35 Burst results for "Research Director"

Google revelations trigger swift bipartisan call for action

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:46 min | Last month

Google revelations trigger swift bipartisan call for action

"All this week. Congress has been holding antitrust hearings with a specific i on big tech companies and also this week in investigation published in politico found that nearly a decade ago commissioners at the federal trade commission apparently ignored evidence. That google was building an anticompetitive monopoly in search advertising. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a second look at big tech story in the news. Matt stoler is research director at the nonprofit election economic liberties project in two thousand twelve. The federal trade commission said we have a bunch of evidence that google is trying to monopolize the entire internet and the five commissioners voted five. Did nothing not to bring a case. So you fast. Forward eight years and google is this giant intermediates the flow of information all over the world controls the internet and there are anti-trust cases against it from a whole bunch of states and forces all over the world which are effectively the anti-trust cases that the ftc did not bring in two thousand twelve companies. Trying to get bigger is not that unusual. What was it about what google was doing at the time that suggested that there should have been a case competing by improving your product or service is what we want but competing by signing agreements to exclude your competitors so that they can't get into the market. That's the essence of antitrust law. Google pays today about ten to fifteen billion dollars a year to apple saying when consumers use their iphones and they open safari on their iphones and they do a search that search automatically goes through google. There were emails that were revealed in this case. They were in the footnotes. That said the effectively the google executives were saying. Yeah we're doing we're signing these deals to monopolize we're signing these deals to exclude competitors from the market in some ways tech with a new crash industry. Then it is clear from these papers that you know. The economists working with the ftc made some predictions that were couldn't have been more wrong. Let's say can you chalk this up to simply not understanding what was happening in the tech industry or what could happen. So one part of a broad problem of elite lawlessness in america and across the west the way that anti-trust lawyers think about the world. They just are completely out of touch that that has to do with a very old school framework where they only look at What's called consumer welfare. If something is good for consumers that's the only thing they care about and they were like. Oh google offers a bunch of free stuff. And then if they're doing that the nothing that they do is bad and the so they accepted a whole bunch of arguments from google and essentially said to the commission don't file a case meanwhile the anti-trust lawyers at the ftc. Were like yeah. This is obvious stuff. This is really. this is really bad.

Google Matt Stoler Politico FTC Congress Apple America
Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | Last month

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

Aragon Live

05:30 min | 2 months ago

Why Your Supply Chain and Cloud Arent As Secure As Youd Think

"Hi i'm jim lundy founder. And ceo on research and today's episode is focused on a topic. That many enterprise already know well. Enterprise security and cloud computing now in the kobe. Pandemic security risks of seemed to increase. We've previously discussed and some other podcast. How the rise of remote work presents a new era of vulnerability for enterprises and so does some of the evolving technology that is allowing hackers. Much more sophisticated. And we're going to dive into that today. So what does your organization need to to make sure it's protected. How can the right cloud technology to help your enterprise. Sometimes close some of those security gaps joining me to answer. Some of these questions is craig kennedy senior research director at research. Craig is one of the latest analysts. Join our team of trusted advisors before joining aragon craig was director of it. Infrastructure and operations have been dabo. He has also held roles at makara. Ariba inc n. P. t. c. Urine earned a bs in mechanical engineering. From the university of massachusetts at dartmouth brings his wealth of practical business experience in it. Knowledge to oregon. Crag it's great to have you with me today. Thank you jim. I'm excited diorite in. Let's start by taking a bird's eye view of what's happening right now. You re wrote a first cut. Analysis of the hacking of a company called solar winds. Can you tell me a little bit about what happened. At this event and why enterprises should care about it why was such a momentous event. Absolutely so in december of twenty twenty solo wins disclose that had had been hacked by an undisclosed foreign government entity resulting in at least eighteen thousand of their customers being exposed to malware in its orion softer product offering this cyberattack extremely sophisticated in is believed to be a russian hacker group and boasts likely state-sponsored they targeted and successfully breached solar winds corporate network eventually gained access to its build servers once. They're the hackers able to inject malicious code into the solar winds orion build process. Then this infected code code. Sunburst was in package and signed with valid solo in certificates giving all recipients of this package the false assurance that this was indeed a valid and safe component of their orion product. This was so devastating because the orion product which is designed to manage a wide range of it resources in an organization requires elevated privilege access virtually all the it infrastructure and enterprises. Both on premise. And in the cloud this new type of attack vector means that supply chains are more vulnerable than we'd ever thought before it will put additional pressure on software vendors and enterprises to use extreme diligence when testings after products and updates before promoting them to production. That's certainly a big time. Hack and you know. Obviously they're still reeling from this and we're still learning what reaches occurred. Craig what are some of the recommendations for enterprise when it comes to preventing clinks their. It supply chain so arrogant reminds that any organization procuring software should evaluate creating their software. Qa teams it will inspect thoroughly test inbound software offerings and upgrades in an isolated staging environment before being even thought of deploying production. We also advised that any service agreements be updated to include software cleanliness clauses so for software providers to perform extra due diligence to prevent this from ever happening again. Lastly and this one is a no brainer. An enforced multifactorial in your enterprise as for all users and servers one of the easiest things he can do help ensure your enterprises secure. Okay thanks craig. And that's really actionable advice. And also add that procuring endpoint and privacy protection platforms and another best practice and reviewed some of that and some of the emerging providers in our hot vendors in privacy and security. Research showed from twenty twenty in fact one of the things that has come out as part of that research is that sometimes the good guys of the bad guys that people that wanna borrow some information for advertising or actually taking a lot more stuff than we thought so. Check that research out. I want to shift gears a little bit and also talked to you. Craig a little bit about cloud and bring cloud in this conversation a little bit about all the different options that people have and how it ties into enterprise security in twenty twenty one. Many organizations are developing newer. It strategies sometimes from scratch or sometimes just to migrate services and obviously there naturally drawn to public cloud options. Some of their benefits include pay-as-you-go operating costs limitless elasticity much less up front capital costs reduced operational complexity and most importantly levels of security. That may be much higher that they can get immediately then they could maybe get themselves often due to maybe the new of this of the company itself a public cloud can provide highly efficient secure. It services for many organizations and it can also help reduce vulnerabilities.

Jim Lundy Craig Kennedy Aragon Craig Ariba Inc Craig Dabo Crag University Of Massachusetts Dartmouth Sunburst Oregon JIM
There's no vaccine for lies about the COVID-19 vaccine

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:16 min | 4 months ago

There's no vaccine for lies about the COVID-19 vaccine

"There is still not yet a vaccine for lies about the co vaccine from american public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm ali would the coronavirus pandemic has gone hand in hand with an info democ of misinformation about everything from homemade cures to weather masks. Work spoiler alert. They do now. If possible. the misinformation stakes have gotten even higher as the covid nineteen vaccine begins to roll out. Doses are set to be administered in the uk as soon as today and disinformation researchers. Say there's a whole new wave of renewed activity spreading lies about vaccine safety and the origin of the virus. Joan donovan is the research director of the shorenstein center on media politics and public policy at harvard so over the past couple of weeks. I've had several doctors as well as a hospital librarians. Asking us for help because people are showing up having junk science at their back. Asking about vaccine. Safety and doctors are wondering. Why is it these questions. Why now at this scale. We also need to do quite a bit clean up online especially around very key. Phrases related to vet the vaccine ingredients vaccine harms. Because we have you know over a decade now of vaccine misinformation. That is just littered about the internet much of which has been waiting for this moment to burst into the public consciousness. Remember what do you think about some of the tools that the platforms have employed in the primary one seems to just be this labeling and linking to some vetted resource you've been a little bit critical of that in some instances as i click through those labels. They're not immediately relevance sometimes or they're not targeted enough in terms of pointing people towards accurate information that they've almost started to become at least in the right wing media ecosystem they start to become a bit of a joke or a badge of honor to some folks. I think something that triggers and all of us when we see a label as we assume that things that are not labeled may be more true than they are in some ways feels like a little bit of a groundhog's day conversation you know the platforms are never quite doing enough in there too. Big and there is no regulation. And yet i think we would still agree though you and i that we also don't necessarily want these platforms fully in charge of deciding what we see given their scale right. What i'm interested in really understanding is how are they going to describe and define what counts as misinformation on their platform and then instead of retroactively. Really trying to band aid the situation. What is their design solution. That doesn't allow monied interests and with political reach to turn those systems against society. So you're saying there's a big delta between what they're doing now and even then becoming publishers in the sense where they're liable for what goes up. Yeah and i think that you know one of the you know. It's it's again groundhog day. But a feeling like a fool's errand to really try to care deeply about any politician you know pulling the rug out by taking section to thirty away for instance when it comes to trying to get platforms to stabilize how they serve information. That's what the struggle is here When trump is saying that we got to get rid of two thirty it's because the information ecosystem is so unstable that he can't wheeled it to his advantage. But we have to be cognizant of the fact of who's calling for this removal and under what conditions but we're going to have a struggle over large centralized communication systems are world's continuously rioted. No matter what is done now. The problem is always going to be you know when it comes to centralizing our communications. Are these platform companies being responsible to the broadest public. Good and at this stage we can. We can demonstrate. No i wonder. I wanna ask you from your perspective as a professor in a weird way it seems like social media platforms at this size or something. We also have to build immunity to like. They're also relatively new and our brains and figure society has not figured out how to handle this new type of virus should curriculum. Be a part of that like should we be designing curriculum for schools for children to teach them how to recognize truth. I think our educators. Do a fairly good job of that. What's hard is is when you go on line and you see a company like google whose tasked themselves with organizing the world's information but then they don't show you how they organize it and so it becomes a really complicated question for younger folks to say well. I have access to more information than any human being in the history of the world. And yet i have trouble finding true things or accurate things. Let's let's maybe scale it down one philosophical notch and so. I do think though that we do need curriculum for understanding it just as we would teach people the practice of citations and why that matters we do need to help. People understand what it is that there are seeing when they searched for You know information on any of these platforms and then you know. It's it's a hard problem though. I mean back in my day. Not that old but wicked pedia was considered this big enemy of the university. Right how could they possibly have so much information on wikipedia and it all be true right and so teachers would say you can't cite wikipedia but it's really where we all began our exploration even if we didn't necessarily show it and i think at this point now we do also have to wonder about the flow of timely local relevant and accurate information and so one of the things that i think. We also have to redesign as we think about and scale of these platform is is to what degree then. We also try to open knowledge and try to make sure that the world's resources information resources scientific publications are also available for people to be able to explore and understand and by and large journalists are the ones who provide that window into science popular science anyhow and and it's hard because we've seen also as we see platforms taking control we see journalists losing resources and Audience

