympics would help boost his popularity but despite a record medal count for japan has ratings sank even lower. The number of covert nineteen cases has surged to all-time highs in recent weeks in japan due to the more contagious delta variant. The japanese public angry after subas decision to hold the international event in the midst of a pandemic as increasingly ignored government pleas to stay at home support for the prime minister was below thirty percent in both july and august according to polls by local media suge has long been under pressure due to criticism of his corona virus response and a host of other issues says christie davila the deputy director of the asia program at the german marshall fund of the united states.

Shahida Suge Subas Amy Guna LDP Japan Shinzo Ave Liberal Democrat Party Tokyo Olympics Yoshikazu Cotto Racquet Insecurities Economic Suka Christie Davila German Marshall Fund Asia United States
What Is Western Civilization and Is It Better Than Other Civilization Projects?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 10 months ago

What Is Western Civilization and Is It Better Than Other Civilization Projects?

"Us through first of all what is western civilization. Thank you charlie. Thanks turning point for having me ny. I'd be remiss if i didn't also thanked charlie to being a newsweek columnist. So thank you for that and yeah great to be here. You know got dinner last night. We were joking about how we can possibly talk about how to save the west thirty minutes. So let's kind of dive writer and get right to the point here. So leo strauss famously defined western civilization kind of the ever existing tension between jerusalem anathemas between the bible and between kind of greco. Roman reason if you will. I think that's a good place to start a research fellow at the edmund burke foundation. Which is your arm zones. think tank. It's a home for kind of national conservatism. And we think of the nation state. The nation state is being directly derived from the hebrew. Bible actually the tribes of israel themselves going to be the original the og nation state. If will so. I think just recovering a sense of biblical identity and the importance of the nation state. In contrast to globalism in contrast to all sorts of utopian global ideals is a good place to start so it starts with the bible truths jerusalem athens and then obviously rome as well. Which is you. Don't more my good friends territory. Of course there's a lot there and so so rob. You have an interesting perspective on this. So can you tell us what does what makes the west difference. Why is this worth preserving and dare we say is the west better than other civilization projects currently or previously. So i would define the west. An not too dissimilar from josh shared as the combination of greek philosophy roman law and judeo christian religion and What's what's special about that combination. Is this view that a man and woman are at home in the world that there is that using reason we can understand the world and because we are part of a whole that is legible whole that can be discovered using reason we can also understand what it means to be happy as a human

Charlie Edmund Burke Foundation Leo Strauss Jerusalem Newsweek Israel Athens Rome ROB Josh
Cyber Influence and Misinformation  a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Cyber Influence and Misinformation a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

"Stop. The lynn is a senior research fellow at the center for international security and operation and the hanke j. colin fellow in cyber policy and security hoover institute and also a fellow of the american association for the advancement of flying's he's also the scientists america. This computer science and communications bought national research council of the national academy so lynn. Thank you so much for your time today. Bigger telling you know when we talk about cybersecurity and cyber threats and we touch on the white range of topics we talk about heke data breaches privacy breaches and we also talk about cyberbullying social engineering and information operations in cyberspace so it's quite ranging so. We're very glad that you can spend thirty minute with us today. To give us your perspectives from one angle given your experience in the technical area as whereas decades of advising on type of policy for two so far today. I thought we can talk about you. Want to nominate on that is increasing attracting much attention which is misinformation is inflammation. So the first question about misinformation is. It's not new. Right is something that we have seen throughout history. We know about you. Sections distractions misdirections and many of us in cybersecurity also know about trojans and which cost based on the famous story of deception. So what really is new with information because we think the be that is getting so much attention and escalating into some sort of information warfare. Is it because events like the pandemic election providing for the ground foucault mistrust. All we just playing catch up. There's many questions to ask so. Let me just unpack a little bit to aggregate some. What you said one thing is that there's what's new the you're quite correct that what's going on with information warfare on has been going on for a very very long time thousands of years.

Center For International Secur Hoover Institute American Association For The A National Research Council Of T Lynn Colin America Trojans
Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness: Kinitra D. Brooks

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness: Kinitra D. Brooks

"Joining us. Today is dr caen. Brooks kimmy tra. Is the jury end john. Leslie endowed chair. In literary studies in the department of english at michigan state university. She also spent the two thousand eighteen twenty nineteen academic year as the advancing equity through research fellow at the hutchins center for african and african american research at harvard university. Where she worked on the project called the conjure women's garden black women's route working tradition caniggia's public scholarship specializes in the study of black women. Genre fiction and popular culture. She is the author of three books. The first searching for sickle racks lack women's haunting of contemporary harbor which is a critical treatment of black women in science fiction fantasy and horror the second sigur axes daughters in edited volume of short horror fiction written by black women and third the lemonade reader. Which is a collection of essays. On as twenty sixteen audiovisual project lemonade kenichiro designed and taught first ever college course dedicated to beyonce's with local national and international press coverage. She is also the co editor of the new sons book series at ohio state university. Press most recently you may have read her weekly blog series on. Hbo's lovecraft country published on the dot com where she provided pointing analysis of each episode and the ways they contended with contemporary art pop culture and critical race frameworks in the context of black lives and horror narratives. I am sure you are as excited as i am to learn more about current projects to welcome kenichiro you for me joy to be here. I've been following you and your work for some time now. I've been intrigued by your public. Scholarship and the way to use your platform to engage audiences critically but most importantly you're engaging audiences on issues related to blackness in a very accessible way so i'm eager to learn about your journey. So are you ready. I am

Dr Caen Brooks Kimmy Hutchins Center For African An Caniggia Department Of English Michigan State University Leslie Harvard University John Beyonce Ohio State University HBO
Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
China steps up threats to reclaim Taiwan

Between The Lines

05:51 min | 1 year ago

China steps up threats to reclaim Taiwan

"China's rise as a great power it showing more and more attention towards reclaiming territory that long regarded as its own witness. Beijing's conduct in the south china sea. The east china sea hong kong the himalayan border with india. And of course. Taiwan fifteen chinese planes were detected flying into taiwan southwest air defense identification zone or on sunday taiwan's ministry of national defense said sunday's incursion involved twelve fighter jets to anti-submarine aircraft and reconnaissance plane. This comes less than twenty four hours. After the people's liberation army air force flew thirteen combat aircraft including chinese bomber planes capable of carrying nuclear weapons into the same region that was from the south korean english language. Every rung account of china's recent intimidation of the lovely liberal democracy of nearly twenty four million people. now one of my guest today has warned the australian defence department. Beijing is highly likely to attempt to take over taiwan using all means short of war as early as twenty. Twenty four ponder that a chinese takeover of taiwan by twenty twenty four. Linda jacobson is the specialist who delivered this assessment to the morrison government. A few months ago linder is founding director and deputy chair of china matters and she joins us from finland. Hello linda welcome back to between the lines. Thank you for having me again. Tom and joining us in sydney. Is natasha qassam. A research fellow at the low institute by the natasha. Thanks for having me tom now. Linda recently published. China matter explores policy brief. Summarize succinctly or faces tom. We've been talking for a long time. That taiwan is possibly explosive issue in our region. I'm saying it again now. Because the president xi jinping has made it clear that contrary to his predecessors he does not think we can leave the unresolved political status of taiwan to future generations. He wants to see movement towards what the chinese say reunification of the mainland and taiwan during his lifetime. That's the first point. The second one is that as of late. Probably because of some of the recent events which you alluded to among others the pfc's actions in hong kong. There's been a lot of talk of war of outright military conflict between taiwan and the pfc. I think these media reports have the problem into the wrong perspective. I think it is unlikely that we will see outright war over taiwan's future but we are very likely to see beijing making a move which is a protractive extensive intensive campaign of pressure using all means short of war to bring the taiwanese political leadership to its knees and agree to negotiate nothing more without preconditions taiwanese leadership has already said they will negotiate. But the pfc wants to negotiate on the basis that there is only one china in other words in negotiations have to end in some sort of agreement about unification so that's in a nutshell is what the policy brief argues. We should appear for this kind of extensive intensive pressure campaign using all means short of a case. i'm not. She heard linda's assessment. There of the chinese threat to taiwan china's military invasion of taiwan's unlikely. Highly unlikely so expect by gene to launch a step by step coercion of taiwan using all main short of war to force taiwan's latest into negotiations to etc unification natasha. What's your response. I'm inclined to agree with linda that this kind of phased coercion with many policy measures that china can easily scale up is the most likely scenario are and we can already see that happening. We can already see china attempting to launch multiple cyber attacks in taiwan to economically co west taiwan to try to put pressure intensive media coverage and even to infiltrate some of those local level groups to try to tan politics in a different way in taiwan. All these measures today have been relatively unsuccessful. China made it very clear that they wa against the current president citing win and that they were going to punish the taiwanese for her. These kinds of measures only encouraged the taiwanese people the vast majority of which do not want to be a part of china to turn out in support and fight to when last year. And at the same time we've also seen the country really come together during this covid nineteen pandemic and we've seen a really incredible of trust in institutions and in that democratic system of government. In a way that perhaps we haven't seen in other countries so i'm inclined to agree with these being the right measures but on the other hand i would say that the military option very much remains on the table not perhaps in the short term but from china's the incredible buildup of the people's liberation army that we've seen over the past decade has very much been directed at a potential taiwan

China Ministry Of National Defense People's Liberation Army Australian Defence Department Linda Jacobson Morrison Government Hello Linda Natasha Qassam Beijing Hong Kong East China South China Natasha Himalayan TOM Linder Xi Jinping Finland India Linda
The Real Danger of QAnon

People of the Pod

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The Real Danger of QAnon

"Finkelstein founder and director of the national contagion researchers to a nonpartisan multidisciplinary research group of experts including neuroscientists psychologists. Physicists machine learning experts who study online disinformation pamela. Presi is one of those experts. A senior research fellow at the institute who focuses on the psychology of thriving in a liberal democracy both have been sounding the alarm about the dangers of the antisemitic conspiracy theory cue on and we're not at all surprised to see the events at the capitol on january six there with us now to discuss what we can expect to see next from the movement and what is within our control to stop it pamela. Joel welcome to people of the pod. Thanks for having us so first of all. Please explain for our listeners. In the most basic of terms what is cunanan and why a group called. The american jewish committee might find it troubling. So cunanan is a cybercult that organized with populist conspiracy theories largely on twitter but another social networks as well it really got its roots in a trench community called h. ham and hmi is largely considered armpit of the internet Some of the worst ideas that arrived from social media come out of. Atm was inching about the colt of cunanan. Is that unlike other populist movements which rely on trash tags and organiz based on conspiracies have anti semitic components be value add for cunanan also had an anonymous profit so these diffuse organizations that form lobs on the basis of hashtags. They have a lot of power and benefit because people can act out in the name of the conspiracy without anybody really being responsible but one of the drawbacks. They have is that there's no leadership q. Figured out a solution to solve that you create anonymous leader who can drop missives secret coded information on avon that's encrypted with encryption that he's the only one that has the key for doing q enlisted his followers to become fellow researchers but got them researching with one another to portray vision of reality became increasingly apocalyptic. Interesting and so tell me a little bit more about the anti semitism that runs through cunanan. And how it informs these theories and this movement. The conspiracy group really semitic disinformation because every single successful conspiracy. Group necessarily has to reach for antisemitic. Disinformation as a matter of history and pragmatics. The beauty for a conspiracy theorist beauty being an awkward us but the the ease of anti semitic elements is that they are conspiratorial. And so there's a long history of as joe was saying things to grab things to look for that you just need to look at anti semitism defined and then you just enter that world that conspiratorial world where there is a mysterious you know evoke but somehow secretly powerful other who hides among you and is not always easy to spot that has tentacles in every seat of power government media and finance. That's the jewish conspiracy theory. That's the disinformation about jews. Jews benefit from transparency and the new technology of social media allows for so many areas of black boxes. You know so. Many areas of the dark web so many areas were light is not shining. And that's where these conspiracies grow pamela. Going back to your point about transparency. I'd argue everyone benefits from it. But yes i see your point about jews benefiting from that. I also should point out q. Went on rose to prominence not just during the isolation of the pandemic but during a moment of racial reckoning in this country is that relevant one of the places where we see this coming together in terms of the tools of the network contagion research institutes used to to create transparency and social media. Literally our goals create literacy on social media use machine learning to extract trans at a massive scale. So you characterize the information operations from these groups like you know and one of the largest information operations ever witnessed took place in the middle of quarantine when george floyd was killed and it was mobilized by cuban on and it was blaming george soros for instigating a civil war against antifa the moral other and so that really kind of i think brings home pamelas point in very concrete terms. You had this entire conspiracy network mobilizing around the idea that jewish international financier was causing a civil war was the force behind the moral other and that that was happening in the midst of the conditions of quarantine in that force not coincidentally also behind the virus so that was the largest surge of source activity. We've seen on twitter

