35 Burst results for "Research Director"

Our Voting Rights Are Under Attack

Our Body Politic

01:44 min | 11 months ago

Our Voting Rights Are Under Attack

"The house of representatives has voted to set up a select committee to investigate the insurrection of january sixth despite efforts to invite republicans to participate in an investigation. Gop leaders are still calling it. A partisan effort and most voted against it. My next guest has spent the last few months exploring this and the issue of voting rights have become so politicized judd leg is the author of the daily newsletter popular information in the last few weeks. He's done some impressive. Investigative work digging into the companies that donate to legislators who didn't vote to certify president. Biden's win back. in january. Judd has years of experience observing politics. He was a research director. For hillary clinton's presidential campaign and worked at the center for american progress where he founded the news site think progress. Welcome to our body politic judd. Thanks for having me. So we're coming up on six months anniversary of the insurrection at the capitol. How do you feel the media is doing in terms of framing. What needs to be talked about. I don't think were doing that. Well i would say none of the members of congress or members of the senate who voted to overture. The election day have really expressed any remorse. And i don't think that there's been any real consequences yet so it in my view we are letting it slip into the rear view mirror without appreciating how close the country tape that day to completely falling apart.

Judd House Of Representatives GOP Biden Center For American Progress Hillary Clinton Congress Senate
Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Chip Crisis in 'Danger Zone' as Wait Times Reach New Record

"Our lead story today is one of demand and supply in that order. The commodity in question is semiconductors. The demand as we'll explain is nearly universal the supply well it's lagging and more so every day bloomberg got its hands on some data from the susquehanna financial group that says if you order a chip today the aforementioned semiconductors you're going to have to wait seventeen weeks for it to be delivered. Four plus months that is to put it mildly no way to run a supply chain. And as marketplace's samantha field reports. It is doing damage to way more than cars or computers or smartphones. These days almost everything has a chip whether we think of it as high tech or not. If it has a plug or battery probably has chips in it glenn. O'donnell research director at forrester says that includes refrigerators video. Doorbells and light bulbs you can turn on with your phone and even lower tech things like kids toys because all the toys gotta talk now and they got to react and they have little motors right. Now there's a shortage of all kinds of chips. Even the most basic ones says china vasan an analyst at bloomberg intelligence for. It doesn't matter if it's one hundred dollars or fifty cent part. There's just not enough capacity at factories around the world to meet the demand from all of the industries. That need chips because there's such a shortage. The semiconductor industry is having to pick and choose what to prioritize says. Mario morales at market research company. Idc it's for prioritizes. The large scale lear is like computing. Mobile phones is the largest market so though supply chains are always going to get priority and other companies especially smaller are going to have to wait longer for chips so shrine of austin at bloomberg says if you need something like a new appliance anytime soon even if you don't care about it being smart all of those products will be in. Short supplies are investigating line and shrim- boston says the shortage is likely to get worse before it gets better

Samantha Field Vasan Bloomberg Bloomberg Intelligence Donnell Forrester Mario Morales Glenn Motors China IDC Austin Boston
The Intimacy of Macro Photography, with Karen Hutton

This Week in Photo

01:53 min | 1 year ago

The Intimacy of Macro Photography, with Karen Hutton

"As a creative professional. There's we have this outlet that we can channel our frustrations or energy into and especially at a time like this where we're uncomfortably separated from others macro photography makes a whole heck of a lot of sense exploring worlds unknown that you probably would overlook on a day when you can go out and do shots of ill capitan or something right. So tell me. Let's start with that. Karen what is your what is sort of. Your worldview about micro worlds world of micro worlds. Well i have always loved Macro photography and i actually got returned a box of my dad's camera gear because my dad was into photography also and because we were trying to sell some of because he had so much you know when he passed some years ago anyway. Some of the stuff that didn't sell he had like macro bello's he had macro like when he was doing at they had these Not rings but tubes so he had like stacked six deep. I don't know what he was i to this day. I don't know what he was photographing. But it was macro micro macro in so and and he was a man who loved to think about things examine things. He was his his work title when he was in the corporate world world was director of research director of research and development and he just had that kind of mind and i was raised that way so i have a tendency to want to examine things and see things up close and find the fine threads that explain why and then make them big and then go. So where do you fit in. How do you affect everything else. So it's like drawing them out and then reading it back in again. That's how my brain works so for me macro is like a visual version. That

Karen Bello
Google revelations trigger swift bipartisan call for action

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Google revelations trigger swift bipartisan call for action

"All this week. Congress has been holding antitrust hearings with a specific i on big tech companies and also this week in investigation published in politico found that nearly a decade ago commissioners at the federal trade commission apparently ignored evidence. That google was building an anticompetitive monopoly in search advertising. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a second look at big tech story in the news. Matt stoler is research director at the nonprofit election economic liberties project in two thousand twelve. The federal trade commission said we have a bunch of evidence that google is trying to monopolize the entire internet and the five commissioners voted five. Did nothing not to bring a case. So you fast. Forward eight years and google is this giant intermediates the flow of information all over the world controls the internet and there are anti-trust cases against it from a whole bunch of states and forces all over the world which are effectively the anti-trust cases that the ftc did not bring in two thousand twelve companies. Trying to get bigger is not that unusual. What was it about what google was doing at the time that suggested that there should have been a case competing by improving your product or service is what we want but competing by signing agreements to exclude your competitors so that they can't get into the market. That's the essence of antitrust law. Google pays today about ten to fifteen billion dollars a year to apple saying when consumers use their iphones and they open safari on their iphones and they do a search that search automatically goes through google. There were emails that were revealed in this case. They were in the footnotes. That said the effectively the google executives were saying. Yeah we're doing we're signing these deals to monopolize we're signing these deals to exclude competitors from the market in some ways tech with a new crash industry. Then it is clear from these papers that you know. The economists working with the ftc made some predictions that were couldn't have been more wrong. Let's say can you chalk this up to simply not understanding what was happening in the tech industry or what could happen. So one part of a broad problem of elite lawlessness in america and across the west the way that anti-trust lawyers think about the world. They just are completely out of touch that that has to do with a very old school framework where they only look at What's called consumer welfare. If something is good for consumers that's the only thing they care about and they were like. Oh google offers a bunch of free stuff. And then if they're doing that the nothing that they do is bad and the so they accepted a whole bunch of arguments from google and essentially said to the commission don't file a case meanwhile the anti-trust lawyers at the ftc. Were like yeah. This is obvious stuff. This is really. this is really bad.

Google Matt Stoler Politico FTC Congress Apple America
Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

Aragon Live

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

"Hi i'm jim lundy founder. And ceo on research and today's episode is focused on a topic. That many enterprise already know well. Enterprise security and cloud computing now in the kobe. Pandemic security risks of seemed to increase. We've previously discussed and some other podcast. How the rise of remote work presents a new era of vulnerability for enterprises and so does some of the evolving technology that is allowing hackers. Much more sophisticated. And we're going to dive into that today. So what does your organization need to to make sure it's protected. How can the right cloud technology to help your enterprise. Sometimes close some of those security gaps joining me to answer. Some of these questions is craig kennedy senior research director at research. Craig is one of the latest analysts. Join our team of trusted advisors before joining aragon craig was director of it. Infrastructure and operations have been dabo. He has also held roles at makara. Ariba inc n. P. t. c. Urine earned a bs in mechanical engineering. From the university of massachusetts at dartmouth brings his wealth of practical business experience in it. Knowledge to oregon. Crag it's great to have you with me today. Thank you jim. I'm excited diorite in. Let's start by taking a bird's eye view of what's happening right now. You re wrote a first cut. Analysis of the hacking of a company called solar winds. Can you tell me a little bit about what happened. At this event and why enterprises should care about it why was such a momentous event. Absolutely so in december of twenty twenty solo wins disclose that had had been hacked by an undisclosed foreign government entity resulting in at least eighteen thousand of their customers being exposed to malware in its orion softer product offering this cyberattack extremely sophisticated in is believed to be a russian hacker group and boasts likely state-sponsored they targeted and successfully breached solar winds corporate network eventually gained access to its build servers once. They're the hackers able to inject malicious code into the solar winds orion build process. Then this infected code code. Sunburst was in package and signed with valid solo in certificates giving all recipients of this package the false assurance that this was indeed a valid and safe component of their orion product. This was so devastating because the orion product which is designed to manage a wide range of it resources in an organization requires elevated privilege access virtually all the it infrastructure and enterprises. Both on premise. And in the cloud this new type of attack vector means that supply chains are more vulnerable than we'd ever thought before it will put additional pressure on software vendors and enterprises to use extreme diligence when testings after products and updates before promoting them to production. That's certainly a big time. Hack and you know. Obviously they're still reeling from this and we're still learning what reaches occurred. Craig what are some of the recommendations for enterprise when it comes to preventing clinks their. It supply chain so arrogant reminds that any organization procuring software should evaluate creating their software. Qa teams it will inspect thoroughly test inbound software offerings and upgrades in an isolated staging environment before being even thought of deploying production. We also advised that any service agreements be updated to include software cleanliness clauses so for software providers to perform extra due diligence to prevent this from ever happening again. Lastly and this one is a no brainer. An enforced multifactorial in your enterprise as for all users and servers one of the easiest things he can do help ensure your enterprises secure. Okay thanks craig. And that's really actionable advice. And also add that procuring endpoint and privacy protection platforms and another best practice and reviewed some of that and some of the emerging providers in our hot vendors in privacy and security. Research showed from twenty twenty in fact one of the things that has come out as part of that research is that sometimes the good guys of the bad guys that people that wanna borrow some information for advertising or actually taking a lot more stuff than we thought so. Check that research out. I want to shift gears a little bit and also talked to you. Craig a little bit about cloud and bring cloud in this conversation a little bit about all the different options that people have and how it ties into enterprise security in twenty twenty one. Many organizations are developing newer. It strategies sometimes from scratch or sometimes just to migrate services and obviously there naturally drawn to public cloud options. Some of their benefits include pay-as-you-go operating costs limitless elasticity much less up front capital costs reduced operational complexity and most importantly levels of security. That may be much higher that they can get immediately then they could maybe get themselves often due to maybe the new of this of the company itself a public cloud can provide highly efficient secure. It services for many organizations and it can also help reduce vulnerabilities.