Joan Donovan Shorenstein Center ALI Harvard UK Donald Trump Wikipedia Google
"research director" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

Journalism.co.uk podcast

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"research director" Discussed on Journalism.co.uk podcast

"Host. Jacob grainger each week we bring the most interesting conversations from around the media industry today. We have a special episode coming to you from on digital journalism. Conference news rewind which started this week. And we've got the main talking points from our keynote speech by julie. Patty global research director of the international center of journalists. She'll be talking about the main findings and conclusions from his journalism and the pandemic project launched in collaboration with the towel center at columbia university. In october they put out a survey with the goal of mapping how journalists and news organizations have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic from the main concerns of staff to the key challenges.

Jacob grainger Patty global international center of journa julie columbia university
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 5 months ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 5 months ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
Study: Counties without masks see more rapid spread of virus

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Study: Counties without masks see more rapid spread of virus

"Well new coronavirus cases are searching in Kansas a new study finds the counties with mask mandates have about half as many infections then the counties that don't the university of Kansas conducted the study that finds the regions that require masks saw a fifty percent drop in their seven day rolling average of daily cases starting two weeks after the mask mandates were issued research director Donna Ginther says they're not saying that masks will eliminate cobit nineteen but they significantly slow the spread of the disease at least they do in Kansas this state's democratic governor tried to impose a state wide mask mandate this summer but almost all of the counties opted out could be cases began spiking in September and the report finds counties without mask requirements have been hardest hit I'm Jackie Quinn

Kansas Donna Ginther Jackie Quinn University Of Kansas Research Director
A platform-by-platform prescription for treating the disinformation disease

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:50 min | 8 months ago

A platform-by-platform prescription for treating the disinformation disease

"From Cunanan to Russian propaganda campaigns to Kobe nineteen myths. Social media is unquestionably the vector for increasingly dangerous misinformation. But the big platforms are still trying to have things both ways they take credit for pro democracy movements and black lives matter. But maintained that groups devoted to armed militia groups didn't influence the shooting of protesters in Kenosha Wisconsin they pitched services to politicians that they claim can win elections, but then say they're not responsible for political speech. So with just weeks left until the US election, we wondered if the platforms all agreed overnight that disinformation is a threat to society and democracy what would change. Joan Donovan is the Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on media politics and public policy at Harvard I up she says gaming twitter should be a little harder a place like twitter needs to get a little bit more honest about how they're broadcast system plays into the disinformation incentive structure. So if you're just a small website by and large is very difficult for people to stumble across that however, if you're employing a little bit of automation, maybe some advertising. And you have potentially even paid off some influencers. You can make that disinformation scale and look organic, and then there's too. But which is way more aggressive about suggesting things for us to consume it systems like youtube that depend on recommendations need to take a serious look at that in need to understand that if I hate watch a and on video because someone sends it to me, the Algorithm remembers that. So even if I didn't like it, I can't get. Out of that Vortex so I think recommend needs an overhaul because it does tend to work in the favour of manipulators. Donovan says recommendations for facebook events, pages, and groups also need an overhaul facebook left up with a call to arms event in Kenosha even after it was flagged at least four hundred and fifty five times according to buzzfeed and only took it down after an armed teenager killed two protesters so we have to be attuned to the fact. That groups like that don't grow fast and become agile without technology and that facebook event page for that night bears a lot of responsibility for people knowing where to show up what to bring and and how to interact with each other. This is a feature of the design John Donovan of Harvard. She also said don't ignore Instagram influencers are driving a lot of this info and no, we don't think any of this will happen absent a lot of regulation. And now for some related actually today, it's related audio. I talked with John Donovan for nearly half an hour and wanted to share just a little more of the conversation with you mainly because researchers believe this is a real threat to the integrity of the election and like I said before ballots are going to start going out in just a few weeks. So I asked her about the sense. Of urgency around solving this problem, you know there is a lot of scenario planning in two thousand, nineteen absent the pandemic of how people were going to be able to vote and how people were going to engage with the election process with the pandemic. There's added emphasis on social media companies to really get this right because most of everyone's information is being filtered through these platforms so even People that would have been going door to door organizing ride shares for the elderly are unable to do that, and so tech companies now are not only at the center of the targets of groups that want to perpetrate information warfare and carry out influence operations but they're also the most important information conduit for groups that just want to have a fair election right. So you're saying that this scenario never accounted for the fact that social media which was already vector for disinformation or for good information. Would become even more central. Exactly and it, and the thing that we know is researchers about disinformation and media manipulation is that it works because it plays on people's outrage and it plays on novelty. So some of the features of social media itself which is journalists really strived to be first out the gate with new information and so that they can be You know at the head of the the pack in the top of the search results are now being turned against them, and so the notion of what it means to wait in journalism to confirm something is up against viral misinformation that is really playing on that information void and the time that it takes for journalists to really know. What it is that they're they're writing about and be able to share that information with their audiences. Right, you know we also talked to a researcher who said that we talked about Qa nine as really kind of an emerging cult and one of the things that she said was that movements like that really thrive in this kind of perfect storm scenario where not only do you have an active and thriving ability to push out disinformation but you have a lot of people stuck at home with a lot of time and a lot of loneliness and desperation I would assume that was also not in this scenario planning. No there was to be honest with you as people were thinking about researchers were thinking about this moment there was a conspiracy wildcard and you know that that was an easy. No. In the end, the threat models in the matrix of our thinking, we did know that something would happen pizza gate, of course, in two, thousand sixteen. Is something that has become instructive and informative for researchers to understand how. This attention to conspiracies within certain communities can strengthen the trust between knees, these groups and also can help them to recruit and I use recruit really loosely nobody's like I'm a member of the pizza gay conspiracy community but with something like Hugh and on you do have folks that are outwardly saying you know where we go one, we go all using these hashtags trying to signal to others that. They believe this to and because the infrastructure of went and the networks were already in place during the pandemic. When the pandemic hit, it became a an opportunity to tell us another story about the deep state and another story about the collusion between what are very coded Antisemitic tropes about a global co ball and that feature. Of Social Media that brings these groups together through the use of Hashtags, is something that is accelerated medical misinformation and really grown the ranks of people who were familiar with John. Do you think that we're headed toward a flash point where people will re recognize the value of information or do you think it's sort of going to be like a long slow decline into little islands of personal truth? It's a really good question. You know if you asked me this ten years ago, I'd say the capacity for the Internet to ensure that we have hyper local information networks is at an all time high. If you think back to the days of indymedia and how great some of the local citizen journalism was in those moments however because we've reached this. Obligatory passage point where information networks have become consolidated within these. You know super large. Companies. have to rethink data as currency and we have to rethink data infrastructures If we're going to. Build the web that we want, and we do have to figure out a public component to this infrastructure that doesn't leave leader leave us at the mercy of social media companies to do. All of this information wrangling I've been a big proponent of trying to get platform companies to see the capacity to do content curation using librarians. You know they keep talking about content moderators. I'm like what about your curation process so that when you do look for information on a Google or on facebook that you're getting things that have been vetted not just things that are popular new Joan Donovan from Harvard, there is of. Course more reading on this topic kind of all over the Internet lately, which is a good thing I guess,