Cunanan National Contagion Researchers Presi Pamela Finkelstein American Jewish Committee Joel Twitter JOE George Floyd George Soros
"research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

"Blank today on the Dan Patrick Show this question Are you involved in personnel decisions? Have you been involved in personnel decisions? Not not as much. I don't You know, I think that you know what do you want to be involved for us? I think it helps. I think it helps it to be involved. More Ross Wilson not happy with the number of sacks and hard knocks he took in 2020. Former Kansas City and San Diego head football coach Marty Schottenheimer has died. 8 77 from Alzheimer's. He won more than 200 games with four different teams into his son, Brian was Seattle's offensive play caller Sports A 10 and 40. After the hour Bill Swartz come on news and the Coma news time now for 11 health leaders north of the border are predicting a possible second pandemic, causing lockdowns and stalled economies to linger even longer comes Brian Calvert explains why some are starting to panic. The words came from the mouth of Dr Eileen developed health officer in Toronto. We are in a position of great uncertainty with respect. Two variants. What we know. Is alarming to clarify her concern isn't over the covert strange doctors have been treating the last several months. Her concern are the variance in Britain and South Africa as well as Brazil that have made it to this continent. We are in a transition from one pandemic. To another a transition. To a new pandemic. The currently known variants are said to be treated with current vaccines bought these new strains from these three countries appear to be more contagious. They spread easier and faster with the possibility of spreading faster than current vaccination efforts can actually keep up with British Columbia Health officer, Dr Bonnie Henry agrees. Sadly, yes, it does change the game in some ways, if it starts to take off and become dominant in the community, who says she's focused on travel restrictions as a way to keep more new strains out of her province tends to be a younger population. So these are people who have traveled or have been in contact with Who have traveled for the most part, travel restrictions have been imposed on those coming into the U. S. For the same reason, which is why many health experts aren't is worried about the new variants. As long as we can pick up the pace with vaccinations. Some are comparing it to a foot race, saying we win if vaccination rates can outrun the variance. If not, there's a possibility of a second pandemic. Andrew Pollard, chief investigator of the Oxford Vaccine trial, told the BBC. He's confident the current vaccines can make a difference. With these variants. It might not prevent covert altogether, but it would prevent the most serious symptoms, he's quoted as saying. As long as we have enough immunity to prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and death And we're going to be fine in the future in the pandemic. Brian Calvert camo news camo news time for 13, Or maybe see news TECH trends. A new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone. Revolution delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Red score up senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues. There are trust past issues are nuisance issues, and it would behoove all of us for states to start thinking about these things before. Is thrust upon them. The center of the new report looks at what states are the most ready for commercial drone businesses to start operating score up, says they did this by looking at laws around airspace over 20 states. Loud airspace, leasing, sometimes over state highway,.

Brian Calvert Marty Schottenheimer Andrew Pollard Mercatus Center officer Dr Bonnie Henry Dan Patrick Ross Wilson Alzheimer Bill Swartz Dr Eileen British Columbia Health senior research fellow Brian Toronto Seattle head football coach Coma San Diego
"research fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"research fellow" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Visiting research fellow at the University of San Diego School of Business and the co host of the Note. Pope podcast, Mitch. Thanks for joining us, they appreciate it. You bet, JT. So, Mitch, um I, You know, I was an early adopter on Bitcoin and crypto currencies. And I've felt like I researched it. Enoughto think it's Slowly becoming the more acceptable asset class. And you know, I just talked about in the open. Black Rock came out yesterday and said a couple of their, uh, a couple of their funds can now buy Bitcoin. Is Joe Biden's administration spending and stuff. Do you think there's some correlation between institutions looking more towards alternative assets in the dollar? I think that now let's step back a bit. I think Bitcoin and crypto in general or sort of their own ecosystem that are largely not understood. Right for folks who want to speculate in something, then make Heil big volatility and there's big gulps big downs and, you know, I think that it's sort of right for the day trading crowd who like to speculate Broader issue is you know how well crypto be accepted in the mainstream, and we're starting to see the Goldmans. The black rocks the big the Fidelity's starting JP Morgan, starting to Adopted somewhere in their investment or doing business using it. Yeah, I know It's not. You know, It's not your I'm sorry. I know it's not your big thing. But I feel like this. On emerging correlation between you know policy and you know the strength of the continuing strength of the dollar as well as commodities prices. Towards people looking for some other asset and I feel like you know, maybe years ago, all grand parents and stuff they used to buy gold and buy gold coins and stuff. I feel like the younger class going down toe. You know our age the forties. Um, even down to the twenties. To be honest with you, Um I feel like Bitcoin is kind of emerging as like the younger man's gold that and there are some uses for it. You can't go to the bagel store with a hunk of gold. Yeah. I actually talk to somebody about that this morning, going to CVS and trying to bring a knife and sliver off a little piece of gold. But then again, you can't go to the bagel store and drop it going on them either. So, but that's the thing Now you can't I'm saying, But you can. Yeah, I think you can. And you want to be in a doctor. You can. I'm just talking about as like an emergency use right? Just like like you said. You can't shave off if you take an hour out of your day and open an account at coin based and then attach it to your Venmo card. Um, you can sell Bitcoin and spend it on US D in a seamless transaction. Right, actually spend big coin seamlessly. Where to me? I feel like gold's great but you know that. What do you do it we do. We starts melting. I don't think so. I think but the broader macro issues JT is Sovereign nations printing money like crazy in valuing their currencies, and it's sort of a race to the bottom. The question is, is our currency going to be better or worse than They've been others on, but that's gonna be the same. Come on. Liquid lunch in the phone's ringing off the hook. You're out with your good lunch. And you know what? It is known now in some idiot trying to get me to a chip. Sweet, my chimney or a car. One thing. Well, listen. I did this on the show on Monday. I believe these warranties were killing me and I went toe. Do not call Do not call. Got golf. And unsubscribed myself on Monday and work stopped. Yes..

JP Morgan Black Rock Mitch Visiting research fellow Joe Biden University of San Diego School golf Pope Goldmans Enoughto Venmo
"research fellow" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KTRH

"Championing censorship. We invited the author. Old Griffith on the show. He is a research fellow three row institute at the Heritage Foundation. I'm going to read to you. Some of the opening of The piece that caught my attention. People of goodwill or deeply troubled by hate, directed it. Fellow human beings. Governments increasingly used this righteous anger as a mechanism to expand control over content. And viewpoint. A speech here in the U. S. A top member of President Biden's transition team, Richard Stengel has called for hate speech laws in the U. S up ending our First Amendment guarantee. Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech. Rather than banning speech. Governments should protect the freedom of speech and religion. It's up to us as individuals to use persuasion to counter hateful ideas. Make no mistake. Hate circulates widely through all strata of society. Jews continued to be a common target. This past year, entertainer Nick Cannon used his wide ranging ranging platform. Share age old conspiracy theories of Jewish deception and control. And then he goes on to talk about Louis Farrakhan, Ilhan Omar and more. So, Joe, let me start before we get to how much how governments sensor And this this content of this this concept of silencing people. I find it to be a very powerful tool that many on the left use and that is that hate must be silenced. And then all they have to do is define what you're doing as hate. And so it strikes me that our solution to this has to be Less outrage. It hate and more outrage at censorship, and maybe we understand that people can handle hate. It's the censorship that scares me. Um, right. I think you're right to be concerned. I share that concern. I think that we have private individuals. We should be speaking out against hate when we see it on the net, and you can actually utilize your First Amendment freedom. To do so. But it's a very is very troubling. When you see those that should be most well aware of our founding principles and our personal freedoms. You see many of those individuals now some of you will be serving in Biden administration that want to use our I think valid concern over hate. They want to use that as a reason to start rolling back our First Amendment protections in and as you record a second ago. Some of them are quite open that their, um their goal to sense of speech. They know that it actually does conflict. With the First Amendment as drafted, as as interpreted, thankfully, by art Supreme Court. They're not. They're not. They're not hiding what the end goal is here. You know, I find it I find it very disturbing. But I have a deep admiration for folks on the left. Who used this technique. It's a very effective technique, and the technique goes first. Let's all agree. With a sentiment. Uh, racism is bad Racism back? Yep. Nobody's for racing. Okay? Now All I have to do is claimed that what you're saying is racist. And now there's no longer a discussion on the merits. We've got to raise taxes because disagree with raising taxes is in and of itself racist and let me show you how and most of them they don't bother. But now it's about fighting racism. I have to silence you because you're racist, and that's why I find these things so disturbing. If if you understand that cove it is a very deadly respiratory of virus that is easily spread. Then everything we do is to defend that if you recognize that Islamic terrorism after 9 11 was a great threat. Then I'm sorry. We're gonna have to check into your bank records to make sure you're not a terrorist. But don't worry. We're doing that to other people. So this coming to a conclusion. And then shoehorning every restriction afterwards, I find to be a very, very disturbing but effective trend. Yeah, This is an often This is a reflection of that dodge that Rahm Emanuel made famous years ago that no good crisis go exactly release And in this situation, the crisis is hate in our society. I think we can all agree that all of us have goodwill can agree that that hate hate drugs, especially he directed his people based on race and national origin that Z horrendous. But I like the conclusion you come to in the piece, you say So what is the proper response to such vile words and we'll call that hate that kind of stuff that comes out of the mouth of No harm, no more. And Nick Cannon and Louis Farrakhan and others. What is the proper response to via words? Your response is exactly the opposite of lifts. You say first. Government should empower all individuals, including Jews and other minorities by protecting their freedom of speech and religion. Proponents of hate often suppressed these basic freedoms. And I think hate goes part and parcel with the silencing of those who are actually the subjects of your hate. No, he was right. Once the government has the power to curtail speech, we can see how they use those powers. It's not just to restrain those that engaged in hateful sentiments. It ends up being used toward this very vague notion of hate to restrain political opponents to restrain those whom Those in power deemed to be a threat to their own ruling order. We can see time and time again. This is happening now. In Venezuela. It's happening in China. It happens. Of course in your career. There's no free speech, but always in almost every instance from these governments crack down on free expression. They do it under the guise of all this is for your own good as an individual or as a society and the rhetoric almost always sounds so comforting, but the end result is us as individuals. Having less freedom to speak freely and having to wonder if our speech is going to be a steamed, hateful deemed unlawful by the powers that be and you know, and years gone by the A C l u the American Civil Liberties Union recognized this tell you fought against racism and in his fighting. Offer for decades. But when it came to defending free speech, they also understood that that civil rights is essential to every other form of progress We want to make. In fact, they even defended the right Off those who are really recent, actually the clan in the Chicago area decades ago, they actually stood up for their right to actually speak to really realizing that a threat to anyone Free speech is a threat to all of us and anything that we want to promote, um to our own ends. That is very well said I have about a minute left. And you you make reference here to the university campus, and I find it disturbing that the university campus used to pride itself. On being a fertile ground for free speech. And I don't know that there's a worst censorship in America on the basis of not hurting people's feelings than the university campus today. It's such a shame you students should be going to university to learn how to.

