36 Burst results for "Research Associate"

Fresh update on "research associate" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:30 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "research associate" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"You know, no one ever questions them simply because it's credential is, um, they have all the right credentials. You know, David, I've worked as a as a research associate of research in turn. Had a number of foreign policy. Think tanks in my in my formative years and then was was at the CIA, which is kind of like the government's little secret foreign policy. Think tank. Right, But a lot of you get the people come in with the same kinds of credentials. You know you go toe these international relations schools, everything, which one reason why the CIA and intelligence community is actually so full of leftist because They tend to self select for other people that you know, went toe. You know Harvard or Columbia and they do these international relations schools where they really don't learn very much. By the way. It's really just indoctrination into the BBC NPR view of global foreign policy and that's that's what you actually learn in those places. But but you're you're writing and I think this is important for everyone to think about Now. We were told that Trump foreign policy because he didn't have experience in that arena and the people he brought in were somewhat non traditional means. Some of them were people that work in this in the past. Trump's foreign policy has been mostly successes. He did not get a deal with North Korea. So let's just get that in a way, and he tried and sometimes I think the stuff he said, was a little weird about Kim Jong. Un but still But in terms of wars disasters, terrible stuff happening in a foreign policy sense. How can we view the trump foreign policy is anything other than Extremely improved upon based on what we have with the Obama foreign policy, right? I forgot to mention Libya where we went in, basically for the Europeans to try, you know, which was a disaster as well, which Barack Obama and his autobiography said was a disaster. And he says that it was Biden's Biden's team and Blinken, who We're part of the strong voices convinced him to do it because he never takes credit for anything. He does wrong, of course, but he can't go to Congress by the way to do it. And that's another aspect of the social quickly mentioned. You know when. When I read all these stories about how great how America's back, it's all about Europe, right? It's all very Eurocentric. The world is a big place. We have a lot of other places to deal with, in a lot of other allies. Around the world, but you're doing with France and Germany want us to do seems to be really what they're talking about, like going into Libya, like joining the Paris accords, which will be ratified by the European Union, but not by the United States Senate where it should be if it's a real treaty. Um, but of course the media will say nothing. I already see all the scene, folks, you know, celebrating how we're going to be, you know, back out there doing what we've done for 35 years. Never once saying, you know, we haven't been in a war during this last 54 years. You know, that wasn't started earlier. Um Then we have, by the way, just just to follow up on them or speaking of David Harsanyi of National Review should read it. Review dot com..

David Harsanyi Europe Donald Trump Barack Obama CIA Libya Research Associate Blinken TOE Kim Jong National Review North Korea Harvard NPR Columbia Biden BBC Congress
"research associate" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | Last week

"research associate" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A senior research associate at the Harvard Law School Project on Disability, Ari. Thanks for joining us, Thank you so much for having me. He doesn't think so. I'm tan Xena Vega with you on the take away. Vote tallies show that Joe Biden is the winner in Georgia, a state that hasn't turned blue since 1992. But the state has also begun the labor intensive process of recounting all of the ballots in 2020 by hand. Georgia has until November, 18th to finish counting all of the ballots to you. Mitchell is a Washington correspondent with the Atlanta Journal Constitution. And she's with us to explain all of this to you. Welcome back to the takeaway. Thanks for having me again. Why are we doing a hand recount in Georgia? Well, the easy answers because these secretaries state decided that was the most transparent way. To audit the election and Ensure to anyone any naysayers that it was accurate. And so he even though it didn't require it, he called for a full hand count of the presidential election. So to you, we know this is a very labor intensive process. Will all the counties be done with the count by November? 18th. The recount has to end by midnight on Wednesday. And then, of course, November 20th deadline for certification, But it's looking like it's going well, actually. Ah, lot of the biggest counties in Georgia are done already. They finished over the weekend. Some of the other counties in metro Atlanta stay. They'll be done by Monday, the end of Monday, so it looks like the deadlines will be met. No, Tia. This remind us again the original vote tally because Georgia was one of the states that we've all been waiting to see which way it would go. And apparently, so far, At least, it looks like Joe Biden has one. The state of Georgia. What this is a state. As you know, that hasn't gone for a Democratic candidate since 1992 What tipped the scales here this time around. So it's the state as we mentioned, never got around to really finishing the counting and certifying the numbers before the recount was called, but it looks like Joe Biden is gonna win by about 14,000 votes, and that's attributed to Donald Trump losing support, particularly in Atlanta suburbs and kind of that outer ring of ex urbs if you will before you get to that solid red rural Georgia And a lot of older voters, independent voters, college educated voters, um and fewer white women were willing to support Donald Trump this time around. That's how Joe Biden was able to win Georgia. Wondering if there's any chance that we could see different results after the recount, or is this pretty much as you mentioned earlier, just for the sake of transparency and maybe to appease some of what the president Mentioned that his concerns are with this election. Yes, definitely to appease those Trump supporters who have questioned the integrity of the election. Of course, we know because of human error. There could be a shift here. They're some of the larger counties or some of the counties reported literally one or two difference in balance. One or two vote difference. Um So we do not expect a sizable change in the outcome again. We're talking about a 14,000 vote margin. It could change you know by a handful of votes, you know, 10 2030 is what the trend is looking like, but not anything that could change the outcome of the election in Georgia. Do you? Mitchell is the Washington correspondent with the Atlanta Journal Constitution to you. Thanks so much as always. Thank you. All right, everybody. The holidays are coming up and all this week we've been asking you. How are you and your family safely celebrating the holidays this year during Cove it This is Cathy from Westport, Connecticut. And we are definitely preparing to be outside socially distance and wear masks when necessary, helping for some sort of Festive winter. How are we doing Thanksgiving away from everybody? I block step, a box of plea potatoes, my garden sage from potatoes and various items, and I expect all my kids to cook their own and send me a picture of how great they fail on Zoom so they'll appreciate what I did. Well, if we have our help, we have everything that's all we need to remember. This year. We have a lot of gratitude for the people that are alive. 8778698253 is our number. Your holiday takes all this week on the take away. Support for KQED comes.

Georgia Joe Biden Mitchell Donald Trump Atlanta Journal Atlanta Harvard Law School senior research associate KQED Westport president Connecticut
Fracking can harm human health, physicians group warns

Climate Connections

01:12 min | Last month

Fracking can harm human health, physicians group warns

"About. Two decades ago natural gas production in the US began to boom largely because of the growth of fracking a technique for extracting large volumes of gas from deep underground burning. Natural Gas produces less carbon pollution and releases fewer harmful particles to the air. Then burning coal but Barbara Gottlieb of the nonprofit Physicians for social, responsibility says fracking is not without its own consequences for human health. She says, the process can emit toxic pollution such as benzene formaldehyde into water and the air, and there's a growing body of research associate active fracking sites with a range of symptoms from headaches too premature birth. That's how extreme these problems are in their terribly worrisome for health professionals. She says, the natural gas industry also contributes to health risks far beyond a fracking site methane leaks from the wells it leaks from the pipelines and compressor stations methane. A potent greenhouse gas contributes to global warming and the health risks. It causes from heat related illness to injuries and even death during extreme storms and flooding. So Physicians for social responsibility has called for a ban on fracking and a rapid transition to clean energy

Barbara Gottlieb United States Headaches Research Associate
"research associate" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:05 min | Last month

"research associate" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is.

Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. migraine Mehta mike
"research associate" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:23 min | Last month

"research associate" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

AI Tries to Save the Whales

WSJ The Future of Everything

09:11 min | 3 months ago

AI Tries to Save the Whales

"We head to the Pacific northwest to understand the obstacles that confront these endangered orcas and how researchers are using artificial intelligence to help orcas and humans to coexist. WHAT HAPPENED TO J thirty five or Tala wasn't an anomaly the southern resident cavs have been struggling to survive for some time they've been listed as endangered in both the US and Canada since the mid arts. But their numbers continue to fall in two, thousand five there were eight. Now there are just seventy two in the wild one lives in captivity. Their home waters in the sailor, see an elaborate network of channels that span the coasts of Seattle Vancouver from Olympia Washington in the south to the middle of Vancouver Island British Columbia in the north. The see encompasses puget sound the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan De. FUCA. Much of it is rich in natural beauty and teeming with wildlife with rural shorelines backlit by tall evergreens and craggy. Hills. It's a magnet for nature lovers who crave inactive lifestyle, but the Pacific northwest has been getting crowded these paths few decades with people competing for space with the local wildlife as of two thousand twenty. Washington's population was nearly eight million and Vancouver's topped out at about two and a half million and is projected to grow. It's become a busy place. So you see things like Bald Eagles nesting next to satellite dishes in busy parking lots. Big. Ravens Beg for food next to cold press coffeeshops commuters hop on ferry boats here like people in other towns take the train or the car. On these trips they can sometimes spot the southern resident orcas milling about but a lot of the time the orchestra framed by ferry boats or container ships. The area's ports are growing along with the population. In twenty eighteen Porta Vancouver ship activity reached a record high and the port is undergoing numerous expansions. Increased. Commercial ship traffic on top of recreational boat activity is one of the biggest threats facing the whales that live here. This traffic causes numerous problems ships pollute the water, and they're loud under the waves. As we're about to find out the ocean is getting crowded and noisy, and it's negatively impacting the whales. Dr Lance Barrett Lennard is the director of the Marine Mammal Research Program at the Vancouver Aquarium. There's also a lot of heavy vessel traffic that comes in some of the going to the port of Vancouver some of the going to the port of Seattle unfortunately both both major west coast ports. have their roots running through. Southern Resident Critical Habitat. But the obvious problem he says is that more boats increase the chances that Wales will get hit. especially, if the boats are going fast. Whale is far less likely to be hit by ship that's running slow, and if it's running less than ten knots, a good chance to survive even if it is hit, that's just the facts. So regulators started issuing slowdown directives, it few areas these slowdowns are mandatory, but in the Pacific northwest or the orcas live, they remain mostly voluntary. Mariner say they want to avoid the ORCAS but there are business conflicts John? Berg. Is With Pacific, Merchant Shipping Association a Trade Group that represents about thirty shipping lines that do business along the Pacific coast. For a lot of ships. Schedule Integrity. Is. Paramount. and. So they need to be at a certain port at a certain day in a certain time. And so planning is essential especially since coming in late can mean higher fees and lost revenue. Mariners go back and forth about how quiet ships they talk about things like reducing noise by finding optimum speed or by retrofitting or upgrading vessels with more efficient quieter parts. They even say that in some cases slower vessels. Moore of Iraq. Now to researchers, this is a settled question, the faster ship the louder the ship. And it's the noise that is even more detrimental to the ORCAS than ship. Strikes. The underwater cacophony is mostly generated by ship's propeller. It releases vapor filled bubbles. ORCAS like all CETACEANS rely on echo location to communicate, made and find food. For ORCAS, it's how they find salmon as the ORCAS chase salmon they make clicking sounds that they send out into the ocean. The click then bounces off of the salmon and creates an echo, and that's how they know where the salmon are underwater noise pollution specialist. Dr Lindy Wildcard is an adjunct research associate at Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. CETACEANS are particularly vocal of the US sounds to find their prey actively using bio sonar. And the various noise sources that humans put into the ocean can affect. Wales and that they are masked, that is the sounds of interests are obliterated by by US adding this sort of acoustics smog of of noise so they can't hear as well. You can actually hear the masking that wildcard is talking about listen to this underwater recording of northern resident orcas who have different dialects from their neighbors, the southern resident or is this recording was provided by Orca lab a nonprofit research center based on Hanson Island near British. Columbia. Canada. Those. SQUEALS ARE ORCA calls. Here's what happens if you overlay their calls with recording of the ship underwater. It drowns out the ORCAS squeals. All you hear is ship noise. That's because the sound created by the ship is at the same high frequency ranges the ORCAS. It's kind of like being at a dinner party where people are talking over each other. But for the ORCAS, the increased sound means they'll lose their seat at the table. If the ORCAS can't hear themselves they can't hear the seminar and so they can't find food. And that can have far reaching impacts that affect the entire population. Their stress hormones can increase. with, noise with the seismic Airgun sounds they also reduce their vocalisations to the point of sometimes falling outright silent, which means they can't communicate with each other and that probably affects mating. If mayors could know where the ORCAS are. They could try to avoid that part of the ocean or at least slow down. So their engine noise doesn't drown the ORCAS OUT Ideally. They'd only have to go slow when the orcas were in the area, but it can be hard for ship captains to confirm where the whales are in fog rain or even under normal circumstances ship captains can't always see them they often miss them. So some conservationists along with the Canadian government installed underwater hydrophones in the Salish Sea along the coast of British Columbia near known ORCA HABITAT, they wanted to be able to track the ORCAS through their echo location calls. But remember how it works. Sound was drowned out by the ship's well, it's not just hard for the orchestra here. It's hard for the humans to. It can take people a long time to listen to all those recordings figuring out what is well sound, and what is this ship fish or other marine life sounds the orcas make noise at all hours of the day and night, and all of that sound even that record overnight has to be listened to by someone. Up. Next. How artificial intelligence can help speed this process up? And maybe find a solution for both the ships and the whales.