Researcher John Donovan Joan Donovan Facebook Kenosha Wisconsin United States Kobe Twitter Youtube Instagram Shorenstein Center Buzzfeed Kenosha Google Hugh Research Director
"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:04 min | 8 months ago

"research director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Existing solutions could prevent catastrophic climate change

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 9 months ago

Existing solutions could prevent catastrophic climate change

"It's possible to avoid catastrophic climate change by ramping up solutions that already exists today. That's the conclusion of a recent report by project drawdown. The nonprofit works with global team of researchers to analyze the potential impact, a range of climate action's from installing smart thermostats and building wind farms, eating less meat and restoring abandoned farmland. and. We've mapped out eighty of them, eighty existing technologies and practices that are real that are workable that are tangible. Chad Fishman is the research director of project drawdown. The group published their findings in two thousand, seventeen book, and this spring. They released a major update based on their ongoing research. It shows that some strategies such as reducing food waste and phasing out polluting refrigerants could have a greater impact than others. But Freshman says solving the climate crisis requires action on all fronts from how we produce energy to what we eat. There are no silver bullets. We need all the solutions that we have at hand that exist today. So he says, everyone can find a way to get involved. When you start to see those opportunities at a readily at hand, you can move forward with vigor and with excitement.

Chad Fishman Research Director
The pandemic has been a chance to sell the cloud

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:21 min | 9 months ago

The pandemic has been a chance to sell the cloud

"As the corona virus swept around the world work and education moved to the cloud with video meetings and online document, sharing our leisure time relied on cloud service to stream, TV shows and movies. Arguably this shift to the cloud is a trend that's been happening for years, but the pandemic sure sped things up. There are a few big companies that stand to benefit Amazon Microsoft and Alibaba big cloud providers Google's actually relative upstart, but it's now rolling out new services for businesses like better encryption as fast as it can. Owen. Rogers is research director with SNP global, market intelligence, and he's been looking at this increased demand, and how much stress it may have put on the cloud. The big benefit of the cloud is visibility to scale, so if you're running your own infrastructure in your own data center, most enterprises had no idea that they needed. Additional capacity might not be able to get it because supply chains disrupted. But with the use of public cloud, it means that you can scale your applications as needs dictate now in corona virus, there are a lot of companies that needed homeworking, and suddenly a lot of applications needed to be accessed from locations on cloud has enabled this because those enterprises in those businesses can scale up their application capacity immediately without needing to have reserve this capacity in advance. Was the cloud capacity to deal with this surge in demand that we've seen because of the corona virus. Yes, so far most Klay providers seem to have handled it really well, I think the majority of cloud providers have had a huge margin of error, so they purchase way more service capability than they ever thought anyone would need which meant they had a lot of surplus when this need was for quiet and also many of the manage their own supply chain, so they were able to keep disruption to a minimum. So does that mean though if there's only a few companies that are offering the service that they control the price, and could that I guess go up if we're relying on it more and more generally, cloud is getting cheaper. There little blips here and there, but clough to set a precedent for pricing coming down. Club providers won't necessarily cut pricing because there is a risk in doing so, and they don't know how the pandemic is GonNa play out, but they wouldn't put up pricing because that might work against them. A cloud service providers competing in and what they offer, because it's not just simply serve as storage anymore zip. No, so some light providers tried to focus on things such as machine, learning and artificial intelligence. Others are looking towards things such as Iot. They're all making sure that they have these portfolios, so it's almost like like Oh, bricks, you can come use. The cloud provided, choose which Lego bricks you want to use and build your application using your best combination of services it all sounds very flexible at other any companies that are not taking advantage of this other barriers or disadvantages to being cloud based. And cloud is becoming more exciting. There were a lot of regulated industries who are worried about using cloud essentially, because a third party is taken a lot of responsibility so healthcare financial services government were initially bit reluctant to use cloud, but increasingly we're seeing more and more of these companies take advantage of cloud. They just have to prepare more, and they have to put more measures in place. Once they've done that, they're far more willing to consider cloud than they used to be. Do. You think the pandemic impact on how willing companies are to consider using the cloud will have a long-term fact, I think so. Corona virus blocked as a catalyst for the adoption of cloud companies that were already in the clouds have been able to scale up and Dan. They've also been able to scale down if they were struggling and I think this will persuade them that actually it was A. A good decision and they should build more applications in the cloud. Companies haven't already put stuff into the cloud. They're probably realising that they've been fairly static and monolithic, and they haven't been able to take advantage or protect themselves against the situation, and those one set survived the pandemic, probably going to put more and more in the cloud. Just so if something like this happens again. They're better prepare it. Oh and Roger Their research director with SAP Global Market

Research Director Corona Rogers Amazon Alibaba Roger Their Google Klay Clough SNP Sap Global Market Microsoft DAN
Chicago’s most violent day in 60 years: 18 murders in 24 hours

Todd Schnitt

02:18 min | 11 months ago

Chicago’s most violent day in 60 years: 18 murders in 24 hours

"On the Chicago front eighteen people killed in Chicago a twenty four hour period and this is from the maze statistics and you look at who was killed a high school student a college freshman who had dreams of becoming a correctional officer this deadly day was may thirty first and of course a lot of this occurred in the aftermath of the George Floyd situation this story and stats from the Chicago sun times may thirty first this was the single most violent day that Chicago has had to in about sixty years and this is according to the data it was dug up by the Chicago sun times via the university of Chicago crime lab we've never seen anything like it at all that's according to Max are composed in Mexico post them who is the crime lab senior research director I don't even know how to put it into context it's beyond anything that we've ever seen before now the data that the lab has it does not predate nineteen sixty one but the next highest single day murder total in Chicago that was registered in the summer of ninety one on August fourth with thirteen Chicagoans that were murdered they were victims of homicide when the entire weekend is taken into context twenty five people were killed city wide from late may twenty ninth through may thirty first one may thirty first was the single deadliest day eighteen people killed and then another eighty five were hurt by gunfire according to the Chicago sun times that's the most violent weekend in recent modern

Chicago Officer MAX Mexico Research Director George Floyd University Of Chicago Murder
Large-scale human trial of potential COVID-19 vaccine kicks off at Oxford

Rush Limbaugh

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Large-scale human trial of potential COVID-19 vaccine kicks off at Oxford

"But two more potential vaccines for the virus are now going into human trial faces today one of the trials is beginning in the UK and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning with two hundred

UK Germany Research Director Oxford
Potential coronavirus vaccines enter human testing trial

Rush Limbaugh

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Potential coronavirus vaccines enter human testing trial

"Well two more potential vaccines for the code nineteen virus are going into human trials one of the trials is beginning in the U. K. and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning with two hundred

Germany Research Director Oxford
Large-scale human trials of two potential COVID-19 vaccines kick off in the UK and Germany

Glenn Beck

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Large-scale human trials of two potential COVID-19 vaccines kick off in the UK and Germany

"Two more potential vaccines for covert nineteen are going into human trials one of the trials is beginning in the U. K. and another in Germany as the race for a vaccine continues in the U. K. trial at Oxford human trials got underway Thursday with more than five hundred volunteers participating the research director said there was an eighty percent chance the vaccine would be successful in Germany that country's first vaccine trial beginning we two hundred

Germany Research Director Oxford
Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