Nick Cannon Louis Farrakhan President Biden research fellow Old Griffith Heritage Foundation American Civil Liberties Union Congress Richard Stengel Chicago dodge Rahm Emanuel Supreme Court Joe America China Venezuela Ilhan Omar
What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

BBC Newshour

02:19 min | 1 year ago

What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

"Normal for viruses to mutate. So how alarms should we be about the emergence of this highly infectious variant of the Corona virus, which is now prevalent in southern England, and if the variant is that much easier to transmit? How do you stop? It spread both within the UK and around the rest of the world On Sundays, its impact was starting to be felt. Britain's Health secretary Matt Hancock said people had to act as if they all had. Variant. The new variant is out of control when we need to bring it under control, and this news about the new variant has been a Um, incredibly difficult and, frankly, an awful year on bond. It's important for everybody to act essentially act like they might have the virus. And that's the way that we can control it together. It's not something for government or individuals. It's something for us all to do together. But could this you vary into the coronavirus also Be resistant to the vaccines that have been developed to counter the existing strain. I've been speaking to Dr Lucy Van Dorf, senior research fellow in Microbial Genomic, said the UCL Genetics Institute. What's name for certain about this virus mutation at the moment. What we know is we have a variant in circulation, which is carrying 14 defining mutations, which we haven't seen in the combination we see in this particular variant before This includes seven within the spike protein off the Corona virus, which is the protein that's most important for binding and entering human cells. One of the reasons that this has raised some concern, it's because some of these previously identified mutations have been implicated. In having some kind of biological relevant So the vast majority of mutations we have in this virus and and mutations are very much a natural process and this thousands of variance in circulation have no impact. But in this case we do have sets of mutations, which have been flagged as may be relevant. So are important in terms of the ability of the virus to bind to human cells, and also potentially for some degree of communication. And so this is one of the reasons together with the A marked increase in frequency of this particular Varian within the UK that scientists are studying it really very carefully right as we speak. But what makes this

Matt Hancock Dr Lucy Van Dorf Ucl Genetics Institute Britain England UK Varian
Selective breeding could help oysters adapt to ocean acidification

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Selective breeding could help oysters adapt to ocean acidification

"For many seafood lovers. There's nothing better than a raw oysters bar but wasters are threatened by ocean acidification as carbon pollution increases in the atmosphere. It's also absorbed by the ocean that changes the chemistry of seawater it makes it more acidic and reduces the amount of carbonate ions in the water hindering the growth of oysters. They produce calcium carbonate shells. So when you limit the carbon available this limits their ability to grow the calcium carbonate shells that susan pitzer a research fellow at the university of stirling in the uk. Her research suggests one way. That may help. Bolster farmers adapt fits or recently studied. Sydney rock wasters. That had been selectively bred in australia for fast growth and disease resistance. She found that the oysters were also more resilient to acidification because they used a different mechanism to build their shells acidification. You d see a small noises in shells but with these selectively bred. Wasters what they were able to do is maintain shell growth so she has selective breeding may be one way

Susan Pitzer University Of Stirling Disease Resistance Sydney UK Australia
"research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"I am Ethan. You cur, joined by Jeff Wagstaff, Kimberly and Doc are not here. Although Doc will pop in for the next segment here to tell us what's new in medicine today. But right now, a recent report by the scientific journal Nature Medicine claimed that if more people wore masks, as many as 130,000 fatalities, Could be prevented by February. But further investigation has shown that their initial data was flawed. So what are we supposed to believe? I don't know. But joining us to discuss is Philip Magnus. Research fellow at the Independent Institute as well, a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. Thank you for being here, Phil. Thanks for having me, of course. Now tell us about this study that was published by nature medicine. Your listeners may remember about two weeks ago, there's a major headline grabbing study that claimed that if Americans would increase the rate of mask adoption 130,000 lives could be saved by January or maybe early February on this study was cited by Anthony Fauci, Joe Biden is referenced in several times. It's been all over the media. The problem with this study is that was based on some outdated data on the current rate that Americans are using masks. So he read into the study itself that claims that as of late September, only 49% of Americans were even wearing masks when they got in public. Come with the statistic is it's outdated by at least 3 to 4 months. This was based on a survey that had been done back in the spring, when mask of use was not as common and when experts recommend more divided them on the subject. What happens is if we look at more recent serving data on how prevalent mass graves for in the United States is actually above 80% Bill, I'm curious. How do you feel mask wearing can affect the virus. At this point based on your research. Well, the science on mouse does seem to support the notion that they are a protective advice for a protective device for other people. This is why they've been used in hospitals or better part of a century. Yet at the same time, they aren't a magic bullet. They aren't something that's going to Clinton make the virus go away if we always thought mask. Unfortunately, I think what's happened in the past several months is a narrative has emerged around mass views. Has treated them is that it was a measure of the difficult on Lee Americans would adopt this public health measure. The virus itself would be controlled. And what we're seeing, actually, in the evidence is that the benefits of masking though not a negligible were overstated. It was treated as more of a magic bullet than a preventative measure among many different things that people can do to stem the buyers. You know what's really crazy. Phil, is that How sporadic. The different mask mandates are, depending on where you go here in Florida in Tampa, where I live, it's pretty much everywhere. Everywhere you go it Zeman three error to see someone not wearing a mask than people wearing them because they wear them everywhere will last weekend, my wife and I traveled to the opposite side of the state. Say Augustine, Florida and spent the weekend And it was insane. Some places that you went. It was like it is here in Tampa. Everybody wearing masks signs on the doors. You know, you can't enter without a mask. Then we went to this pizza place to get dinner. Luckily, there is an outdoor courtyard so we could sit outdoors with a nice breeze. But when we walked in, I almost turned around and walked right back out. Nobody had mass son and including the servers s. Oh, it's just strange and it was like that all over the city of ST Augustine. Some places you'd see him some places you don't Sometimes there was a mix. I think there's been a mixed message here from from the governor from our mayors and leadership. What do you think? I know Biden has basically said that he will institute a national mask mandate if necessary. What are your thoughts? Right. So sort of this goes all the way back to the spring. If you remember when Anthony's Palocci and the surgeon general and the World Health organization even back in March and April, they were giving very mixed messages about what Master do And sometimes they even went on technology went on 60 minutes and said that master not effective. Turns out that there were other political reasons behind some of these claims. But that miss mixed messaging really get the country off on a unkind of the wrong course. And solar is basically until the summer to really correct that, when mask used became Much more common what we are seeing in the data that urban areas, large urban areas tend to have much higher rates of vast usage of the often approaches near universality, so upwards of 90% of people in most major cities Are reporting that they wear math. That number does drop off a bit. If you move away from major cities in the smaller towns and rural regions, But still, even in the rural regions. It's clear majority that's wearing that. Oftentimes upwards of 70 to 80% of the public. So we caught up with a lot of the misinformation to happen, even though the reason consistency in the nationwide you know still one of the things that I believe the research will will. After this is all over and people take a look back. I think that originally when Dr Fauci was talking about He wasn't sure of the effectiveness of mask. I think there was a major concern by the government by CBC by W. H. O That if they said to wear masks that there would be a run on mask much like there is Right on toilet paper and paper towels today. So a smudges. I agree with you. I think some of that initial information was misleading. But I also believe it was misleading for our own good so that the medical professionals doctors, nurses on the front line, Our first responders would have first access to pee pee. Um My concern now is with mask wearing now that we're in, you know, it seems like day 4000 of this pandemic that people are beginning to have Coben fatigue. And they start to release and reduce their Their guard. I'll give you a perfect example. Listeners of the regular listeners of this show know that I am a caretaker for my father. We were going to have My daughter. And my mother in law for Thanksgiving, who both households. Quarantine and with all of the news this week, even though they're quarantining they're urging. Don't bring people into your home that don't live there. We canceled even that among quarantine people I would at this point. I hope the country agrees that we need to air on the side of caution so we can get this virus under control. I think that's absolutely the case. I mean, Our own risk assessment and risk aversion is going to be our best guide moving forward. Unfortunately, we've fallen into a bit of a trap here because not only do we have coded fatigue we have Fatigue from the lockdowns fatigue from all these blunt instruments of policy that we adopted in the spring, and now they're talking about bringing them back. And in some states, they have even brought elements of this back. People are starting to get wary of that, and what it does is it reduces the public's willingness to comply and participate in these measures that they were more willing to tolerate that in the spring? To complicate that the mixed messaging that we've got many scientific Community members. Many public health officials up into including this study that was published in nature is that evidence is often set aside for some of the political arguments that are being made. Unfortunately, that's starting to take its toll on the public's trust in our public health officials in the trust in scientists, which is a really bad situation to be in in the middle of a pandemic, the stolen with us still ongoing and still, ah, very severe threat Theo the individual in public health. Yeah, Phil, it's It's strange because I told you this the other day, Jeff that everything has been so politicized, especially the mask this and that there's conspiracy theorists out there, for instance, anecdotally, my wife and I went and bought. She bought a piece of furniture about an hour south of Tampa. Down in Britain. We drove down there to get it. It was an older woman..

Anthony Fauci Phil Tampa Nature Medicine Joe Biden Jeff Wagstaff Doc Florida American Institute for Economi Philip Magnus Ethan Research fellow Independent Institute Fatigue senior research fellow United States ST Augustine Zeman Clinton
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 1 year ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

Between The Lines

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

"Well, you'd have to be living under a rock not to notice that Australia, is radically different security environment than walls just two years ago. The Prime Minister he's locked into the situation to the nineteen thirties, and in the last six months, we've seen a massive increase to the budgets for defense and our intelligence agencies. Now, the external threats are undeniable. You just think of the rising power of China, but are we at risk of undermining our political freedoms by expanding the powers of security agencies too much. Hell big and powerful. Should we let security agencies get? And what kind of oversight exists to ensure that the intelligence is not collected or used for political purposes? What do you think we'll pay the redwoods is the former official historian and the author of several award winning books. He's most recent one is called law politics and intelligence a law of Robert. Hope. Welcome back to the show painter. Thanks very much tom thanks for having me and just into carol she's a visiting fellow and senior research fellow at the national. Security, college it you good to be with you again just enter right to be thanks Tom. Now let's start with the hope commissions in the seventies and eighties Peter. This is your faces take us back to that time. Why are those commissions so important well between the mid seventies in the mid eighties over ten year period three successive Prime Ministers Whitlam Fraser and Hoke commissioned the same man just as good hope to conduct major inquiries into the intelligence agencies What he set up was not just not just any inquiry into a agency in Asia was the declared one and quite controversial that he set up a whole system for the agencies. Sitting out what each what agencies Australia needed, what each one should do, and what should not do how they should interact with each other, how they should interact with departments with individual ministers with the cabinet and cabinet committees and with the international partners Those we now know is five is and he emphasized a number of things. He particularly emphasized the intelligence system should serve the whole of government and not be unduly influenced as it was when he started by one or two very powerful departments, and towards that end, he said that should be a central coordinating agency which would only be invoked with assessment and he allocated collection assessment and dissemination different agencies. this one would be only concerned with assessment on like the American CIA and with its the independence of its. Assessments guaranteed by legislation. To, be independent from ministerial oh departmental. Precious. and. He said a of other things about the relationships between intelligence and lure enforcement agencies. Keeping Intelligence and policy making separate keeping intelligence and law enforcement separate were among the the basic

Australia TOM Prime Minister CIA Visiting Fellow Whitlam Fraser China Senior Research Fellow Official Peter Asia Hoke
"research fellow" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KTRH

"Did you see Tucker Carlson last night? You usually did I watch? Yes. Did you see Chris Ruffo, the research fellow it Discovery Institute. About a serious of white privilege. Seven. Ours that are going on in our federal agencies. Yeah, I We've reported it. I reported the one that was at Alamogordo. Last week. Well, this word through this I did this story. His piece really got my attention for those. You who maybe missed it last night, Right here is what he says is going on in our federal agencies right now. Serve some examples. If you will of critical that this is how they refer to it critical race thinking first the Treasury Department I broke the story on the Treasury Department, which held AH seminar earlier this year from a man named Howard Ross, a diversity trainer who has build the federal government more than $5 million. Over the past 15 years conducting seminars on critical race theory on DH, he told Treasury employees essentially that America was a fundamentally white supremacist country, and I quote virtually all white people uphold the system of racism. And white superiority and was essentially denouncing the country and asking white employees at the Treasury Department and affiliated organizations to accept their white privilege. Except they're white racial superiority and accept essentially all of the baggage that comes with this reducible essence of whiteness. Holy crab in your tax dollars. Your federal tax dollars are going to pay for this. Yeah, the headline. I don't know if this is the same person who did the teaching, But it was, ah, the people who lose safeguard our nuclear Stockpiles in Alamogordo. They had to go through that to go through to it sounds like from what he was saying in another part of the interview, the FBI has gone through it. The FBI. Wow, 7 50 time for traffic.

Treasury Department Alamogordo Treasury FBI Tucker Carlson Chris Ruffo Discovery Institute Howard Ross research fellow America
Translucent Frog Optics Dial In Camo Color

60-Second Science

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Translucent Frog Optics Dial In Camo Color

"Ocean animals have a clever form of camouflage transparent, but being through as far less common on land and was a few reasons why that might be Jim Barnett is a postdoctoral research fellow at McMaster University in Ontario Canada differences between air and walters. Surrounding media means life interacts differently with a transparent organisms body tissues. Any Ocean light is always coming from above and the background is less variable, but in jungle. CANOPIES light is coming from all over the place and the background is far more variable. Enter a little critter called the glass frog. It's not actually transparent. It's translucent that means it's skin in some places is thin enough that you can actually see its internal or hard at work most of the time when you see photograph of these folks, they're taking onto quite controlled conditions with either strong lighting like powerful flash. Photograph underneath on a piece of glass, and it's really the the bellies which are transparent and these folks are pretty small and thin and quite delicate Sarah. If you have a powerful flash on your camera, you can tell just lost light through them and they look pretty transparent. Barnett says the frogs translucent skin is actually a novel camouflage strategy that no one's ever really studied. Until now we're thinks is happening is that light is traveling through the frog interacting with the pigmentation about a lot of it does pass through the frog and bounces off the background Some of that light will be absorbed by the background underneath Roque. This'll some reflected of that becker a come back through the frog. So if a glass frog is sitting on a break greenleaf. In the jungle canopy, the light passing through its thin skin and onto the leaf, make the frog appear Brenner and color matching more closely with the leaf. The jungle canopy is filled with leaves, but it's also filled with predators, birds, snakes, mammals, and even invertebrates in search of their next meal these animals acquaint. Visual Systems are pretty cute into finding differences luminance brightness between different patches. So the quite good at finding prey based on differences between the background on the animals brightness and by being translucent sees folks are able to have an adaptive camouflage. So regardless of whether the leaf is dark or bright if the glass frog is sitting on it, it will appear to change to more closely matches background the study by Barnett and calling is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. With around one hundred, fifty known species of glass frogs in the World Barnett says the next project is to find out if the franc's translucence may differ based on their individual habitats. One thing is certain. It'll be hard to see what they find.

