17 Burst results for "Rene Duress"

"rene duress" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:57 min | Last month

"rene duress" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Including some secret loans from the Bridgeport bank in a state that he calls this inadvertent tax preparation errors. He says he's paid the back taxes, repay the loans and question his conscience is clear. And none of this, he says, has anything to do with his public duties? Only hours before the and I became out, Thompson was sitting in judgment of another alderman in a City council hearing on renaming Lakeshore Drive for disable I think if people disagree, I don't necessarily agree with some of my colleagues to accuse him of being racist. Bill Cameron 8 $90 You listening Great news today for the U. S economy thanks to vaccinations, reopening businesses and the stimulus President Biden is now on track for the strongest markets since JFK's 1st 100 days. The biggest indicator of economic activity. The G G DP It grew faster than predicted in the first three months of this year, a whopping 6.4% and that is the biggest increase in growth since Ronald Reagan was in office. So what is fueling this economy? Stimulus spending Sure has helped $100 billion a month in record high bond buying from the feds increased unemployment spending and consumers already to spend again. Richard Quest. Editor at large for CNN business says things are looking very good. The U. S economy is doing so well on people are talking about a boom year that 2021 will be better than most expect. And the Dow today closing up 242 points, NASDAQ Up 31, the S and P, finishing up 28 points. One in four Americans say that the covert vaccine is just not for them. A new poll released by Monmouth University shows 25% of us just say no to being vaccinated President Biden trying to deal with why there is such a hesitancy are people not receiving the right information? Is there a mistrust of the government? Her people afraid of the vaccine and does getting one or not seem to fall along party lines. Rene duress to is a researcher for Stanford University, she says. It's a lot of everything. A lot of our attitudes about vaccination are shaped by the people that are around us. You know who's our social group? What are they saying about it? It's related to the information that we see what media are re consuming what social media communities Arian and arrest adds. It is also about any prior experiences we may have had with vaccinations that could be contributing to the Presidency. Well, Donald Trump's former personal lawyer understands very well what might be in store for Rudy Giuliani, now that federal agents raided his office and home removing what has been described as tons of stuff. Michael Cohen, the now disbarred lawyer and convicted felon still under house arrest, says he thinks Rudy is going to sing to investigators. There is no love lost between him or Donald Trump. Cohen says that he will start talking to Donald becoming president. Rudy didn't like Donald and Donald certainly didn't like Rudy. So do I think Rudy will give up Donald in a heartbeat? Absolutely. He certainly doesn't want to follow my path down into a 36 month sentence for something is innocuous, says a hush money payment. Right to a porn star. Federal agents will continue their long running criminal investigation into Giuliani, acting as an unregistered foreign agent with Ukraine during the Trump administration. Ah, Chicago man is convicted of selling heroin in Iowa in 2018 40 year old Eric D'Angelo Grigg sold to one woman from Waterloo. She died. Griggs was charged and convicted today. Of also using Facebook messenger in a cell phone to get the drugs around the state of Iowa. No Chicago police are warning residents on the North side, There is a trio of armed robbers making their way through neighborhoods. One male suspect will brandish a gun victims then ordered to hand over valuables. One victim would not, and they were shot. Detectives are looking for a light blue Toyota Camry and an older Ford Explorer used as the getaway cars by those three armed bandits. Ws news time 605. Let's check out your traffic. Well, we've had a rough time on the Kennedy Today. Accidents car stalled in the tunnel. Out. Founders created a lot of travel time for O'Hare right now. It is down to 42 minutes headed out found on the Kennedy out to the airport. Inbound just under 40 minutes. If you are on the express planes right now, outbound from Ontario to Montrose there, sipping along 19 minutes on the bike inbound route. 3 92 The old post office 47 minutes 33 minutes inbound from Wolf. Through the old post office Now, Dan Ryan traffic There is a problem right now. There is some police activity going on on the Dan Ryan. It is right around the local lane south on between Garfield Boulevard in the Chicago Skyway. We'll have another update coming your way in just a few minutes. Identity.