Between The Lines

07:09 min | 1 year ago

Market panic after coronavirus spending stimulus packages

"As crown avars cases Roy's across the country and industry shuts down hundreds of thousands of people. Losing jobs and businesses across the country lay going broke so is government spending enough or too much and how long can the Australian economy survive before we keep into irreparable damage? Are WE AS POOR. Kili asks in the Australian newspaper This Week. We burning the village to save it. Daniel would is budget policy and institutional reform program director at the Graduate Institute. And she's the incoming chief executive officer of the Graduate Institute and Salmon. Cowan is the research director at the Center for Independence Studies at Sydney. Think tank that I had up Danielle Salmon. Welcome both of you. Thank you come now. Danielle the in response to the government's big spending stimulus packages those a seventeen billion dollar package about a fortnight ago. Then another six billion dollar one earlier this week in response the markets panicked a full stampede trends indicate that the markets will continue their stampede lock fraught and capital is all this government largess justified. Look I think it is absolutely justified when you look at the style of health challenge. And what the government's trying to do to keep that contained in terms of effectively shutting down pretty significant sectors of our economy You know the hospitality industry is gone. anything that relies on social consumption so a lot of businesses headdresses petitions. The canucks very significant swipe at the economy. And so we need this government package in order to support the businesses during what is going to be a very shop. It comes down to it. Jonathan Freedland in the Guardian this week Sam and he says just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship. There are no free marketeers independent so manure relating free-market t doesn't this unprecedented cross justify unprecedented measures such as much bigger government. Well you've wrought remind frame rocketeer evening across as so. I guess that's a positive spun for from Mor perspective. I think there's an important distinction that we need to make I here. Which is the audio of stimulus as opposed to the broader concept of what government support government action in a pandemic? Cannon should be so the idea that what the government can or should do his prop up. Economic growth is in the short term. Which is what stimulus is. I think that that's a very mistaken idea. It's a mistake and concert. Not The least of which because what? We're actually trying to do here is Danielle roughtly. Daddy shutdown pots economy for health rights. So the the issue here is not so much. A case of should the government being involved in short term stimulus. It's what sort of support package. Should we give to cushion some economic impacts of this crisis in? What should we do on a health perspective? Now of an expert on the hill saw things. That's where the government's getting its health advice from an economic perspective. I think it's important to realize that we cannot prop every business in in the country. You know Macaroni France. Basically said we won't let a single business go bankrupt. That would be a stike. We're looking at a potentially protracted shut down in the economy with significant economic impacts. And we need to be smart in strategic about how we deploy our resources. The government doesn't have an unlimited budget. Econ prop up. Everyone and it shouldn't try and provide support to everyone. What it needs to do is target. It's assistance to the areas most in need to the people most in need and ensuring that when we come out the other side of this whereas applies to as we can be to get coming out on the other side of this means massive deficits as far as the. I can see and that would imply a substantial future tax increase crosses. Maybe as soon as next she wouldn't that retired the recovery. Daniel look really depends on how quickly you try to pay down the debt. And you're absolutely right when we will be wrecking up a substantial amount of with these reforms. There's absolutely no question about that So essentially we are asking future generations to pay for this response but given the importance of supporting business through this and I do agree with him. We will not say every business here. But we absolutely need to avoid. Is You know what will be preheated to economics and the economy becoming a permanent one if we lose a lot of productive capacity and the economy that has got to be the priority. Right now yes it waiting for that we go substantial debt to pay off the government will hopefully find a path to do that in a way that will not hit the the economy is coming out of the what happens if the pandemic lasts into the winter and early. Spring Salmon Cowan that the CLEM will be for another round and then another round of high levels of government spending. Is that really sustainable? Well it's an interesting question Australia's coming into these spots. A lot of people were not an is good spot as wearing two thousand night. But we're not coming into these crosses with government dead at one hundred percent of Jj pay a lot of the countries in Europe. The challenge I think here is and what the government You know it's difficult for the government to do this because it's been so reactive in such a short period of tall it but it is. How can we draw on the resources of society? More broadly so that we don't put the entire burden for these onto future generations. You know if you sort of think of it in these terms Government has its role to apply. It will take its level of debt individuals who have resources businesses who have resources we should encourage them to access those resources as well One good example. These we have caught a good deal of money in superannuation that could be used to support people in the short term. It's not going to be a complete substitute for an expanded welfare system in this cross but it could take some of the pressure off the system at a point in time where we don't know how long this will last Danielle. The government did announce that would allow Australians to access a superannuation. What's your position on that yet? Look wait we think unbalanced the good idea and clearly difficult decision for individuals to make to to draw down on the sweeper particularly the time when we hear the knock. It's onto forming. Particularly well sited the value of their investment might not be what they were but in a world in which the government is offering generous safety net but for many people that will not be enough if I have lost their jobs to keep up with their bills So we think allowing people to tap into those saving given the extraordinarily nightshirt. These crosses is a good idea to help people get

Danielle Government Daniel Graduate Institute And Salmon Danielle Salmon Danielle Roughtly Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Freedland Cowan Kili ROY Canucks Graduate Institute Program Director Research Director Center For Independence Studie Australia Sydney Macaroni France
"research director" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Suit Stephen on tell me a little about what transit since what transit center does and and your role as research director sure so at the center is a national foundation we work to make cities more just sustainable and prosperous through better public transit we really do that in a few different ways we support local advocacy organization so NGOs citizens groups who are working to make public transportation better in their own communities we bring together folks in the transit industry to learn from each other and we conduct research into what makes public transit attracted to people whose riding public transit what cities can do to make transit defective and that's the area where my work is concentrated as research director I am really understanding what makes whether it's rail or bus service what makes transit a great experience for people and how do you actually make that happen on the street so I'm I'm going to ask you a question about your what are you observing because I'm assuming you're right in New York City right that's right in Brooklyn in Brooklyn okay and I'm I'm assuming you rely on public transit to get around the city that's right so what what are you observing now during the pandemic with with ridership on the buses or subways that that you take well it's certainly down and when you look at what cities around the country are doing in places like San Francisco Seattle and New York you're seeing ridership declined of roughly in the range of thirty to sixty percent and as we mentioned earlier in New York if you're real pattern you look at the places where ridership is down the most at the places where people have the ability and the privilege to work from home and you look at other parts of the city and you see that there's still a lot of people relying on transit to get to work and and that's important for a couple reasons it really emphasizes what core public service transit is it also emphasizes some of that connection that if we talked about that we really have to be thinking about making it you know financially possible for more people not to work in a crisis like this and you know they got a little bit beyond transit but it showed you how equity and transportation are really inextricable from each other are you concerned that the corona virus will have a negative impact on public transit systems I think that there is going to be it's really gonna be financially challenging for transit agencies you know what we want to see what we need to see happen is president he's continuing to run service not cutting service because you know that a lot of people not to be packed in but that's a very hard based on current funding sources the federal transit administration just made federal funding more flexible generally the rule is that the majority of federal transit funding that goes to agencies can only be used for capital expenses for building things for buying buses and they are now allowing agencies to you know kind of back fill the gap but we need to address that to a much greater extent in the long run and in fact this is actually it's a bigger issue actually in the seventies and eighties the federal government client a lot of operating support to public transit agencies and that mostly went away in the nineties except for the very smallest transit agencies so not only is that important for the crisis it also would allow cities to provide more frequent and more abundant transit service you know throughout our cities and metropolitan areas so do you think the pandemic could be an equalizing force in cities and a force that leads to an improvement in services like public transportation well I want to build a little bit on what we were saying I think that crises like this do so much to expose what is not working in in America in our cities in our region and so it does create an opportunity for citizens and for political leaders to react to that D. but one of our partner organizations in New York City a group called the center for an urban future put out a report a few years ago looking at the really unreliable and terrible can use at home health care aides have to deal with in New York these are folks who are often taking two hour trips taking the subway to another subway to a bus and this is before the pandemic ever having it's just a really awful difficult time trying to to get around and just imagine what they're going through now imagine what their patients are going through now this is the sort of thing that has been a problem for a long time but a crisis really exposes and it's so important for public leaders to get organized and fix it so it is possible if we work and fight for it have you heard anything from any of the presidential candidates about plans if they're elected to improve public transit throughout the country well some of the folks who are still in the race have mentions public transit Bernie Sanders for examples home or a three hundred billion dollars for transit systems Joe Biden and yeah I'm not sure there's quite a specific number there it is mentioned in the plan I would say overall there is I think a bit of a bipartisan failure or you could call it a sort of Dombey policy the last twenty years the last fifteen years federal transportation money and you alluded to this federal transportation money has been so focused on expanding highways and we're done with the interstate highway system but we're still plowing tens of billions of dollars into it every year meanwhile can help transit is officially getting pennies on the dollar and that's the mentality and had you know about a one other thing on the net you know so many cities that don't have sidewalks on twenty five or fifty percent of their streets either really basic things that are missing in cities and the money is just not going to those priorities and so talk about how making places walkable also can be an improvement in public transit how those two things are related well most transit trips and this is certainly true for bus trips are pedestrian trip as well you know you get you gotta walk to the bus stop most of the time and your bus trip can be fast you can have frequent service the bus coming at you know at least every ten to fifteen minutes is the ideal it can be reliable but you're probably still not going to view that as a good trip is to get to the bus stop you have to cross an eight lane road if you're constantly service within your head looking out for traffic if you're standing on the side of the road in mud or in the highway shoulder if all of the front of the new banking area that's right that's right very important in a place like Madison standing in the snow and it really shows how often these things in US cities are silent the bus is operated by transit agency that is totally separate from the city government that controls the streets and sidewalks and there's a lot of work that has to be done to get everyone working together okay if you're just joining us you're listening to the Monday March sixteenth twenty twenty edition of a public affair my name is Patty politicos and I'm.