Orcas Vancouver Pacific Northwest United States Pacific Seattle Canada Vancouver Island British Colum Wales Southern Resident Critical Hab Strait Of Georgia Cavs Porta Vancouver Vancouver Aquarium Tala Puget Juan De Sound Columbia
Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

Morning Edition

02:12 min | 4 months ago

Malaysia court sentences ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak to serve up to 12 years in jail for crimes linked to 1MDB scandal

"Court has found former Prime Minister Najib Razak guilty. He's been sentenced to 12 years in prison. This was in his first corruption trial connected To the plundering of the so called one Mdb State Investment fund. This is part of one of the largest most far reaching financial scandals in history involved at least 10 countries, including the United States, Michael Sullivan reports. Things could have gone a lot better for Najeeb today, the judge finding him guilty on all seven counts of abuse of power, criminal breach of trust and three counts of money laundering in a trial widely seen as a test of Malaysia's commitment to the rule of law. I think it's a good day for Malaysia. Bridget Welsh is a research associate with the University of Nottingham. And an expert on Malaysian politics. Speaking from the capital, Kuala Lumpur, This decision actually re affirms that the rule of law is working. The judge was very careful and laying out his decision, and I think that there was set the sense that the decision move forward in a very uncertain political environment and the judiciary. At least this has ruled the day and with that there has been a sense of justice. Now Jeeves Fall from Grace has been swift just two years ago. Then Prime Minister. Najib's party was dealt a shocking defeat in the general election, in part because of the public's discussed with one MDB scandal, which saw billions siphoned off from the government investment fund into individual bank accounts, including prosecutors say Najib's The Jeep has maintained his innocence and said on Facebook last night that he was misled by others and that the charges against him are political in nature. It's going to be a long process of appeals and their two more paces, and it may be a number of years, but you know he will basically not be allowed to contest the election. During this process, and that's important, Brigitte Wolf says, and helps Malaysia's current prime minister Modena seen who heads a shaky coalition that includes Najib's party. She says Mujahideen will gain the most from today's rulings because he will be seen as putting the country before politics malicious restoring its reputation internationally, and it used to be in the top 10 countries for corruption. Now this makes it stand tall, and I think that is that really serves Malaysia well for NPR

Prime Minister Najib Razak Malaysia Prime Minister Brigitte Wolf Kuala Lumpur Michael Sullivan Najeeb United States Bridget Welsh University Of Nottingham Mujahideen Facebook Research Associate NPR
"research associate" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:31 min | 5 months ago

"research associate" Discussed on KPCC

"Basso is a research associate at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and a clinical psychologist at Mass General Welcome both the science Friday And Archana Basset was a research associate and Harvard Th Chan's School of public Health and a clinical psychologist that mass General Hospital Welcome to science Friday. Thanks for having him to Robin. Let me begin with you. You've worked with Children and families who have experienced disasters. How is the pandemic unique in terms of other types of crises. So when we think about what's happening with covert 19 there are several unique features one. We can't see it so I can't go outside and say there's somebody with it. There's somebody without it. Right, So it's it's invisible. I don't have any knowledge with this pandemic around how bad it will get when it will end and everybody is directly affected so well. Katrina cut a wide swath across the United States, there were still places in the United States. That we're not physically damaged with Cove it There is nowhere in the world that I could say, Oh, if I went to this little corner would be there. So those uncertainties certainly do make this pandemic quite unique Art to this pandemic, as as a Robin has said, is an event that most people have not experience so Hetty a characterizes there a playbook for this. Is there a medical manual to characterize what this event is? Unfortunately, not, and I think the long term uncertainty there isn't sort of it's all clear. Now, you know there's not a clear horizon and the ways in which we're coping and what we are adapting to is changing along the way. I think the other thing is some of the public health recommendations in terms of how to cope. Typically one of the main ways in which we sort of adapt to stressful situations is by, you know, huddling in with our loved ones are giving is very visceral. You know, it's hugging our family and friends and holding hands. But the physical distance and guidelines are actually affecting our ways of coping there necessary and they're a good technological solutions to staying emotionally connected. But there is a missing piece in terms of the physical connection that I think is also important to acknowledge. Are you seeing more patients do to Cove it or Different issues in patients that you were already seeing. Well, I think in general what the science tells us after any large scale event, including public health emergencies like Cove. It is there that the mental and emotional stressors are going too far outweigh sometimes thie, other the physical stressors. And so we're dealing, not only family's heir not only dealing with the mental health concerns around Cove it and it's Long lasting, But with so many deaths, you're also coping with grief and loss that is quite different, then typical grief and loss because of the circumstances surrounding the death. Of those two pieces really are pushing the mental health numbers across the country, both for adults as well as Children. Hotlines are reporting many more calls. With Cove it happening, and I think as arched and talked about some of our coping strategies during times of uncertainty are undermined, adding two more emotional stressors, But it's also you know when this first started and everybody went to a stay at home, where there was a period where most everyone was given stay at home as things are re opening. I think we're adding a new uncertainty to this. OK Yesterday I was allowed to do this today. I can't or vice versa even within my own community. How come my neighbor next door is not wearing a mask or and I am an or vice versa there. And so it's very confusing for Children. As well to be able to navigate all of this uncertainty, and I think the uncertainty honestly is getting higher than Lower because there are different things happening in different parts of the country now. Want to share some of our listeners comments with you and have you react to them because we have a lot of listeners who are asking questions and let me first go to Matthew from Maryland and Luisa from a New York Hello. My name is Matthew, Age 10 in Maryland. During the Koven 19 outbreaks. It has been really hard for us kids to connect with friends. And that, along with not knowing a lot about Koven is making it. Very stressful for us in these times. And That is making it really hard for us to concentrate on things like school when we were really worried about things, and that's making it hard. My name is Luisa. I live in New York. And I'm tense. I'm scared that quarantine will never end. I'm scared that everyone will be different when it's over and scared of me. Changing. I'm scared of becoming more introverted. I don't want to be that person. Wow. So how do you react to those? Dr Bassett. Doctor Gurwitch. What would you say? All of those feelings make a lot of sense. They're worried about what they're already experiencing and worried about the uncertainty of what the future might hold when this might end. And there's a lot of feeling of sadness. There's disconnect from friends. I think there's also this idea of family sort of are struggling to both work from home and, you know, manage academic goals and schooling from home. Which Incidently I don't consider homeschooling. I mean, this is crisis schooling. I think that I would say, you know for parents. The idea. First and foremost that they support themselves as they are..

Robin Harvard Th Chan's School of pu Luisa Harvard T. H. Chan School of P research associate New York United States Maryland Matthew mass General Hospital Archana Basset Basso Koven Katrina Hetty Doctor Gurwitch Dr Bassett
Computer Aided Biology Platform Helps Companies Meet the Challenges of 21st Century Biomanufacturing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

04:40 min | 6 months ago

Computer Aided Biology Platform Helps Companies Meet the Challenges of 21st Century Biomanufacturing

"Marcus co-founded synthase after working as a research associate in synthetic biology at University College London where he developed novel Bio Synthesis Methods using pathway engineering prior to ucla, he was a bio transformation scientists working as part of an industrial biotechnology group that conducted more than ninety contract research projects for over twenty clients. Marcus has a PhD in plant biochemistry from Durham. I'd like to start by asking if you could tell us a bit about the concept of bioprocessing four point zero, and what it means to the industry. By purchasing full. Has Come from a cut derived from the attempts of industry full point. And will that's referring to. Is the Barracks Industrial Revolution which happen which is made human production Gamal as sophisticated, inefficient through the ages first industrial revolution, we just quoting a Siamese what steams to be used as a power source, replacing manual effort, the chemical energy. Dramatic increases the productivity as possible. Within Industry and then moving onto electrification, innovation production lines any more efficient ways of producing products an visit us. Industrialization around Automation Electronic Control that. So they find the content industry full point. As is often referred to in thinking. Okay. How can we connect all of the different devices of pieces of information that we might have particular setting? Connect those in to to the digital. Computing where you can have data storage across crossing and data analysis, so then debates this. Use of automated production is that one level higher allows the three sophisticated knowledge in control of what's going on, we take. This is particularly important for area such as processing. Biological Because of the complexity of what we daily with, so we really need to be able to get to grips with the complexity of the processes. Running on wore the day to this coming out with those and get into Rica era format such we can use asked me as we progress. That's really interesting. You explain. The Solutions synthase provides in this area. said they didn't start out as companies as we all now, so these days we provide software ted help people do their science recently made this offering the first late is because we processing. Those looking for ways of doing more sophisticated automated experiments in order to address the next is the will to do so the cool capability software. Anthony is the older generation. ultimated instructions abolish Christ calls. While is means is the scientists can rapidly specify They want to run. The works out all the details down to the every step of run protocal it can convert those detailed actions. The scripts that needed particular. These Commission and Toronto away from the intent. The scientist is given the software old way through old details that needed to actually run at intended experiment. Includes will to calculating the volumes concentrations, the reagents in the samples that needed shows the US to set those regions on on your. So then using that. Hey, go on the road. Will that wrong this? Project Hope with instructions. To generate. Amidst. Substantially more usable impactful at the moment there's a real issue It's highly flexible due to the complexities of programming and so out, there allows much more flexible, useful information. Law Context for more complex experimentation. So. Now's where we started. To do some really cool experiments that we re proud, generated number case studies which show the power of using automation in all science. But. It also has a really big beneficial effect when it comes to digital integration. If we think about all the different devices we have within the lab. Is the automation is? Also Dr and actually we have about electrical devices in particular, which is an associated with those. Two nations which actually produced the data, which is the whole point running experience in the first place. What we need is a way of structuring dates from all of these diverse diversities equipment.

Scientist Marcus Automation Electronic Control Barracks Industrial Revolution Durham Ucla United States Research Associate University College London Gamal Toronto Commission Anthony
Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

Live Happy Now

05:41 min | 6 months ago

Using a Game to Improve Resilience in Teens With Rosemary Lokhorst

"Good Day and welcome to episode two hundred, sixty, three of live, happy now. This is Paula Phelps and this week. We're going to imagine. Living in a world has been plagued by a great tragedy. The. World is you know is gone. All the stores are closed and you can't see your friends. Sound familiar. Interestingly enough. We're talking about shadow's edge. A mobile game and lifestyle platform that was created to help teens and young adults build resilience skills. Today we're talking with Rosemary law forced one of the creative minds behind this innovative platform. Let's listen as she explains how this game has helped. Teens and young adults deal with chronic illness, anxiety and now a pandemic. Rosemary. Welcome to live happy now. Thank you I'm very flattered sphere. Well, we have a lot talk about because you've got so many different components to shadow's edge, but before we start talking about those components. Can you explain the game to us? So shadow's edge is a free mobile game that is helping teens and young adults build emotional resilience and the game dust that true self help content that is delivered right where they are on their devices playing games, so we incorporate principles of narrative therapy and artistic expression and turned that into a game to meet them rather. Rather at, can you explain what narrative therapies narrative therapy is the principle that you tell your story and talk about what you're going through that you're actually start to work on it internally. Bunch of research associated with that budge. The idea is that for example I've had trauma and top about various times with potentially with different people that I started incorporating how what has happened to me into my story and as I started doing rats. I Tell Louisville differently each time, and that's because. Because you are accepting what's happened to you and I will actually to move forward, and it sounds like it'd be a great thing for the teen market because a lot of times talking about your feelings is difficult and just saying this is what I need. You don't necessarily have the language for that. Yes, and especially in a try it teams. That's what they're meant to do. They're meant to become more independent, and there's so many things going on in the brain with gross and with becoming. Becoming their own person, they're finding their own identity, and I think that specific he now, even just in general teams are so much more pressure than we were when you were younger. There's so much more pressure to be the best that everything. There's so much more pressure from outside from your social media in all kinds of TV shows where people become billionaires by the age of twenty right, it can feel like some of these genes after Tuesday, full career path by age fourteen already and so. That stress in addition to just really finding out who they are and becoming more independent is just very heavy on their minds, and that's not always easy for them to the neck. Stress any in addition to that our research is also shown when we were harvesting over fourteen million conversations of teens online that they actually prefer eating out to somebody that is potentially not really in their immediate few, because they don't know if they would be understood there and you mentioned the research. You did a lot research. There's so much science and research that goes into the backhand of this and I want to get to that, but. But you have created this whole platform. Can you talk about where the idea began to get us here? Absolutely more than just a game, and that's why this is a great question, an answer a little bit so that you can see sort of how it all came together. It all started with a book. Our founders Sherry, Subroto. She had a brain Schumer when she was younger, and she experienced firsthand that there's really no tools that are appealing and engaging for young people out there to help them through that journey of dealing with something really harsh comes your way, and so when against all odds? She survived Jackson. Jackson went into psychology for years. She did lots of workshops teens with young adults, and upon her twenty fifth year of survivorship. She then decided she wanted to do more, and so she wrote a book with France, that was called digging deep, and for that she set up a foundation and the foundation digging deep, published the book and distributed to over seven hundred hospitals in the US with about thirty five thousand copies, basically two parents professionals psychologists, the male started working with the book, and they loved it, and so with that she also than established log for parents and professionals to help them guide them, you know. Know how to deal with these kinds of things, talks your team. All kinds of subjects and a lot of subjects actually came from parents requested by healthcare professionals, and that sort of where I answered. You know she was running out of books and I knew her already were friends. She knew I had a technical background and she knew I had storytelling backgrounds though she said you know Rosie. I want to do more with this and I'm running out of books. How can I make this into something digital you know? How can we reach a wider audience with this self? Help content that we've had in the book. And, so we look at what's possible. What's the other people will redoing engineers? That wasn't really a lot around. You know. There were gangs that were focused on shooting your cancer, or that were specific applications to monitor your diabetes there things to make you feel more healthy physically, but really on the mental side, and so we really set out to do something that helps teens in medium that they're comfortable with and. And, so that's why we decided to build games versus an