Jim Barnett Mcmaster University Postdoctoral Research Canada Walters Ontario Becker National Academy Of Sciences Brenner
Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

Judaism Unbound

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

"Reo is the CO founder and executive director of a mood. She's a Jewish educator performer and perpetual student who is a former Fulbright research fellow and has taught at the national hoverer institute door to door tutoring and was the two thousand nine. Hundred thousand feature teacher at the Jewish singing retreat. Let my people sing Mirror Rivera is a board member of a mood where she also serves as resident rabbi. She has rabbinic ordination from the Jewish, theological seminary and services a rabbi at New York's Roman Nu- She has also board certified Chaplain Mirror. Rivera is also co chair of the Rabbinical Council of Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay. Fridge. And the CO founder with Rene L. Hill of Harlem. Have Ruta a brave space for Jews of Color Allies and co-conspirators in partnership with the Community of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company before rabbinical school she taught hundreds of New York City Public School children through the National Dance Institute Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera, welcome to Judaism unbounded. So great to have you. Here, thank you. We're really excited to talk about a mood. It's such an interesting and important project. I'll give a little bias in that. I'm really interested in this in particular because I've been on the board of Sfar for many years, which is the issue of the Torah Academy, the Talmud Academy for lgbtq folks are that comes out of the Experience Lgbtq Q. Folks. It's probably a better way to say it and. When I first heard about a mood I was so excited to hear that there was something that seemed similar from edge use of color perspective. So it's something that I've really wanted to explore for a long time that both of us have and and we're really thrilled to finally have this opportunity. So Mirror I was wondering if we could start with a little bit of the origin story of a mood. In, two, thousand, eighteen, I was invited to be in the Selah Cohort fifteen of bend the arc four juice of color by Jews of color and there I met Ya McCoy will meet her the year previously. And part of that training. Was a study that we that she called. J O C. Tour Academy. And it was several afternoons where we would look text from an anti oppression lands, and at the end of that hurt I was sitting with you who the webster was hard the cohurt. We looked at each other and I said, why does this have to be only part of this training? We need this to be real, and so we started talking with start talking about that. So that was may of two, thousand eighteen. By June or July. Are Corman had come back from Israel at, pass it to you. I did a fulbright year in Israel I live in. Jerusalem and when it came back, I became involved in. J. Fridge which is to cherish on economic justice. And Colored. Caucus. Part of my involvement. J.. Fridge I was connected to Huda Webster An. I approached you Huta saying that I wanted to teach a small class on the politics of Hebrew pronunciation and I wanted to teach it for Jews of color of an Alexi that you're smiling because acid is immensely nerdy deeply nerdy. Added belts deeply important but you huda one up to me and he said what if instead of just having your class, we actually create a container for this kind of learning to happen more often. and. So that really launched the idea of. Jesus, Colored Tour Academy, which became a mood colored tour academy and we started out by a every other week having a person in the community, a Jewish person of color in a community teach whatever they wanted and we we started her first Beta run I'm really got to see what what kinds of topics were interesting. How did the groups of people showed up for different topics differ in and we basically got to conduct all this research We launched our first full year after the high holidays. This past fall in two thousand nineteen. And we just completed our first full year of classes. We got here because for as long as there have been Jewish. People color navigating predominantly white Jewish space the roots have been growing and deepening. People like you. Huda. Myself were able to found something like this because of all that work that had been happening. JESSOP. Color entering wet Jewish is being Jewish spaces and also getting to know one another.

Mirror Rivera Co Founder Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera Colored Tour Academy Israel Rabbinical Council Of Jews Ya Mccoy Huda Webster J O C. Tour Academy National Hoverer Institute Research Fellow Alexi REO New York Huta Martha Graham Dance Company Harlem Torah Academy Jerusalem JAY
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 2 years ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
Free Yourself From Conflict

The LEADx Show

04:50 min | 2 years ago

Free Yourself From Conflict

"Thanks for joining today's Webinar, an optimal outcomes are host. Today is the founder and CEO. Alignment Strategies Group the near based consulting firm that advises CEOS in their executive teams on how to optimize organizational health and growth. She's the author of optimal outcomes for yourself from conflict at work at home in life, which was selected as the Financial Times Book of the month Jennifer is A. A keynote speaker at fortune, five hundred companies public institutions in innovative fast-growing startups, where she inspires audiences of all kinds including those Google Harvard in tax, and in her popular course at university, a former counter-terrorism research fellow with the US Department of Homeland Security, she is a graduate of Tufts. University and holds a PhD in social organizational psychology from Columbia. Please welcome Dr Jennifer Goldman wetzlar. These are trying times that we're in. We are in the midst right now. Two months into the global pandemic. Of Corona virus and we're facing a big tough global problem. The likes of which most of us have never seen in our lifetimes. I've spent my career studying and working with incredibly tough problems, none on this scale, but tough problems nonetheless. Typically the tougher the problem, the more likely it is to capture my interest, and the more likely I am to be helpful. This has been true for me since I was A. So I didn't want to solve just one or two sides of the Rubik's Cube I wanted to solve all six sides while Hula hooping. and. That's why today we're going to be talking about a tough problem of type of problem conflict. That comes back. No matter how many times you people have tried to resolve it. Will be talking about recurring conflicts. And what to do when your efforts to resolve those conflicts fail. So in a minute I'm going to be asking you to think of a conflict situation. You know about that. You can apply your situation well, so you can apply these practices to that situation. But I. WanNa give you an introduction to this work. In Nineteen, seventy, three one of my mentors, Dr Morton Deutsch widely considered father of conflict resolution, wrote a book called the resolution of conflict and in it he detailed research that he and his colleagues had done, which basically showed that conflict lead to more conflict and cooperation leads to more cooperation. When I learned that all I can think was well if that's true, how do we get out of this conflict loop? And how do we get on to the cooperation loop? Well I've now spent the last thirteen years trying to answer those questions and the answers are in the book that I've written optimal outcomes that we're talking about today. My research began with a fellowship from the US Department of Homeland Security in two thousand and two, and since then in my role as CEO and founder of Alignment Strategies Group I've worked with. Leaders. All kinds of different organizations from innovative fast-growing startups to Fortune five hundred companies to academic institutions to global nonprofits. And what I've done is helped them by using the optimal outcomes method to address the most challenging situations that they have faced. And I'd like to bring some of that work here for you today, so I'll be talking about a specific clans situation throughout today's Webinar. But I also want this presentation to be highly relevant to you so I'd like to take a moment now to ask you to think of a situation that you know about. It could be one from your own life, or it could be one that you're helping other people with, or it could be one that you know about simply from watching the news. And I'd like to ask you to answer two questions. What who first of all you're thinking about a conflict situation, but it may be one that you don't even necessarily think about as quote unquote conflict. It may be something that simply recurs over and over again. No matter how many times you or other people have tried to resolve, it could be the daily fight with your spouse about the dishes in the sink, or it could be how to track down that colleague. That's always been hard to reach a now that you're working remotely is even more difficult to find. Get the answers that you meet, or it could be about politics and elections in presidential elections, and how to have conversations about those without getting caught in a cycle of frustration with friends and colleagues and family.

Founder And Ceo Us Department Of Homeland Secu Dr Jennifer Goldman Financial Times CEO Alignment Strategies Group Fortune Dr Morton Deutsch Research Fellow Harvard Google Tufts Founder Of Alignment Strategie Jennifer Executive Columbia
"research fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Immigrants in the country illegally heritage foundation senior research fellow for homeland security Laura rea says the majority of the court did not take into account the doctors should never have been implemented the Supreme Court could have simply said this rescission was lawful because the Obama administration was without authority either by Congress or the constitution to create this program in the first place for now the immigrants to retain their protection from deportation as well as their authorization to work in the U. S. even though they are in the country illegally racial tension was probably during a house hearing on police reform here are the details from correspondent Bernie but at a house Judiciary Committee hearing on the justice and policing act Louisiana Democrat Cedric Richmond got into a very contentious exchange of congressman Matt Gaetz says a Florida Republican asks are you suggesting that you're certain none of us have non white children it is about black males in the streets how to do it in a move one of them happens to be your kid I'm concerned about him too and clearly I'm more concerned about him then you'll socialist we I think so for my family I do any better than Washington correspondent Karen Travers reports even as a crowd of virus spreads rapidly around the world China is being called on to relieve the financial burden on the African African nations have called for a two year suspension of debt payments another relief that would allow them to focus resources on the health crisis but China Africa's biggest creditor has not indicated it will offer a sweeping solution and experts say will focus instead on bilateral arrangements with countries that is correspondent Karen jam is reporting on Wall Street right now the Dow is down sixty six points or the stories it town home dot com Thursday June eighteenth two thousand twenty you are listening to the Riley update here's what's happening across our nation a former Atlanta police officer faces the death penalty for the killing of a shard Brooks meanwhile some Atlanta cops call in sick revolting new cases of the virus hit record highs in six states the NBA unveils his plan to bring back pro basketball is it time for the Dixie chicks they changed their name also ahead American police may backlash against the anti cop movement but first stories in Georgia charging Garrett Ralph with eleven counts in the killing every shard Brooks looting felony murder if convicted Mr Ralph could get the death penalty meantime a number of Atlanta police officers called in sick last night I will deal with this in my upcoming commentary the department justice targeting social media companies like Facebook and Twitter issuing new proposals that would end the legal protections for content published on those sites what forms could face big penalties for posts that promote cyber stalking terrorism defamation or child exploitation six states now reporting the highest level of coal with infections since the contagion began Florida Texas Arizona Oklahoma Oregon and Nevada confirming the biggest single day spikes on record nineteen other states seeing cases rise since re opening in may covert is killed more than a hundred and twenty thousand Americans in less than four months the National Basketball Association releasing all one hundred thirteen page plan to bring basketball back by July twenty two teams will relocate to Disney world in Orlando after a mandatory quarantine period players will be sequestered in three hotels the athletes will be allowed to roam around the properties but they will stay primarily isolated the Dixie chicks could be the next act to change their name just days after another trio lady antebellum became lady AA users on social media are targeting the checks according to a writer for variety the word Dixie conjures up a time and place of bondage for black people farewell Dixie cups in a moment we'll American police revolt right back with it Edward and his wife Margaret we're looking forward to retirement Edward started having serious health issues a few years before he turned sixty five and had to take an unplanned early retirement the loss of income and medical bills meant that word could not afford his expenses including the premiums on a one million dollar life insurance policy faced with lapsing their policy for nothing Edward and Margaret turned to Coventry direct.

senior research fellow
There Is No 'Second Wave.' The US Is Still Stuck In The First One

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:09 min | 2 years ago

There Is No 'Second Wave.' The US Is Still Stuck In The First One

"Coronavirus cases are surging in more than twenty states but experts say the recent surge of covered nineteen cases in places such as Arizona and Texas and Florida are not indicative of a second wave of infection they're part of the initial rolling wave of cases that have previously ravaged Illinois New Jersey and New York in both Florida and Arizona restaurants that had reopened the indoor dining have since closed after employees contracted covered nineteen epidemiologist Chelsea Boyd is a research fellow at nonpartisan and nonprofit R. street institute she joined us earlier on Skype to talk about the search this isn't the second wave we never really got rid of command this is just an extension of the first wave opening early particularly and we were seeing this and a lot of the states that did open early just meant that they hadn't tamped down the levels enough ease the summer possibly something that could stop corona virus the heat and humidity that comes with the season in many parts of our country it's unlikely that summer is going to compete lately around a K. or nine late the virus it does seem that cove it is less likely to spread widely if you're outside so being and doing more things outside will hopefully help and not have people trying to congregate so much indoors however that is not to say that there's not a risk of contracting co bad if you're interacting with people in close contact outside and without masks layering is many protections into your activities and behavior is the best way to go should the whole country pretty much stayed on lock down for at least a month longer I think that's really difficult to answer some of it is that if you would come out of locker down slowly and if people had worn masks and not started congregating in groups obviously we all saw the pictures of certain places particularly beaches was a big one where people were not social distancing at all and are within close contact with people for long periods of time you're just asking for coverage to start spreading if people had worn masks at the beach it probably would have helped a little but it is still not a great idea to congregate where there's a lot of