Stephen research director
Why Netflix Turned To Junk

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Why Netflix Turned To Junk

"I used to spend hours in blockbuster video a week stack of movies for the weekend box. Milk Duds box red. Mine's spread is good times. Oh yeah but all good things etcetera etcetera blockbuster died and a lot of the reason had to do with net flicks. Netflix meant that. You could have on demand movies and TV shows but you did not have to leave your house. Also no milk debts. Yeah everything has trade but Netflix was on top for years and then something happened stuff started kind of vanishing from net flicks and the vanishing started slowly. Show here movie there. And then it became a full on exodus now. Dozens of shows drop away every month. Net flicks recently lost friends. The sense cocoa the star wars movies pulp fiction. The reason Karma Capitalism Karma. I like that idea up. Competition that is the answer the movie studios and networks that own these shows and movies are taking them back because they are launching their own streaming services Disney. Cbs HBO ESPN and B. C. Warner yet and if your net flicks you might be worried that this is going to be a death knell because all your stuff is going to disappear your increasingly like blockbuster video right. It's like real blockbuster. Video you're losing readings and a bunch of competing. Video stores are opening up next door. Richard Cooper is the research director at on Peer Analysis which specializes in media research. He's net flicks realized it was going to survive. It was going to have to make a big pivot. Changing really who? They are from a stream of other people's content to studio in their own right. Because how do you stop losing all of your content? Make some of your own content and that meant Netflix. Had To essentially become a movie studio and TV network and it had to do that fast because it is bleeding that content by lead to start building those assets as quickly as possible and they need to build substantial assets and what I mean by that is critically acclaimed film and TV content as well as popular film and TV. Content has been doing just that. They've made big budget. Lavish shows Oscar Bait type stuff. Like the Irishman and marriage story. Irishman was. Your favorite. Right has so so many feelings but it was so long anyway. Don't give me sidetracked on the Irishman. They also made marriage story the crown the series when they see S. They've got a big sci-fi film coming out starring Will Smith they're also cranking out popular crowd pleasers stranger things when Paul chose goop series queer eye cheer and tons of filler. Like dozens of romantic comedies. Many of which seemed to be about. Sassy independent women who marry princes has a whole genre. Netflix you've not seen fads not come across. But here's the thing about all of this content. It costs a lot of money to make. I mean a lot a lot. We've calculated spent just as ten billion dollars. I was pretty floored. Netflix has taken on more than ten billion dollars. Worth of debt to make all these shows. And here's the thing. Last year net flicks made less than two billion dollars in profit. So how is net flicks paying for all of this after all its main source of income is the monthly subscription fees and it has to keep those low because there is so much competition out there and if you think of all of those twelve alarm subscription fees thank you? Add Up But no they can't find him sort of this. Simply through subscription fees they have issued quarterly debt mainly through the the side of junk bonds junk bonds. It all comes back to junk bonds on this show really. It does nexus funding. It's movies with junk bonds. Stranger things junk bonds. The Cram Junk Bonds Stacy's favorite movie the Irishman junk bonds. It is like a house of cards. That was junk. Bonds to net flicks is literally become

Netflix Paul Richard Cooper Disney CBS HBO Will Smith Research Director Peer Analysis Espn B. C. Warner
"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Our research director sandy Peterson and I have spent the day digging through the data to look at the likelihood that one of these candidates could win the nomination for the Democrats on the first ballot going into the different Democrat convention there was always talk of a brokered convention this may well be the time it actually happens I won't guarantee it but five thirty eight which is pretty far to the left of me there are more there eight liberal operation it does campaign strategy polling predictions prognostications has the odds of Bernie winning the nomination going into the convention at one and three nobody winning the nomination on the first ballot that one in four and then it drops off from there they have it at a four percent likelihood the Bloomberg does a four percent likelihood that brigade does but I'm gonna go through some of the numbers this will be a little more dry show than usual because I wanted to get into the numbers and now that they're fresh in my mind I want to share with you the fall Patrick bowed out he was the he is former governor of Massachusetts he was kind of seen as a possible barackobama in this race it didn't happen he never broke one percent the Democrat primary polls they poured a bunch of money into his campaign he had super pac money a lot of super pac money poured into this race on his behalf and he just never never got off the ground let's talk about who wins and who loses from last night's results the obvious winner officially is Bernie Sanders Bernie one to twenty six percent to twenty four percent for boating Bernie one sixty one percent against Hillary in two thousand sixteen now he's still one but I think the liberal media going to such great lengths to to to say who did well last night and leaving Barney out of that you can't deny that he came in first but he didn't run away with it the way he did in two thousand sixteen maybe this is a tougher field and Hillary Clinton and that's really saying something that's really saying some because this is a terrible field in fact several prominent Democrat strategist coming out today and saying none of this crop is up did not describe is electable all right so Bernie wins the the the popular vote second time in a row he did that in our in Iowa motor gig did pretty darn well for himself got to give him credit to he comes in second he's now a delegate ahead they both have about twenty twenty one delegates each not enough to make a difference they're four thousand delegates in play takes two thousand about two thousand when the real winner is clover char because she leapfrog ahead of Warren inviting that buys her a few more weeks I don't think should be around longer than that but it buys her a few more weeks and so Hey good for her she'll even be talked about as a vice presidential candidate I think she is eminently unlikable but last night is a win for her you got account that she supposedly has thirty staffers on the ground in Nevada which is the next place they'll be voting which will be February twenty second ten days from now they'll be a debate on the nineteenth a week from tonight a debate on the nineteenth and then the Nevada caucus on February twenty second and then a debate three days later and then February twenty ninth will be South Carolina and then the thing that's getting very little attention is March third over a third of the delegates will be available on March third including California super Tuesday that's the day when everything happens that's when you clear the field after that because you got to compete in a lot of states at once so you do this little one state Iowa one state New Hampshire one state Nevada one state South Carolina and then all of a sudden boom you got all the states and that's where you're going to see the real separation of those who are left so that leaves us with Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren tough run for Joe Biden here is Joe Biden in South Carolina he left early yesterday he knew he could win you know it wasn't on a whim so instead of going to Nevada he flies down to South Carolina and then he mentions Nevada as having already voted I we.

sandy Peterson research director
Oil Prices Slide Into Bear Market on Coronavirus Concern

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Oil Prices Slide Into Bear Market on Coronavirus Concern

"Are chosen in point of entry to the global economy story of the day today. The spread of and the uncertainty about the corona virus comes to us from the commodities markets oil specifically specifically the global benchmark Brent North Sea. It's called fell another two and a half percent today down twenty two percent just since the beginning of the a year. The supply demand equation on that goes like this. China is the world's biggest oil importer and as the bad virus. News continued over the weekend. People began to realize the Chinese demand could be cratering which since oil is a global commodity means not great things globally. Perhaps even more telling though is this. There is buzz today about OPEC and Russia calling an emergency meeting to talk over a huge cut in oil supply to prevent a free fall in prices from Washington. Marketplace's Scott Tong. Its is going oil. Traders already knew that driving an air travel and China had fallen off. They knew that. Oil Shipments China. We're being resold elsewhere. Then head-spinning head-spinning Bloomberg News report on China's falling demand. Situation Says Ellen Wall that transversal consulting one of the things that hit the market this morning. Was this report that Chinese demand maybe down as much as three million barrels of oil per day if true that would be a huge and sudden drop off for China enough to tumble prices at that point were came that OPEC and Russia were considering an emergency meeting next week to cut supply up to one million barrels per day and bring supply lie closer to demand. Normally you'd hear news of million barrel-per-day cut and oil prices would go up. Didn't happen nervous. Traders are selling oil oil contracts. I and asking questions later says research director Michael Herbert at the National Bureau of Asian Research. He says official data on China won't come out for a month. Maybe three Chinese oil demand. Statistics are a little fuzzy much more opaque than say the US market European now where this viruses viruses evolving so quickly. We're all in a lot of ways in the dark when the numbers do come. Markets may come down a bit. But there's still a big unknown. Says is Roger De wine at IHS market and that's how long the Chinese slow-down will last and nothing is that part which is a right now. Fraying nerves in the market doc. We don't have some other week another four weeks six weeks which leaves a lot of time for potential panic. Some banks suggest a barrel of crude oil could fall to around forty eighty dollars and that translates into. US Gas prices going from an average two fifty a gallon. Two two dollars flat. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. We'll get to American stock markets in a bid. But it's worth a note here coming out of Scott's piece that when Chinese stocks opening day for the first time since things got bad over there they promptly fell almost to what's known as Limit Down Circuit. Breakers that stop a runaway decline or run away on the upside to in different circumstances anyway. The main Shanghai index is down almost eight eight percent on the day to