Rosemary Jackson Paula Phelps Louisville Schumer United States Subroto Rosie France
Malaysia gets new PM, Muhyiddin Yassin, after week of turmoil

Between The Lines

07:53 min | 9 months ago

Malaysia gets new PM, Muhyiddin Yassin, after week of turmoil

"To Malaysia which has a new prime minister seventy two year old my eden. Yesen it's less than a week after the abrupt resignation of the world's most national later. This is the ninety four year old Muhammad Muhammad that plunged Malaysian politics into turmoil. So how has this South East Asia nation about thirty one to thirty two million people? How has it gone from an inclusive? And reformist government to a nationalist conservative law. Within days. Bridget Welch is an honorary research associate at the University of Nottingham. That's at Malaysia's Asia Research Institute bridget. Welcome back to between the lines. Great to be here now. Mahadi rule Malaysia for more than two decades until a two thousand and three in my twenty. It mighty gripe political comeback. Those last time we had you on the program bridge. What did he suddenly resign? Listen to us into his tenure. Well I it's reasonably clear that had he had very serious tensions between himself and anwer Abraham and the coalition that he led the pocket harp on coalition was divided and ultimately it split And as a consequence of that The the coalition collapsed and part of the collapsed however in the ball to move to a new coalition government and mightier himself was not willing to accept what other other parties in the coalition were doing montier resented working with. I'm no particularly the former leaders of the former government who were Who are tainted by corruption allegations? So what we see is a situation where Montier many politicking dividing rule many of the trying to split the pot the coalition itself his his reluctance to to leave Turn power over to Anwar set the conditions for the power. Grab that took place but at the same time Montier was not willing to go full. Go through with it. Because he wasn't willing to to allow the new new coalition to include the members of who he stood against when he came back into power. I'm into thousand. Mahalia and You mentioned ny Abraham now. Let's be clear. He's the protege turned. Raul turned ally although they fill out about a waco so ago they have reunited though having I think they have reunited from a perspective of They're now forming the opposition. But they have not yet completely resolved their differences. The fact of the matter is is that if Montier had supported Anwar clearly laid out a time line and stopped the politicking within the coalition then the government would not have collapsed. So I think for now. They are working together against a now common enemy. Who was someone who took the took took over the government in a in a power grab but at the same time that doesn't necessarily mean that they are fully resolved the question of the Lisa Session? If alcohol everyone was to come back to government says he feels but tried he success that. Yes in his malign nationalist. He's backed by this corruption tarnished former governing party. You mentioned the Mama tells more about yes so mine didn't yes and has been in politics for over forty years He joined politics in nineteen. Seventy eight He came into. I'm no He was the Chief Minister of the the very important state of Jehovah on the southern part of Malaysia and he has served in different capacities as different ministries that has held six different ministries In I'm no I'm he has not necessarily Had A clear Persona that That an extensive grassroots but he's been a very effective tactician and capable administrator And as a consequence he rose through the ranks through I'm no And he became deputy prime minister under the previous government From two thousand nine to two thousand fifteen We didn't ask known predominantly for three things He's I known for defining himself I as a Malay- as opposed to a Malaysian which is of course part of the reason. There's the brand that he is. Emily nationalist government and this new coalition that exists combines is predominantly Malays based parties And so this is something. It seems to have been Quite defining of who he is. The second thing is is that he's also known for standing up for against Najib on they won. Mvp scandal He he was sacked and after putting pressure On on Najeib to on these issues of corruption and he after in this happened in two thousand fifteen when the scandal is revealed so he stood up for On this important issue. And he's also known now for The effective maneuvering up becoming the winner in the power. Grab Which of course they're very different views and Malaysia about this Those looking at this recognized that that there are real serious. Ethical concerns about Whether or not amyloid and Yeltsin actually had the numbers which really did not seem to be the case in terms of A majority government When he was positioning himself for taking over power And others feel that that there's a there's an that he had. He had more than most numbers at that time and that he should that He was effective and moving and getting the position of power. There people in Malaysia are divided right now. Some people are are willing to give mood in a chance Wanting the situation to be more stable is and others very very angry that they feel that their sister the government has been stolen from them their dreams of different Malaysia of stolen for them. And there's a bit of considerable fear among people that this that lead in Yassin were lot real will be an old Malaysia. Politician Aka using the levers of power using issues of race using of issues of of of exclusion as a way to build up his powerbase so to the extent that this new Malaysian pm a struggles to govern and of course we have to remember elected public. Mandates does this mean this unprecedented instabilities. Luckily to continue the fact of the matter is is that Malaysia is a coalition government And is dealing with the situation of coalition governments in coalition governments across the world. You have one type of party set. A parties emerged. And then you can have a very unstable situation that a new set of parties emerged from Malaysia. This is a very new dynamic and of course it played out in the uniquely Malaysian Way with with intense amount of personal drama and Intrigue Enemies and betrayals Because the politics of Malaysia or highly personalized Right now mood in is Has Very is behold into the parties that he that he is that a put him into office and and the questions of Prot. Who is he's going to prosecute or maintain the prosecution's how much Islam governance he's GonNa put in whether he's actually GonNa try to seem to have any reform without his gonNA use race relations and of course importantly now lead in. Essen is is somebody who's just recently had a very serious bout of pancreatic cancer so the issue of the leadership succession is is equally important for this new government so there are very important points of instability and and as a result of that This is something that the people are watching very carefully. The instability is also facilitated by the fact that the opposition the new opposition bucket on Harapan. Now is that is actually quite emboldened by how this power crap has taken place.

Malaysia Montier Prime Minister South East Asia Muhammad Muhammad Anwar Bridget Welch Anwer Abraham University Of Nottingham Mahalia Harapan Asia Research Institute Essen Raul Research Associate Najib Yeltsin MVP Waco
Yaakov Lappin: Europe's Refugee Crisis II and the Virtual Caliphate

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

05:52 min | 9 months ago

Yaakov Lappin: Europe's Refugee Crisis II and the Virtual Caliphate

"Predicted the rise of Islamic state. And where it would establish a caliphate in his book. The virtual caliphate published nearly a decade ago. It's Yaacov Lapeyton military affairs correspondent and analyst research. Associate Bagan sit at center for research studies at Bar. Ilan University and in House analyst with the Miriam Institute. And it's with thanks to Chief Executive Sergeant Benjamin Anthony for making our introduction in nineteen twenty four the last caliphate. An Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran was dismantled in Turkey but in twenty eleven the virtual caliphate outlined an Islamic state that already exist on computer servers around the world used by Islamists to carry out functions typically reserved for physical state like creating training camps mapping out to states constitution and drafting tax laws. His book predicted how Islamists equipped with twenty first century technology to achieve as Seventh-century Vision would upload the virtual caliphate into the physical world. You predicted I. S I did and I even humbly. I predicted that they would establish it in either Iraq or any area where they would find a failure of state sovereignty. I didn't foresee Syria. But I certainly saw the crescent of Iraq area has a place where he's Law mcstay could upload it's vision and absolutely we have seen this transition from the online jihadist world into the physical off-line territorial world you've seen this vision being uploaded and then destroyed by a coalition of Western countries. I look at contemporary history around the world. I'm looking at that terrible attack on this for non-christians is not the same. Inspired idea that they are testing the Buddhist majority in Sri Lanka the Muslims there or are they sending another message is one hundred percent of the same ideology. Salafi Jihadists Salafi jihadists believe that they are in a state of war with the entire world. Where anywhere that does not fall in line with their fundamentalist a vision of how state should be run which is the most extreme of adherence to Islamic law They consider themselves to be municipal war with that place. It doesn't matter if it's an Arab Muslim country that's not religious with them. A Christian country a secular country where Buddhists country and the terrorist cell to carry out this relaxed bombings is perhaps the same Salafi Jihadist ideology that gave birth to al Qaeda and two Islamic. State's Yaacov as you develop these ideas through your research. What extraordinary developments have you found? Well when I was researching the virtual caliphate book which was as you point out approximately a decade ago. I was amazed by first of all how accessible this online activity was was an English. I was being exposed to English. Recruitment chat rooms where a senior Islamist jihadist figures were basically bringing me in British Muslims into their way of thinking and I was alarmed by this by published articles in the times when I was exposing this activity and it also makes me about how how easy it was to get into these foreign taxable. This entire world was these days. I know that things have changed very much so I'm not active in this line of research anymore. But I'm well aware that these chat rooms are encrypted. They're very difficult to enter and they've lowered their profiles so the activities still very much going on very much danger to international security much harder for people who are looking for to find it and get into these four without being spotted by therefore managers now since he wrote the book. We have seen the rise of Islamic state in Iraq and Syria than subsequent defeat and the consequential mass migration of refugees into Europe which has changed the politics of Europe is the gap between the people and their governments in the West bigger than ever in the West. It's hard for me to comment on because I Expertise does not focus on the West. What I can say about migration and how it's going to change Middle Eastern migration to the West. And how could change politics is is? This is just one reason why Middle Eastern refugees are pouring into the West. Another reason is say take the Assad regime. The Assad regime is responsible for millions of Syrians. Leaving the state of Syria. And the fact is that most of these people who are who have emigrated from Syria who who escaped conflict there are Sunnis and they're running away because of the coalition of Shiite Alawites who are waging the war in Syria on behalf of us have basically ethically funds them from their homes through mass murderer and war-crimes so what we're seeing here. Sectarian Warfare Creating wave upon wave of refugees from the Middle East and I think that will destabilize To a certain extent the political systems in the West if it repeat itself C. Another wave which I think is quite likely I mean if I said continues. He's about to launch a major offensive in Italy And if that creates another wave of refugees or if Turkey makes good on its threats to open the gates open the floodgates on Syrian refugees and let them travelling to Europe and we'll see this trend

Syria West Iraq Europe Assad Analyst Turkey Yaacov Lapeyton Middle East Sri Lanka Yaacov Chief Executive Ilan University Benjamin Anthony Miriam Institute Italy
"research associate" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"research associate" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Research associate from the urban institute so that technology the contradictions alert is really a starting point and it's how it's integrated and using and investigations that's really crucial for the departments with us also in a place or maybe it's not a high crime area at all but there's just a large gathering of people like for example we remember the shooting in Las Vegas okay is there a possibility of that being set up in such a way where as knowledge gets better at least even the people around there they'll know immediately where the shot is coming from and it kind of a least eliminates that kind of search for and you know kind of doing it the hard way you can't wait for the next shot to see where that's coming from where they can increase the response to that yeah so in terms of like the accuracy of the technology they the the vendor themselves have a I believe it's like a twenty five metre radius around the around the ten point and that's just for a stake of of I've been stationed there in their technology but we found that through interviews with officers and sergeants they typically will they'll find people do you know passing to firearms during a private sale in their backyard and apply the ten point on you know the back porch and they because it's a pain point that defender sees that the officers can also see they can then go and follow up with that presidents day a week we believe there was a shooting occurring here we want to clarify what was happening and them and learn more about that and it can be very very accurate second party questions in terms of response time so we look at response differences of gunshot detection alerts compared to those traditional nine one one calls for service from community members and in each of the cities for shots fired which are just those types of nine one one calls working over say I heard a gunshot I'm not exactly sure where it was we found that officers responded much faster compared to those events for gunshot detection alert roughly thirty seconds to three minutes about three and a half minutes faster and what was interesting about this was that it wasn't that officers were treating these types of alerts differently or these types of shooting notifications differently they weren't saying this is a gunshot detection alert I need to respond faster or this is actually a call for service I'm gonna take a little bit more cautiously the the increase in response time really came from the technology being able to notify the department of the shooting events faster than I can remember can notify department and we saw a large increases in the speed that the parties are notified and and therefore an officer can then be re assigned and begin their response incredible last question is really involved with training and I know you'll say this obviously this is most effective when is thoroughly incorporated into training is that going on right now is that kind of the planet is this thing is released throughout the country really there has to be that part of the the training in the implementation is just so important to really make it as effective as possible yeah absolutely and we found across each of the three departments that training was very light for this technology in most cases it was a very short you know less than twenty minute conversation with recruits about this is an additional tool that you can have it and use in your responses we learn that it training itself with implemented unevenly across the departments also across time so when I was first implemented indeed agencies you know years ago at that point there's a lot of excitement around it and because of that they had longer training that we need more data now that it's been out for a number of years and they're used to it as as an agency standard the trains are are much but they're they're not as intense or as as details we also found that there are very few trains for other stakeholders in the departments such as crime analyst who can use the data from the system from gunshot detection technology and to create crime reports or you know weekly or monthly reports identify hot spots of shootings or even in Milwaukee we saw that they were using that information to identify gang shootings and and retaliation against students and try to get ahead of the curve to prevent future shootings at the former retaliation there's a lot of data behind the scene that's important state agencies as well that can be used but if there is a crime analysts aren't aren't even familiar with the system or they're not using the data and if they don't learn about it your training and they can't do that and create these types of reports well as you can hear the urban institute does some great work Daniel Lawrence thank you so much for being with us couple things before we go where do we find out more about gunshot detection technology and then secondly if we just want to get involved with the urban institute and see what they're doing every day where do we go shares of gunshot detection technology there's a few different vendors out there our valuation focused on shots spotter they're the the that a large vendor and and the field on the on the urban institute we're looking in Washington DC and our website is urban dot org and we have and I say we had my my team that worked on the study we have a number of publications coming out on this evaluation but there are a couple things out all already.