Michael Cohen Ronald Reagan Donald Donald Trump Richard Quest Eric D'Angelo Grigg Waterloo Bill Cameron Iowa 25% 242 points Monmouth University 36 month Ontario Garfield Boulevard 28 points Rudy Giuliani 2018 Montrose CNN
"rene duress" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Disinformation all the time. They even hand themselves Pulitzer Prizes as a result. Can we go to Russia Collusion? There was never any evidence whatsoever, Period and we spent 2.5 in three years on this, and they tried to take out President Trump as a result of it. You said that disinformation. When auntie from black lives matter trying to attack The White House where federal courthouse isn't that domestic terrorists. So why is it only now that this is being written about? Why is it mutually exclusive that you can have the clan and neo Nazis and so forth? As well as Marxists and neo Marxists and Black lives matter, Antifa why Why are they mutually exclusive? They're not mutually exclusive. All of them are attacking the fabric of the nation. Now the fact that this This group. I don't know how many There were. I don't know why the FBI doesn't tell us at this point. Violently attacked the Capitol building while members of Congress were there on January 6th. Is not compared to The left. Extremist domestic extremists. Attacking the White House. The White House. Amazes me. They do this in broad daylight. The media Right now, these experts said the federal government's response, the disinformation and domestic extremism again, they pull them together is haphazard and spread across multiple agencies, and there's a lot of unnecessary overlap. Rene duress to a disinformation researcher. It's Sanford's Internet Observatory. Internet Observatory gave the example of two seemingly unrelated problems. Misinformation. I thought we returned about disinformation. And covert 19 and this information about election from Often, she said. The same people in groups are responsible for spreading Both types Star instead of two parallel process is one of the centers for Disease control aimed at tamping down covert related conspiracy theories. And another at the Federal Election Commission trying to correct voting misinformation. A centralized task force could coordinate a single strategic response. Unbelievable. So this guy al experiencing has been writing on and on former New York Times reporter Not so much that has been wrong with the federal government's response to cover 19, including the so called scientists and departments and all the rest of it. He could theoretically be called an agent. In this information who would wind up on the same list is the neo Nazis. That's the problem with this. From these damn fools in these universities in these damn fools at The New York Times. Task force could also meet regularly with tech platforms and push for structural changes that could help those companies tackle their own extreme. This would be a perfect document. For the communist Chinese regime sort of Vladimir Putin regime. For the Iranian regime. The Castro regime. But apparently for the Democrat Party and Joe Biden. Justice, BRANDEIS said. Obviously some time ago. Justice, BRANDEIS said. My paraphrase. The answer. Hate speech is more speak. You hear that anywhere on the left? You have that in any newspaper in America. Do you hear that from any Democrat ever? Not less. Speech, more speak. And what they're doing now. Is there also Fuzzing up or mushing up the line. Between speak and violence. That's why break that's what big tech is doing now. They're saying that this speech is violent or could lead to violence. Therefore we are Eliminating it. All of this needs to be looked at, not by government. By you and me because these air our liberties that they're intending to control and regulate and have a commission examine. Absolutely shocking. I'll be right back. Mud been.