Jim Lundy Craig Kennedy Aragon Craig Ariba Inc Craig Dabo Crag University Of Massachusetts Dartmouth Sunburst Oregon JIM
There's no vaccine for lies about the COVID-19 vaccine

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:16 min | 1 year ago

There's no vaccine for lies about the COVID-19 vaccine

"There is still not yet a vaccine for lies about the co vaccine from american public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm ali would the coronavirus pandemic has gone hand in hand with an info democ of misinformation about everything from homemade cures to weather masks. Work spoiler alert. They do now. If possible. the misinformation stakes have gotten even higher as the covid nineteen vaccine begins to roll out. Doses are set to be administered in the uk as soon as today and disinformation researchers. Say there's a whole new wave of renewed activity spreading lies about vaccine safety and the origin of the virus. Joan donovan is the research director of the shorenstein center on media politics and public policy at harvard so over the past couple of weeks. I've had several doctors as well as a hospital librarians. Asking us for help because people are showing up having junk science at their back. Asking about vaccine. Safety and doctors are wondering. Why is it these questions. Why now at this scale. We also need to do quite a bit clean up online especially around very key. Phrases related to vet the vaccine ingredients vaccine harms. Because we have you know over a decade now of vaccine misinformation. That is just littered about the internet much of which has been waiting for this moment to burst into the public consciousness. Remember what do you think about some of the tools that the platforms have employed in the primary one seems to just be this labeling and linking to some vetted resource you've been a little bit critical of that in some instances as i click through those labels. They're not immediately relevance sometimes or they're not targeted enough in terms of pointing people towards accurate information that they've almost started to become at least in the right wing media ecosystem they start to become a bit of a joke or a badge of honor to some folks. I think something that triggers and all of us when we see a label as we assume that things that are not labeled may be more true than they are in some ways feels like a little bit of a groundhog's day conversation you know the platforms are never quite doing enough in there too. Big and there is no regulation. And yet i think we would still agree though you and i that we also don't necessarily want these platforms fully in charge of deciding what we see given their scale right. What i'm interested in really understanding is how are they going to describe and define what counts as misinformation on their platform and then instead of retroactively. Really trying to band aid the situation. What is their design solution. That doesn't allow monied interests and with political reach to turn those systems against society. So you're saying there's a big delta between what they're doing now and even then becoming publishers in the sense where they're liable for what goes up. Yeah and i think that you know one of the you know. It's it's again groundhog day. But a feeling like a fool's errand to really try to care deeply about any politician you know pulling the rug out by taking section to thirty away for instance when it comes to trying to get platforms to stabilize how they serve information. That's what the struggle is here When trump is saying that we got to get rid of two thirty it's because the information ecosystem is so unstable that he can't wheeled it to his advantage. But we have to be cognizant of the fact of who's calling for this removal and under what conditions but we're going to have a struggle over large centralized communication systems are world's continuously rioted. No matter what is done now. The problem is always going to be you know when it comes to centralizing our communications. Are these platform companies being responsible to the broadest public. Good and at this stage we can. We can demonstrate. No i wonder. I wanna ask you from your perspective as a professor in a weird way it seems like social media platforms at this size or something. We also have to build immunity to like. They're also relatively new and our brains and figure society has not figured out how to handle this new type of virus should curriculum. Be a part of that like should we be designing curriculum for schools for children to teach them how to recognize truth. I think our educators. Do a fairly good job of that. What's hard is is when you go on line and you see a company like google whose tasked themselves with organizing the world's information but then they don't show you how they organize it and so it becomes a really complicated question for younger folks to say well. I have access to more information than any human being in the history of the world. And yet i have trouble finding true things or accurate things. Let's let's maybe scale it down one philosophical notch and so. I do think though that we do need curriculum for understanding it just as we would teach people the practice of citations and why that matters we do need to help. People understand what it is that there are seeing when they searched for You know information on any of these platforms and then you know. It's it's a hard problem though. I mean back in my day. Not that old but wicked pedia was considered this big enemy of the university. Right how could they possibly have so much information on wikipedia and it all be true right and so teachers would say you can't cite wikipedia but it's really where we all began our exploration even if we didn't necessarily show it and i think at this point now we do also have to wonder about the flow of timely local relevant and accurate information and so one of the things that i think. We also have to redesign as we think about and scale of these platform is is to what degree then. We also try to open knowledge and try to make sure that the world's resources information resources scientific publications are also available for people to be able to explore and understand and by and large journalists are the ones who provide that window into science popular science anyhow and and it's hard because we've seen also as we see platforms taking control we see journalists losing resources and Audience

Joan Donovan Shorenstein Center ALI Harvard UK Donald Trump Wikipedia Google
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 1 year ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
Study: Counties without masks see more rapid spread of virus

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Study: Counties without masks see more rapid spread of virus

"Well new coronavirus cases are searching in Kansas a new study finds the counties with mask mandates have about half as many infections then the counties that don't the university of Kansas conducted the study that finds the regions that require masks saw a fifty percent drop in their seven day rolling average of daily cases starting two weeks after the mask mandates were issued research director Donna Ginther says they're not saying that masks will eliminate cobit nineteen but they significantly slow the spread of the disease at least they do in Kansas this state's democratic governor tried to impose a state wide mask mandate this summer but almost all of the counties opted out could be cases began spiking in September and the report finds counties without mask requirements have been hardest hit I'm Jackie Quinn

Kansas Donna Ginther Jackie Quinn University Of Kansas Research Director
A platform-by-platform prescription for treating the disinformation disease