Research associate urban institute
Understanding 'church and state' in Brazil

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:55 min | 11 months ago

Understanding 'church and state' in Brazil

"Today's show. We'll look at a couple of places which is and politicians make pretty unabashed best use of each other and at one country where a critical mass of the population seems to have grown tired of the arrangement. We'll stop in Brazil who's new president. Cheyenne Shaya Bolsonaro. One power on campaign heavily geared towards the least generous impulses Brazil's traditional Catholic believers and it's increasingly influential and rather less tolerant evangelical converts joining me to discuss. This is Antonio San Pyo research associate for conflict security and development at the International Institute for Strategic Agents Studies. Antonio I'll start with the very basics generally right now how religious a country is Brazil. Well Brazil is a very religious country. People's religion is quite important for their dentists. Mostly although obviously in the big urban centers in the southeast where people are wealthier and more connected to coacher and things this tends to be a bit smaller but resists to a very large Catholic country. There are a lot of. Catholics is by far the majority the Evangelical Population Elation Brazil has experienced tremendous growth in recent decades and it is estimated now that there are about thirty percent of the population identifying themselves as if Angelico but this population is divided in several different nations different churches but these population tends to be extremely conservative -servative in social terms in terms of controversial social freedom issues like gay marriage abortion and other issues. We'll come back to the van Jellicoe presently because they are a relatively recent arrival certainly in the Brazilian political sphere at least to the extent they now operate if we look at the Catholic Church in particular which is as you point out historically the root of Brazilian faith. How politically active or influential? Have they been. The Catholic. Search has been relatively modest or discreet in terms of politics in never officially endorses. Any candidates TASR assumed for itself a role as an actor and a supporting pillar in the more impoverished communities in Brazil Brazil as a country with large areas that are extremely poor and marginalized It is very important in urban areas. Where the poor resort to religion as an escape scape from the realities from the marginalization that the broader society and the broader economy regard them with so it is an important factor in social terms but politically medically? It hasn't had a lot of influence in Brazilian politics at least in this current era of democracy since the mid nineteen eighties. So is it fair to say. Even the evangelical more explicitly politically ambitious in the Catholic Church. was they want to take more direct role in Brazilian politics. Absolutely I believe and have been by far more active and more proactive in seeking political influence the Evangelical priests in their churches especially those of the biggest searching in Brazil such as the Universal Church of God the occasion of your cell to Hanes deals led by Juma do it you must see a do also owns a very large. TV Station in Brazil called record TV and he hasn't being extremely vocal but he has given even some public comments supporting able scenario the far-right candidate that ended up winning the elections now. The president of Brazil and there are several media reports showing how even though the public indoctrination or public mention of candidates and support in the church during ceremonies themselves themselves are quite discreet or sometimes completely absent on the margins of the religious ceremonies in the way that people talk and discuss with each other. They are quite supportive of what is currently the far right movement in Brazil the talk phone crime conservative in social terms so this is a very strong movement. Many Brazilian a majority of the evangelicals showed support for Djabel scenario by some poles seventy percent of Brazilians who identify as evangelical voted full. Oh Bolsheviks what's your sense of which way round the horse and the car were there by which I mean were evangelical voting Wgir Bolsonaro. Because because they think he's the guy always Bolsonaro going out of his way to convince evangelical that he's the guy so the interesting thing. Is that Djabel. Sano is N- aunt and oven jellicoe. He doesn't follow jellicoe religion his Catholic however his wife is of Jellicoe and he has demonstrated several policy positions nations and other philosophical points that are very aligned with evangelical concern so for instance the transfer of the Brazilian embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem Jerusalem. He stated publicly during the campaign than closer to the election. He showed that he wasn't sure about it. And now he continues to tiptoe on that however it was a point that is widely supported by the fans Alecos because of their belief that the Jews should return to Jerusalem and rebuild their temple so at the second coming of Christ would come to believe that is very widespread evangelical community at least in Brazil and other points such as publicly stating certainly in the pass on to some extent the president also stating opposition to gay marriage to the presence of gender and sexual education in schools that evangelical bellicose think is beyond unacceptable for their ultra-orthodox views. Sold these points. jellicoe symbols on auto are very well aligned. There are some voices in the oven. Jellico community that worry about the long term implications abused for the Evangelical Movement as a whole for its future because at the same time that there are very comfortable. Alliances of positions between both scenario and the evangelicals Bono also states some points that are quite violent excellent and points regarding public securities. Such as shooting took you criminal supporting torture off. Criminals suspected criminals and these tend to afflict particularly the poor and particularly poor black men which is also the constituencies the demographics that tend to be more heavily. Evangelical John Jellicoe so it's not a complete harmony of thoughts but so far the social conservatives mobile zone auto and of the Jellicoe movements have become quite aligned. Wind is it a challenge for President Bolsonaro or any Brazilian politician to try to manage the The expectations the hopes and the energies of both the van Jellicoe and the Catholic Church. Are there points of difference between them at all. I believe that it is a challenge to acquire the political political support of these different communities while also attending or respecting the less conservative positions of the rest of the Brazil's population. So the reason why this balance between jellicoe Catholic hasn't been very prominent in recent years. Is that the Evangelical Movement has been quite divided politically whereas the Catholic Church doesn't explicitly get involved in politics. The evangelicals have been involved but in a very fragmented way so they haven't really supported a single presidential candidate or a single political party. Brazil country with around thirty parties represented in Congress and it is is very fragmented and there are evangelicals in many many parties. Do Workers Party that is now. The main opposition the arch enemy of Bozon Otto and his right wing wing movement. The work aspired self aligned itself with the Evangelical so during Duma rousseff and Duma Roussev went back on some policy proposals to provide sexual education gender education schools because of Evangelical Influence Tube. Resilient political fashion diva jellicoe movement. Woman has been quite versatile and adaptive in align itself to whoever is in power in order to increase its influence and tried to block some of the moves against its philosophy and its main driving influences main driving voice has been against social freedom issues abortion gay marriage sexual education schools and things like that so just as a final thought then if as does seem to be the case. Brazilian politics has become more conservative. At least if we think think of that phenomenon as being personified by the current President Dawda extent is that being driven by religious faith whether it is the more traditional oh Catholic faith or the the new genetic evangelical faith. I think a big part of this right-wing shift of Brazil and the growing conservatism servicemen. That has been demonstrated by political leaders is being driven by evangelicals would just saw that the number of evangelical representing Congress rose by ten percent in the lower chamber of Congress in the October elections so their presence in politics has been increasing. It's just not something that is to the dominant can't power. Its shares power with some all the conservative sections so for instance in Brazil there is a faction of Congress that is called BBB so for stands for bullets bowls or cattle and Bible so the agribusiness influence is very strong as well and they also have a conservative view view. Those that support the more freedom to bear arms also tend to align themselves with the social conservatives of Jellicoe so these forces allied lied to themselves the form of important source off conservatives and to some extent swing shift in Brazilian politics Antonio some thank

Brazil Jellicoe Evangelical Population Elation Brazil Brazil President Trump Cheyenne Shaya Bolsonaro John Jellicoe Catholic Church Van Jellicoe Congress Antonio San Pyo Catholic Church. International Institute For St Antonio Research Associate Jerusalem
A Top Keto Researcher Shares Her Findings

The Keto Answers Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

A Top Keto Researcher Shares Her Findings

"I think you'd be on the podcast today. Anger Anthony Yes. Yes you are Maybe you say give people information just a little bit of your background currently what you do I'm a research associate at the University in South Florida and the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology I worked with Dr Dominic Douglas. You know we have a lab here where we we study metabolism and how it pertains to the development and potential therapeutic interventions for a variety of diseases. primary focus for me would be cancer Um so he's been cancer. Metabolism things like Akita Genetic Diet or other non talk ways the target metabolism could be a useful advent to standard of Care Therapy for cancer better level so looked at eight non toxic metabolic targeted therapies or other these jazz seizure disorders and also near genetic disorders including some rare disorders like Kabuki Syndrome which is something that we've recently started studying so we have a wide array of interest kind of all related to how we can optimized metabolism to prevent and treat the gotta before we dive in deeper and I think what you do on a day-to-day basis just curious as far as your background and what got you interested in this field in the first place sure so I was always interested in. I was even a a young on girl. I was very much like a tomboy. I would always be playing outside like you know catch lizards grasshoppers than I was just so interested in those dot dot kind of so biology plus always really interested in me to the point where I never really thought about doing anything else. I probably from the time that I knew being scientists was an option. I was decidedly going to be a scientist and I always really loved the idea of contributing something new to be in a wealth of knowledge that was out there so just reading scientific textbooks and thinking about how literally each each launch of their represents an advise some fine history that had an interesting question or idea and tested dot hypothesis and came up with something new that had never been known before and that really drew me the being though after to High School I went to college with that in mind I studied biochemistry molecular biology at Hendrix College which is a small college in Arkansas which is where I grew up had a really great experience there where the the call all just very intent on experiential learning and so I was actually able to work in a neuro science research lab for three years at Undergrad and able to do really really interesting research and actually present at them national conferences even while I was an Undergrad which kind of furthered heard my you know solidified my interest in going on to graduate school and being scientists so then I decided to do my PhD after Undergrad and I came down to University of South Florida for or a PhD program in Biomedical Sciences and started looking around four labs to join though when you start a PhD program you have to identify who's GonNa be your nature Professor and the project that you're going to work work are gone for your dissertation project and that's what I'm doctor you know he was a new faculty member here. USF This is about ten years ago or so and he was doing a load of work at that time for the Navy looking at mitigation negation strategies to combat a unique type of seizure that manifest when you breathe high oxygen concentrations at depth so such a navy diver might experience and that led him down the rabbit hole to booking at he does this which of course the Ketogenic Diet had been used clinically for a hundred years actually to treat epilepsy mets refractory to education and so he was doing work in that field and at the time has kind of stumbled across this idea about a ton of research on at the time by the thought that maybe toes Hud's them properties that could be anticancer and that it was at the time I was looking for a research lab and I met Dr Casino and you described these ideas to me and it just sounded really fascinating in part because it seems so novel. It's funny now when I think about at that time the idea of diet impacting something as serious as cancer. It seemed surprising to me because now it seems so obvious that something so impactful the Diet would have major impacts on something like cancer but at the time it was very enterprising and I I'd had some personal experience with with cancer and and my father had had brain tumors starting when he was very young he had them even had them irradiated was pretty pretty intense radiation therapy which saved his life allowed him to live past you know his back speculation into his you know into relatively old age and and allowed me to to come around so that radiation saved his life but 'cause very long lasting negative effects and that he had cognitive physical decline over time and you know this was at a time we're a lot better now at using targeted radiation to eliminate much of those off target effects but at the time it was kind of more intense whole brain irradiation type therapy and I think I was just very intrigued by this idea that maybe there's here's the non toxic ways that we can before standard of care therapies so that we can protect our healthy tissue while putting more stress on the tumor and I I love that idea about potentially using diet do that and and I think that that really kind of caught my cut my eye. I and I decided to join Donovan and start up the Kantha research program and his love so now still split your serve research focuses. This is in in everybody all in on this sort of like metabolic therapies or or how do you split up. Yeah I would say our whole lab is it's pretty dynamic and their interest we kind of have people have more specific areas adventures expertise I I really enjoy and tend to focus on the cancer work in our lab dominate the classically trained neuroscientists and daas more his wheelhouse but we all kind of are familiar with the whole territory and contribute in other ways. I think that is also really important part to this kind kind of science as being multidisciplinary because we understand and learn a lot from each other though we're lucky about the epilepsy field has a very long history three of studying diet and metabolism and not do these days and there's a lot that we can learn from each other those are those and cancer biology for example or people studying nearer nearer developmental disorders can look at things like epilepsy and learn from I'm definitely we have people who kind of tend to focus on certain things were all also contributing to most of the projects that come out of the lab okay. How many resources do you guys have the right. Now we have about Devon fulltime not fall and then we have a number of students who come in and we'll volunteer or work as a student researcher for some period of time here and there so I would say I'm sure on yours and the answer is not enough of course always okay okay so one of the things you mentioned before was that you sort of have this transition in how you're thinking about cancer therapies and in that you know how could nutrition affect any of this nine eleven obviously. How can it not so? What did you learn that brought you from one mindset to the other. I think just the learning how impactful nutrition is on everything that happens in our bodies. I mean it is I would say one of the main them Eli but but our body is receiving it it tell their internal system a lot about the outside world.