China Scott Tong Opec Russia United States Brent North Sea Bloomberg National Bureau Of Asian Resea Washington Ellen Wall Michael Herbert Roger De Research Director
Report: Florida state lawmakers are increasingly blocking local governments

AM Tampa Bay

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Report: Florida state lawmakers are increasingly blocking local governments

"A new report is shedding light on the legal tug of war on cities and counties in the right to govern themselves proposals said to be heard in the legislative session would limit or preempt local laws from having any effect the report from the nonprofit group integrity flora is raising a red flag over the twenty preemption bills that have already been filed for the twenty twenty session research director Ben Wilcox says a hundred similar bills have been filed in the last three years it's much easier to get the legislature to preempt local governments from acting on issues than it is to go fight those battles in every city and town in the state of Florida some state lawmakers reportedly backed by powerful lobbying groups that want to impose regulations on things like vacation rental properties and certain types of

Ben Wilcox Florida Research Director
"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know what's what's what's really interesting is if you look at how other animals communicate with each other and they do right we're way behind the times because we don't have to communicate with animals right but there are a lot of birds that really know the alarm calls of their neighboring species because it helps them survive so nature ready communicates in many ways just without us in the loop so we probably should get in the loop destiny's cursing she's the research director of the wild dolphin project her full talk dot com on the show today anthropomorphic what we can learn about ourselves by observing animals including our closest relatives so what's what's the story about illness yeah Amos he was and some mail a handsome chimpanzee email me distinguished he sings in temples is also he was a handsome male he was he was beautiful and very intimidating physically but T. rarely used his sim sempre of force this is on the wall he's a primatologist at Emory University in Amos he was an alpha male yeah name is sort of interesting story because he was a very popular alpha male and also males become popular if they keep the peace and and keep everybody happy and and bring harmony to the correct that's it that's the one the ones that they really like and chimpanzee society at the end.

research director Amos T. Emory University
"research director" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Top story it's been about twenty years since state lawmakers got raise I'll get one starting in January state panel has recommended boost. The base pay for the governor Lieutenant governor attorney general controller and members of the Senate and assembly significantly for legislators it would work out to almost a sixty five percent hike by twenty twenty one. Your public interest research director Blair Horner, says won't go over well with members of the public especially since lawmakers haven't been able to do much with the ethics question. You think going to prison would be more of a deterrent than losing your pension spending years in an orange jumpsuit, trimming hedges somewhere away from your family and friends that should be big deterrent. But it hasn't had any effect because they think they can get away with it on the other hand panel is recommending an end to leadership stipends known as lulus and limiting outside income to nineteen thousand five hundred dollars annually that could be a problem for lawmakers. Like, John McDonald who tells news channel thirteen he has no plans to sell marrow's pharmacy, poor willing to work harder and really put forth the effort. I don't know why they should be penalized by stretch. Machination raises are set to take effect in. January no decision from Troy city council on the sanctuary city issue after several hours of public comment pro and con last night council voted to table the measure to give them time for further review sponsor of the non-binding resolution Democrat, David December says it's all about public safety will improve public safety this will reduce crime. Because members of the public understand when they are talking to our local law enforcement. They don't have to fear that that someone's going to ask for their papers resolution is designed to affirm a longstanding policy of not asking people about their immigration status, when they seek assistance from local government, but it has stirred up strong feelings on both sides. Nick lobby is the president of choice police union. I will gladly violate this resolution every day, I work if it means assisting any law enforcement entity that finds themselves in the city of Troy attempting to do their job council plans to take another look at the resolution in January WG Y morning news time five thirty three choice that he council members did. Okay. Revisiting and rewrite. Writing the city's dangerous dog law. WG wise, Mike Patrick incidents would be evaluated on a case by case basis. This after Luna was at risk of being euthanized after biting neighbor's dog a k still awaiting an appeal. Meanwhile, in Albany county, lawmakers dumped in Asia protecting animals left inside a dangerously hot or cold vehicle allowing officers first responders or vents to break in will vehicle and removing animal in Maine. The owner can't be found then notify the owner where they might pick the animal up violators could face a one hundred fifty dollar fund for the first defense as much as five hundred dollars for a repeat offense like Patrick NewsRadio. Eight ten one zero three one WGN y in Alaska conference, call with area reporters before leaving office in January. Congressman John facile says he would advise Antonio Delgado to be true to his principles and do what's right as he takes over in the house in January the Republican from kinder- hook says the midterm elections should be a warning and a wakeup call for Republicans. He's. He says the party is in trouble in New York and partly because of the daily chaos from President Trump people don't like it. They wish he wouldn't tweet. They wish you wouldn't say a lot of the things that he says Republicans that I talk to overwhelmingly say they wish the president had a much less chaotic Whitehouse. As far as future plans. Facile sassy literally does not know what he'll be doing next one thing. He says he has no interest in is serving as chairman of the state Republican party special counsel. Robert Muller's office will reveal new details in the Russia probe today. This is the deadline for Muller's office to explain to the court, Wyatt accused former President Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort lying to investigators and breaking his cooperation deal. Prosecutors accused Manafort of lying on a variety of subjects after meeting with them several times WTY morning news time five thirty five. Our next update at six I'm Reid shepherd. Not Chuck and Kelly on NewsRadio eight ten one zero three one WJ y cattle regions breaking news traffic. And weather station. Ladies and gentlemen. Jack. Vanna white people. We want to complete investigation..