White House FBI Internet Observatory Federal Election Commission BRANDEIS Russia President Trump Vladimir Putin The New York Times Democrat Party Joe Biden Congress Rene Disease Sanford Castro researcher America reporter
"rene duress" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Facebook. Last month announced it will stop recommending political and civic groups to its users the company says users want less politics in there feeds and has said it didn't realize how much it's groups we're going to spread medical misinformation be used to radicalize people into on and be one of the home bases for the people who plan the capital insurrection on january. Sixth but this week the wall street journal reported that the company has had in research for months. If not years about private groups being toxic full of calls for violence and still being recommended to facebook users and rene arresthe a research manager at the stanford internet observatory says the shift to groups creates a long standing cycle of radicalization. What was happening. Beginning in two thousand sixteen was you were starting to see these very conspiratorial communities that were taking shape and they were being recommended to people who had interest in other conspiratorial communities. And when you started to have this it was like a correlation matrix. were saying. Oh you're interested in this wild theory while here try this one on again that engagement. Highly engaged communities wildly sensational content high-volume groups and posts really came to in some ways. Become a much more significant part of the experience for people who went and participated in those communities. Is it credible to you for facebook to say. We couldn't have anticipated how conspiratorial these groups were gonna get. No no not at all and that's because there is a wall street journal article that came out last year that said that what the platforms own internal research had showed back in two thousand sixteen was that they were realizing that sixty four percent of people that joined some of what they called more extreme groups were doing it because of props from the recommendation engine for researchers such as myself who were seeing it from the outside we have been very kind of anecdotal sense of the problem. Like right now if you were to go to instagram and follow robert. F kennedy juniors account. You'll see a whole range of recommended accounts that will be suggested to you. That are mostly corona virus. Denial accounts. now. That's the thing that i can see it small-scale but i really don't know if that's a systemic problem or a problem that's anecdotal. How hopeful are you about this move to stop recommending political and civic groups like you know how big a deal do you think it could be to untangle the recommendations from the existence of the groups themselves. I'm not sure that a blanket ban on topics is the way to go about doing this. And facebook has encountered some challenges with the definition of political in other product fronts like ads for example where in order to run advertisements that were related to political issues. You had to go and get yourself verified. Now i think that that's a reasonable amount of friction but the question then became what is a political issue. I think that there are plenty of political groups. That new stay within the realm of healthy behaviors right. They're not being used for organizing violence. The decision to re remove them from recommendations just means that people will have to go and kind of proactively search for them. And i think it'll be interesting to see what impact that has on their growth. I don't think it's a silver bullet though. And then how about the announcement that facebook will require moderators to spend more time reviewing member post like his moderation. A better solution. There's some really interesting evidence from read it. That suggests that the answer to that is yes. Read it really worked to empower moderation at the local level giving tools to moderators at the sub reddit level to make determinations about what norms and values and standards were appropriate for their communities. And so i think improving moderation tools. And then also you know putting the onus on people so that if they create these groups that they don't just kind of you know let them go haywire and then say oh. I just didn't know if you're choosing to form a community it gives us perhaps more of a sense going forward that that that choice is something met. We're going to be expected. To take responsibility for rene duress says research manager at.

Facebook facebook robert last year Last month january sixty four percent instagram this week reddit one two thousand Sixth corona virus two thousand sixteen wall street home street stanford sixteen
"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 6 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Again all false that you know Bill Gates is profiting from this In order to microchip. You there are theories that this is going to turn people into Antennas for five G. There's no mechanism by which that could happen. But at the same time, this is still a narrative that begins to gain traction among the conspiratorial, anti five G community. And so you see a lot of these cross pollination narratives taking shape. One thing that we're seeing is a lot of attempts to obscure the source. So there was a wordpress blogged, broaching the idea that the vaccine was going to sterilize people and it was shared as a photograph is as a mean and so the information's very sensational information is presented to people in the form of an infographic that looks legitimate. But if you were to go and try to dig in and try to understand where the Claims came from they're not coming from any kind of scientific organization at all. They're coming from a random wordpress page. That's just not immediately obvious to people when they encountered information on their social feeds. One other element here is the political and we did a story. Well, look you to it on blacks, historical fear of the medical community, A well founded fear based on how often blacks have historically been experimented on, and there are several black leaders and Anthony Fauci trying toe Overcome that. But when we did our story, we also heard there's distrust off this administration. How much as President Trump played into this while now he's pushing what he's calling. His vaccine in 2007 heat was anti vaccine. You make comments along those lines. He did not get behind masks. So how much have these mixed messages? Affected. You know everyone when it comes to vaccines, the crisis of leadership and the lack of trust is impossible to separate out from what's happening today. The problem is, people are not sure what authority figures to trust. So on the left, You saw people saying that they wouldn't trust anything that came out