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:50 min | 1 year ago

A platform-by-platform prescription for treating the disinformation disease

"From Cunanan to Russian propaganda campaigns to Kobe nineteen myths. Social media is unquestionably the vector for increasingly dangerous misinformation. But the big platforms are still trying to have things both ways they take credit for pro democracy movements and black lives matter. But maintained that groups devoted to armed militia groups didn't influence the shooting of protesters in Kenosha Wisconsin they pitched services to politicians that they claim can win elections, but then say they're not responsible for political speech. So with just weeks left until the US election, we wondered if the platforms all agreed overnight that disinformation is a threat to society and democracy what would change. Joan Donovan is the Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at Harvard I up she says gaming twitter should be a little harder a place like twitter needs to get a little bit more honest about how they're broadcast system plays into the disinformation incentive structure. So if you're just a small website by and large is very difficult for people to stumble across that however, if you're employing a little bit of automation, maybe some advertising. And you have potentially even paid off some influencers. You can make that disinformation scale and look organic, and then there's too. But which is way more aggressive about suggesting things for us to consume it systems like youtube that depend on recommendations need to take a serious look at that in need to understand that if I hate watch a and on video because someone sends it to me, the Algorithm remembers that. So even if I didn't like it, I can't get. Out of that Vortex so I think recommend needs an overhaul because it does tend to work in the favour of manipulators. Donovan says recommendations for facebook events, pages, and groups also need an overhaul facebook left up with a call to arms event in Kenosha even after it was flagged at least four hundred and fifty five times according to buzzfeed and only took it down after an armed teenager killed two protesters so we have to be attuned to the fact. That groups like that don't grow fast and become agile without technology and that facebook event page for that night bears a lot of responsibility for people knowing where to show up what to bring and and how to interact with each other. This is a feature of the design John Donovan of Harvard. She also said don't ignore Instagram influencers are driving a lot of this info and no, we don't think any of this will happen absent a lot of regulation. And now for some related actually today, it's related audio. I talked with John Donovan for nearly half an hour and wanted to share just a little more of the conversation with you mainly because researchers believe this is a real threat to the integrity of the election and like I said before ballots are going to start going out in just a few weeks. So I asked her about the sense. Of urgency around solving this problem, you know there is a lot of scenario planning in two thousand, nineteen absent the pandemic of how people were going to be able to vote and how people were going to engage with the election process with the pandemic. There's added emphasis on social media companies to really get this right because most of everyone's information is being filtered through these platforms so even People that would have been going door to door organizing ride shares for the elderly are unable to do that, and so tech companies now are not only at the center of the targets of groups that want to perpetrate information warfare and carry out influence operations but they're also the most important information conduit for groups that just want to have a fair election right. So you're saying that this scenario never accounted for the fact that social media which was already vector for disinformation or for good information. Would become even more central. Exactly and it, and the thing that we know is researchers about disinformation and media manipulation is that it works because it plays on people's outrage and it plays on novelty. So some of the features of social media itself which is journalists really strived to be first out the gate with new information and so that they can be You know at the head of the the pack in the top of the search results are now being turned against them, and so the notion of what it means to wait in journalism to confirm something is up against viral misinformation that is really playing on that information void and the time that it takes for journalists to really know. What it is that they're they're writing about and be able to share that information with their audiences. Right, you know we also talked to a researcher who said that we talked about Qa nine as really kind of an emerging cult and one of the things that she said was that movements like that really thrive in this kind of perfect storm scenario where not only do you have an active and thriving ability to push out disinformation but you have a lot of people stuck at home with a lot of time and a lot of loneliness and desperation I would assume that was also not in this scenario planning. No there was to be honest with you as people were thinking about researchers were thinking about this moment there was a conspiracy wildcard and you know that that was an easy. No. In the end, the threat models in the matrix of our thinking, we did know that something would happen pizza gate, of course, in two, thousand sixteen. Is something that has become instructive and informative for researchers to understand how. This attention to conspiracies within certain communities can strengthen the trust between knees, these groups and also can help them to recruit and I use recruit really loosely nobody's like I'm a member of the pizza gay conspiracy community but with something like Hugh and on you do have folks that are outwardly saying you know where we go one, we go all using these hashtags trying to signal to others that. They believe this to and because the infrastructure of went and the networks were already in place during the pandemic. When the pandemic hit, it became a an opportunity to tell us another story about the deep state and another story about the collusion between what are very coded Antisemitic tropes about a global co ball and that feature. Of Social Media that brings these groups together through the use of Hashtags, is something that is accelerated medical misinformation and really grown the ranks of people who were familiar with John. Do you think that we're headed toward a flash point where people will re recognize the value of information or do you think it's sort of going to be like a long slow decline into little islands of personal truth? It's a really good question. You know if you asked me this ten years ago, I'd say the capacity for the Internet to ensure that we have hyper local information networks is at an all time high. If you think back to the days of indymedia and how great some of the local citizen journalism was in those moments however because we've reached this. Obligatory passage point where information networks have become consolidated within these. You know super large. Companies. have to rethink data as currency and we have to rethink data infrastructures If we're going to. Build the web that we want, and we do have to figure out a public component to this infrastructure that doesn't leave leader leave us at the mercy of social media companies to do. All of this information wrangling I've been a big proponent of trying to get platform companies to see the capacity to do content curation using librarians. You know they keep talking about content moderators. I'm like what about your curation process so that when you do look for information on a Google or on facebook that you're getting things that have been vetted not just things that are popular new Joan Donovan from Harvard, there is of. Course more reading on this topic kind of all over the Internet lately, which is a good thing I guess,

Researcher John Donovan Joan Donovan Facebook Kenosha Wisconsin United States Kobe Twitter Youtube Instagram Shorenstein Center Buzzfeed Kenosha Google Hugh Research Director
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"What what do you <Speech_Male> see <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Let me ask you differently <Speech_Male> what radius <Speech_Male> that you're most <Silence> excited about, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> where do <Speech_Male> you think we will make <Speech_Male> the biggest <Speech_Male> leaps in <Speech_Male> terms of whether <Speech_Male> it's a diagnostics <Speech_Male> are <SpeakerChange> or <Silence> treatment. <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> I. Think <Speech_Male> I. Obviously, <Speech_Male> I'm very, very excited <Speech_Male> about all the <Speech_Male> entry nasal therapies <Speech_Male> that have <Speech_Male> been developed since. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We started <Speech_Male> reporting about <Speech_Male> nosed brain delivery <Speech_Male> in nineteen, <Speech_Male> eighty, nine and <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> are so many of these. <Speech_Male> We've talked about a <Speech_Male> number of them today <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Another area <Speech_Male> that we didn't <Speech_Male> really get into <Speech_Male> is we know <Speech_Male> that iron accumulates <Speech_Male> have. <Speech_Male> In rains <Speech_Male> of people <Speech_Male> with all these <Speech_Male> disorders whether <Speech_Male> it's a master <Speech_Male> Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, <Speech_Male> and you <Speech_Male> can deliver <Speech_Male> intranasaly iron <Speech_Male> binding <SpeakerChange> drugs <Speech_Male> into the brain, <Speech_Male> which are quite <Speech_Male> effective <SpeakerChange> than animals <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> a treating stroke <Speech_Male> Parkinson's <Speech_Male> Alzheimer's. So there <Speech_Male> are a number of these <Speech_Male> therapies that I <Speech_Male> think we're going <Speech_Male> to see move into <Speech_Male> human clinical trials <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I'm hopeful <Speech_Male> that they will be <Speech_Male> safe <SpeakerChange> and effective. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah and and <Speech_Male> that's the oxidative <Speech_Male> stress <Speech_Male> issue right <Speech_Male> with. <Speech_Male> China that is <Speech_Male> correct <Speech_Male> and so so <Speech_Male> what what you're saying <Speech_Male> in general is <Speech_Male> that they could be <Speech_Male> lot of <Speech_Male> different agents. <Speech_Male> It doesn't necessarily <Speech_Male> just the just <Silence> insulin but. <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> it's almost <Speech_Male> like correct me if I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> wrong <hes> <Speech_Male> it's almost <Speech_Male> like a clean up operation <Speech_Male> and that <Speech_Male> <hes> that <Speech_Male> needs to be done in some <Silence> systematic <SpeakerChange> way in the <Speech_Male> brain I <Speech_Male> think that's true. <Speech_Male> You're in some cases <Speech_Male> you're <Speech_Male> you're sending signals <Speech_Male> signals <Speech_Male> into to increase <Speech_Male> brain cell energy <Speech_Male> so the brain can <Speech_Male> repair itself <Speech_Male> better. <Speech_Male> In other <Speech_Male> instances you're sending <Speech_Male> in the doctor's <Speech_Male> this the stem <Speech_Male> cells and <Speech_Male> other cells <Speech_Male> that can actually <Speech_Male> diagnose <Speech_Male> the problem go to <Speech_Male> the right spot <Speech_Male> produce what's needed <Speech_Male> like little biologic <Speech_Male> factories. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know you <Speech_Male> can deliver gene <Speech_Male> therapy and <Speech_Male> turn easily <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> know in people that <Speech_Male> are missing born <Speech_Male> missing enzymes <Speech_Male> in the brain you can <Speech_Male> deliver the <Speech_Male> gene to produce <Speech_Male> those enzymes <Speech_Male> and the brain or delivered <Speech_Male> the enzyme itself. <Speech_Male> There <Speech_Male> are so many things <Speech_Male> treating brain <Speech_Male> tumors <Speech_Male> This way <Speech_Male> with therapeutic <Speech_Male> cells <Speech_Male> is already <Speech_Male> been reported in <Speech_Male> animals and <Speech_Male> we hope to <Speech_Male> see this <hes> moved <Silence> into well. Yeah. <Speech_Male> I know that he didn't <Speech_Male> get time for that <Speech_Male> I just. <Speech_Male> quickly, mentioned <Speech_Male> <hes> the <Speech_Male> what is <Speech_Male> the blast <Speech_Male> Omar the globe blasio. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> At. Again, <Speech_Male> that is an issue that we <Speech_Male> can get in there to <Speech_Male> to treat it, and that's <Speech_Male> what happened <Speech_Male> to <SpeakerChange> <hes> <Speech_Male> Senator McCain's <Speech_Male> outright. <Speech_Male> Yes <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> yes, <Speech_Male> and again, <Speech_Male> this might be an opportunity <Speech_Male> for us to <Speech_Male> for us to potentially <Speech_Male> treat <Speech_Male> certain <Speech_Male> diseases <Speech_Male> <hes> right now there's <Speech_Male> some really have <SpeakerChange> any <Speech_Male> effective treatment. <Speech_Male> Exactly. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> Yes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Excellent Excellent <Speech_Male> Thanks <Speech_Male> so much. <Speech_Male> For this <Speech_Male> thanks so much for <Silence> spending time with me <Speech_Male> and. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> and good <SpeakerChange> luck with all your <Silence> research. <Speech_Male> Thank you so <Speech_Male> much. Thank you. Bye.