president Congressman John facile Troy Nick lobby Blair Horner Robert Muller Mike Patrick Patrick NewsRadio John McDonald research director Paul Manafort WGN Senate Machination attorney Vanna twenty twenty
"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Thirty five. Footsie is little changed out of action Germany's down a quarter of a percent the. CAC comparisons down one tenth of one percent that's a Bloomberg business flash I'm Greg. Jarrett this is, Bloomberg markets with Pimm FOX and Lisa Abramowicz on Bloomberg radio housing market in the. U. s. has seen. Some, signs of stress this year I'm looking at. An index of homebuilder shares and the s&p. Five hundred down nearly eighteen percent so far this year the question is here does this Mark a prolonged take down of the US. Housing market or is this a blip to kind of create a more even. Ground for people to afford properties joining us out. Of talk about this is Aaron therocess economic it research director for Zillow Aaron I'm, really glad, that you're, joining us today because this has been sort of an underlying theme for a. Lot of people especially if they're bearish in the economy they say, look at the. Home builder's so what's going on Do you see that the weakness that has been observed recently is, a symptom of some kind of deeper, whoa that, will be expressed throughout the. Rest of the year Your. Housing data happen coming in a little bit weaker than expected. You look at home sales housing starts home appreciation, although it's been very strong it's starting. To slow down we recently producing data showing, that listings of the price cut you're seeing out there on the market that. Said it's according to. Put this in context the housing. Market has been first of all leading economic recovery was on, the first sectors to start showing strength. And all it's been very strong the past two years normally strong we saw a rebound and young adult homeownership, millennials in particular have been out in force buying homes, and so I think we're starting to. See more of a normalization things are coming back to a normal pace not the frenetic hectic pace of the past two years. But still it's still very much market so you noted in your recent report that about fourteen. Percent of all listings across the US had a price cut in June that's up from a recent low, of, less than twelve percent near the end of twenty sixteen So you are seeing people have to realize wow if I really want to sell this. Home I have to ask for less I'm just wondering where you're seeing the biggest price cuts That's a great point because, so much of this story is where it's happening first of all it's happening primarily. At the top of the market if you look at that expensive third of. Of the. Housing, market that's where you see the biggest jump in price cuts and already more price cuts we know that a of, the market that buyers are. Ready to, be tested the limits also I think the second thing to keep in mind here is when you look at the size of the price cut it's actually been pretty stable you know the typical price goes around two to three percent would. That tells me is that some of these price goods overseeing, has actually, been sellers being, rather aggressive. In their in their listening strategy and then. Just testing what the market can tolerate so you know the the market's so hot so fast. Moving you know might as well listen aggressively see if I get that that? Dream price one thing. I'm wondering especially as, Chuck, about the high end home seeing the biggest, price declines how much does this. Tied to the tax policies and places like New York New Jersey Connecticut that are typically high, tax states seeing price reductions. In the homes do to some of the changes that don't allow some deductions That's a great, point you know I think there's two forces that. Have, been squeezing, that high end on the demand side you you talked about the tax structure particularly changes in that state and local tax deduction they're you know we kept it. That deduction at, ten thousand dollars starting the here for most of these very high end communities that's not going to cover a local property taxes and you know we were watching the last few months and we are. Starting, to see a little bit of. A significant effect of a logger slowdown in places that rely more on. That state and local tax deduction obviously the second factor is interest rates. Interest rates are, creeping word that matters more at that high price point one thing that I, found interesting in a recent report about household debt by the government it looked like people were. Actually encouraging a? Significant increase, in mortgage debt recently which kind of, flies against the series that rising interest rates would dampen the demand for mortgages what are you Make of that especially since it is toward higher quality borrowers this is not necessarily another subprime mortgage boom just to be very clear right you know the people who have. Been, barring tend to be high credit. Borrowers people with stable income documental income I think two factors are driving. That increase in in debt outstanding one as talked about a moment ago young adults I, home buyers have been out in force the past two years they're acquiring mortgage, debt for the first time often mortgage debt in pricey markets where we know that there has. Been a booming Employment situation able to buy homes but very, pricey homes, at that I think the second part of that a rising debt. Is Barak people borrowing against their homes home, values have recovered very strongly from the bottom of the market in two thousand twelve Comfortable enough to borrow a little bit? Against their own evasions perhaps GM to fund any other education so return if the reverse mortgage just real quick here Erin, I'm curious to know a year from now, your best guess do you think that prices on. US homes will have gone up I think prices will certainly have gone up, gone up at a slower. Paced and then they went up the past year. You think about nationwide over the past. Year we've, seen home value appreciation up about eight percent I think we'll go down. To about, sixty seven percent lower than it's been but still positive entrust us thank you so much for joining. Us really interesting Aaron trousers economic research director, for Zillow and yeah those homebuilders have. Been really beaten up this year down nearly eighteen percent of course the home builder's have also, been hit by higher lumber prices. And other higher costs tied to labor so there could be some other issues there but certainly. A big wild card here a lot of people looking at the housing market is possible Leading indicator though. As Aaron, just said it has actually let the market up so perhaps is just softening to keep up pace. With everything else right now let's head over, toward ninety nine one studios in Washington. DC Nancy Lyons is there with world and national headlines Nancy Thanks Lisa President Trump says he expects to quickly revoked the security clearance, for yet another official after evoking the clearance for former CIA director John Brennan he says this time it would be. The Justice department officials who. Wife his wife worked for. The, firm that. Commissioned the dossier on Trump's ties to, Russia.

US Aaron therocess Bloomberg Zillow research director Nancy Lyons Germany Pimm FOX U. s. Jarrett Washington Trump Lisa Abramowicz Justice department Chuck CIA Barak
"research director" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Dot com he is. The market research director there he's also member, of the markets team and you so far, we've been talking. A lot about you know big picture stuff what's going on And I guess the biggest question people are asking. Right now is around trade so when you think about. A lot of the policies that are being enacted fifty billion two hundred billion steel aluminum solar? Panels. Washing machines where does, it all lead how, does it impact you how does it impact the economy, how does it impact, the stock market all these things, are, big questions some of them are not? Knowable some of them we, got some, clues to so let's. Go talk more with our guest Justin Nielsen right now I wanted to finish with one question do you think that you, are a better investor for having lived through, a few bear, markets absolutely I think and unfortunately as with most things I. Think that when you're going through. The hard time it doesn't you you. You kind of look and say oh how could this be a good thing but in retrospect, you realize, oh yeah that. That helps to Thousand I actually got out very good in two thousand it was two thousand one and two thousand two where I was trying. To go into heavy, too quickly that that's what really hurt me and I'm so glad that I. Had that lesson when I had less money because you know if I had, been up, you decades into my, investing, career you, know making. Those mistakes would have really? Hurt so I'm kind of? Glad to have some of those? Mistakes under my belt that I've made? Already with less money so that. As my account rose I'm hopefully. Not gonna make the same mistakes with a, larger account and you know that's the same thing. You know getting back to that I guess the overall. Theme that we've been talking about today is timeframe if you're starting out in your twenties and? Thirties. A lot of the, stuff just doesn't matter, for your long term horizon however if you're getting closer, to retirement I think, that's where you could really start, worrying, and not sleeping at night because you're? Worrying about is my risk, to have, and if you see A major correction in the market you know and you wait a year. To, go into more conservative investments if, you have everything kind of on the line in the stock market and you're supposed to retire next year of course you're not. Gonna sleep very well And you know what I. Would say to that is that even those people as much as you freak out because you're like oh I'm close to retirement. You aren't going to spend every dollar in your portfolio in the year that you retire. You're gonna be do something very nice fresh you're going, to give us a gorgeous investors dot com. In, an IB chart that we can. Share with everyone listening to, this I want, people, to, really take take a good look at the long term horizon here it really does help you not freak out as. Much and I think that you're you're absolutely. Right, Justin just like. Living. Through, these things it's not like it's, fun but you're like. Okay well I can get through this and I will get through this by the way my portfolio recovers. Because that's what happens so I don't have. To make, myself nuts well thanks so much Mr. Justin Nielsen for coming. On the program his second performance Mark maybe we should put a link in the show notes to.

Mr. Justin Nielsen Dot research director
"research director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Health and society and research director of the safe tennessee project jonathan welcome to the takeaway thank you so much for having me so we have a ton of things to unpack here and i am particularly interested in this narrative around mental health i think this is one of the times that we are one of the many times we hear about this but this shooting seems to have brought this to the forefront is mental health has mental illness or mental health if you will become a scapegoat to larger issues facing this country when it comes to firearms well it's it's a great way to start this conversation and first let me say just empathic li as somebody who studies this issue and also trained in and mental health that it's understandable to me why as a society we turn to questions of mental illness and mental health in the aftermath of the shootings these shootings are unbelievably traumatising we try to divide a line between our own civilized society and somebody who would act with it with such disregard for human life and of course there are significant psychological histories for many of these highprofile mesh shooters and so in that regard that turn is understandable as a national way of processing the trauma that we've experienced but at the same time people like myself who study this find it highly highly irresponsible and really almost an abdication of leadership to just focus on mental illness from the top down for i think three main reasons one is that as we see in the florida shooting there are so many factors that might lead somebody who has a a troubled history two to commit an act like this a second is that i can say as a psychiatrist unfortunately there is no psychiatric diagnosis whose symptom is shooting somebody else are harming somebody else and i would challenge the leaders who are saying this is a mental health issue to tell us what is the diagnosis here in a way it's a concert of many factors but it's not like somebody with depression schizophrenia has one of their symptoms to go shoot somebody and so in that regard it's not like there's a predictive value of psychiatric diagnosis and i think that's really a key issue that it's a.

research director tennessee florida depression
"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Health and society and research director of the safe tennessee project jonathan welcome to the takeaway thank you so much for having me so we have a ton of things to unpack here and i am particularly interested in this narrative around mental health i think this is one of the times that we are one of the many times we hear about this but this shooting seems to have brought this to the forefront is mental health has mental illness or mental health if you will become a scapegoat to larger issues facing this country when it comes to firearms well it's it's a great way to start this conversation and first let me say just empathic li as somebody who studies this issue and also trained in and mental health threat it's understandable to me why as a society we turn to questions of mental illness and mental health in the aftermath of the shootings these shootings are unbelievably traumatising we try to divide a line between our own civilized society and somebody who would act with it with such disregard for human life and of course there are significant psychological histories for many of these highprofile mesh shooters and so in that regard that turn is understandable as a national way of processing the trauma that we've experienced but at the same time people like myself who study this find it highly highly irresponsible and really a must an abdication of leadership to just focus on mental this from the top down for i think three main reasons one is that as we see in the florida shooting there are so many factors that might lead us somebody who has a a troubled history to to commit an act like this a second is that i can say as a psychiatrist unfortunately there is no psychiatric diagnosis whose symptom is shooting somebody else are harming somebody else and i would challenge the leaders who are saying this is.