Cancer Anthony Yes Scientist Dr Dominic Douglas Research Associate Department Of Molecular Pharma South Florida Kabuki Syndrome USF Donovan Hendrix College Arkansas High School ELI Navy University Of South Florida Devon
"research associate" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

13:38 min | 1 year ago

"research associate" Discussed on Bad Science

"Out west pesticides things like that we thing uncalled integrated pest management where you can collect a bunch of spires release them out into a agricultural area of having to put out a bunch of chemicals so yeah they're they're helping us out for sure so there's some direct benefits but i think the real reason you appreciate it just because they're cool you know karadzic i'll keep trying on that one but i don't know kenny i mean cool but more frightening than cool for me maybe that's why they're maybe did you say you spend some time watching their behavior and watch you know eat we had more experiences where we were getting into spider world instead the spiders coming into our world you know maybe we would see him a little bit different life i mean that's a good point seeing it in action like do its thing i was fascinated i thought that was like the the closest i've come to being a spider expert yeah my fear of bugs does not necessarily come from seeing them in the wild or in their natural habitats it really comes from you're in my space bitch i need you out now yeah it's intrusion of you you know there's a lack of control happening in my own home that freaks me out it has very little to do with the actual bug yeah we got to be more like kenny and get out to these tropical rainforests and check out these spiders i'm sure we're both just down to do well i hear the amazon's nice right now sorry dark turns in this podcast look out guys okay so i had a couple of things that this movie just i don't know sparked my interest in so one thing there's this really funny any scene were there in the van and meryl streep is asking chris cooper's character about just dropping stuff that he loves because she's trying to like look for a passion that's like her jermaine drive in the movie her passion is to be passionate about something and he's super passionate about orchids and so she's asking him like but what about these other passions that you've had didn't you love fish or something that he gets into a story about fish and he's like i was obsessed with fish i would go deep diving the ocean i love the ocean and then one morning i woke up and i said fuck fish and now now i never went to the ocean again i'm just over it and so i was just curious because it made me think about my own life if you guys have had a passion before that you were just all in on and you know either as a kid or teenage years then just one day decided like nope i'm done with this now onto the next thing i i off meryl's whole arc of like i want to be passionate about anything i'm just again i'm like curl get yourself to therapy clearly you're suppressing oppressing something so much i think what we actually like i mean i bet i'm going to wage a gas here that kenny's love of insects comes from a very young time like when he was a little little little kid he got really into this shit and was like spiders are cool and then he followed that throughout his adulthood adulthood and thus became scientists cities today but i look at maryland i'm like gee surely either something happened something like very dark happened for you to just like shutdown eddie memories of anything passionate or you're just the most boring person alive like you have no pasha nothing like you're just stopping yourself like little oh yes she seems to be just like caught up in this weird elite is a job i don't know where a brighter color try try writing for differ magazine company new york or go to the go to the hamptons anything that gets you out of your right lane jump into this very strange field of orchid hunting at orchid drugs which i also wanted to ask about like what the hell is that are there other orchid drugs yeah so kenny answer we both if you ever dropped something a passion of yours that you were just like i'm done with this now and we're gonna get these orca drugs okay so hashemi's now that i've just like you know sort of cold turkey meryl don't be american so don't be america and maybe john laroche's main point is that it doesn't matter what you're passionate about is just finding somebody you can be passionate about it and what it is less important john rochon is kind of saying and why he says fuck fish is it it's not that he loved best is that he loved being obsessed with fish what was your other question the other question was orchid drugs bro yeah so where can we snort some powdered orchid kelly green cocaine was was working drug steph was not re-offend right kind of the point of the movie is is that the protagonist was kind of forced to to make up stories to make his movies exciting but there are flowers we can snort right well they're flowers have certainly provided a medicines that's for sure i mean poppies come to mind right what's your experience with that my streets poppies i wrote it but there are a lot ton of other drugs there are a lot of drugs that come out of the amazon that were still discovering all the time okay an off-the-record which ones are you experiment you gotta get it before the damn thing burns down you gotta get in there kenny take the trip trip of your life before jody percent of the world's oxygen just evaporates yeah and tell us which wants to do because i don't want to do the wrong drugs and then you know be tripping for four four years sounds like a good project for a student out there i'm just imagining the what student that's like no this we'll work i can make this a thesis i can spend seven years just being really fucking yeah and so you never like we're into a goth the the clothes and music and then decided like oh no i'm not a kid anymore i don't think i had like a big i don't know i guess i would probably went through some we're faces like that big thing for a while and then words that's absolutely accurate pokemon hoping uh-huh oh that's a good point mongo okay great then there was a writer's block so of huge part of the film is him suffering from writer's block he can't can't he doesn't know how to make the movie doesn't know how to write it out and so i wanted to know if you know if you had writer's block nadia ever and how do you deal with it and kenny i don't know if there's like science blocker walker research blocks or something but but i just wanted your both of your takes a perfect writer i'm just kidding now i think i've had it definitely had blocked but i think really what it is that i think the idea of writer's block is very romanticized and the notion of it is again a great way to sort of self sabotage tauch if you really think about it procrastination is essentially we procrastinate because we're afraid of dying because the minute we actually set forth and do a thing we have to to face our fear whether that's a fear of failure whether it's a fear of acceptance of fear of achievement whatever that thing is so you put off stuff because you don't want to face that fear just yet so i feel like when i've had i'm gonna put it in quotes writer's block it's really more just this long-term procrastinating where it's not so much oh i can't solve this thing it's that either for whatever reason i don't have the mental or physical energy to face that thing in the back of my head that charlie are nick cage one i should say really you hear his veto or as the film and you hear him just being like i'm fat stupid you but i'm bald i'm a mess and i think that's a that's many people it's a very a relatable identifiable things they hear that voice in your head telling you not to do things because society and your peers and your family and all these people that put those voices in your head when you're really little they start to come out when you're an adult trying to do a creative endeavor so i really say that like as far as writer's block goes i think i've got there's been times where i've gone maybe a few weeks or months without picking up something i've have definitely had moments where i go i know that whatever that thing i'm working on isn't ready yet and i don't know that i can fix it this second which which is like another thing that's driving me nuts about the film that i was watching charlie just like i'm like go take a shower go do a vacation anything like you need to get out of your comfort zone not that a shower is out of your comfort but like you need to do just walk the dog like so many people if they say like how do you break you know how do you how do you solve a story or whatever it's like just do anything else in like your brain will naturally start to giving you're giving your brain a break from staring at the page will give yourself the opportunity community to like let it come through and filter it and then you go there it is yeah yeah i love that that's just i think a great classic remedy for being stuck and problem solving is just take your focus away from the problem he had to go to new york and then the minute he goes to new york that's when he starts solving things and i'm like you should have just taken a trip to the desert is an hour away you know you wanna take a trip you always talk about it he has to go to santa barbara to go to that or confessed that he keeps trying to bring women too and i'm like look i get that though i get that it's a horny plant but also like you don't need to be horny on your work expedition just go take yourself to see like the mission go hi it's like a nice little john right away from santa barbara just get put yourself in a different situation because it does does force your brain to problem solve when you're not in that or just like give yourself a break why was he always thinking about work he's just that's the kind of guy he is probably a subdued passive dude got caught down a little bit i also love ohi by the way great oh hi tourism board is gonna love this that's a good just to take take a break go to ohio it's like nobody touched it since like nineteen eighteen what's this money from the ohio tourism board i'll just put that on my chest we'll edit at at that part out so they don't know that we're getting paid and kenny what about you how do you solve when you're stuck yeah i mean i think we all have writers blocker curb you know what we're gonna use it a lot i think all points you guys are are spot on you're you're doing these projects is research don't work out some of them do and you really need to write that up and make it public public so it's a common phrase that research really doesn't exist unless it's disseminated at knowing can read about it you know it's like tree fell in the woods so you can do that and then we do this thing called peer review so i write up this this research i have and i wanna submitted to a journal so i sent it to the journal they look at it if they think it's good enough if they send it out to anonymous other scientists who then essentially read it and territory shreds and trying to poke holes in it and find everything that's wrong i'm going to revise it and if they like it and they don't reject you eventually gets published so from you can expect like a year or two like is people spend many years from submission to getting published so regarding writer's block getting those responses back especially a you know some people are really kind of polite and nice and have good comments other people just like you know a rip your science apart that can be pretty daunting so i think a big challenge especially for younger folks in science is to kind of maintain that self-motivation kinda have it within you to keep the persistent even if even if you're down in the dumps about your work i can't imagine having to send off script and then having to wait a full year ear and then a bunch of people have come back and ripped it apart that is excruciating so sorry yeah he's gotta be sure right it makes science it also prevents junk science from being published usually but yeah it as far as having this is a career there are there are better parts jolly thing will thank god that at least once the science is published that becomes legislation immediately ah right there's no red tape or loopholes or people that have to vote depending on if it's an election year it's just like oh the scientific community has all aw decided on this they've gone through peer review and so now that's the law that's how it works great so on that note people i should check out your podcast nadia why do you know that tell us about the podcast yeah check out my podcast why do you know that i co host steve schlage also very funny i hi we basically want to know why you know so much about an incredibly specific topics so we interview all walks of life about something that they really really are into not just obsessed with but like as hyper-specific as we can possibly get whether that isn't offend a person a cultural movement et cetera great okay that sounds fun and it's available wherever you get your.

kenny four four years seven years one day
Amateurs Identify U.S. Spy Satellite Behind President Trump's Tweet

KCBS Radio Morning News

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Amateurs Identify U.S. Spy Satellite Behind President Trump's Tweet

"Late last week president trump shared a photo of failed rocket and satellite launch in Iran on Twitter after some investigation by amateur satellite trackers it's believe that photo came from a satellite known as USA to do for it's one of America's most advanced a spy satellites a very little is known about it for more we're joined live on the KCBS ring central news line by grace Lou a research associate in the east Asian nonproliferation program and the Middlebury institute of International Studies in Monterey great thanks for the time. thank you for having me so okay what little what do we know about this the satellite. well we know that these are capabilities that are highly classified and they are generally talked about in public there's speculation that the US government certainly has this type of technology but I think it's a little different when we see the actual subtly image itself and we see how high quality there isn't a lot of detail you can see on the ground yeah for those who haven't seen the photos of the president tweeted out the other day it's remarkably detailed it's believed by I guess a lot of people sleuthing this thing that it may have been of a photograph of a photograph so to speak somebody took a picture of a hard copy photo but you can read you know the writing around the edge of the launch ring is it's quite remarkable. yes certainly it's beyond the resolution most commercially available satellite images that we can buy as open source researchers inducing this level of detail again was astounding and well you know experts and use spatial analysts in the field no that is this technology exists and the US government probably uses it quite often again it's pretty shocking to see the images. what must be great for people who study this stuff people like you but I'm sure that you know defense department officials not thrilled that something like that was put out on Twitter. absolutely I think one of the issues and the reason why declassifying information usually takes such a long process because you don't want to give away information that you're not intending to share so even if there's nothing in the image itself that the US government didn't want to share with the public there are researchers and analysts who can gather a different details about the satellite and the sensor that's taking the image and derive more information about the about the government's capabilities so you don't want to giveaway details that you know you don't intend to share so how many of these class of satellites are up there may not knowing where they are isn't actually the hard part of the problem I guess for people to keep an eye on the sky into the map how many are up there. right well that's a great question and I wish I had the answer thank you one of the things that the US military and the government would want to keep on the down low is you know how many of these satellites do they have what is fair orbital pattern it and that's just you know something that you want to keep I was up there hard as possible so that you're not revealing your capabilities one can assume that they keep an eye on places that they would want to keep an eye on the right. certainly and that's not the case only with government satellite but as some of the open source commercially available satellite images that we work with are often either test or designed to orbit around sting sensitive areas around the world so that we have more imagery more often and more frequently over these places let me ask you one final question based on what you've seen of this image how much more detailed is it than what we had previously been privy to. much higher resolution than what I'm used to dealing looking at the image you can actually see things like small a door workers just stares on. each individual step on the stairs going down to the launch pad and those are just some of the details that we need are not custom to sing and I assume if we saw personnel on the pad we could actually either make out faces or at least general facial features so I think it I mean it's incredible capability and really something that you know we know exists but again it's a different story when you see the image itself thank you for the times when it's degrees solutions a research associate in the east Asian nonproliferation program at the Middlebury institute of International Studies in

Donald Trump Iran Twitter President Trump
Will China's Economy Overtake The US?

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Will China's Economy Overtake The US?