of President Trump's FDA. And now as President Biden will take office shortly. I think we'll see the same thing from the other side as we're seeing there. People who Just simply don't trust politicians or media unless it's part of their partisan community. The black communities had historical reasons terrible circumstances with regard to things like Tuskegee and countering that, making them feel that they're able to trust the vaccine and that it's not going to exploit their communities in some way again. That has to come from People who they believe have their best intentions at heart and are well informed. And so this is where really there's a phenomenal role to play here for community organizations. Religious leaders that served particular communities. And so those are the voices that have to be incorporated into the conversation about any vaccine rollout because their moral authority is so key at this point to countering wild accusations and sensationalism that prey on people's fears, So meantime, people are being targeted with misinformation. On Facebook and Twitter. But studies show that it would take 75% of the population getting vaccinated to control the outbreak. Do you worry that we might not get there? Yeah, For sure. Unfortunately, A lot of the rhetoric is trending towards this. Why should I have to narrative and I think that we need to make sure that anybody who's communicating about why These vaccines matter is is explaining the value to all of society, not just to the individual and how any restoration of you know our old way of living is something that we bear collective responsibility for Rene duress to again technical research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory, an expert in the study of online manipulation. They just got a couple seconds here. We have to ask you. I asked this of people whose job it is to pour through. This information and misinformation. What's that, like? Well, it's an interesting glimpse into understanding what makes people think and feel a certain way. How do we make sure that communities are receiving information in the way that helps them achieve full understanding of the facts, making sure that they're not manipulated by grifters or people who are putting out information? Because there's ah financial motivation for them or what we call clout chasing getting a lot of likes kind of motivations. It's not enough to just say off the CDC put out more fax, this problem would be solved. It makes you think a lot about how people see the world what they trust and how those trusted messages can reach and connect with the greatest number of people. Oh, I hope people Responsible for doing that are talking to you about how to do that, Um,.

President Trump Bill Gates Anthony Fauci President Biden President Facebook CDC Tuskegee Stanford Internet Observatory FDA Rene Twitter research manager
"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:16 min | 7 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Were the more um Nish content, and that's what you're continuing to see. There's been a really interesting divide. Now we're even Fox News is being rejected by some parts of the people who are very, very deeply in this ecosystem who believe that because Fox News called Arizona for Joe Biden and his, you know also of the opinion that Joe Biden won the presidential election, so in other words, in keeping with facts What they're looking for, instead is engagement with O and a newsmax and more extreme fringe media that are telling them what they want to hear. And that is, that is, I think the real danger that you you immerse yourself in a space where you are only told what you want to hear, Buy properties that are financially incentivized to keep telling you what you want to hear. And then eventually there is a crash because your reality doesn't comport with actual reality, And that's where there's the tendency for something like violence. Among communities of people who are absolutely convinced that the election has been stolen. Right. So what does it tell you that when? Yeah, you've had maybe say a fox news that has been supporting your reality for a really long time doing the bare minimum in terms of fact checking or, you know Saying who won the presidential election and how by something as logical as vote counts that it actually rather than moderating people's views and saying, Oh, okay, like, maybe I should accept this because I trust this new source because it's been you know something that I believed in and supported my views for so long. Rather than doing that. It ends up actually driving people toward Newsmax in Oh, yes. And as you were saying, you know these other alternative alternative platforms. What does it say about where we're at a guess as a society? Rene duress to I think that what it is about us as a society is that they're this. This crisis of trust is bigger than social media. Right. Social media is infrastructure. It's the infrastructure upon which you get your information. That's where you communicate with your friends. It's now so tightly coupled with broadcast media right, Sometimes the narrative emerges up from the bottom where social media chatter becomes the nightly news. Other times, people on social media discuss what was on the nightly news, right. So there's this. This interplay between these ecosystems. At this point there are You know, historically low levels of trust in media historically high levels of polarization, and so the dynamics at play are far bigger than what Facebook chooses to show you. Or you know these air platforms that air that exacerbated that reflected but also at the same time. People are looking to find people who are like them to communicate with two commiserated with particularly at this time when there are people who sincerely believe that Donald Trump was re elected and are looking to kind of hold out, you know, hold out hope and and kind of continue to fight that fight. We're talking about the rising popularity of conservative social networks with Rene to rest to research manager at Stanford Internet Observatory. You our listeners are with us. Give us a call 8667336786 Get in touch on Twitter or Facebook at KQED. Former email as a form of kqed dot org's And tell us how you think we need to regain trust offline in the real world. And what questions you have about these alternative social media networks like parlor and whether or not there you've been drawn to them. Real practice senior writer Wired has been with us. Thanks so much for joining us for your reporting on parlor. It was really illuminating. Thank you so much, and we'll have more with Renate arrested after the break. Stay with us. We'll get straight to your calls. I mean, it came China banned all fentanyl related compounds more than a year ago. But that hasn't stopped users from obtaining chemicals used to make the opioid if they know where to.