research director tennessee florida
"research director" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"I'm a research director and i'm a delivery drivers spent a lot of time i cars you've got options on play playlist it's called play nearly one violet this podcast audio books being control when you keep us in your playlists you stay in control of your day stake her in on what's happening in the new mike meets going to be like also had a whether it's very easy for things that fall apart throughout the day news traffic and weather on wlsam 890 toyland jio the world changes do we have like the work why you think i'm in radio todd bowles a out its spending seven nights in paradise with you stars and legends in the guys from this steve dull show all right sounds good decisions presents us on the each 2018 joins god brendan whereas seven i is at the i bureau star pera he so del mar outer space is incident space on the trip is limited so sign up today get more insulin sign of now a wlsamcom nine fifty bombs run mary immerse yao coming up in just a couple minutes eleven your next shot at 4 k day with bother marianne them a clash at high noon and then uh steve were and the crew from three until six thirty because well it's it's six free game starts of six the night chuck and they'll have.

research director mike brendan steve todd bowles marianne 4 k
"research director" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WDRC

"The policy research director for the yankee institute for public policy in the yankee institute is a big conservative think tank huge thinktank and they're out there saying that this is a good first step that if you want indiana and governor mike pence brought india to back it didn't happen overnight if you want michigan which now is led by a republican governor it didn't happen overnight i i guess from my perspective i was looking for wisconsin moment but i guess you're not going to get a wisconsin moment until such time as you get in connecticut a republican governor and a legislature that is controlled by the republicans wisconsin incidently is now thriving because it became among other things a right to work state it limited the power of the public employees unions which were just destroying wisconsin's budget is wisconsin perfect today no does it still run the dead at times yes but they've reelected scott walker twice he will always just in his second term if you recall because there was a recall vote yes they do have the power of recall in wisconsin they had a recall vote in the middle of his first term at he won that recall vote and that was after a lot of special interest money of the left poured into that state he won the recall vote and then he won his own reelection bid so the journey of a thousand miles begins with that first step that's the old chinese proverb i'm gonna try and look at this is the first step but i still have my doubts in the.

research director yankee institute indiana mike pence india wisconsin scott walker michigan connecticut
"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To rule rishaad salama bloomberg daybreak asia hongkong six minutes past the hour let's update global news now japan's prime minister is a reshuffling the cabinet that's getting underway at this hour at baxter's covering covering global news from the bloomberg 960 newsroom in san francisco this is the moment we've been waiting for ranked did yeah and it's apparently happening right now dug we've been reporting to you that fumio kisha we'll be out nhk now saying that they will pick to women and retain five others in the cabinet saying suge also issues psycho and yoshino october a sasa who is a jp morgan chase japan research director says the polling is going to be really really tough for prime minister alberto turn around and just the usual fiscal spending or a pact scott proposal is not enough to shop or vote rigging the election is in september 2018 for ldp leadership russian sanctions bill forest on us president trump has been signed but not before the president protested saying it was among other things going to bring china north korea russia closer together bloomberg's margaret tell of says it'll be interesting really his complaints fall into two categories one is encroachment on executive authority predictable part and the second is the idea that everyone from afghanistan to germany you could be impacted by this sort of downstream in terms of the application of the russian sanctions thou margaret says the next he's trying to give a path for congress to rescind this also trying to send the message to allies that he is stuck with it germany has already expressed concern congress wanted to make sure of that he could not unilaterally softened the sanctions and passed the legislation overwhelmingly senator lindsey graham has a a real interesting perspective on this and putin has done something that nobody else in america could do unite the congress south korea saying today it's not looking for reunification or artificial reunify occasion or the collapse of north korea but it says a nuclear ambitions definitely have to be curbed luck tycoon south korean foreign ministry spokesman saying we believe the us policy on north korea also maintains a fundamental position of imposing maximum pressure and intervention jay why share samsung has rejected allegations that he paid bribes to a friend of south korea's former president of the secure supply for a key merger this well on.

america south korean foreign ministry putin germany afghanistan executive ldp scott japan asia hongkong south korea samsung jay north korea prime minister senator lindsey graham congress russia china president trump alberto research director suge san francisco bloomberg baxter six minutes
"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"research director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Financial system and ultimately the party's legitimacy to rule rashaan salaam at bloomberg daybreak asia hongkong well japan's prime minister and his cabinet reshuffle getting underway the today and we gotta baxter covering global news from our bloomberg 960 san francisco newsroom at right exactly brian we've been reporting to you that fumio case should it will be out nhk is now saying that the prime minister avi will pick to women and retain five others in the cabinet thing suge also aeci cycle and yoshino the her sasaki who is a jp morgan chase japan research director says the polling is going to be very very tough to turn around and just the usual fiscal spending or a pact scott of appropos our eyes not enough to push out there or of our evening the election is in september 2018 for ldp shift russian sanctions bill forest on you as president trump has been signed but not before the president protested saying it among other things will bring china north korea and russia closer bloomberg's margaret tell of really his complaints fall into two categories one is encroachment on executive authority that's the predictable part and the second is the idea that everyone from afghan dan to germany could be impacted by this sort of downstream in terms of the application of the russian sanctions margaret says a next he's trying to give a path for congress to rescind this also trying to send the message to allies that he stuck with it germany already expressing concern congress wanted to make sure that he unilaterally soften that he did not not unilaterally soften sanctions and passed the legislation overwhelmingly senator lindsey graham has a very interesting perspective hasn't putin has done something that nobody else in america could do unite the congress south korea saying today it's not looking for reunification or artificial reunification or collapse of north korea but it says the nuclear ambitions must be curbed by taking on south korean ministry spokesman saying we believe the us policy on north korea also maintains a fundamental position of imposing maximum pressure and intervention on that north korea jay wily vice chaird has samsung rejecting allegations that he paid bribes stupor end of south korea's former president park to secure support for a key merger he's uh for the.

senator lindsey graham samsung south korean ministry germany executive ldp brian san francisco japan asia hongkong south korea america putin Financial system congress margaret bloomberg russia north korea china president trump research director suge bloomberg prime minister
"research director" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Seoul how are we john lewis news excuse water words off our cup runneth over here we hope you wls made ninety i'm research director and a delivery driver has a lot of time i carson you've got options that way listed coldplay away one pilots listen podcast audiobooks why kinda liked to be in control when you keep us in your bladeless you stay in control of your day stay current on what's happening in the new my commutes going to be like also have the weather's a pound very easy for things that fall apart the news traffic and weather on wlsam 890 by the toilet jio digital footprint twitter instagram all the links at wls mm josh horowitz ever in my house everywhere you can visit online on your phone add on the air wls ama nineman wlsamcom dr feet of the city leaves year made it for all of vendrell narrowing hind ruined and on ignoring me wlsam and only get.

Seoul research director josh horowitz john lewis digital footprint
"research director" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WLAC

"Our research director seine peterson is nothing short of genius true story she's like the female version of a combination of oscar wound albert einstein eight show mean kin monday says and bill buckley all rolled into one who can give you and assisting answer like joe jim male she truly is amazing unbelievable in a time anything breaks i call her if if i'm driving your where are shoot her a message hey can you can do the background this thing give me up to speed and she didn't brief you and give or ten minister very few ten minister research and five minister briefs you and you'll know as much as is unknown in the in the were in in the public's fear anyway on the matter justin keying our what livid of title for just he's our resident millennial but that it was born that way that's the there's more to just thinking just thinking is the youngest member of our team he is our connection to all things hip even though we give him unrelenting grief about it he he produces the evening show so when i come in he's the one yes you name it we need typically have the number one or number two website in our entire companies in number of clicks is that only in our format that's only no no all all over thank you and the reason we do is because he manages our game and just michael very dot com and he manages.

seine peterson bill buckley justin research director joe jim michael
"research director" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"research director" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"That's the thing is and there's it all right there's a rick research director market research dot com his name it david sprinkle mr sprinkle has said that there is a turn for this has increasingly replaced at owner because these people see themselves as parents now if you're a parent you're not going to give your kid but this the right i didn't do that so if these people are in fact pat parents i think this is a bad decision on civil i think it's good live air spahn so why would you give your kid but his well i'm not going to give my point how to get my job is but okay well here's an example of a reason but someone my do you that savannah thrash are who is a medical beller who attended attack town calf a she said this is the greatest thing ever it would be great if my pop could enjoy of wine with me i said this is so this is the market then this is for that the cat ladies is added that this is for it later i don't that has to be yet right there's no i see i see seems though that over again you are trying to fill in for the the account late eighteenth all this is so sad he really sad right listen if you want to do this then that's available very gap they went another is a minute to where it was amazingly things him being only usually again of national security criminal act elite team the next schein polite have has a lot to answer should race years on the next of everyone notches.

beller research director schein