Alzheimer Senator McCain China Parkinson Omar
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Right? Yes I think. So and at even after what you're saying is that even after somebody ver- covers whether it's as him matic a mild symptoms or otherwise there has to be some sort of monitoring. monitoring system in place because if we can pick it up early enough suggesting is that they might be speaking intervene that that's exactly right you. You said it better than I could and I'm I am concerned because you hear so little about the neurologic consequences. Now, researchers than Spain have done an amazing job reporting about the acute neurologic consequences of this cove infection in the brain and and and I think that's very Encouraging and I know that we have researchers here in the United States who are certainly looking into what's happened in the brains of people who have had this infection but I think that the public in general and the policy makers are not thinking that far ahead. Am I think that could turn out to be a very serious mistake just if they if they just think about what happened to people who survived the nineteen pandemic? Yeah. So so inclusion bill If you look forward of four five years You're doing research health partners neuroscience enter by debate that is supported by. Foundations and external funding Private companies and Ponte's yes. Yes. We are a nonprofit research thunder, and all of our work is funded by grants or by other foundations we have two foundations at health partners, of course, also nonprofits and by donations from people across the world that are supporting our work as well and Of course, we've been slowed down quite a bit by the pandemic several of our clinical trials. We had a clinical trial going on for Intra Nasal Insulin in Parkinson's we had another trial going on in front of temporal dementia that that both of these were temporarily suspended because of the corona versus but. All of these are supported either by philanthropy or by grants and. We always appreciate any help get. Yeah. I. I believe the details if somebody wants to get in touch with go those details in the in the writer. But in terms of you know looking forward.

Ponte Spain Parkinson United States writer
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The morning and once in the evening entrance Saly and of course, most diabetics inject their insulin twice a day as well. Right? Right. Yeah I, want to talk a bit about Topical Item Bill Skobic Nine Dean. Sure and don't. Don't want to scare anybody but you said that in addition to his adverse effects on the lungs Gobert nineteen can also rapidly transport into the brain leading to problems with oxygen sensing and difficulty breathing because could anecdotally and also now that sufficient data thank in terms of loss of smells and other type of other type of symptoms. So. So what do we know about this and? I've can be do yes. I'm glad you brought this up. So first of all I think your audience will know that. Cova nineteen accumulates in the nasal cavity in the nose, and that is in fact why people do nasal swabs to determine if a person has the corona via this particular corona virus and we know that the virus can travel from the nose through the nasal fair knicks down into the lungs where it can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome and this can a- damage the lungs quite severely in some people and. Increase their risk of dying in that way. Yet. has been known since the nineteen hundreds that. That get into. The can often also transmit directly from the nose to the brain and they convince fact follow these same nerves that we've discussed earlier the olfactory and TriGem nerve pathways from those into the brain. And of course, the virus is very inflammatory and it can. It can lead to what's called the site kind storms cited cranes in this case being very inflammatory. Peptides or. Proteins. Inflammation in the brain damages the brain now other corona. have. Actually been shown directly to go into the brain in in humans and We know for example, that if you go back to nineteen eighteen and the very critical flu pandemic that occurred then where millions of people died worldwide there people whose who got infected with a nine thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen pandemic virus who did not die. Often went on decades later to develop brain disorders in particular Parkinson's Disease Parkinson Ian type visit. So I think it is quite likely. We let me just say we also know that can be acute neurologic problems that occur in people who have the corona virus infection and those have been reported in the literature. So, it's quite likely that this corona virus will also be able to transport into the brain and it's sort of it would be sort of naive for us to assume that there may not be long term neurologic consequences of covid nineteen infection in people who get the infection and survive. Survive the acute infection. Sort of analogy to this other than the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic..

Parkinson Saly respiratory distress flu knicks Inflammation Cova
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You're introducing insulin into the body you are treating that but is there any correlation to untreated? Type. Two diabetes and and and Alzheimer's. Well. Yes. Having type two diabetes doubles your risk for Alzheimer's. Okay Okay and but eat that's true. Even with the fact that diabetics are obviously being treated peripherally their encino outside of the brain, they are taking medications. That are helping them with their diabetes but. That doesn't get into the brain though, right? That's one of these years. So well might get into the brain, but it's not solving this problem. Yes. Some of it might reach the brain but people are looking at people are looking now at internees -ly delivering not just insulin as we have done. But but other diabetic drugs? Yes. So the Internet is the the improvement in memory with international insulin has led to newer studies with drugs like P one, which is another diabetic drug and and people are also looking at met foreman. and. Some some of these they are looking at intranasaly as well. Yeah I. Don't know if you saw this bill there was there was something that came out last week and You know basically talks about multiple sclerosis. the protective coatings, surrounding nerves damaged, causing them to become less energy efficient, which makes them one rebel to further damage and cause disability. This is something of University of Edinburgh and basically The bottom line here is said, they're saying MS could be treated using a diabetes drug apply obliged zone, right? Right. So Ms I'm glad you asked about this. So Ms is a disorder that also has a memory permit about thirty percent of MS, patients have memory impairment, and in fact John's Hopkins a was carrying out a clinical trial of internees insulin to see if it would improve memory in people with multiple sclerosis and that trial was listed on the clinical trials gop website yet. But. The. Most important thing that I will tell you about Ms is you sort of summed it up a minute ago we know that the big problem in Ms. is failure to keep the nerves myelin aided, and so it's a De Maya Lin eating disorder, and in fact, it is the allegation Denver sites, these particular cells that are charged with keeping cells Milo native in the brain. And remain a nation is thought to be defective than MS because these Denver sites do not have enough energy to carry out the mile nation process. The other thing we know about Alexandra sites is that they they're surface is covered with insulin receptors. So you would expect that entrance easel insulin could signal those cells through their insulin receptors and help them take up glucose and produce more energy so that they would then be more effective at carrying out, remodel a nation. No one has tried this however. Yeah. In people with him. And looked at whether or not they can increase re Mile Asian but that is certainly something we would like to see that. Yeah you have a need six encouraging, right. So if you're saying that you know we can create some of these conditions using.

Ms diabetes Alzheimer memory impairment De Maya Lin encino Denver foreman. University of Edinburgh Alexandra gop John Hopkins
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"He's also faculty member in the Graduate Program in neuroscience at the University of Minnesota though compel. Thank you so much gal great to be here. I want to. Sort of free one time little bit and go back to one of your papers from two, thousand, nine. I know that you have been walking in the stadium for a long time and this paper is entitled Inter, Nasal Delivery of cells to the brain. In which you say safety and efficacy of cell based therapies for a degenerative diseases depends on the mode, of Cell Administration. The hypothesized that internationally administered cells could could could bypass the blood brain barrier by Mike dating funded nasal because into the brain and the cervical spinal fluid. before we stepped off Bill, you could Briefly describe what the blood brain barrier is and why exists and And and why we have to actually get through it sometimes. Sure you know the brain is our most important Oregon not that we could live without many of the different or her consent we have. Yeah. Brain controls the functioning really of all the other organ systems, and for this reason we as humans and animals other animals as well. Have evolved a specialized barrier that protects the brain from things that we might be exposed to from the environment. So when you eat things or drink things or get things. Know injected into, you go into your bloodstream substances by by almost any route those substances can easily go to your liver, your kidneys, your heart, and your lungs yet. But the brain is protected by this blood brain barrier and it only allows really a small molecules and generally things that are fat soluble. Soluble Olive, for example, to pass through four bloodstream into the brain. Now, of course, there are certain carriers in this lead brain barrier that allow the brain to take up a certain specific substances. But this is very good because it does protect the brain from things that we might ingest that otherwise would rapidly damaged the brain or things that we might inject or what have you into the body. Unfortunately, when it comes to treating brain disorders. That can be very serious like stroke or Alzheimer's or Parkinson's et CETERA. The blood brain barrier then becomes a problem because it limits the kinds of therapeutic agents are drugs or biologic therapeutics that you might be able to use to treat those disorders..

Oregon Nasal Delivery Cell Administration Alzheimer faculty member University of Minnesota Mike dating Parkinson Bill
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Existing solutions could prevent catastrophic climate change

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Existing solutions could prevent catastrophic climate change

"It's possible to avoid catastrophic climate change by ramping up solutions that already exists today. That's the conclusion of a recent report by project drawdown. The nonprofit works with global team of researchers to analyze the potential impact, a range of climate action's from installing smart thermostats and building wind farms, eating less meat and restoring abandoned farmland. and. We've mapped out eighty of them, eighty existing technologies and practices that are real that are workable that are tangible. Chad Fishman is the research director of project drawdown. The group published their findings in two thousand, seventeen book, and this spring. They released a major update based on their ongoing research. It shows that some strategies such as reducing food waste and phasing out polluting refrigerants could have a greater impact than others. But Freshman says solving the climate crisis requires action on all fronts from how we produce energy to what we eat. There are no silver bullets. We need all the solutions that we have at hand that exist today. So he says, everyone can find a way to get involved. When you start to see those opportunities at a readily at hand, you can move forward with vigor and with excitement.