Newsmax Fox News Joe Biden Facebook Rene Arizona Donald Trump KQED Renate fentanyl China Twitter Stanford Internet Observatory writer Wired research manager
"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A layer of protection for the rain. That's find your umbrella because rain is in the forecast for tomorrow morning and tomorrow afternoon. Some lingering showers possible on Wednesday as well. Time now is 10 20. This is Fara, my Nina Kim, Facebook and Twitter have clamped down on election misinformation and its profit claims of bias against conservatives, even while right leaning voices continued to top their lists of popular count content. Now conservative social networks are gaining new members and in droves, they say, and we're learning more about who they are, what they are and their implications for our already fractured politics. We have Arial parties with a senior writer at Wired and also joining us now is Rene duress to research manager at Stanford Internet Observatory, where she investigates the spread of malign narratives. Across social networks and assists policy makers in understanding and responding to the problem. Thanks so much for joining us, Rene duress to It's for having me you know, One of the things that are real part is mentioned eyes that censorship comes up a lot that conservatives feel like they're being censored, and it's like a running grievance, and I remember Ted Cruz Back in June, slamming Silicon Valley for censorship and actually promoting parlor and I wondered if I could play a little bit of that for you and get your reaction. Big tech is out of control filled with hubris and flagrantly silencing those with whom they disagree. From conservative media organizations to the president of the United States. And millions of Americans in between. These actions don't just threaten our First Amendment rights in our free speech. Threatened the integrity of our elections and the future of our democracy with another presidential election just months away. I'm working in the Senate every day toe hold big tech accountable to the American people. And to make sure that your voices are heard. That's why I'm proud to join parlor. This platform gets what free speech is all about, and I'm excited to be a part of it. Let's speak. Let's speak freely and let's end. The Silicon Valley Censorship is sober in a dress. It is that one of the key grievance that really make these platforms compelling or really draw a lot of people. Yes. So the grievance think the conservative are censored Grievance, particularly coming from Ted Cruz, unfortunately, is not borne out by the actual data or the statistics on the platform, but it has become a very popular narrative. That does drive people to feel that they have been unfairly treated mistreated. And so it makes these calls to join alternative platforms quite compelling. Senator Ted Cruz. Interestingly, if you look at the publicly available statistics about his interactions on Facebook, one of the committees held a hearing recently, um I believe in the Senate Commerce Committee on day One of the things that that we looked at ahead of. That was how the engagements were shaping up for all of the different senators on the committee over the last year. And Senator Cruz, in his across his two pages had about 17 million interactions, which was close to I think No. Gosh, the next most popular senator was Senator Amy Klobuchar with four million. So Ted Cruz was by far the senator with the most interactions on Facebook. He does quite well on Twitter s O. The idea that Senator Cruz is in any way censored and needs to leave either of those platforms. Is farcical if you actually look at the the actual data, but the narrative place quite well, yes, the narrative place quite well, even when it isn't true, And that really is, in many ways, the point and the danger, right? Renee duress so that it really doesn't seem to matter anymore. What is true? Well, that's right. And that's because this is your one of the ways that people come to believe in narrative is through persistent repetition. And so since it became clear that the platforms were beginning to moderate and it's it's important to note that the moderation is not viewpoint based. It's often behaviorally based, and unfortunately, there were certain types of behaviors that the platforms determined to be harmful. That were kind of disproportionately carried out by conservative influencers. And so several of those people you know, such as fake account networks or kind of coordinated cross posting two pages to try toe, you know, sort of juice their engagements on Facebook there A number of these behavioral Um Actions that were taken that led to Facebook, taking down a few networks in mid 2018, and that was what really kind of precipitated this idea that the platforms were disproportionately targeting conservatives. Well, let me go to collar fill in Burlingame. Hi, Phil. Join us. I, You know, Can we talk about free speech, You know, free speech doesn't include the right to yell fire in a crowded theater. To slander or deceive, and only U. S. Citizens have protected speech. You know, Russian trolls have no us free speech rights, You know, what are we gonna have a conversation about what speech is protected. Bill