Arizona Texas New Jersey New York Chelsea Boyd Research Fellow R. Street Institute Florida Illinois Skype
"research fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John that Sir this is the John Johnson was a research fellow with the proper environment a research center in Bozeman Montana is also an attorney at the Pacific legal foundation and he is constructed the way forward what the problem is and mines from the nineteenth century it was a process of capitalism and growth and progress and going out there and taking risks well the risks included cleaning up afterwards but they're all gone our ancestors have left us with a burden that right now is not being addressed by the federal government or the state governments they don't even know how many lines there are how dangerous it is we can estimate that they're damaging to the ground water we can also estimate that there are enormous risks to people who traveled throughout the west this is chiefly everything west of Kansas is at risk including California which last time I checked is a fairly heavily settled state however there are things to be done John is that I learned from you we identified Superfund EPA and clean water act not created in the twentieth century to be problems but they are when it comes to their regulations so you have very practical concise as I've suggestions the first is to eliminate disincentives for the super fund for the clean water act for the EPA what does that look like Jonathan I think it means owning up to the fact that their statutes while well intentioned don't work the problems like this find in the clean water act were designed with identified polluters in mind someone who put in a pipe and dumps pollution today into a stream and abandoned mines don't work under the same system the biggest thing is get rid of the disincentives for good Samaritans to contribute as we discussed earlier there are lots of groups that would happily pay their own money to clean up the site that mining companies who could profit from processing the waste utility companies who could lower the cost to clean drinking water supply side dressing and stream conservation groups have an interest in healthy streams are healthy fish populations but can't in last week's Ashley's pollution sources but right now the regulations and the threat of liability under Superfund clean water act are so great that essentially none of these groups can even try to help out let's go to that site let me go to details because at this point I'm reading heavily and I'm thinking you're kidding okay the EPA has regional staff who are to be applied to when you see as a good Samaritan under the good Samaritan initiative of two thousand and seven to address the region's threat by this abandoned mine the water inside of it for the rest to cat campers or travelers or residents all right however when you apply you get a form letter back how is that I mean Johnson did they need to read your book at EPA central is that what we need to rapidly get a form letter hopefully they are be it that's right that the good Samaritan program while certainly well intentioned doesn't give good Samaritans the protection they really needed to it was noted that kaiden socket meaning it's not even binding on the agency could be withdrawn tomorrow with a moment's notice so it doesn't really provide protection to it more more of a please do that please go just trust us it'll be okay but it doesn't actually provide any protection that anyone can rely on and that's why it open we haven't really worked out let's talk about what it doesn't provide for you have to pay for it you have to pay for a search just in case there's a deep pocket pistol live a hundred and sixty years later and you don't get an agreement that waives your risks if something bad goes hot on another words EPA isn't looking to partner with you they're looking to supervise you have I miss read this no that's exactly right and to some extent that's because of the way the Congress wrote the clean water act and Superfund the agency doesn't have that much discretion to provide them the protection it needs to which is why Congress needs intervene but big you're absolutely right that one of the problems is that they have program quite unnecessary bureaucracy in the way of good Samaritans they have to do a bunch of steps they don't really have anything to do with what are the environmental conditions of the site and what can we do to fix them one wag who happens to be a judge commenting on this lengthy process because it has been litigated there have been good Samaritans to say Hey what the heck we're trying to do something positive here you know Mark Twain no one let never let a good deed go unpunished self behind where we were following mark Twain's guidance ugh the judge wrote do nothing that's the alternative and that is the best choice I mean right now Jonathan if a good Samaritan was in front of us we say all right fine we acknowledge your your benevolence but our recommendation is do nothing that would be a wise counsel that's exactly right and that's why these groups though they've persistently expressed interest in doing it have done nothing if they go to any of their lawyers whether the mining company for anyone else the first thing was it absolutely not at the risk are too great you would bankrupt the company this organisation and however much we might want to solve the environmental problem over here in and deal with as a band in mind it's not worth that kind of rate limit red tape now's the there's a recommendation I think everybody's smiling how we do that the clean water act is one way to do it but the permit process it looks like it's constructed again for the twentieth century not for an abandoned mine from eighteen fifty that's right the purposes set up we are trying to regulate a company that's polluting that might not want to be regulated or might have conflicting interests it's not set up to work with a partner like a good Samaritan where their interest in his interests are aligned in cleaning up the abandoned nine program I have a couple recommendations in the book in the paper about how to streamline the process for them so that you give them some trust you try to help them out by giving them guidance to the front and they know what they can do to make a payment process as cheap and quick as possible and so far that guided hasn't provided EPA EPA to basically put all of the burdens on the American security figured out and they've largely been able unable to and there no rewards for good Samaritans in other words you take all these risks you clean up the mind and you have pictures of before and after eighteen eighty and nineteen ninety nine and what we're talking about is regulatory you just have to take one glance at any of these lines in your city and you look at the Cannes gold mine catastrophe and you see what happens if you don't clean up of mine but we come to this part and here's the part that made me smile because if you hired a law firm that said go ahead you fire that law firm right away the litigation research Jonathan the PA won't take on the litigation risk and waive it if you're doing all this good work that's right and that's another area where Congress is somewhat tidy kids hand but because of the way the clean water act is written EPA can't even in my expeditions because actually anyone in the country could sue a good Samaritan and the clean water act and it is actually happened where mining companies and other groups have tried to do good command of project to clean up abandoned nine in exchange for a permit and at the end of the day they did the work they got the permit in a local special interest groups sued and blocked it I could deny them the benefit of the bargain and unless Congress acts to provide some sort of litigation protection there's not much you can do to help to solve that problem let's address Montana where the property environment a research center is headquartered in Bozeman Montana you're part of this you can take the lead here you've got very sophisticated lawmakers and willing willing population to clean up the minds at that you don't even know exist in.

John Johnson research fellow Montana attorney Pacific legal foundation Bozeman
To adapt to climate change, some tea growers must plan ahead

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

To adapt to climate change, some tea growers must plan ahead

"T is the second most consumed drink on earth after water but in many places. Climate Change threatens tea production for example in Kenya. Malawi Africa's top tea producing countries. They are experiencing warmer temperatures average and higher frequency off hot weather events. That's no middle. A research fellow at the University of Leeds in the UK. She says during a heat wave the leaves on tea. Bushes can scorch and turn Brown. Drought can make the problem. Even worse middle is part of a project that generates site specific predictions of Future T. growing conditions in Kenya and Malawi. Growers can use the information to adapt for example by planting shade trees near crops or starting to grow more heat tolerant varieties of tea. It takes eight to nine. Ni Os for newly planted T- Bush to become productive and an average economic life cycle of T. Bush is around sixty to eighty years. So middle says the choices. Growers make now will affect their livelihood for decades to come this highlights. How crucial informed longtime decision making is for the sector? I think to know what the future holds is really important for. The

Kenya Malawi T. Bush University Of Leeds Research Fellow Brown UK Africa
"research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

"And show it's a pleasure to be with you on a Monday night the Democrats pushed hard for that extra six hundred dollars for those on unemployment well now now they're trying to get back to work and the six hundred Bucks maybe costing us more than we actually thought six hundred dollars a week I thought we talked about that with Rachel grizlr who is a research fellow in economics budget and entitlements at the heritage foundation Rachel welcome back to the program thank you very large so what do we do when we have a group of people who were employed at jobs they were unexpectedly unemployed as the rush to shut down America happen and now that they're unemployed they're actually in some cases making more money than they were when they were actually making a job and I think some of them find it attractive so attractive they're actually telling their employers I don't want to come back to work if I come back to work I have to work and I make less money how did we end up with a program that creates that kind of perverse incentives well that's the reason I got a problem here is that in trying to get benefits out the door quickly and trying to create a higher benefit level than we normally provide your unemployment harbors just said we're going to get everybody six hundred dollars a week more but what has done is made is that a majority of Americans can actually make more by losing their jobs and they can by keeping their jobs and so we already think that this is impacted the number of people who have filed for unemployment claims and now is we're starting to see some states we open it's going to be difficult for some of those businesses to be able to get their workers to come back and fix all those positions start policing because interested again and we've already heard from restaurant owners in the hotel industry in particular where you tend to have lower wage earners you know somebody who is making about the twenty fifth percentile versions they're going to get an extra fifty percent every week if they stay home first is that they go back to work that's a difference of five thousand dollars over the course of four months this is a really bad situation we have put people and that they can make more I'm not working on my work okay now Rachel at least on paper and you feel free to tell me Lars what a naive view of this but but if if you got people who had a job they got sent home another employer says we're going to re open and we're gonna we want to hire you back when the employee says I'm not come back to work boss I'm making more money and I like sitting on the couch playing video games all day long isn't a simple solution then that their employer tells the unemployment division the employment office my worker won't come back to work and at that point the employment division says guess what your benefits just ended or why is it not that simple well you know part of it is that simple that's the case with the state owned programs usually only have state level unemployment insurance but now we have two layers of it and that initial six hundred dollars to the federal government is not contingent on the same requirements are multiplied at the state level I will say it has been helpful to you some of the governors getting out there and I'm sending a message to workers saying look our system was designed to be there for people who don't have job options and if you are given an option to come back you need to take that are you can't file for these benefits and they can do that for their own benefits that replace about fifty percent of workers wages but the way that Congress were to invest six hundred dollar additional benefit it actually does allow workers to just say I am choosing to not go to work because of any reason related to cover ninety so presumably they could at least they'll get that six hundred dollars but their state may be able to cut them off from their fifty percent so in other words they they they won't get the regular unemployment benefits anymore but they'll still be getting twenty four twenty five hundred dollars a month for doing absolutely nothing and when does that end that is until I thirty first but we are already hearing called to potentially extend that and we don't even know yet if necessary no we haven't seen what it looks like it's still the very beginning of may and that's three months off so I think it's too soon to be talking about potentially extending this benefit you know I don't know if you're aware of this or not I'm talking to Rachel grise lawyer who is a research fellow in economics budget and entitlements at heritage but Rachel I just found this out an awful lot of the schools systems have decided to furlough some of their teachers but only a small furlough they've told them you're getting one day a week off well that's twenty percent of their regular paycheck at least in my neck of the woods they're telling these teachers by putting you off work on Fridays let's say that's the day off that you get once a week you qualify for the six hundred Bucks a week and so you have teachers who at least in my neck of the woods are reasonably well paid already who are saying so I get to work four days a week instead of five and because my paycheck is cut by twenty percent I get an extra six hundred dollars a week from this entitlement that's an extraordinary that's that makes it even worse these are truly not people who are unemployed they're still working four days a week and they're getting eighty percent of the regular paycheck plus six hundred which puts them again well ahead of the game wow yeah I haven't heard about those types of situations but you know unfortunately something that was set up to try and help people during a short term crisis and bridge the gap so that people don't lose all their income is even you know the used and misused in ways that weren't intended well and and I don't know why I mean for all the years and decades the Congress right rights legislation you'd think that some of these people writing these plans would no you don't right these kinds of things into them currently the requirement to get the six hundred Bucks is that you've lost at least ten percent of your job well they assume that a lot of people would have lost a hundred percent of their previous job but apparently the threshold for getting the six hundred Bucks is ten percent of your employment so somebody who loses one day every two weeks of work is going to qualify for six hundred Bucks extra per week which means there's almost nobody who isn't gonna end up ahead of the game financially except of course the taxpayers exactly and I you know people realize that there were members of Congress particularly the Senate the Chargers office he said Hey let's just do it at least happened at a hundred percent of people's previous wages so that they don't actually make more on unemployment but that was blocked in some of those numbers on the left we're saying Hey it's not the worst thing in the world if we force the destroyers to raise their wages to try and get the workers to come back but that's not recognizing the reality of the situation that employers can just raise wages by fifty percent and then hike up their prices also when we're already in an economic downturn that's different because those businesses that have to shutter their doors for good well I'm hoping that a lot of those employers out there will say if we can legitimately give you your job back you need to come back to work if you decline to come back to work then we tell the employment division they're not willing to come back to work and they are therefore not entitled unemployment they may get the extra six hundred Bucks but they won't get you know they won't get at least unemployment plus six hundred Bucks a week for not doing anything right and refusing to come back to work Rachel thanks so very much I appreciate you taking the time tonight my pleasure thank you that's Rachel grows or from the heritage foundation by the way from our email filed today in you can always send more to talk at Lars Larsen dot com this is from Bob Lars how do you know or do you know about the long term problem with land theft and the Los Angeles VA hospital yes I do we've talked about it many times there's been fraud and theft and possible extortion almost four hundred acres originally designated for helping homeless veterans none of it has been used for what it was intended for I'm in direct contact with the Vietnam vet who is currently fighting the issue it's the same bad who's.