Chad Fishman Research Director
The pandemic has been a chance to sell the cloud

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:21 min | 2 years ago

The pandemic has been a chance to sell the cloud

"As the corona virus swept around the world work and education moved to the cloud with video meetings and online document, sharing our leisure time relied on cloud service to stream, TV shows and movies. Arguably this shift to the cloud is a trend that's been happening for years, but the pandemic sure sped things up. There are a few big companies that stand to benefit Amazon Microsoft and Alibaba big cloud providers Google's actually relative upstart, but it's now rolling out new services for businesses like better encryption as fast as it can. Owen. Rogers is research director with SNP global, market intelligence, and he's been looking at this increased demand, and how much stress it may have put on the cloud. The big benefit of the cloud is visibility to scale, so if you're running your own infrastructure in your own data center, most enterprises had no idea that they needed. Additional capacity might not be able to get it because supply chains disrupted. But with the use of public cloud, it means that you can scale your applications as needs dictate now in corona virus, there are a lot of companies that needed homeworking, and suddenly a lot of applications needed to be accessed from locations on cloud has enabled this because those enterprises in those businesses can scale up their application capacity immediately without needing to have reserve this capacity in advance. Was the cloud capacity to deal with this surge in demand that we've seen because of the corona virus. Yes, so far most Klay providers seem to have handled it really well, I think the majority of cloud providers have had a huge margin of error, so they purchase way more service capability than they ever thought anyone would need which meant they had a lot of surplus when this need was for quiet and also many of the manage their own supply chain, so they were able to keep disruption to a minimum. So does that mean though if there's only a few companies that are offering the service that they control the price, and could that I guess go up if we're relying on it more and more generally, cloud is getting cheaper. There little blips here and there, but clough to set a precedent for pricing coming down. Club providers won't necessarily cut pricing because there is a risk in doing so, and they don't know how the pandemic is GonNa play out, but they wouldn't put up pricing because that might work against them. A cloud service providers competing in and what they offer, because it's not just simply serve as storage anymore zip. No, so some light providers tried to focus on things such as machine, learning and artificial intelligence. Others are looking towards things such as Iot. They're all making sure that they have these portfolios, so it's almost like like Oh, bricks, you can come use. The cloud provided, choose which Lego bricks you want to use and build your application using your best combination of services it all sounds very flexible at other any companies that are not taking advantage of this other barriers or disadvantages to being cloud based. And cloud is becoming more exciting. There were a lot of regulated industries who are worried about using cloud essentially, because a third party is taken a lot of responsibility so healthcare financial services government were initially bit reluctant to use cloud, but increasingly we're seeing more and more of these companies take advantage of cloud. They just have to prepare more, and they have to put more measures in place. Once they've done that, they're far more willing to consider cloud than they used to be. Do. You think the pandemic impact on how willing companies are to consider using the cloud will have a long-term fact, I think so. Corona virus blocked as a catalyst for the adoption of cloud companies that were already in the clouds have been able to scale up and Dan. They've also been able to scale down if they were struggling and I think this will persuade them that actually it was A. A good decision and they should build more applications in the cloud. Companies haven't already put stuff into the cloud. They're probably realising that they've been fairly static and monolithic, and they haven't been able to take advantage or protect themselves against the situation, and those one set survived the pandemic, probably going to put more and more in the cloud. Just so if something like this happens again. They're better prepare it. Oh and Roger Their research director with SAP Global Market

Research Director Corona Rogers Amazon Alibaba Roger Their Google Klay Clough SNP Sap Global Market Microsoft DAN
Chicago’s most violent day in 60 years: 18 murders in 24 hours

Todd Schnitt

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Chicago’s most violent day in 60 years: 18 murders in 24 hours

"On the Chicago front eighteen people killed in Chicago a twenty four hour period and this is from the maze statistics and you look at who was killed a high school student a college freshman who had dreams of becoming a correctional officer this deadly day was may thirty first and of course a lot of this occurred in the aftermath of the George Floyd situation this story and stats from the Chicago sun times may thirty first this was the single most violent day that Chicago has had to in about sixty years and this is according to the data it was dug up by the Chicago sun times via the university of Chicago crime lab we've never seen anything like it at all that's according to Max are composed in Mexico post them who is the crime lab senior research director I don't even know how to put it into context it's beyond anything that we've ever seen before now the data that the lab has it does not predate nineteen sixty one but the next highest single day murder total in Chicago that was registered in the summer of ninety one on August fourth with thirteen Chicagoans that were murdered they were victims of homicide when the entire weekend is taken into context twenty five people were killed city wide from late may twenty ninth through may thirty first one may thirty first was the single deadliest day eighteen people killed and then another eighty five were hurt by gunfire according to the Chicago sun times that's the most violent weekend in recent modern

Chicago Officer MAX Mexico Research Director George Floyd University Of Chicago Murder
Large-scale human trial of potential COVID-19 vaccine kicks off at Oxford

Rush Limbaugh

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Large-scale human trial of potential COVID-19 vaccine kicks off at Oxford

"But two more potential vaccines for the virus are now going into human trial faces today one of the trials is beginning in the UK and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning with two hundred

UK Germany Research Director Oxford
Potential coronavirus vaccines enter human testing trial

Rush Limbaugh

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Potential coronavirus vaccines enter human testing trial

"Well two more potential vaccines for the code nineteen virus are going into human trials one of the trials is beginning in the U. K. and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning with two hundred

Germany Research Director Oxford
Large-scale human trials of two potential COVID-19 vaccines kick off in the UK and Germany

Glenn Beck

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Large-scale human trials of two potential COVID-19 vaccines kick off in the UK and Germany

"Two more potential vaccines for covert nineteen are going into human trials one of the trials is beginning in the U. K. and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning we two hundred

Germany Research Director Oxford
Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

Between The Lines

07:09 min | 2 years ago

Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

"As crown avars cases Roy's across the country and industry shuts down hundreds of thousands of people. Losing jobs and businesses across the country lay going broke so is government spending enough or too much and how long can the Australian economy survive before we keep into irreparable damage? Are WE AS POOR. Kili asks in the Australian newspaper This Week. We burning the village to save it. Daniel would is budget policy and institutional reform program director at the Graduate Institute. And she's the incoming chief executive officer of the Graduate Institute and Salmon. Cowan is the research director at the Center for Independence Studies at Sydney. Think tank that I had up Danielle Salmon. Welcome both of you. Thank you come now. Danielle the in response to the government's big spending stimulus packages those a seventeen billion dollar package about a fortnight ago. Then another six billion dollar one earlier this week in response the markets panicked a full stampede trends indicate that the markets will continue their stampede lock fraught and capital is all this government largess justified. Look I think it is absolutely justified when you look at the style of health challenge. And what the government's trying to do to keep that contained in terms of effectively shutting down pretty significant sectors of our economy You know the hospitality industry is gone. anything that relies on social consumption so a lot of businesses headdresses petitions. The canucks very significant swipe at the economy. And so we need this government package in order to support the businesses during what is going to be a very shop. It comes down to it. Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian this week Sam and he says just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship. There are no free marketeers independent so manure relating free-market t doesn't this unprecedented cross justify unprecedented measures such as much bigger government. Well you've wrought remind frame rocketeer evening across as so. I guess that's a positive spun for from Mor perspective. I think there's an important distinction that we need to make I here. Which is the audio of stimulus as opposed to the broader concept of what government support government action in a pandemic? Cannon should be so the idea that what the government can or should do his prop up. Economic growth is in the short term. Which is what stimulus is. I think that that's a very mistaken idea. It's a mistake and concert. Not The least of which because what? We're actually trying to do here is Danielle roughtly. Daddy shutdown pots economy for health rights. So the the issue here is not so much. A case of should the government being involved in short term stimulus. It's what sort of support package. Should we give to cushion some economic impacts of this crisis in? What should we do on a health perspective? Now of an expert on the hill saw things. That's where the government's getting its health advice from an economic perspective. I think it's important to realize that we cannot prop every business in in the country. You know Macaroni France. Basically said we won't let a single business go bankrupt. That would be a stike. We're looking at a potentially protracted shut down in the economy with significant economic impacts. And we need to be smart in strategic about how we deploy our resources. The government doesn't have an unlimited budget. Econ prop up. Everyone and it shouldn't try and provide support to everyone. What it needs to do is target. It's assistance to the areas most in need to the people most in need and ensuring that when we come out the other side of this whereas applies to as we can be to get coming out on the other side of this means massive deficits as far as the. I can see and that would imply a substantial future tax increase crosses. Maybe as soon as next she wouldn't that retired the recovery. Daniel look really depends on how quickly you try to pay down the debt. And you're absolutely right when we will be wrecking up a substantial amount of with these reforms. There's absolutely no question about that So essentially we are asking future generations to pay for this response but given the importance of supporting business through this and I do agree with him. We will not say every business here. But we absolutely need to avoid. Is You know what will be preheated to economics and the economy becoming a permanent one if we lose a lot of productive capacity and the economy that has got to be the priority. Right now yes it waiting for that we go substantial debt to pay off the government will hopefully find a path to do that in a way that will not hit the the economy is coming out of the what happens if the pandemic lasts into the winter and early. Spring Salmon Cowan that the CLEM will be for another round and then another round of high levels of government spending. Is that really sustainable? Well it's an interesting question Australia's coming into these spots. A lot of people were not an is good spot as wearing two thousand night. But we're not coming into these crosses with government dead at one hundred percent of Jj pay a lot of the countries in Europe. The challenge I think here is and what the government You know it's difficult for the government to do this because it's been so reactive in such a short period of tall it but it is. How can we draw on the resources of society? More broadly so that we don't put the entire burden for these onto future generations. You know if you sort of think of it in these terms Government has its role to apply. It will take its level of debt individuals who have resources businesses who have resources we should encourage them to access those resources as well One good example. These we have caught a good deal of money in superannuation that could be used to support people in the short term. It's not going to be a complete substitute for an expanded welfare system in this cross but it could take some of the pressure off the system at a point in time where we don't know how long this will last Danielle. The government did announce that would allow Australians to access a superannuation. What's your position on that yet? Look wait we think unbalanced the good idea and clearly difficult decision for individuals to make to to draw down on the sweeper particularly the time when we hear the knock. It's onto forming. Particularly well sited the value of their investment might not be what they were but in a world in which the government is offering generous safety net but for many people that will not be enough if I have lost their jobs to keep up with their bills So we think allowing people to tap into those saving given the extraordinarily nightshirt. These crosses is a good idea to help people get