thinks I mean this use of saying that parlor is a free speech platform. But we hear from our real partisans. Exactly what kind of speech is prioritized there? I mean, Have. We sort of lost the concept of what it really is. I mean, it's also very debatable, but it's also also had strong foundations in our nation, and that we've been able to somehow. Have and hold without seeing the most recent proliferation that we've seen. Well, I think it's really important to not lose sight of the fact that free speech and free expression are cherished values and you know, paramount to our democracy on do you know globally, something that we've tried to export as as Americans for quite some time. The idea that Democratic governments that participation that freedom to express oneself is ah, kind of core human right. The challenge, and I think what people are uncomfortable with me in the age of social media is that you have phenomenal reach that goes along with your speech. So what That means is somebody post something, And there's an algorithmic amplification effect, which means that the speech is no longer the equivalent of you know you expressing yourself in a public square. There are share buttons and like buttons, which again the original intent was to signal kind of like a signal quality. This is something that other people should be paying attention to. But since those engagements can be faked, what happened was, you know, bad actors realized that they could game the structures to amplify their content to give it disproportionate reach. In fact, And then when the platforms have curation and recommendation engines that further amplify certain types of content, unfortunately, quite often the most sensational types of content It also created a new incentive, You know, kind of misaligned incentives where being sensational. Being outrageous was rewarded by the algorithm, faking some engagement to make the algorithm amplify you to then get real engagement. So sort of the fake likes begetting real likes was also a dynamic that was happening. You know to the caller mentioned Russia and, of course, well, that's a small percentage of the activity on the platform. One of the things that you're able to do today that you that you know people never really had the ability to do before is to run targeted ads grow a targeted engaged audience..

Facebook Senator Cruz Ted Cruz Twitter senator Senator Amy Klobuchar Rene Senate Stanford Internet Observatory Fara writer Silicon Valley Wired Senate Commerce Committee research manager United States
"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:25 min | 7 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yeah, Renee duress. I think you're really getting at the conditions that we created. That has helped make these narratives and things so powerful. Speaking of Russia are real part is James Tweets Parlor's just the Russian sponsored version of gabbed. We get these all the time, and they never take off. Remember conservative media? Do they have an article on parlor? Couple things their first. What do you think? Is the staying power of something like a parlor? I mean, they've mentioned that they're that they're growth has been to 10 Million, but remind us if you could about just the relative size of Twitter, which I guess is its competitors. And then the other question. I just wanted to ask you is there have been some questions raised about Um, Father having ties to Russia. Do you know if there's anything there? Great question. We'll tear to your first point. It's true parlor has grown exponentially in the past week, but at at president has you know something like 10 Million users. Twitter has hundreds of thousands. I think the latest statistic is 330 million Excuse a million users. This book has billions of users. So we're really talking about a small fish in a very big pond here on Dove course, The reason that social networks catch on is because of network effects. If there are more people there If they're bigger followings of all your friends and everyone you want to talk to you is on the network, then that's a reason to stay. But sort of without those network effects. It is very possible that parlor like so many of The other APS in this space will just sort of fizzled and die to your second question about the relationship to Russia. John Massey is married to a Russian woman. And so there have been some questions about the relationship. Between her family the origins of the APP on but potential influence of Russian actors on some of the policies into signs of parlor. I'm not sure that any of that has been proven out yet, but what I will say for sure is that with all the recent attention and scrutiny to adapt like parlor people will definitely start to be asking these questions more seriously digging a little more deeply and trying to unravel what's really going on. Well, the sister writes Donald Trump, the Republican Party and their supporters are choosing to live in a reality of their making a reality counter to democratic ideals and Western values with news that they're seeking to further isolate themselves in their own propaganda. Media APS What will it take to bring them back to reality? Really duress. I definitely want to get to that question of what it