"Worth of goods and services every year, whereas China produces about thirteen trillion dollars worth so China's still a bit behind, but the Chinese economy is growing more than twice as fast as the US economy and also China is just a way bigger country. It has about four times as many people as the US. So if you take those two mathematical facts, a faster growth, rate and way, more people and plug them into a spreadsheet as we love to do every single day here at the indicator plugs into spreadsheets, it seems inevitable that China will eventually maybe even not that eventually have a bigger overall Connie than the US we made exactly this point in an episode of the indicator earlier this year, but an old friend of the shows a friend with quite a deep understanding of China was listening. I'm George Magnus. I'm a research associate at the school of oriental and African studies in London. And also at the China center it opted university. And I'm the author of the book called red flags. Why sees China is in jeopardy? Having just finished his book on China. George call this up to say, he was not really buying this idea that China would inevitably overtake the US life is not quite as simple as that. It doesn't really work. According to spread cheese. What sad. Can you imagine? If it did, I know and we actually did it. When listeners tell us that we are missing a part of the story. I mean, most of the time we. Careful. This is indicated for planet money, I'm card Garcia, and I'm Stacey van today on the show. Why nothing is inevitable, especially when it comes to the US and Chinese economies. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from fund rise the future of real estate investing access private market real estate projects from high rises in DC to multifamily apartments in LA. Get your first three months of fees waived at fund rise dot com slash indicator. Support also comes from gain bridge gain bridge offers in new ities designed for the digital age. Simplified products with guaranteed returns that you can buy direct. Learn more at gained bridge dot life slash NPR. Gain bridge is not available in all states. Okay. Economist George Magnus offers us three reasons why it is not inevitable that the Chinese economy will overtake the US economy. So the first reason I think for skepticism is that I think that China will not be able to sustain the kinds of levels of growth that the government says it is now achieving in order for China. Catch up. It's a Connie has to continue growing a lot faster than the US economy last year. The US economy grew by less than three percent. China's economy grew at more than six percents more than twice as fast, but George thinks that kind of Chinese growth just cannot last. I mean several years ago it was growing at around nine or ten percent. Now, it's come down to what the government says six to six and a half most private for Costas think it's more like five to five and a half. But I think in the next kind of ten or fifteen years it's going to continue to come down to something that's much slow. Maybe something of around three or four percent. And here's the reason George thinks that China cannot keep up those growth rates, it's because of what's driving the growth. Most of the growth has been coming in China from investment, and which is like a building, Plum, and factories, and railroads and ports and infrastructure. And so on. And you can only do that in, you know, forever. Kind of thing if it's always commercially viable and pays for itself. Somehow the idea here is that when the Chinese government and Chinese companies invest a lot of money into the economy. Those investments should be for things that will bring more economic benefits in the future. That's what an investment is. But in China a lot of the money being invested is going to things that won't payoffs as George the classic example is investing in apartment complexes that nobody will ever live in or you know, in malls that nobody will ever shop in eventually those investments have to be written off as worthless. And any money that was borrowed to make those investments will not be paid back and that will harm economic growth rates in the future. So that's reason number one white is not inevitable that China will overtake the US reason. Number two, George says is that the Chinese currency? The renminbi will lose some of its value against the US dollar, and it's worth explaining why this. Would matter. So if the Chinese renminbi loses value against the dollar, then Chinese people and Chinese companies cannot afford to buy as many dollars dollars that they need if they're going to buy things made in the US or elsewhere that are priced in dollars. In other words, win the value of the Chinese currency goes down. It means the Chinese economy is less rich. And it's Connie is smaller the right now. The Chinese government manages the value of the renminbi against the dollar which saying sayings that within the next decade or to the Chinese government will force the renminbi to become weaker against the dollar. The Chinese government will have to do this Jorde says because it has printed so much of its currency in trying to stimulate the Chinese economy that the currency's value will simply have to fall my contention is that over this time period. There will be a meaningful and probably very significant devaluation of the Chinese currency, which will mean that perhaps by twenty twenty five for example that China. GDP relative to America's may not look that different from what it does look today. And that brings us to join his third reason that it's not inevitable that China's economy will become bigger than the US economy referred reason caught if is is that a lot of countries tend to get stuck in what we call a middle income trap. So they can grow out of poverty, not with these. But but managed to do it. But then they have to get smarter when they have to try to become rich and achieve the kind of Paris with the most advanced economies in the world today, the middle income trap is this idea that country can go from being a low income country to being a middle income country pretty easily just by investing in some very basic things like infrastructure and housing if you other things that most countries need for a functioning economy, but after that it's really hard for country to go from being a middle income country, which is what China is right now to being an advanced economy. Like the US in the countries of western Europe. A lot of countries have tried to make that leap. But a lot of them have failed which is why it's called the middle income trap. They're trapped with middle income status on the problem. The China has is really about its institutions because we generally think that the key to getting out of the middle. Income trap is to have good competitive regulatory legal educational intent logical institutions that basically nurture innovation and technological efficiency and productivity to become an advanced economy. China will need to be able to compete with other countries across a lot of high tech industries, but to compete in those industries, it helps to have entrepreneurs retesting ideas in the market who are competing with one another to come up with the best technologies and who don't face a lot of regulatory barriers to starting up their private companies, and George says, the problem is how much control the Chinese government holds over to Connie. And the regulatory and legal barriers imposed by the government all of which makes it harder for those entrepreneurs and new businesses to really flourish and to compete in those high tech sectors. And this third reason that China won't be able to escape the middle income trap. Because it lacks the right institutions is probably the one that is the most hotly debated because even though the government has started to control more and more of the Chinese economy. It's also thrown a lot of money at developing those high tech sectors. So it might still be successful in some them. George just doubts that spending a lot of money without the right institutions in place will be enough for China to compete across enough of those sectors to catch up with the US. So those are the three reasons and note, by the way that George never says it's impossible that the Chinese economy will one day overtake the US economy. He just doesn't think it is inevitable world after all is a messy place in all that mess. Genus cannot be typed into a spreadsheet yet. Working on it. This episode of the indicator was produced by

China United States George Magnus Chinese Government China Center Connie Renminbi Research Associate School Of Oriental London LA Garcia Costas Stacey Van America Twenty Twenty Plum Paris Western Europe
Papadopoulos: Informant Who Tried To 'Seduce' Me Was CIA Not FBI

America Trends

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Papadopoulos: Informant Who Tried To 'Seduce' Me Was CIA Not FBI

"George popadopoulos who served as a campaign advisor to president. Donald Trump has a new book deep state target. It gives his account of his work on Trump's twenty sixteen campaign popadopoulos tells CNN he did not know the Turkish woman who allegedly sought to seduce him. I have no idea who this person is. And I think some of the investigations into what happened in twenty sixteen probably going to bear that answer for for everyone on we now know that she was in some sort of research associate as I explained she just didn't fit that profile. She really match the profile of some sort of agents. So I was very suspicious right away about her popadopoulos says he believes the woman was CIA affiliated with Turkish until

Donald Trump George Popadopoulos CIA CNN Research Associate Advisor President Trump
Monogamy May Be Written in our Genes

60-Second Science

03:18 min | 2 years ago

Monogamy May Be Written in our Genes

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin. All monogamy. What makes one species pair off while members of a closely related species? Play the field. The answer may lie in their genes. Researchers at the university of Texas at Austin, we're interested in how complex characteristics arise during evolution. We chose to investigate. This question using anonymous mating systems because animals listening systems are available in all of the different vertebra Clayton's Rebecca young a research, associate and evolutionary biologists. Who led the study able to find species that had independently evolved monogamy in each of these lineages Young's colleague, Hans Hoffman professor of integrative biology ads. So we decided early on that we didn't just want to study a particular group of animals, like mice or fish, for example, or particular group of birds. In compare between monogamy and nominal there. But instead take very broad look across the prince across four hundred fifty million years of Lucien when these fish birds, and frogs and us she at the last common ancestor. The researchers chill is five pairs of species and look to see if they can spot a signature pattern of gene activity that was shared only by the animals that were monogamous and they discovered a set of twenty four genes whose activity in the brain is strongly associated with monogamy, including genes involved in rural development, learning and memory and Coug nation the results appear in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences. And again, this is surprising because they've evolved monogamy independently. And the species have diverse for hundreds of millions of years from one another. So we might expect because of this distance evolutionary distance that gene, expression brain will be quite different. But in fact, we find this share signature that. Seems to be related to the mating system of the organism. No, those chains may not be setting up entirely new patterns of behavior. They may just be building on underlying mechanisms that all species share take. For example, pair bonding Herrmann. One has to tolerate another individual for a long period of time, yet even members of the most intolerant species have to put up with one another at least for as long as it takes to get the meeting done shrews, great example, they tolerate each other for one day year into those mechanisms already exist in in very aggressive species that they just happened for short periods of time. And we think potentially what's going on is as modifications of these conserved pathways that exists in different kinds of mating systems. Get elaborated or modified in the volition of monogamy in principle young and Hoffman and their collaborators could have extended their study of monogamy to humans perhaps comparing. Our gene expression signature to that of one of our less monogamous relatives say chimps the results could suggest whether we should pick up a few extra cards for Valentine's Day. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Hans Hoffman Rebecca Young Lucien University Of Texas Coug National Academy Of Sciences Austin Herrmann Clayton Professor Sixty Seconds Four Hundred Fifty Million Yea One Day
2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:57 min | 2 years ago

2018 in Review: Election Highs and Lows

"Unsurprisingly all things considered the citizens of many countries decided that it was time to put someone else in charge in two thousand eighteen but did they make the right choices on nonstop net. Extra jet that award hundred. I should is a military scientist author and research associate at so SS South Asia institute, she considered the decision of her country Pakistan to elect former cricketer Imran Khan as prime minister. He has really brought about a new generation of supporters and voters who are very grateful. Very intolerant. To give you an example in Karachi, Imran Khan recently made a speech saying that, you know, people in job who support Nevada schrief donkeys. And then what is body follow? As did the got hold of a real donkey in Karachi and beat it up to death. So it's violence. I mean, they're very Gresley. If you watched them in social media the foul he's foul mouth. So it's almost kind of fascism that he's bringing a new fascist flavor. That is bringing to politics. That's what's different. I don't think that the taste will change is just that a new make belief world has been. Created through media through narrative management, and in this the military has a large and to play giving the view from Mexico where voters bucked international trends by electing a left wing populist is Andre Rosenthal. A former deputy foreign minister of Mexico ambassador to the UK and Sweden Representative to the UN and now international consultant on Latin American affairs. I think the first thing new president Mexico has to do is to tell the truth campaigns are one thing, but once you're in office, and once you know, what the situation is regarding the checks and balances that you have either on the legislative side, or in the media or civil society, you need to tell Mexicans the truth. If you continue to promise all sorts of impossible things like free education for everybody know exams to get into university selling off the presidential air airplane fleet traveling by car everywhere giving up the president's residence and and living in his house or renting. Little house near the offices things like that those are very populist promises, which resonate with a group of people. But they are things he will not be able to fulfil. And therefore, I think at the end of the day, his first speech his first act as president elect, even before he takes office needs to be to begin to tell the truth one of the main themes of elections this year, wherever they were taking place was an increasing disconnect between the public and the politicians. It was no different in Iraq, which was long overdue. He is NPR's. Jane Arraf, people are incredibly disillusioned with politicians and not just politicians. The interesting thing is they're disillusioned with tribal leaders. They're disillusioned with religious leaders. So there's a lot of skepticism we've seen that reflected in the turnout results in the Iraqi election, for instance, and really a lot of cynicism about whether this group of politicians will. Be any better than the next group. Even though they talk a good game. And also in Iraq Renauld monsoon academy fellow with the Middle East and North Africa program at Chatham house. Well, it's been fifteen years and the Iraqis are asking fifteen years, what have these leaders done, the political tribal religious leaders? What have they done in terms of basic services in terms of employment and the answer they're coming up with is not much? And so the bigger gap in Iraqi society today isn't the gut between Kurds and Shia which is sort of defined post two thousand three Iraq. The biggest gap is the gap between the citizens and the elite between the rulers and the ruled many sort of people from bustling all the way up to slay. My NIA have very similar demands. So what you're seeing are the Shia protesting against their own leaders and Kurds protests against on Kurdish leaders. They're tired of identity politics. They know that any Iraq since two thousand and three Kurds Sunni and Shia leaders have all become wealthy at the expense of the majority of the population. Those are the citizens. But to go back to where we came in and to try to conclude review of two thousand eighteen on a note more positive than being mealy. Glad it's all over is it possible that the tunnel down, which we all traveling has a light at the end of it. And is it possible that that light has been illuminated accidentally by the most unlikely Pathfinder more presidential than any president that's ever held this office that I can Amy pope is associate fellow at the US and the Americas program at Chatham house and former deputy homeland security advisor to Barrack Obama. So she's not quick to jump to President Trump's defense. But is the even a glimmer of good news from his presidency? So far, I think it is the role of women in society. It is the election of so many women to congress, and it's the conversation that has been going on since his election about the metoo movement about the exploitation of young women beh-. Savior is that had pretty much been accepted for decades as long as women have been in the workforce are now front and center. And that's frankly in large part due to him the access Hollywood tape and comments about how he was treating women galvanized a conversation galvanized commitment from women to engage in public life. Women. I know who had no interest in politics are now organizing fundraisers getting out getting out the vote writing speaking. That's a great thing. And that is not that we've been trying to crack for many many years. And so I suppose hats off to Donald Trump for bringing the women to the table before to UCLA, Geoffrey Howard, Jeff any optimism for us. I think the way in which Trump may be an advertently making America greater again is by getting Americans to think seriously about the role of moral values in politics. And I think there's a long standing. Tenancy to think that when you go to the voting booth you're just going to vote for your own pocketbook devote for your own self interest. And I think that assumption is is under pressure and people are once again as in all the great moments of American history in the great moments in the history of any democracy taking seriously, the idea that the purpose of politics is to provide for certain basic rights and opportunities for all. And when our institutions are subverted in when they are not being dedicated to that proper purpose, it's important to hold political leaders accountable. So if the president is able to inadvertently reawakened in people a sense of moral commitment in passion in public life. That would be a terrific inadvertent achievement.