Danielle Government Daniel Graduate Institute And Salmon Danielle Salmon Danielle Roughtly Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Freedland Cowan Kili ROY Canucks Graduate Institute Program Director Research Director Center For Independence Studie Australia Sydney Macaroni France
"research director" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Suit Stephen on tell me a little about what transit since what transit center does and and your role as research director sure so at the center is a national foundation we work to make cities more just sustainable and prosperous through better public transit we really do that in a few different ways we support local advocacy organization so NGOs citizens groups who are working to make public transportation better in their own communities we bring together folks in the transit industry to learn from each other and we conduct research into what makes public transit attracted to people whose riding public transit what cities can do to make transit defective and that's the area where my work is concentrated as research director I am really understanding what makes whether it's rail or bus service what makes transit a great experience for people and how do you actually make that happen on the street so I'm I'm going to ask you a question about your what are you observing because I'm assuming you're right in New York City right that's right in Brooklyn in Brooklyn okay and I'm I'm assuming you rely on public transit to get around the city that's right so what what are you observing now during the pandemic with with ridership on the buses or subways that that you take well it's certainly down and when you look at what cities around the country are doing in places like San Francisco Seattle and New York you're seeing ridership declined of roughly in the range of thirty to sixty percent and as we mentioned earlier in New York if you're real pattern you look at the places where ridership is down the most at the places where people have the ability and the privilege to work from home and you look at other parts of the city and you see that there's still a lot of people relying on transit to get to work and and that's important for a couple reasons it really emphasizes what core public service transit is it also emphasizes some of that connection that if we talked about that we really have to be thinking about making it you know financially possible for more people not to work in a crisis like this and you know they got a little bit beyond transit but it showed you how equity and transportation are really inextricable from each other are you concerned that the corona virus will have a negative impact on public transit systems I think that there is going to be it's really gonna be financially challenging for transit agencies you know what we want to see what we need to see happen is president he's continuing to run service not cutting service because you know that a lot of people not to be packed in but that's a very hard based on current funding sources the federal transit administration just made federal funding more flexible generally the rule is that the majority of federal transit funding that goes to agencies can only be used for capital expenses for building things for buying buses and they are now allowing agencies to you know kind of back fill the gap but we need to address that to a much greater extent in the long run and in fact this is actually it's a bigger issue actually in the seventies and eighties the federal government client a lot of operating support to public transit agencies and that mostly went away in the nineties except for the very smallest transit agencies so not only is that important for the crisis it also would allow cities to provide more frequent and more abundant transit service you know throughout our cities and metropolitan areas so do you think the pandemic could be an equalizing force in cities and a force that leads to an improvement in services like public transportation well I want to build a little bit on what we were saying I think that crises like this do so much to expose what is not working in in America in our cities in our region and so it does create an opportunity for citizens and for political leaders to react to that D. but one of our partner organizations in New York City a group called the center for an urban future put out a report a few years ago looking at the really unreliable and terrible can use at home health care aides have to deal with in New York these are folks who are often taking two hour trips taking the subway to another subway to a bus and this is before the pandemic ever having it's just a really awful difficult time trying to to get around and just imagine what they're going through now imagine what their patients are going through now this is the sort of thing that has been a problem for a long time but a crisis really exposes and it's so important for public leaders to get organized and fix it so it is possible if we work and fight for it have you heard anything from any of the presidential candidates about plans if they're elected to improve public transit throughout the country well some of the folks who are still in the race have mentions public transit Bernie Sanders for examples home or a three hundred billion dollars for transit systems Joe Biden and yeah I'm not sure there's quite a specific number there it is mentioned in the plan I would say overall there is I think a bit of a bipartisan failure or you could call it a sort of Dombey policy the last twenty years the last fifteen years federal transportation money and you alluded to this federal transportation money has been so focused on expanding highways and we're done with the interstate highway system but we're still plowing tens of billions of dollars into it every year meanwhile can help transit is officially getting pennies on the dollar and that's the mentality and had you know about a one other thing on the net you know so many cities that don't have sidewalks on twenty five or fifty percent of their streets either really basic things that are missing in cities and the money is just not going to those priorities and so talk about how making places walkable also can be an improvement in public transit how those two things are related well most transit trips and this is certainly true for bus trips are pedestrian trip as well you know you get you gotta walk to the bus stop most of the time and your bus trip can be fast you can have frequent service the bus coming at you know at least every ten to fifteen minutes is the ideal it can be reliable but you're probably still not going to view that as a good trip is to get to the bus stop you have to cross an eight lane road if you're constantly service within your head looking out for traffic if you're standing on the side of the road in mud or in the highway shoulder if all of the front of the new banking area that's right that's right very important in a place like Madison standing in the snow and it really shows how often these things in US cities are silent the bus is operated by transit agency that is totally separate from the city government that controls the streets and sidewalks and there's a lot of work that has to be done to get everyone working together okay if you're just joining us you're listening to the Monday March sixteenth twenty twenty edition of a public affair my name is Patty politicos and I'm.

Stephen research director
"research director" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on KCRW

"The British carried the Rosetta stone off today it sits in the British Museum in London ray says it is hands down the most popular thing there more people stand in front of the reserve to stern than any other thing in the museum there's just something about the idea of the key that unlocks a whole system that compels people which brings me to the real thing I want to tell you about a new or is it a stone that isn't made of marble or granite but electricity and was discovered not in the foundation of an old Ford but in a much more modern institution so why don't we just start with can you say your name and and what you do at Facebook my name is Edwin bold research director on Facebook in a research several years ago to machine learning experts in Antoine Bordes lab Facebook approached him with a strange sounding idea they wanted to see if they could get a computer to translate from one language to another say English to German even if the computer was never given any kind of dictionary or any other information about the actual words in those two languages and so I told them give it a try but I don't think this is going to work now this wasn't completely insane and I understand why you need to know a little about this interesting advances in machine learning that happened in twenty thirteen when some clever computer scientists created a program which took all the words in the English language and had the computer use them to create this image picture.

Facebook research director British Museum in London Edwin Antoine Bordes
"research director" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on KTRH

"It's that time of time lock and load can we you know it is a great honor for us me for a moment not to mention producer can research director sandy it is a great honor for us to get to ride home with you to get to be with you ladies as you're cooking your dinner for the family leisure tending the kids or the kitchen the home and hearth which I consider to be a very noble thing I do have relative I am we're very lucky that my wife now gets to stay home she's still she's still on boards and things like that but she still gets to spend a significant amount of time at home and our family is the better for it now I will tell you that is a noble thing it makes a world of difference for a family it really does but make no mistake we are honored and grateful that you with all the things you could be doing as you're driving or listening to music or listen to the show as you're doing really that you choose the show the Michael berry show you know we heard Michael perishable eve that at the end of a long hard work.

producer research director Michael berry
"research director" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