Rachel grizlr research fellow
"research fellow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KCRW

"Children she has a PhD in math from UC San Diego and is a research fellow at UCLA to see a scan of her notes from his visit our website the mark dot org T. S. we believe it is phone number from the story but we tried it and it doesn't work anymore anyway remember you can purchase your story at them off dot org check out this page okay so I really need help somebody that story when I was a sophomore in college the night before my mother wants to come out to pick me up she called up did she said okay I'm going to be there at you know two thirty she gave me a very specific time which was very unlike my mother because you know choose flighty she didn't really do things that way and I said well why why exactly at two thirty or one thirty whatever time she told me and she said well yeah I'm going to be there because I love the park I'm going to set the house on fire she arrived at my apartment had exactly whatever the assigned time wise early afternoon and she says to me okay I'm really nervous you have to drive home you are burning house and I said but I don't know how to drive and my mother had like this top ranked on the car I think it was called maverick it was yellow and black and I had to drive home well my mother's in the car hysterical because we're going to be going home to our house the top player and I have to act like it I actually did which I'll give you the details if you want to know the details but I only have a minute okay that's the end of my story so I'll give you the rest of the details this is like a machine gun to go off now and tell me that my time stops.

San Diego research fellow UCLA
"research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Her and the national fair housing alliance he was a twelve year old from one of five point nine FM one small welcome at this event it was one of my dear brother in a research fellow at the heritage foundation focusing on weapons of mass destruction counter proliferation of Davis institute for national security and foreign policy also happens to be an expert on pandemics is joining someone discuss crime fighters Peter let's talk a little bit about the the corona virus outbreak cell right now it seems to me that everybody is very speculating in the absence of information we don't know the death right we don't know the transmission rate and this is causing tremendous volatility in panic and yet the media are focusing in for some reason I'm president trump I have this right yeah pretty much I think that's I think that's the case I mean I'm very comfortable with the administration is done and if you look at the numbers we're talking about sixteen cases here in the United States and then a number another forty some plastic came from the diamond princess overseas on a cruise ship and we've not had any deaths here in the United States fortunately we all we are concerned about this one patient that doesn't seem to have traveled overseas or been in contact with anybody with with corona virus and we had a number of people who have recovered so I think I think the president is is doing and the administration is is that he's doing a very solid job on this they've done all the things I would have said they should have done in developing a task force getting information out education campaigns are limiting travel limiting travel to China and they were caught under back heels by and so was everybody else by what the Chinese did you know what their cover up and the lack of transparency in the unwillingness to engage in international cooperation coordination on this epidemic so Peter what exactly should the federal government be doing in these cases because I know the CDC has plans in place to deal with the flu RT hearing rumors about shortages of testing kids for example what what was the federal government's will normally be here and it is the federal government really being caught up short here as media seem to be suggesting no I think I think the administration do a much better job than you would see in most in most of the media I mean all the media such big term right and I think some are giving him the credit that they're there too but there are challenges right this is a dynamic situation we're dealing with this this virus in over fifty countries and territories around the world not just here in the United States were concerned about what's happening over there and how this how this virus might be spreading there are concerns about the supply chain for instance you know a lot of our generic drugs are the active ingredients are sourced out of China you probably heard about that you know there could be economic effects in there could be disruptions of everyday life but you know and if I go down my checklist of what's the ministration should be doing I think they've done most of it the real one of the real challenges has been in development and distribution of test kits to to have somebody has who may have flu like symptoms but it's not anything positive for the flu whether they might have this a covert nineteen so with all this said you know what do you put the risk of facts in the United States I know that's a hard question to answer get attacked that you could have you know some sort of explosive outbreak in in a place but with that said I mean right now we have sixty people in a country of three hundred thirty million people who have actually been diagnosed with with corona virus as you make as you say the vast majority of these people have mild cases nobody's actually died in the United States it seems that way like the death rates really do vary widely by country seems like we have a great public health system in fact is number one in the world like the president said and that's fine independent organization Johns Hopkins economist magazine and the national nuclear threat initiative did a study last year on on health security around the world the United States is considered to be the best we have very good public health if you contrast that with what for instance is going on in Iran with the death rate is very high that's because the difference in the public in the public health system but more to point I mean you know we are concerned what I'm concerned about I think others are are concerned about is the fact that we're having a very heavy fleeces season this year and if there is a concern that before we knew about current virus that there were people that may have been infected with aids had tested negative for flu and are out in the population remember you know China sound out about this sort of kind of in December early December they covered it up for three weeks until early January and I think it probably goes back into November in China you get on a general day there eight to ten thousand Chinese or people from China they could be Americans or whatever but eight to travelers from China day land in the United States we can put the travel restrictions in place until February early February so a lot of people could have traveled here that could have been infected people could have had the rotavirus they could have recovered from it they could have had mild like symptoms flu like symptoms never went to a doctor never were hospitalized so there could be people in the population that could be affected could be transmitting this is what we're seeing right now and once again we're still early on in this situation is that about eighty percent of the people suffer mild to medium sort of symptoms or our issues in terms of illness so they may they may just stay home for a couple days and there's questions about its communicable E. like what is it able to be to make what are you contagious and able to but insect other people so there are a lot of questions out there right now that we're trying that we're struggling with and I but I think the administration is taking in the right steps to try to to deal with that well Peter Brooks really appreciate your time and really appreciate the information and it is amazing how much misinformation floating around out there in the absence of actual good information here really appreciate it thanks so much for me coming up when we talk about South Carolina tomorrow he Joe Biden's last stand or is the beginning of Joe Biden's long awaited comeback we're about to find out there's a brand new polls plus is Michael Bloomberg prepared to really harm Joe Biden or anybody else on super Tuesday considering the fact that he is splitting votes with Joe Biden in a bevy of states will be getting that momentarily you're listening to the men's dress one of five point nine FM Washington small W. A. L. he was a twelve year old prodigy when he released his first album as little Stevie Wonder he.

research fellow
"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

"Charges me very supplement this is KGO San Francisco a cumulus stations now on Amazon Alexa open the KGO eight ten scale I'm John this is the John Messer show is Asian welcome Lonnie chat is a professor of public policy at Stanford University and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution line and I've spoken for many years and it's a pleasure to meet you in person we're here to discuss a counter factual which is a fun word for make believe an alternative universe looking into the future I am at the Hoover Institution ins on Stanford university's campus and gorgeous Palo alto California thanks to Hoover and the generosity and support of my sponsors scholar dot com a global technology firm transforming the retail space with digital signage Lonnie of very good evening to you and thank you for this the counter factual is president Warren it is twenty twenty one and the board administration begins to act on the candidate war now president mourns campaign promises about what can be described generally as socialism this is to direct the president's attention against big banks a big technology big pharma big farming all of that so before we go into the details of what senator Warner said so far this word socialism is left over from the twentieth century is there an agreed upon definition that fits all purposes or is that you in the eye of the beholder good evening to you well thank you John it's great to be here with you in person I I think that there is certainly an agreed upon definition of socialism from the perspective of political philosophers who understand it to be a situation where the government controls the means of production and where the government has an exerts a signet makes a gig significant amount of control over of right of different economic resources but I I think in the parlance in the political conversation socialism has come to mean something else has come to mean policy proposals that give more and more power to the federal government in particular to change and transform the nature of the American economy and you know when president trump uses the socialism versus capitalism contracts that's what he means he means sort of policies that would change the way that Americans understand how our economy works in a very fundamental way our company works is transparency the court's markets will of law rule of law absolutely that hence the courts and also eight our conversation a dialogue with the investor class always every day the markets reflect upon that now senator Warren is not said she's going to end markets but the effect would be let's apply first these are general terms but after all she's campaigning and she has an audience and she holds their attention she believes that the boards of major corporations and she has a metric you know how much money it generates that's a moving number of those boards are not to be trusted and therefore those board should be made up of to be named later members who are from the workers of the count of corporation public policy good willed people and also officers are nominated by the federal government this follows registering all corporations nationally not state by state is we doubt do now she in your opinion I understand this is a great big love for Brad and good heavens Congress would have fun slicing it up with that with that change our lives dramatically are we do we really care who is on the board of IBM or Facebook well it it matters because remember the board is tasked with oversight with governance with setting large big picture policies and directions for companies in that sense yeah it'll have an impact of course that the bigger problem is not the specific changes effectuate signed one corporate board versus another again it's a question of philosophy if you say that companies can no longer decide for X. who are to be on the board who are to be in charge of governance and policy you have now given the federal government that extra measure of power over the private economy when the federal government says these are the kinds of people who will govern your organization these are the kinds of philosophies they will have this is their world view then it alters in a very fundamental way our understanding of what the free enterprise system is what it means to have a market based economy where companies do the best they can to create jobs for private citizens to take resources and to expand them and multiply them to create goods our understanding of the capitalist free enterprise system fundamentally will be changed so it's easy to think about it in the microcosm of well would it matter if IBM's board look different perhaps not but it would matter a lot if the philosophy of how government interacts with private enterprise changes and that's what worn is proposing break up the banks break up the big banks especially the money center banks the banks too big to fail and implicit in this is punish those who have misbehaves or have broken laws over the years that have escaped prop escape criminality is that a profound change in our environment note recently that Wells Fargo in the United States and Deutsche Bank and your have been if not broken up certainly beaten up fairly badly and the jokes about Georgia Georgia banker now surprising such as when somebody mentions that there are a customer Deutsche Bank the the immediate quipped as they still have customer so do we need to break up the big banks or is the market doing it for well I I certainly think in the case of you know Wells Fargo there been some very well publicized missteps that the company is made and they've paid a price for it yes there is in my mind the two big to fail thing is interesting because that actually grew out of an obamacare a set of policies the reason why we have banks which are deemed to be systemically important and therefore too big to fail this is an outgrowth of the financial crisis of the late two thousands it was policy that was reinforced by president Obama and Democrats in Congress when they had control and and and and so in that sense Warren is arguing against a significant measure of main line center left and center right thinking when she says we got to go in and break up these things I look my view is are there abuses of course there are are there situations where financial institutions have not behaved in the best interests of their of their customers and their shareholders again of course there are is the answer is though to have government go in and again fundamentally change the deal part way through to say government is now going to come in and decide what is in the best interests of the financial sector the best interests of the American people I I just don't subscribe to that point of view as being the right one now there are a lot of people out there not just Elizabeth Warren a lot of her supporters who take this sort of populist mantle on and believe than the right answer is if anything becomes too big you got a break it up whether it's banks technology retail whatever industry think about it and and it's just the difference in perspective it's a difference in point of view I just don't happen to believe that substituting the private sector substituting free enterprise systems for government or government substituting for those things is the right answer in addition it occurs to me that they a major stumbling block for our adversaries China is that they don't know how to end of businesses fail the state owned enterprises carry on like zombies yeah indefinitely with new money new credit that would be a puzzle for a corporation that has the hand of the federal government on its throttle how do you and a corporation in the creative to structure in without a plot right yeah I mean one of the things about the free enterprise system is you know there are situations where companies fail and when those companies fail that replaced by companies that do something that they did but do it better that's why they're around and so if you look at the Chinese economy if you look at the Russian economy if you look at economies in the Eastern Bloc of Europe which emerged from the communism what you will see is precisely what you've noted when you have the state playing such a significant role those enterprises cannot be wound down and you don't have an economy that works efficiently you an economy that works for the benefit of political cronyism and that is what will happen if Elizabeth Warren's plans eventually come to a place which is that the decisions of private sector actors trying to maximize shareholder value and maximize value for customers will be replaced by a system of cronies yes cronies socialism I think you've invented something new last yeah one more break up big tech now this is the land of big tax sand hill road is twelve steps away and Facebook started when I was first coming here in the early part of this century Facebook a little storefront right in town now I believe it is a town somewhere so breaking up big tax meaning the big guys Amazon Facebook Microsoft Google we could go on the list of companies however the puzzle is why will breaking up big tech lead to a better world as a US senator Warren get a president warned does she give us to understand that because my understanding of big tech is that it's it's here until somebody comes along with a piece of software that does it better and chats exactly right so you know again this is an example of trying to direct anger and frustration at a target that's that's an easy target you know there's no question that a number of these tech firms have not always been good citizens they've not always done the right thing which points by the way to a need maybe for additional regulation I don't think anybody reasonably would disagree with the notion that the regulatory framework we have maybe doesn't capture the tech companies and what tech companies do in a particularly good way now we have to distinguish by the way they're different kinds of tech companies so company like Amazon has managed to to be successful because it has done a lot of what other think other companies did but more efficiently and at a at a better cost basis now Facebook and Twitter and social media companies it might be in a different boat and so some kind of regulation might be needed but just come in with a blanket statement we got a break up big tech is remarkably naive and very much miss apprehends what's happening and the innovation that's happening in this part of the world and the importance of having a system of government and an economy that promotes the rise and fall of not just companies that are income and players but also of disruptive players that could potentially see say do the same thing but better and therefore be the next Amazon the next Facebook and that's what we don't want to prevent I'm speaking with Lani chat he is the David and die and staff a fellow in American public policy studies at the Hoover Institution director of domestic policy studies and a lecturer in public policy program at Stanford University I'm on the Hoover Institution campus on the Stanford University campus in Palo alto California thanks to my sponsors Scala dot com a global technology firm transforming the retail space with digital signage I'm John Batchelor.