President Trump Iraq Karachi Imran Khan Chatham House Mexico America Donald Trump South Asia Institute Pakistan Jane Arraf Nevada Prime Minister Deputy Foreign Minister Scientist NPR UN Congress
SC county judges toss same-sex domestic violence cases

24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

SC county judges toss same-sex domestic violence cases

"Crew members into the ocean to have been rescued. They were five crewmen aboard the KC one thirty which is a propeller driven aircraft us for aerial refueling. And there were two aboard the F eighteen fighter so far to crew members have been pulled from the water that was correspondent Dave Martin reporting. The first woman to publicly identify yourself as a victim of former Michigan State University sports, Dr Larry Nassar, so statutes of limitations need to be. Address to ensure survivors of child sexual abuse of access to the Justice system. Rachel denhellender. The former gymnasts spoke at a Vermont conference on preventing child sexual abuse, then Hollander, the lawyer told her story and the obstacles that she and other survivors of faced Nassar is now serving effective life sentences for child porn possession and molesting young women and girls a new study out from the university of Michigan warns the grade school absenteeism is on the rise. Statewide w j Zach Clark with the latest one in six Michigan children are chronically absent that means they miss at least ten percent of the school year. Now, the main culprit is homelessness. That's according to Michigan senior research, associate Jennifer herb downward when you think about a child not knowing where they're going to be staying from one nights the next, and then that family also trying to plan how do they get their child to school and creates a number of various for the students. The impact can be. Disastrous for ten percent of the school year has been shown to negatively impact almost all educational outcomes. Now, you can look at Clark for w w j NewsRadio nine fifty well with so many strains of marijuana out there these days, which one would work best for you. A well-known pot advocate has her recommendations MIR with the story is WWE as Charlie liked it for Fox News anchor and cornet Jameson is marijuana advocate, and she's happy that people will now be able to enjoy marijuana so cute. You have any recommendations. Strawberry, cough is a great uplifting strain. It has a little bit of law, which is a Turpin. So it's a little more sedating. Now, if you wanted to maybe relax I love Northern Lights. I think it's a very nice strain. It gives you a little bit of the gig lease, but it won't consortium knock you out. If you're tired, or maybe you're dealing with insomnia. Granddaddy purple is one that I tend to like for insomnia anything with purple purple Ercole granddaddy purple her dispensary botanic in cork down. Can only sell medical marijuana for now. Charlie Langton, WJ NewsRadio nine fifty WSB. News time one thirty seven. We'll head out to the roads update, traffic and weather together. Now when it comes to taking

Marijuana Dr Larry Nassar Charlie Langton Michigan Zach Clark Michigan State University University Of Michigan Dave Martin KC Cough Rachel Denhellender WWE Jennifer Herb Cornet Jameson Fox News Hollander Vermont Strawberry Ten Percent
Chinese Presence in Pakistan Is Targeted in Strike on Consulate in Karachi

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Chinese Presence in Pakistan Is Targeted in Strike on Consulate in Karachi

"In Karachi three tacos storm, the local Chinese consulate killing four people including two police officers before being killed themselves and before they could detonate their primary weapon econ Laden with explosives for more on this. I'm joined by Aisha Deka military, scientists offer and research associate at so as I should first of all the attack itself on the Chinese consulate in Karachi, it's been claimed by the Balochistan Liberation Army. Basically who are they in what they want? The Balochistan national liberation on me is a nationalist below ch- nationalist movement, their ethnic movement a want independence from Pakistan. But what is very cute cute is that. Earlier on in the past Balochistan Liberation Army or any army associate with the below schmooze Flint has never had the capacity to strike inside of an centers and astrategically aside, as for example, the Chinese consulate says very very strange, and it's a cross border attack as well. It's not within Balochistan. Yes. It's not within Balochistan earlier. What we've seen is that be LA or other armies of the movement would strike say petty workers, laborers working for the army all blow up a pipeline going through Balochistan having their years ago. This is like four five years ago. There was a blast in Islamabad, which was the extra beauty to be LA. But you know, everybody knew wasn't the LA. Be LA didn't have the capacity. I still don't think it has the capacity, but what is being claimed is on behalf of LA. This was on its own merits at least clearly an extremely ambitious attack. I mean, this is a a high profile and presumably will secured target, which they clearly intended to do serious damage if this was the Balochistan the beret army, and as you correctly point out, there's some doubts as to whether they're claiming to whether it's being claimed on their behalf by other actors, but why would the Chinese consulate of Bena target fastly because there is the China puck sonic comic corridor, which passes through Balochistan. There is development work and guava, which is a portent of very strategic port very strategic location in Balochistan. It's a deep sea fishing pole, which would give China the ability to kind of a be part of the Rabian, see. Says very strategic and what the Balaj ethnic Ballade say is that well, a strategic mood shift has been made a strategic decision has been made regarding the province without taking them into account. And they do not want to be part of Pakistan. I still don't think I mean, I'm doubtful that there are several claims. There's a Pakistani claim that the Balaj themselves are being funded by by Indians in intelligence agency in of gone intelligence agency, they could be others as well. And what the Chinese have been saying so long is allow us allow the Chinese to come bring their own force into Parkistan the security forces to defend and secure anything. Why there is Chinese investment or Chinese presence? So it could be anyone really. But it doesn't look like. The work of be LA because be LA has limited capacity is much not just in Balochistan, but in Pakistan as whole is the much resentment or suspicion of China's increasing influence in Buxton. In Balochistan, the issues being raised bought generally the state, and the people are generally, you know, excited about money coming in. I mean through the China Pakistan economic corridor. China plans to invest sixty one billion dollars into Pakistan and has so far invested about twenty six billion dollars. They were stopped after the last government lost in elections. And there is a new government in the new government destroying to reach out to the Giannis. But there are other problems, for example, IMF has raised issues with how CPAC known as coming into into parka sawn, and they're saying that box on will get into debt trap China. And so when box current prime minister went to China, very recently, he was met very warmly, but not giving any money Buxton. Badly needs money. So it was a smile. Good vicious press. But nothing several M several MU signed but nothing substantive in terms of

Balochistan Balochistan Liberation Army China Balochistan The Beret Army LA Chinese Consulate Pakistan China Pakistan Economic Corrid Aisha Deka Karachi Buxton Islamabad Laden Research Associate Bena IMF Prime Minister Flint Giannis Twenty Six Billion Dollars
"research associate" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Tidal wave one word dot net. Right. All right. And you answer your Email. I take it. Yes. You know, I can't guarantee I keep up if I have if I get inundated, but I do my best. Well, you're going to be inundated. Believe me what projects in the remaining moments here. What projects have you all taken on after the military? I take it you're leaving the national security stuff behind. Now, you probably had enough of that sinking ship. Yes. Or maybe you, I don't know. But but so what are you doing? Now. This is Joe I'm a research associate still with the cognitive sciences lab that was the original Abacus awry, and then later at SAIC, and we're currently working on some very interesting contracts for some major corporations that have tasks us with doing some research and doing and we hope to continue pursuing the mechanisms behind remote viewing. Can you talk about it at all? I mean, I for example, our own CIA which wants spent all its time with national security work. You know, congress and oversight committees have been talking about which ones spent all its time with national security work. You know, congress and oversight committees have been talking about changing the direction of the CIA to industrial espionage..

CIA congress SAIC research associate Joe I
"research associate" Discussed on Warm Regards

Warm Regards

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on Warm Regards

"Welcome to warm regards conversations from the frontlines. Climate change. I'm Jacqueline Gill, assistant professor at the university of Mainz. Joining me this week is our brand new co host Dr. Sarah, Mary. You may remember Sarah from a show. We did last fall on the metoo movement in climate science, Sarah, I'm really excited to have you join us as a regular, and I think our listeners would love to know especially those who didn't hear that at the sewed with you. Who are you and what do you do. Well, thank you for having me as one of the new co hosts, it's really great. So I'm a research associate at the university of Washington where I studied Palio paleo climate, science. And I do a lot of other things besides just basic science. I'm a grassroots organizer on with five hundred women scientists. Yeah, I do a lot of work talking about how institutions can do better. So doing a lot of work integrating framework of social Justice and intersectional feminism into public life and public leadership. But see, I'm a, I'm also a mom and I'm a cat Mon. That's my jam. That's awesome. And so your line of research in terms of paleo is is very similar to what I do, but you tend to cover the oceans where I tend to stick more on land. And you were just telling me about this new study that you were reading that is a little bit on the scary side. Can you tell me a little bit about that? Yeah. So there's a study published on. Called constrain the evolution of Neo gene ocean carbonate chemistry using the Baronne isotope proxy. So it's the payload graphic study to constrain and understand the variability of the carbon system in the global ocean through time. And so one of the things that they found which was really important to see that and because you know, of course, the past is the key to the future, right? We wanna used past or system very ability to understand the kinds of changes that we predict and project in the future. What this study showed is that. If we continue on emission trajectories by. The year twenty one hundred. The global ocean will be essentially we haven't seen peach levels in fourteen million years. That we will see one hundred years. So the it just I'm not explaining this very well. How you doing, but it's it really what the study shows is that we are exiting these geochemical envelopes that are so fundamental for the way that life functions on the planet. And it shows us that there's all this work that we need to do to understand what will happen to marine ecosystems from the on the on calcified in microorganisms always up to the the large organisms in the food chain on from these very large chemical consequences of carbon emissions into the global atmosphere..

Dr. Sarah Jacqueline Gill university of Mainz assistant professor university of Washington research associate fourteen million years one hundred years
Communist Party, Cuba and Dr Emily Morris discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

05:02 min | 2 years ago

Communist Party, Cuba and Dr Emily Morris discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Cuba has had its first draft constitution since the Soviet era published following today's debate, the country's national assembly approved document which makes no mention of building a communist society. It recognizes private property and opens away to gay marriage. What I'm doing by Dr Emily Morris is a research associate at the UCLA institute of the Americas currently in Havana. Welcome back to medical twenty four Emily and explain to us a little bit more about what's in this new, very different constitution. Well, it's it's, it's not funded from is based on the previous ones, but it's called as you say, some significant new departures on what's happened inside of the Las well, they've lost thirty years. So particularly over the love five or ten years, they've been a whole series of reforms have been introduced economic side, which have opened to space from more private business for the exchange of houses for selling players in the house cost. So the society has actually changed already. And so the constitution is really catching up with the changes that are already underway. So in a way, it's not surprising anybody in Cuba Russo because it's a adjusting, mainly things have already happened. So you've mentioned you've mentioned two things. One is the gay marriage and the other is the economic reforms. There's not the reforms as well in there, but on the gay marriage. This is really something that doesn't surprise any control. I think you know that they've been. There's no real opposition to this apart from a few churches have made some noises, but there's they vision to to gain those permissive in in that respect, they look gay clubs and transsexuals and so on. So this is coming out in the boost in one a long time ago in Cuba on the economic side, what's interesting is that the they've already private property people in their houses on the pictures, allowing for the creation of five businesses and giving them a clear constitutional basis than they had before. And this age interesting they detail will be in the laws of hostile, move the exact tons. But it does open a new space for the development of the private sector into the and one thing that people have noticed in terms of the absence of the word from the constitution is the building of a communist society. That's something that was afraid. Geology belonging to the Soviet era constitution. Instead there's something called prosperous. Socialism. Has anyone explained exactly what it means? You've given us lots of examples of what it might look like. But the idea of a thing, a theory, an idea called prosper. Socialism, do you know exactly what that is. On your term. It's already been used in a barrier documents that have been posted last five years talking about the conceptualization bird, the modal so that is prosperous. So for in sustainable, socialism is what they, they say, they tried to build. It's kind of interesting because fifty used to what commu came when qb aligned itself with the union. And so now obviously, that era is over and so they say, have been talking in this is they always talk about and rather than building a community system. So 'cause especially what they're in the process of defining and that's why this is interesting because they're trying to define their own brand of sulfur in the stoop, and I listen and what it consists of and the debates within that a really profound under debate happening at every level. So this is really very interesting moment any given his day, and I think you know globally it's a very interesting case that we've got here. So if they're talking about a socialist system, they do have a communist party the so they don't have a multi party system. They have a a concentration which has what they call participate, true democracy values level. But the only legal political party is the communist party. But the other thing that the constitution signed to do time to separate the the different functions. And so that's the policy to be separate from the government and they're trying to separate the executive from the legislature so that this is a lot of constitutional very profound constitional shift for a thing Mark here, but detail of them though we don't actually know let expect you know how this is going to work, but already close. You. Have a head of the communist party is not famous person country that happened this year when the canal took over the presidency, would this test you?.