11:17 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Research director Arizona Grand Canyon Grand Canyon institute tank based in Phoenix and my question we've been talking about some of your work on charter schools and I don't think you can leave the education as well getting to what most parents would consider to be the fundamental thing what do we know about how the schools are performing relative to public schools well it varies a lot of servers all forty six percent of charters are not meeting current academic standards about half of the schools that are not meeting academic standards are charters on the flip side there's a whole lot of work okay forty six percent of charter's not meeting academic standards what's the comparable number in public schools whether it's about two hundred and about half of them are charters and about half of them are districts schools except there's a lot more districts schools in our charter schools so they charged the the traditional public schools on average are doing better enter in terms of that measure yes and then because what's actually you've got with charter schools is a lot of them deal with some kids who are struggling in school and credit recoveries and yeah a lot of these college prep ones like me hours and that's a that's what I I I you know when I look at this as somebody does evaluation research it depends on what the basis what the pool is and and if you have you know if you have struggling schools I'll guarantee you in almost every case those are schools from poor neighborhoods right yeah and I think great hearts is a really good example of that because they have a very strong college prep curriculum they do their finances we think pretty well but what the they have one school in Merivale which is a very high poverty area and I'm like their other schools which almost all considered a schools but they also have you know higher socioeconomic students there the morning merry bill gets a C. grade from the state which is very similar to what the cart right elementary school district which is not comparable yeah and car I does have one a school and but and and that but the idea is that it's it's really more challenging us to students in a lot more resources and there's no magic pill that even the charters that we think are doing a show a good job they can't just simply fix some of the challenges we have with poverty and overall it when people see the aggregate Maisie merit scores and always in the charters location always say Hey our scores are higher than district scores and our concern with that is because you can't it's not apples to apples not apples apples because of what you need to basically provide your own transportation to get to a charter school so generally what we've found is we think that charters are getting slightly higher income students the family and as a consequence because you because its students who have the ability to transport themselves right there Panama do that made me not only income maybe but two parents say who can take their kids to school two parent families is a probably a big plus in that area right in there and our number of charters that are really focused in on that college prep kind of curricular so they're sort of creaming from the top two and I've I've seen that I mean I interview I remember interviewing one student one of very top top prep schools and they went through this process with them in the ninth grade where they sit him down and they say listen you're gonna work your backside off in this school and you need to think about that because if you're not prepared to you know stay up all night every night work and and all that you probably shouldn't be here yeah and so in other words within a pool of already very good students they wanted to keep only the ones that were willing to work extremely hard well of course they're going to outperform any other entity because the pool they're working with him which I think you have in this gets a little wonky but A. as you know it is the thing well I don't think we've ever had is a true randomized control experiment other which where you took the same pool of kids and then you randomly assigned half of them to one kind of school then you're randomly assigned the other half no self selection involved because when you get parents and taken the initiative to move their kids somewhere on average there either higher income are more motivated there's something about them that's a little bit different even if it's just that the the parents get it a little bit more that education is important but if you take a pool of kids that are in there whatever pool they aren't randomly assigned to duty to do groups don't mess with then everything else is sure they're quibbling in every other respect then you then and only then can you take the differences in performance and relate that to the quality of the school right and there's only one entity is try to do something similar to that by get things were going on in the student data that's a center for research and educational outcomes which is a part of Stanford University and what they found in Arizona is that in general district schools perform a bit better than charter schools that doesn't mean every charter school is worse than the bond charter school has a wide range generally doesn't it I know there is the good ones are very good the bad and really bad it is a control for geography and then they try to control for as many demographics is in hand and and they Sir try to make an apples to apples comparison and when they've done that for years on they've found that and again their data still about six years old or something like that they've done I found that district schools performed a bit better they found the online charters I think there were three out of four which were just dreadful and effects students may not be learning anything those are some really and those are those are nationwide concerns we have we've had that's why we're going to focus a lot on trying to improve online charters yeah anecdotally I can I. for it's there it's there some kids are small number for home that may make some sense but it's hard to maintain the level of motivation and control right yeah I think for well motivated kids that it's great for kids who already were struggling in a traditional environment for you know participating from a computer's not gonna help unless there's a lot of support to make sure that they're really engaging the curriculum and have are able to figure out questions and so forth this is the other question I wanted to ask you about the financing of schools the thing that has never made any sense to me we are pumping extra money we rate our schools A. B. C. D. E. F. and we pump extra bonus money into the a schools saying you've done a great job this is a reward isn't that completely backwards yes do of theirs they give the kids any the most added resources and we really would like to see this are the kids are in the the low income schools because they're the ones who may have to deal with their families being evicted or they may have a family member incarcerated it if all the different things going on the the they've got a maybe a single parent who's got on hours and so forth so these are the kids who need a lot of support or maybe the parents even got it didn't go to college so that there's those are the kids that need the most support and right now we and as a state don't actually provide really any difference we don't have a poverty wait in the way which we fund schools and other were delivered just the poverty wait that's a technical term I think what that means of just clear what you're saying is we don't assign extra dollars to schools based on certain kinds of needs that you're going to have they're going to be associated with poverty that's right up there in high poverty areas the kids are going to have more of all kinds of other problems in any educator who's ever taught anyone in any diversity of schools will tell you that you know in the poor areas you're gonna have you know if you get broken homes and you got a whole other stuff going on the schools need to be more resource to deal with that before they can even get near education we deal with that on the the nutrition and I mean we provide school lunches stats but I think in that federal money I think that's one area where we do that we've addressed that concern right and they also get some title one money from the federal government but it's not nearly enough to really bridge the gap and that and then in Arizona when they when they compare us to other states we're really basically funding the all the schools about the same in that and we need to do a better job of finding the low income schools because it we could get a huge improvement in our high school graduation rates and and really improve the state you know tremendously by really focusing a lot more resources on those the model of giving more money to the a schools that only makes sense if you really believe that the problem is that the teachers aren't trying hard enough in those other schools and if only they would try harder to schools would be if that was what was going on then the extra money for the a schools would make sense but I think if you think about that what's really happening that's downright laughable yeah I I think that's the example great hearts is I think a great example of that I mean I I think their teachers are trying hard and all of their schools and just because merry ville has a season meaning that they're doing C. effort they're probably doing a effort and all the schools is that they have a much bigger bridge to try to cross in Merrillville in terms of helping those students be as successful as possible how much would it take I think you one of your research projects do doubt with that and what kind of level of resources would it take to get get a bang for the Buck in the lower per lo and performing schools so I try to be pragmatically reasonable in Arizona what we'd like to see is basically ten percent more money it's about a hundred and fifty dollars more per student for kids who are from poverty and that would we think would be enough to at least close the gap by at least one third between where they're at and where the state average is at and and you've related that to actual performance using data that suggests yet get a performance increase because everybody you know this is the argument against it well throwing money at it isn't the answer yeah and we've seen there's nationwide data there's a lot of nationwide data that shows that when you put resources into low income schools you get the most results because those kids can really benefit the most from both having high quality teachers not hang slightly smaller classes one of when possible and also the outside supports that can be really critical for those students to be even more successful in school when you can provide those things and yet every underfunded schools in general in Arizona so we can do we can do that especially better for those kids will do a lot better you know I keep coming back there soon anecdote but I thought it was a very thoughtful one my kid when he was in middle school I went and guest lectures class it was a highly advanced districtwide school and I started talking to teachers let me talk to you about this class side it's business you know what does it really matter any he said to me you know in this class I've got kids that are highly motivated they sit down there ready to work they don't have any problem I could probably take a few more in this class but there is other classes where the kids are bouncing off the wall and have all kinds of promises I couldn't in a class like that I couldn't handle half of what I have been here the other word but we've got this formula that treats every class size as well as if it's one thing in his answer which I thought made just eminent sense it depends on the kind of kid you got in the class and the more problems they can this is where I presume you talk about getting a bigger impact in the poverty schools you got more kids with problems that's where that you're gonna get the big pay off from from smaller smaller Rabb class sizes such right so we will be back we will talk to Dave wells about another subject at the Grand Canyon and she's been working on and that is the subject of unemployment insurance we will return with him in just a few minutes in the think tank on KTAR.