San Francisco Stanford University research fellow Amazon John Messer Lonnie professor of public policy
"research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:47 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That it would be launching a blockchain crypto currency has provoked a message of caution from regulators and central bankers around the world many worry that the social medias giant two billion strong user base could allow it up and the current global banking system others embrace the technologies capacity to give financial system access to the billions who are now excluded the currency called libra could effectively become the world's first sovereign currency without a government to back it joining us for our conversation about this innovation is Angela Walsh research fellow at the center for blockchain technologies as University College London and assign you a proper finance and technology writer for The New York Times moderating the program is my co host race Juarez this broadcast is made possible each week by the generous support of chevron TPG enter draper richer's Kaplan foundation and now to raise one is welcome to you both great to have you along I guess the best place to start with this particular topic is to help people understand what's at the core of this conversation Nathaniel what is a digital currency Hey that's a great question and and and less easy to answer than you'd think I mean in a sense digital currency it's just something like pay pal dollar you know dollar you have in a digital wallet that doesn't have any physical form and that you can send to other digital wallets and so that's I think that's the traditional OSHA and in fact most money to some extent is already digital you know most dollars is not is not most dollars do not exist in a physical form there just a notation on some digital spread sheet ledger somewhere but what we've gotten in recent years with the with the advent of big coin is a new a new concept in a new kind of digital money and this is a digital money that isn't just tracked by one company like pay pal or like by your bank but this is a kind of digital money that exists almost independent of any institution and so that was the the big idea with that corn was that it was a kind of digital money that was tracked on the spreadsheet that was kept by a whole bunch of people a whole network so that there was no one institution that everybody was depending on you had this this money that was kind of free floating at the original idea was that it was like a twenty dollar bill that you could hold that twenty dollar bill without relying on any bank or anybody else it was it was yours and that's that's a deal with big coin and that idea the big when introduced has now taken on a whole bunch of new forms is the latest of which is the most prominent now is this idea that Facebook has introduced that they're going to have their own digital money that once again is not just kept by Facebook for by a whole group of institutions of the Facebook announcement caused a tremor in this world Angela Walch how is libra which takes its name from an old Roman term for currency how is it different from PayPal from big coin from all the other things that have been proposed so far nothing it was talking about who is behind these digital monies and there's kind of been this trend to and that kind of a fight about who gets to create money who gets to operate money and governments right for a very long time where the operators of what money is how decisions are made about money and with the crypto currency trend the introduction of big goin around ten years ago right that expanded to just normal people and what Facebook is bringing to the table here is saying well okay maybe we've seen with crypto currencies that money doesn't just need to come from the government it can come from other places so maybe we will get in on this too and it's very interesting because Facebook is very much an institution just like governments are right so it's it's distinguished in in my mind from currencies like the coin and others by the involvement of large institutions and so it's it's another big player I think stepping up and claiming control over their right to say what money is and who runs it well we'll talk more about Facebook's more than two dozen partners in a little while nothing a Popper when I want to buy something if I wanted to use libre it still has to start with the euro with the pound with the dollar somewhere in the world I mean it it originates with an actual piece of species of value that somebody has in a bank in their pocket it's not just conjured into being is it that's one of the pieces of libra that that Facebook designed to distinguish it from that point so be so big coin at you know is a is a mark on additional ledger that is backed up really by nothing other than this network what's happened to fit to big corn because of that structure is that the price of bit coin has shot up and down and that's probably what most people are aware of it that coin you know it goes from from a hundred dollars to twenty thousand dollars for a big point because it's really hard to know what it should be worth Facebook has said there something valuable about the way a bit coin operated through a can move around but this volatility is not something we want and so Facebook has introduced this this design that it's digital currency which this is under great it's going to summon into existence out of no where but it's only going to summon a a lead brought into existence when somebody puts a dollar into a bank account or euro into a bank account and so the idea with libra is to give it a stable value so you know it's backed up by ex number of dollars X. number of euros and Facebook has done something a little interesting here which is to say we're not just going to give a libra value in dollars we're actually gonna back lever up by a basket of currencies so so believer will be worth some amount to some combination of dollars euros yeah and and that will give it this sort of international flavor that's I think that's the idea and the idea here is that it's not just peg to one dollar it's not just a digital dollar it is a kind of new currency and that that kind of help simply brand certain ways but I think it also raises other problems that Facebook is gonna have to answer but or they actually try to launch this thing next year which is what they're which is what they're hoping to do so prices if you want to buy something will be expressed in libra I think it's it's not entirely clear what the economy of libra is going to look like once the thing launches man certainly Facebook has said we want our you know our market place Facebook marketplace you can buy and sell goods using libra will those things be priced in terms of dollars or will they be price in terms of libra I think that's an open question I think it's it's partially a question of you know how stable does leave Brenda being my guess would be on day one that things are still going to be priced in terms of dollars and you have to convert your leave Brenda dollars when you want to buy something but I'm sure you know Facebook has has big big ambitions for this they say they want this to be a new global currency the sort of foundation for a whole new economy and I think the long term vision is that you know everything is priced in terms of labor but that's probably not where it is on day one the money making machine of other forms of digital purchase is a free that gets charged every time somebody by something Angela Walch the planet is as I understand it that this is going to be nearly fee free there's going to be very little cost involved with using libra and so it's hard to understand what the business model is yeah I'm actually confused about that myself I think that's one of the important questions to try to you know get an answer to as we're investigating that says Congress is talking to people from Facebook about this in these upcoming hearings how are they going to make money off of this Facebook is in outlook a company with a money making mandate right is supposed to make money for its shareholders but yet there's a lot of language in the documents that they've released in their public comments about you know we're doing this for the good of the world right we want to bring in people who have not previously had access to the financial system we want it to be cheap and it's interesting because this these promises actually kind of echo a lot of the promises that were made early on with big point another crypto currencies right that was said to be one of the amazing features of them was that you could send money without cost right it was basically free for you to do it so there was a lot of talk about remittances using that point right so people can send money back to their families and their home countries without paying the very high fees that they would with the Western Union or something like that well interestingly you know we've kind of been coming to a gradual realization that transactions in these crypto currencies are not free and the transaction fees on the network have fluctuated greatly depending on you know how many people were trying to use the network at any given time so this is one night I definitely have a big question mark in my head about how can they be promising that these things will be free right someone has to provide the infrastructure someone has to provide the validation in those things aren't free and that the companies involved in this are not non profits therefore profits go ahead nothing there's an interesting precedent here though with with Facebook itself which is that when Facebook started well said how are you going to make money from people being friends with each other online and and Facebook sort of famously introduced this model that we're not going to worry about making money initially we're just gonna try to get lots of people using this thing and then we're going to figure out how to make money from it and Facebook has already said that's that's kind of their their vision with libra we're we're not going to have an explicit business model on day one for how we're gonna make money from this I they they have a they have laid out a couple of ways they might make money from it but I think the vision here is let's put something out there that's cheap relief even perhaps even free like Facebook was initially and Facebook still is in some sense and say we're gonna offer this free thing get tons of people to use it and then we'll we'll figure out how that turned into a business and so you know did Facebook is not making money and some of the obvious ways on day one they're not taking you know I a transaction fee every time somebody sends a libra around or or that's not the vision anyway they their goal is let's try to get as many people to use this as we can and then we'll figure out how to make money from it and and that's a that's a business model that Facebook has used successfully in the past used successfully but also gotten into tremendous trouble known offend you yes yes for sure and I mean in some ways this is the worst time that Facebook could introduce this I mean this is this is the moment when everybody has realized all of the problems with Facebook's existing business model and so this is not a moment where everybody's gonna say oh sure you know go ahead let's you you've you've taken over communications you know messaging email yeah let's let's let's it welcome you to the financial system as well all of the same questions that surround their existing model are now be going to be directed at at libra and and are probably going to make it very hard to get off the ground Angela Walter earlier you talked about Facebook behaving like a sovereign issuing money which for by the whole modern era has been the exclusive province of sovereigns they're also acting like a bank aren't they and bank so one of the most heavily regulated industries on the planet from country to country to country this is a there's a lot of critique of the tech space.

research fellow Angela Walsh twenty dollar twenty thousand dollars hundred dollars one dollar ten years
"research fellow" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The economy the budget entitlement programs a research fellow there how are you Rachel I'm doing well thank you Dr now we always appreciate having you on and course you know the a couple of years ago everybody thought Bernie Sanders was completely off his rocker when he talked about a fifteen dollar minimum wage and now we've seen it passed in the house I did that I find it frightening I think that this is one of the most dangerous pieces of legislation in quite some time and I think you probably agree with me there were nine of thirteen because what this is sold out of something that they're trying to help low income workers and the reality is that it's going to hurt income while income workers sh yes will raise the wages of Saddam but it's gonna have devastating consequences for the people who lose their jobs and potentially lose their homes and just for for a cascade of unintended consequences here and are just far better ways that we can help low income earners then to cut off all jobs that make less than fifteen dollars per hour yeah and I think you pointed to up one of these legislators and actually a Democrat in Montgomery County who voted against a minimum wage increase because after looking at you know some studies about what it would cost in terms of jobs he he he he in good conscience couldn't do it the county that I live in Maryland outside of the DC area in the legislature passed this is the democratic county executive had a study commission which I've caught him for actually looking at the economic amount was behind it and they found that one out of every three low wage jobs would be lost the county and just all kinds of unintended consequences both for the individual workers as well as for the county as a whole nevertheless the legislator what legislature went back and overturned that detail in which you have a fifteen dollar minimum wage instrument that was passed I walk in my local McDonalds instead of cashiers you see machine but not the same in other places across the county and the and other areas that have a fifteen dollar minimum wage one of the impact is to push out all those jobs that make less than thirty eight thousand dollars per year that's what it costs one player can play some beer fifteen dollar minimum wage and so by S. but I do not case to automation taking jobs away from people permanently and your especially hurting the smaller employers who are able to automate in the same way that companies like Amazon yeah yeah and and I I I know that's an unintended consequence but it's one that has seems to have been proven over and over again not just with studies but I look at some of these states like what Washington and you see you know business is feeling particularly small businesses are a mom and pop who is going to be forced to pay fifteen dollars to the you know front door person either a clerk can't stay in business exactly so we're already seeing that in places like Seattle and even.

research fellow Rachel fifteen dollar fifteen dollars thirty eight thousand dollars
"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

"Fame here's Rhonda Rowland study is today a Hoover research fellow obvious Malani as we talk the latest with Iran the latest that I've read is something I didn't know I thought that was real simple we got a dump the sanctions and then they'll talk but now there's something else now they're saying we have to stop selling arms to our allies in the region is this new almost everything but you know every day since instructions most people policies and being in a Russia and China will play into this you can be seen on the policy does Iran wanna talk bottom line do you think they do you do back over in the street I wanted to open up often talk but they have been secretive about it and he had to be able to show a little bit not not being committed this is the only issue with this actually she survives on being very against its own people and in the region and to maintain that position they can't seem to be buckling under so if you go back from nineteen seventy nine Obama administration and I can see what we the only issue behind closed doors and then try to sell it does it make the sanctions are working on thank you sanctions or community morning and so do you have made it impossible for the mission in Kosovo hello hello hello now ever since the revolution on new media files will in essence they're working in the sense of bringing about new behavior Biden reaching the school virtually had resulted in the only two that is credible the machine does seem to be in the retreat the ties that we put the sanctions and the fact the more impact it'll have a mess logical so therefore maybe we should keep doing it well several things that I think need to also be taken into consideration I think the long term prospects long term position the one with the words coming the sanctions will eventually pollution mon more controversial as needed instant purchase online towards China addictions increases the risk between US and Europe it seems to be doing whatever impact it has in terms of reaching the age must be calculated against Lebanon long term prospects I firmly believe that long long term stability in the region will only come if you want to comes with democratic so all the sanctions have also in my do you have to be judged in terms of what the healthiest long term transaction okay content whatever game you have insurance will be more than offset the control options in the long term final point though the trump administration is pushing for regime change are they not or not but I think you're right I think in Scotland and cried and sometimes we exclusively on some of the people who are close to the situation listen to me I mean still Bolton and clearly they believe the pleasing changes and all the way out and they also believe I think that they can play a very important role in this listen to me on the cheek one opposition group in particular and condolences which I think one is going to come to put that moves change their lan I. can cause to confirm the people of Iran they want to make this change correct yes on the C. help you money and people make at least that's who research fellow opposite Lonnie I was thank you very much for joining us.