Communist Party Cuba Dr Emily Morris Cuba Russo Ucla Institute Of The Americas Havana Research Associate Executive Mark Thirty Years Five Years Ten Years
"research associate" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on The Anthill

"Fifty percent confidence to one hundred percent confident if you want to truth then you're right a full house that's three cards of one rank and two of another does beat a flush which is five cards of the same suit but it's how sure you are about your answer that's interesting particularly to those scientists keen to understand how confidence works and the way people communicate it this is one of one hundred questions from an online confidence calibration test designed to work out the relationship between the person's confidence and whether they're right now i clearly need to brush up on my poker rules because when i sat down to do the full test i got that question wrong and worryingly i was seventy percents sure that i'd got it right to find out more about these tests and what my results mean i called up eva crow a research associate in health sciences and psychology had the university of leicester who studies confidence that gentleman knowledge test that you did is actually quite common thing to do in order to put a number on your confidence into see whether you are what we call well calibrated so whether your confidence actually matches your real knowledge so basically for each statement you had a fifty percent chance of whether or not you're going to pay correct now we really hope that you would receive a percentage score correct answers of higher than fifty percent and the believe that's actually correct you received i think sixty six percent actual corrects percentage of sixty six percent yeah say first of all that's pretty good news for you gentlemen knowledge it shows that was also better than guesswork so of course you had to give confidence rating which is in the end of the day it's quieter subjective writing say with ours between fifty and one hundred percent satisfied correct answer because the the number fifty was given because fifty percent would have been correct just based on pure guesswork because it was a true false question and then you had that range between fifty percent and one hundred with a hundred super absolutely confident and fifty percent just giving a guy and having vandam guests now your confidence school you mean score was seventy four percent so indicate that you were pretty pretty confident of the time so it was definitely above guesswork what you were doing well at least you thought say when you were completing the questions but does it got between my main actual correctness so that's really that's exactly the video interesting point here so we basically look at this cup to then evaluate whether you are either confident or under confident now in your case jemma i'm afraid to say that you mean confidence score is above you actual potential school of the correct answers which means that you're slightly overconfident okay that is not necessarily a massive guy so you don't need to be extremely worried about this but it is something that maybe you want to consider in the future all right i'll take that into consideration here a bit from either later and some experiments she's been doing to test the way people communicate that confidence but first let's go back to basics i asked dan bank a postdoctoral research associate at the wellcome trust centre in neuro imaging at ucla in london how scientists actually define confidence confidence it has many different nations and it's been defined in many ways over the years but i think an emerging consensus at least a working definition of confidences that it some grated feeling a great sense of the probability or the likelihood that a belief is correct so for example you might have a belief that you will be able to cross the street before an oncoming car would hit you and that might be associated with a sense of the probability that that's going to happen it's it's about taking all kinds of information integrating them into some kind of summary estimate if you like that sort of describes how likely it is that belief you hold the decision that you made to be correct this is different from a person's general feeling confidence in themselves as they go about their lives or in a social situation there will come to that later it's more akin to a mathematical statistical computation that's going on subconsciously in our brains to explain this further down gave the example of tennis line judge so imagine that you are tennis lon johnson and what you have to do is to tell whether the ball was in our.

fifty percent one hundred percent sixty six percent seventy four percent Fifty percent
"research associate" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

"Like nobody cares about men who are failures they are like off the bloody radar so and there's no sympathy for men who were failures so men stack up at the top and the bottom and and we don't have a discussion about that we don't have a discussion about the fact that women are radically underrepresented in dangerous jobs although they are or in or in or in in trades that require like brutal physical labor women are radically underrepresented or in or in jobs outside women radically under represented so the complaint is always well if you look at the top one percent it's there are more men than there should be you know by pierre sex division it's like well yeah but if you look at the bottom the reverse is true so if we're going to have the discussion which are and i don't really necessarily think which have that discussion but if we're going to have the discussion then we should look across the entire economic spectrum i wonder how much of this debate is being governed by unconscious forces i wonder how much of what we're experiencing a manifestation of as of on we're toll goofy has not yet been think the lord of it what are you thinking about any particular part of it why feel like is the the reason that i imagine that you are arguments based on research associate excess full is because people are expressing feelings as opposed to cudgeon and researched arguments need feels like varies a powerful dominant patriarchy and no one can deny i mean that there is power they such thing as power and they're all people that benefit from structures being as they are horse of class appoint of those structures being by one of the things i've observed is the whenever changes disgust you know and my tendency has always been to be sympathetic towards movements that are about change or the element of what might be termed disadvantaged groups.

research associate one percent
"research associate" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Go to my nine to five is under water that's pretty good to me she pretty yeah yeah so i just i took a liking to it after graduation dr higher beyond fulltime and i like the research associate in the lab can overseeing you know our students and interns and then i manage our rescue reprogram which is the outreach education in the citizen science expeditions we so how do you get funding for something like this all over the place that's one of the reasons are live is kinda unique is that typically in academia you know you're applying for federal funding or private funding through grants things like that and that's pretty much how you live know year to year basis but so so when you hear all of these political talks in you guys kind of have to keep an about what's going on with that because they cut government funding for programs like this for sure add it to our you know small military budget and it affects you guys whose livelihood exactly i mean sciences like under attack right now i mean you saw the march for science was a way kind of trying to stand up against that but it's troubling for sure because we know that there's going to be cuts and drawbacks and we just have to do our best but the one cool thing is that it's kind of energized another population that want to continue support and what we're doing so we've had a lot of people that will actually just donate out of their pocket we want you guys to keep doing what you're doing because they see the goodness and so contribute that way we get a lot of own tears so part of the way our programs designed as we allow the public to dive with us and actually help replant since you're interested in one time we just scared of the water it's all right real scared of what it's shallow you can look up and see the boats don't care.

research associate
Starfish Aren't Fish

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:46 min | 3 years ago

Starfish Aren't Fish

California Research Associate Smithsonian Institution Writer Julian Perry Marshall Medina Scully Beth National Museum Of Natural
"research associate" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With now more on one of the contentious issues in the tax reform debate that is going on among senate republicans how much tax should be paid on passed through income what is pass through income and wise it's such a big deal that it threatens to blow up the gop tax bill over joe rosenberg who is senior research associate at the urban brookings tax policy center hi welcome to the program i robert and a spear individual need vigilance corporations bay corporate taxes what's up passed through entity in what kind of tax do which owners pay right so paso entities are obtained says ah that pay corporate income tax or any entity level tax but rather the profits are passed through to the owners of the business and then the owners report that income on their individual tax returns and pay tax on it along with the rest of their normal income now most businesses are small businesses and most businesses that pay taxes this way are small but they're not all small so that's one of the common meant misconceptions while the majority of a pass through entities are quite small there are a number of our pass through entities that are quite large and report the vast majority of of the total income what an example of a big kind of bisnews that they'd wouldn't pay a typical corporate income tax in a typical corporate tax there are a lot pass uh for example law firms or accounting terms that are structured as partnerships and the owners of the firm would tax at the individual level so let's say you mentioned a law firm that say it the partners in the term do pay taxes as as though to pegged through entity what rate would they typically pay in and what would these republican tax proposals due to change that rate sakau nibiru income his taxes ordinary income so the top individual income tax.

joe rosenberg senior research associate tax returns corporate tax law firms law firm income tax senate gop tax policy robert corporate income
"research associate" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With kelley now more on one of the contentious issues in the tax reform debate that is going on among senate republicans how much tax should be paid on pass through income what is pass through income and is it such a big deal that it threatens to blow up the gop tax bill we're going to ask joe rosenberg who is senior research associate at the irs urban brookings tax policy saw hi welcome to the program i rather than a severe individuals by individual income tax corporations bay corporate taxes what's up passed through entity in what kind of tax do which owners pay right so pass through entities or or businesses ah that don't pay a corporate income tax or any entity level tax but rather the profits are passed through to the owners of the business and then the owners report that income on their individual tax returns and pay tax on it along with the rest of their normal income now most businesses are small businesses and most businesses that pay taxes this ray or small but they're not all small knows one of the common misconceptions while the majority of a pass through entities are quite small there are a number of pass through entities that are quite large and report the vast majority of of the total income what an example of a big kind of business that that wouldn't pay a typical corporate income tax and a a tip it corporate tax there are a lot of pass rues for example law firms or accounting firms that are structured as partnerships and the owners of the firm would pay tax at the individual level so let's say you mentioned a law firm that said the partners in the firm do pay taxes as as as though it to pass through entity what rate would they typically pay and and what would these republican tax proposals due to change that rate so currently income his taxes ordinary income so the top individual income tax rate is currently about forty percent did two bills uh moving now would take us a different approach the house bill which has already passed the house of representatives would cap the tax.

kelley joe rosenberg senior research associate tax policy tax returns corporate tax law firms law firm the house senate gop irs income tax corporate income forty percent
"research associate" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Uh yeah the the representation of a juicy steak out of some parts of india could be a difficult job assignment on that side of the world julie i pray i really appreciate your call monte steve wondering ron hero in here professor public policy at howard university he's also a research associate with economic policy institute author of outsourcing america and the forthcoming engineering globalization reassuring in near shoring uh run here thanks very much for being with us today thanks for having me on we've heard so much for so many years about a huge volume of american jobs going abroad being outsourced offshore now the here's this i don't know what you call it river trickle stream of jobs coming back this way how do you characterize this run is this a new day or the jobs coming home are we making too much of it what's the balance the bub online you well i think it's probably a combination of both i think there's it's right now it's kind of a niche market um did because customer um a demand has changed the nature of software development has changed many of the factors that have been discussed um but i i think also there's a huge potential here if we have some smarter policies if we highlight these kinds of things more um there's opportunities uh to date really when we've been talking about outsourcing and restoring it's been mostly focused at least the policy world in washington on manufacturing and we forgotten about all of these it jobs and it's not just i jobs to counting jobs many bet back office whitecollar jobs where there's.

india research associate software development washington ron professor howard university economic policy institute america back office
"research associate" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Uh that would get a list of all those technologies in that area well i would imagine if you're trying to bring technologies to market than the people who would be licensing those technologies are buying them outright and we can talk about that uh are not scientists they are their business people absolutely in some cases there would be scientists i i believe you could have a chief scientist um from a company or research associate at a company that made look through this so that they can add to their technology portfolio or grow their business um but yeah you're right it doesn't necessarily have to be a scientists and this is why it's so important that we righted in a way that uh is understandable by the by most people um so we do have a lot of enterpreneurs that come to that sei we have venture capitalist that could visit that site or small companies entrepreneurs as i mentioned well aware edge big companies like uh the conference that you and i were at siemens was there and some other big companies that are always looking to patent new to license new technologies or to invest in 'upandcoming patents that are being developed the energy space absolutely for instance i know we are on growing our relationship with the g e they are very interest obviously in an energy and so they are looking and again a number of companies uh large companies that we work with absolutely.

research associate venture capitalist siemens scientist
"research associate" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And now a milestone in physics a team of chinese researchers has achieved a form of teleportation in space now you're thinking exactly what i'm thinking but now this isn't exactly be me up scotty this is quantum teleportation in involves the strange in complex properties of photons white particles scientists routinely teleport photons here on earth but in space this is an impressive new achievement christa shamas a research associate at the national institutes of standards and technologies and he's here to explain what all this means christer thanks for joining us thank you are used the word teleportation mi exactly right yes you you are exactly right you mentioned that people often think about teleportation they think about star trek and unites the onto the tele porter pat and then you appear at some distant location and we have to do a form of that in in the quantum world so i'm a i'm a quantum physicist and what that means is i study the properties or the behaviour of some the smallest things in the universe things like atoms end little particles alight photons and one of the interesting things you learn about quantum mechanics are the rules are quite a bit different then and what we would normally experience in our everyday lives the physics is different and there's this one property of these quantum particles and that is that you can't make a copy of them so instead what we have to do is we have to teleport lease properties in order to move information around and that's exactly what the chinese group has done they have teleported the properties of a photon on earth and transferred it to another photon that they've been sent the satellite that's whizzing above them in space so that's really amazing but if we ever achieved sifi fantasy of teleporting objects will this be the day that the.

scotty research associate physicist christa shamas
"research associate" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"research associate" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"There's a was the ledger the first question does this was the quincy patriot ledger we don't call it i know that once in the matter novak caller was not but now actually what happened was i was a research associate at a brandeis think tank which was marvellous job researching writing about racial violence and at little a lot of emphasis on the media and when the center closed i had to figure out what i want to do and i found myself chang you know i'm fascinated by television so i was very lucky to get a job at channel five with the original good day shown as an associate produces the early 1970s that's exactly right it's nineteen seventy three i stay there for for three years and then i thought lot of on off air people say you know i can do that it's really very easy and look at the big bucks the talent is getting so i then went to wjr um i in providence in providence is it still and julie station channel chant i have no clue but it's still there are other are indeed a it used to be located in a department store believed dramatic the outlets store but anywhere save their for year i got fifty dollars a week and then i realized that dean on camera was not a satisfying to me as writing about television as opposed to being in or on television and i was very fortunate i knew someone who is familiar with my my research at a brand ice and he helped get me my first job was actually at the miami herald size of tv writer there and then emigrated became.

research associate providence dean writer novak brandeis julie station miami herald fifty dollars three years