Phoenix Research director Arizona Grand Canyon Grand Can
"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Our research director sandy Peterson and I have spent the day digging through the data to look at the likelihood that one of these candidates could win the nomination for the Democrats on the first ballot going into the different Democrat convention there was always talk of a brokered convention this may well be the time it actually happens I won't guarantee it but five thirty eight which is pretty far to the left of me there are more there eight liberal operation it does campaign strategy polling predictions prognostications has the odds of Bernie winning the nomination going into the convention at one and three nobody winning the nomination on the first ballot that one in four and then it drops off from there they have it at a four percent likelihood the Bloomberg does a four percent likelihood that brigade does but I'm gonna go through some of the numbers this will be a little more dry show than usual because I wanted to get into the numbers and now that they're fresh in my mind I want to share with you the fall Patrick bowed out he was the he is former governor of Massachusetts he was kind of seen as a possible barackobama in this race it didn't happen he never broke one percent the Democrat primary polls they poured a bunch of money into his campaign he had super pac money a lot of super pac money poured into this race on his behalf and he just never never got off the ground let's talk about who wins and who loses from last night's results the obvious winner officially is Bernie Sanders Bernie one to twenty six percent to twenty four percent for boating Bernie one sixty one percent against Hillary in two thousand sixteen now he's still one but I think the liberal media going to such great lengths to to to say who did well last night and leaving Barney out of that you can't deny that he came in first but he didn't run away with it the way he did in two thousand sixteen maybe this is a tougher field and Hillary Clinton and that's really saying something that's really saying some because this is a terrible field in fact several prominent Democrat strategist coming out today and saying none of this crop is up did not describe is electable all right so Bernie wins the the the popular vote second time in a row he did that in our in Iowa motor gig did pretty darn well for himself got to give him credit to he comes in second he's now a delegate ahead they both have about twenty twenty one delegates each not enough to make a difference they're four thousand delegates in play takes two thousand about two thousand when the real winner is clover char because she leapfrog ahead of Warren inviting that buys her a few more weeks I don't think should be around longer than that but it buys her a few more weeks and so Hey good for her she'll even be talked about as a vice presidential candidate I think she is eminently unlikable but last night is a win for her you got account that she supposedly has thirty staffers on the ground in Nevada which is the next place they'll be voting which will be February twenty second ten days from now they'll be a debate on the nineteenth a week from tonight a debate on the nineteenth and then the Nevada caucus on February twenty second and then a debate three days later and then February twenty ninth will be South Carolina and then the thing that's getting very little attention is March third over a third of the delegates will be available on March third including California super Tuesday that's the day when everything happens that's when you clear the field after that because you got to compete in a lot of states at once so you do this little one state Iowa one state New Hampshire one state Nevada one state South Carolina and then all of a sudden boom you got all the states and that's where you're going to see the real separation of those who are left so that leaves us with Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren tough run for Joe Biden here is Joe Biden in South Carolina he left early yesterday he knew he could win you know it wasn't on a whim so instead of going to Nevada he flies down to South Carolina and then he mentions Nevada as having already voted I we.

sandy Peterson research director
"research director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Favorite dog or something just so that you get rid of that nervousness and settle in and the Vegas thing the cool thing is why we have out there mainly as the feedback so quick if you can be and one with feeling really good I'm grateful and card open you get rewarded with money within seconds if you go in the greed fear echo your turn is over yeah you're right yeah it's it's a it's amazing how that works and the are we manipulating the cards or the dice or the slot machine physically what's happening thank you know there's a difference of opinions here some feel like huge us with very high energy you get into the synchronous the place where you are at the right place at the right time but I I personally believe it it can be it is energy we don't understand yet and that we are manipulating with higher consciousness changing and changing outcomes and change in energy is one of the universities work with his universe Virginia at the apartment of perceptual studies and Ruston fees there has become also part time research director Monroe institute and he's developed the box to try to have it have sensors in it to try to figure out what this energy is and what we're doing to it so the box is really heavily shielded from all kinds of conventional energy like collector magnetic.

Virginia Monroe institute Ruston research director
"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know what's what's what's really interesting is if you look at how other animals communicate with each other and they do right we're way behind the times because we don't have to communicate with animals right but there are a lot of birds that really know the alarm calls of their neighboring species because it helps them survive so nature ready communicates in many ways just without us in the loop so we probably should get in the loop destiny's cursing she's the research director of the wild dolphin project her full talk dot com on the show today anthropomorphic what we can learn about ourselves by observing animals including our closest relatives so what's what's the story about illness yeah Amos he was and some mail a handsome chimpanzee email me distinguished he sings in temples is also he was a handsome male he was he was beautiful and very intimidating physically but T. rarely used his sim sempre of force this is on the wall he's a primatologist at Emory University in Amos he was an alpha male yeah name is sort of interesting story because he was a very popular alpha male and also males become popular if they keep the peace and and keep everybody happy and and bring harmony to the correct that's it that's the one the ones that they really like and chimpanzee society at the end.

research director Amos T. Emory University
"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And you know what's what's what's really interesting is if you look at how other animals communicate with each other and they do right we're way behind the times because we don't have to communicate with animals right but they're a lot of birds that really know the alarm calls of their neighboring species because it helps them survive so nature ready communicates in many ways just without us in the loop so we probably should get in the loop destiny's cursing she's the research director the wild dolphin project her full talk at ten dot com on the show today anthropomorphic what we can learn about ourselves by observing animals including our closest relatives so what's what's the story about illness yeah Amos he was and some mail a handsome chimpanzee email me distinguished he sings in samples is also he was a handsome male he was he was beautiful and very intimidating physically but T. rarely used his superior force this is the front of the wall he's a primatologist at Emory University in Amos he was an alpha male yeah name is sort of interesting story because he was a very popular alpha male and also males become popular if they keep the peace and and keep everybody happy and and bring harmony to the correct that's that's the one.

research director Amos T. Emory University
"research director" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Deter you and then you're gonna look at and go yeah whatever the smoke you know that's true we'll be doing well tonight let's talk to Chris in San Jose what's going on Chris hello Sir you know what I got thank you for what you got up yes for about Cory because your he made me feel so young one events and what were the Barclay I I sold so well are you I mean I was a little when you haven't heard it when you heard in a long time in the let the let you give me yeah yes okay no now to our question yeah okay now if anyone has a research director knowledge of of our generation everyone who would turn the TV on on ABC on I believe it was Sunday night to turn onto flinstones and their number one sponsor at the time Winston cigarettes that's right it was fun to see warmer and the red light up if I can find out I know she has the fastest fingers in the west if you can find hi healthy so real I like to give can we credit that she's not the booth I'm the one that plays all this stuff but I'm gonna let me see we right here the candidates the big money yeah I hate to see the work so hard and we go what's going on back I like it he's got his wife after the long.

Chris San Jose Cory ABC flinstones research director
"research director" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Still ahead on this guy delight sure it's good to get a lot done in a day and be productive on the job but in the digital world where the line between working measures blurry isn't obsession with personal productivity counterproductive productive a look at the history of time management and what it means now in a digital age end i sometimes procrastinate do you maybe we need higher own boss to breathe down their necks a bit enter boss as a service where you pay for someone hold you accountable that coming up which are continued nora young says are summer series the spark guide to life from your friends at cbc radio today a focus on productivity at work i am a complete sucker for productivity tools the books sixty apps the life hacks oh when the lists i have apps for keeping list but i often right paper lists and i take pictures of my paper list so they're on my phone alongside my apps i'm forever try and find methods not just to get more done butterfield less distracted less stressed from constant task switching less of that nagging feeling it there's more to do and i'm endanger forgetting hence the list and i keep looking for these methods even though i already know what to do an i already know the one thing that's guaranteed to make be productive a deadline there are lots of people like me of course why do we do it it's a great way of feeling like your putting our best foot forward when society really values work as a prisoner success that's melissa greg she's a principal engineering research director at intel she's also the author of a book called counterproductive history of time management in the workplace over the past century the book tells us a lot about how people and and particularly workers who deal with information manage in digital culture is twenty four seven world or don't early on in the history of time management a lot of focus is on the most efficient way to do tasks physically through techniques like time motion studies much if you study the motions you make when you set the table every day i'll bet you find you're wasting a lot of energy in fact i'll better a better ways of doing almost everything around here i'll take the simple job of setting this table women do it the hard way problem women can't run a house like the fact why not because they say maybe wouldn't be so tired at the end of the day march in her book melissa greg find some surprising roots at the time management movement i think a lot of people be familiar with us fw taylor and that whole idea of applying efficient movements of the factory floor but you actually find some of the roots of this productivity wave in the home in how women were in courage to understand how this works so can you talk a little bit about that absolutely this is one of the most fun things that i discovered in this research in fact i got totally distracted by it it was partly tyler but it was also some of his competitiveness at the time and i focus on franken lillian gilbreath who were adding motion study to time management in the high end in the factory and it's people like really and gilbreath who actually did a lot of the writings of that couple even though she wasn't credited that well at the time that will optimizing the household lay by an also women's work in the horn and that was partly a response to the increase temptation i think for middle class women to maybe start working outside of the home and so there was a an intense kind of tension happening there between your class status an your ability to become an.

"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Well, this has been a hell of a day. I'll tell you what. No, I'm not being facetious. Ramon. And I. We made it our first time. I am actually announcing this publicly we made it our business to find a husband this calendar year for sandy Petersen. Our research director. And she's made it very easy on us. We we've kinda you know, we've talked about it in the past. And we've, you know trust set her up with with with some dudes and. We got serious about it. And so she said, hey, y'all haven't talked about it. So maybe you're not ready to do it. And that's okay. So she had some extra time. So she made a match dot com. Profile. And she said, how do you want me to because she knows it Ramon, and I have veto authority over who she goes out with be. We'll be able to spot a scam artists like quick. So we said she said, well, you may just send you the photos of gas, and I'm interested in and I don't care to see the photo. I wanna know. I wanna see what they wrote so Ramone, and I decided that we needed to review those. So she said, well, how about if I just give you my credentials. So we spent the afternoon looking at how dudes present themselves to women my goodness alive. It is something else. I will tell you what I will tell you. If you wanna have a raucous good time. And you're stuck in the office where you can close the door. Fellas. Go. Find.

sandy Petersen Ramone research director Ramon