research fellow
"research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Investigator. We Fisher reading from a telegram chat among radicals, these links. All the while. These will help supporters in the rates on social media platforms. And we advise you place these links in common section on YouTube. Thinkers on recommend VPN. The person's protect themselves. Came out that about nine t something percents all too. When the bad guys. See your work is indispensable perhaps that should give pause. Especially says Fisher when society is demanding that non-academic platforms, eradicate this stuff. Facebook YouTube under pressure from. I think we can be saying say one just price. Oh on the web. And another group is Facebook to me. To me doesn't make sense. Fisher also can reconcile the fact that some individuals have been jailed for posting jihadi content while scholars and in some cases government make the same practice routine. So yes, it's clear that there is at least some level of double standard less clear is whether the content in question is actually what lures recruits into the terrorist fold to begin with. There's this assumption that ISIS was particularly successful in getting young people, particularly westerners to go to Syria because of its savvy media, I'm Mara syndrome is a senior research fellow at the institute for strategic dialogue. And so there was a kind of causal link John in the minds of some policy people in law enforcement that because it was so good at it social media that it automatically led to this foreign fighter problem that we're seeing, but that formulation tomorrow Singham says overestimates the impact of the propaganda and ignores the more significant factor to way social media messaging if you were in. An ISIS wanna be you could reach out to them. You could talk to them you could get logistical advice. You could ask them who to contact when they're in Turkey to cross the border. And so it became kind of personal interaction and friendship started forming and this kind of online community of jihadists supporters started forming out of this access to these fighters..

Facebook Fisher YouTube Turkey Investigator. Syria jihadists senior research fellow Mara John Singham
"research fellow" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Guest is senior research fellow and director of the equity initiative at the Mercatus center at George Mason University in Fairfax Virginia before we go any further what exactly does the equity initiative due. Well, what we do is we explore instances government, favoritism. So that's where the Foxconn deal came to light. There's a great deal of evidence that economic freedom is good for prosperity that lower taxes and fewer regulations. Those types of policies tend to be good for society. But what we find is that, you know, targeted tax breaks regulatory privileges. Those types of things that that sort of undermine economic freedom that raised the burdens on everybody else are often really driven by special interests who want some sort of government assistance. So our our project really aims to better understand the causes and consequences of this type of government, favoritism, and I gather that you would see the evidence as being that in most cases. The cost benefit analysis would shoot these down. Yes. That's right. That's right. Go ahead. Well, one thing I wanted to point out is, you know, there's a off as I was saying, you know, you could think about absent a subsidy to one firm you could lower everybody else's taxes. The there's an interesting political economy thing going on here though as well. So we knew spare particular firms from having to pay an an onerous tax. Then they no longer are advocates for for lowering that tax. So as I mentioned earlier, Wisconsin, actually spares all this is a relatively new policy for the last. I think about four years Wisconsin has spared all of its manufacturers from its corporate income tax rate. So while sixteen thousand firms have to pay a corporate income tax rate some three thousand firms don't because they're manufacturers. Well, those firms are no longer advocates for reducing the states corporate income tax rate, and so you actually find and there's there's recent evidence where some economists looked at the relationship between economic freedom and subsidies, and they found that states. That give out more subsidies actually, have lower levels of economic freedom, which is another way of saying they have higher taxes and more regulations on everybody else. One eight six six five O JIMBO our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six as we talk with the match you Matthew Mitchell of George Mason University. It could be argued I suppose that while you could use the same expenditure of money to lower overall tax rates, but that other people aren't offering a a ton of jobs such as at least in the beginning. Foxconn was offering in other words, it could I guess from from that perspective be argued that they're more worthy of a tax break because they're breaking in all these jobs. If in fact, they had in fact, you brought in.

Foxconn George Mason University Wisconsin senior research fellow Mercatus center Fairfax Virginia Matthew Mitchell director four years
"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:40 min | 3 years ago

"research fellow" Discussed on KGO 810

"Three five zero. Hear the news on. Keijo? I'm John Batchelor. Malcolm Hoenlein, Conference the president's my colleague and co-host, and we turn there's the question of eastern Syria. Again, this time anticipating the US backing away. If it happens, there's no clarity yet. And what that does for the prospects of our fo the Islamic Republican, welcome better mentality. Blew a research fellow at the foundation for the defense of democracy. I'm told that the person celebrating the night of or the day of the president's announcement Benham. The person celebrating was everybody in Iran. Why what advantages there for Iran if the US is two thousand combat in? This can't be significant up against the size of the Iranian ability to field an army. What's today represent Iran? If and if they went away, what would a gain for a wrong good evening to a very good evening to you in a bladed happy new year to you. And Malcolm, I think that's exactly right. The question is what does this represent and let me be clear. This represents a triumph of Iranian. Resolve in Syria, a battlefield accomplished, which they have been involved in in terms of blood and treasure for the past seven years over American resolve in Syria at American bipartisan, resolve has actually failed to check volume resolve that means when in twenty ten when causing money said, we're not like Americans. We don't abandon our friends that means that the Iranians were correct and we were wrong, and it's an unfortunate situation because unlike the passive ministration, the Trump administration has laid out. A very clear. Kosher articulate strategy against Iran, but failed to operationalize that strategy in the regional dimension. It's almost entirely focused on nuclear issues and sanctions and missiles and failed to be able to change the regional balance. And if you want to get runs regional chocolates to change to post less of a threat to Syria, less of a threat to Israel, less of a threat to Saudi Arabia, less of a threat to the region. You have to fight with the public is active, and there is no cedar that best describes this like Syria. And so when you hear news any Iran of American withdrawal, you do what you always do when you hear this American withdrawal you fill the vacuum is happening in Iraq. This happened in Afghanistan and Mike Mark my words gentleman. This what happened in Syria. Now, let me ask you about the practical implications of what you just said in terms of the land bridge that Iran has been building up from Tehran to the Mediterranean through Syria. Iraq, the US positions are very important in blocking net that. So either other potential deterrent mechanisms or who else can disrupt the completion of this will they also take advantage of the absence for more frequent attempts to transport advance weapons to symbolize in Lebanon. Both of those areas are are involving as we speak until we have a very clear definition of what the US Roddam will look like the exact timetable it'll be unclear with respect to the first one the most important basis, you know, it was a little bit further south out times we've seen that basically a potential flashpoint between the US which active defensively against several Iranian backed Shiite militias which tried to approach areas where the US was helping train the SDS earlier in the previous year before that at the US act defensively, they're that defensive action has slowed Iran's ability to actually create that land bridge, and I want to take you back a little bit further and history within the past two years in Washington, we've been using the term land bridge discuss along Iran's land routes from Iran to Iraq to Syria to Lebanon, ultimately as a threat to Israel, and then as a force in the eastern Mediterranean, but if you remember during the heyday of the Iran, Iraq war the the time period. When you're on actually allied itself with the Assad regime and made this south in bargain, this devil's packed. There was the same thing which is at the road Jerusalem passes through our Bala. So that means Iran prioritize resource conflicts until she get to the ultimate strategic conflict, which was the test Israel, Iran. Now in some ways is best in the US in Iraq with the withdrawal of US forces in Syria is best the US in in Syria. Now that the European Grand ideal the grand strategy of posing a threat to Israel conventionally through this regional corridor. Is reaching for version. Let's go let's go to the Golan Heights. Just him on the KOMO wanna follow this room. Does that mean Iran can now field a sizable military threat to Israel in the Golan in the Golan? I would say not yet. What I would look at when you discussing a running back cheer militias for their Syrian or Iraqi for Afghan-Pakistani. They. They know they are paramilitary forces their unconventional fighters that are beginning to move towards the conventional military, there'd be getting to evolve into a conventional military assets, Israel retains the advantage in this period meeting as Iran's proxies moved from an unconventional force to conventional force. Israel has the advantage to strike and Israel has been tracking in Syria, not necessarily against the paramilitary forces and the militias but against at entities and transport lines. And majestic supply lines and bunkers and basis that are actually creating weapons, but as those weapons are produced indigenously at no longer need to be transferred. Israel will eventually have to target man. Not just munitions, and it's in this area that I think Iran's logistics will be diversified. We're talking about a land route. Now, they already have an air routes. That's important to note. They don't mind using civilian airliners to ferry men and money over to that conflict zone. But Israel overtime as running footprint, deep it in Syria will have to change and has been changing target packages. And this will come at a very dangerous time because it running resolve in the Middle East is increasing not decreasing dot com. And we'll and we see that Iranian troops are within the fifty kilometers of the Golan that they were supposed to be excluded from and other shifts that are taking place. So. When Israel recalibrate how does that affect its relationship with Russia and Russia's role in this, and what are the Kurds do endeavor to Russia or others? And do you see France coming in to fill any of the void? Those are three important actors and let me be clear and brief with respect to the Russians. They are not a long term partner for peace in Syria. They have strategic interests that at times can diverge from the Iranian. But I don't think the Israelis will be able to guarantee what they needed terms of their security just by relying on the Russians about the Kurds again most. Unfortunately, we feel sorry for them. You've seen trail after betrayal against the Kurds in the region, particularly in countries like Iraq and Syria. I think this might be another betrayal of the Kurds. And I don't think we can rely on them that much because what the Turks are gonna be able to do is come into Syria deepen their presence in Syria under the guise of fighting Islam of terrorism. But of course, in reality working to stamp out any claims made by Syrian Kurds, and I expect that issue to evolve the next couple of months or twenty nineteen there with respect, your friend. I think we'd have to look to any kind of European decision to to change the balance of power in Syria to happen. Not on the. Battlefield. But at the international level at at at the UN, and I think that will that will pacify the Europeans will actually have very little impact on the actual battlefield to Syria at anything right now, the the Assad regime would not be deterred by any European state of making such a declaration or taking such action because they know that deed will not follow through their rhetoric. Benham the world described it suggests to me that Syria will not be put back together. And that there is no one working now to unite is that accurate. I am very worried about that. And this is where you know, speaking for myself here, I'm a bit of an old fashioned kind of person with respect to the Middle East and the debates over sovereignty sometimes less lines in the sand can be better than more. Now. What are you talking about breaking up states, and and the disillusion of central power, it creates new problems for the US, we go from fighting, strong states or state sponsors of terrorism to creating vacuums to creating jurisdictions a central authority, the US has to shift from counterinsurgency counterterrorism, and that requires an entirely different footprint at entirely different Pentagon at at target for military strategy and an entirely different foreign and security policy when looking at the Middle East, and there's something the Trump administration cannot take lightly and must consider because it will have a great impact on how we're looking at the counter, Iran. So if you want to begin to be able to answer that question, you're going gonna have to start not at the the the low level, what effect it will have on Syria. But you're gonna have to start the high level wishes. Does this mean you are seeding the mission of countering around pushing back on around in the region because answering that question are you committed to this countering Ron will answer the question of what are you going to do in Syria? What will you settle for what is an acceptable state? And what of course, are you willing to see happen to the Kurds? And what can't you see happen? Once you stand by for to see. So as the US is looking to withdraw now, it's the who the Trump administration to exact if very high price if it wants to see this most unfortunate withdrawal happened now. Coming one minute last very quickly Russia, Turkey and Iran. None of them want to see the others succeed or become dominant. Does this ship their policies towards each other? Now, the longer the Syrian conflict-wracked on countries like Russia and Iran, which happened tactical partners in the least actually can end up becoming strategic partners and working together. To again, fill the vacuum left by the Americans Turkey. I think has been covered more by the Russians than the. Iranians Russians will usually sell it out at the right price. You get the longer the conflict drags on the more these countries, which actually do have differences incentivized to minimize those differences. And that of course, he's assaulted the lack of American leadership, Ben and Ben Taylor. Blue of the foundation for the defense of democracy. Malcolm Hoenlein, Conference of presidents. I'm John Batchelor..

Syria Iran US Israel Iraq Malcolm Hoenlein John Batchelor president Middle East Benham Russia Assad research fellow Lebanon Golan Heights Bala Afghanistan Saudi Arabia KOMO