will take to bring that back to reality. And I also wanted by their listeners to weigh in if they have thoughts on how we regain trust in sort of this offline, real world in order to help fuel maybe greater trust and accountability in the social media world. But I guess one of the things that I would love to talk with you a little bit about is just the degree to which you you are concerned that these kinds of sort of isolated social networks can create real and felt and potentially violent consequences on the ground. Do you have some examples that you know if you are worried that that you feel like are illustrative of why Sure it's a great question, so One of the real Just to drown with the with the listener had had alluded to the idea of bespoke realities. You can create a reality of your own making. That's the dynamic that we're familiar with on social platforms, and it exists to different degrees depending on what platform you're on. On Facebook, particularly in the group's context. You do see things that people you know people in the communities you've joined or the communities that have been pushed to you are sharing. And so there is this thing dynamic of the Echo chamber, and there's a difference between an echo chamber and just a closed community. It's kind of a knish, you know, maybe academic. Kind of geek definition. But the idea of an echo chamber is a community of people who actively reject the troops outside of their community. So if you are in a community and you know, you may be a passionate, liberal or passionate conservative, but you don't summarily dismiss anything coming from the other side's media. As you know, false on its face, right? You still engaged with it? Once you're involved in these more insular communities, that's where you start to see more of the kind of radicalization dynamics come into play the idea that you're only seeing content and anything that is not coming from your trusted sources. Your trusted politicians, your trusted institutions. Anything else. Anything that they do not say is false. And so that's the dynamic. That people are concerned about when it comes to thinking about more insular, closed spaces where people are are definitely not going to see any counter content, or, you know for using the Democratic ideal, you know, the Democratic ideal here of counter speech, right? The antidote to bad speech is More speech. This is the principle upon which free speech rests that the claims, however, that when a fact check is appended to the president's tweet that that it's censorship, as opposed to contextual ization, That's where we start getting into some some signals that there are really Troubling dynamics at play, because rather than seeing that look, here's this. Here's what a fact checker has to say about this statement. The the There are a lot of audiences that are just outraged at the audacity that the platform would do something like that. They see it as a Growth of parlor, so they're punctuated periods. I've been on parlor since December, 2018 or so, so I've had an account for quite some time. And it has been. I joined in part because epic times and Aunt Edie are just Extraordinarily active on there. They posting every you know 3 to 7 minutes, just kind of an eye like an analgesic feet of their headlines. And I was kind of fascinated by that dynamic by the fact that epic was on their long before Fox News influencers came on. They didn't come on until the wave with Ted Cruz and and folks in around the mid 2020 timeframe. So this is then, eh? Really significant shift the publications that were active on there. The news media the entities that were pushing out content to people who were on parlor early in, it's in. It's in creation. Were the more um Nish content, and that's what you're continuing to see. There's been a really interesting divide. Now we're even Fox News is being rejected by some parts of the people who are very, very deeply in this ecosystem who believe that because Fox News called Arizona for Joe Biden and his, you know also of the opinion that Joe Biden won the presidential election, so in other words, in keeping with facts What they're looking for, instead is engagement with O and a newsmax and more extreme fringe media that are telling them what they want to hear. And that is, that is I think the real danger that you you immerse yourself in a space where you are on, Lee told what you want to hear. Buy properties that are financially incentivized to keep telling you what you want to hear. And then eventually there is a crash because your reality Doesn't comport with actual reality, And that's where there's the tendency for something like violence among communities of people who are absolutely convinced that the election has been stolen. Right. So what does it tell you that when? Yeah, you've had maybe say a fox news that has been supporting your reality for a really long time doing the bare minimum in terms of fact checking or, you know Saying who won the presidential election and how by something as logical as vote counts that it actually rather than moderating people's views and saying, Oh, okay, like, maybe I should accept this because I trust this new source because it's been you know something that I believed in and and supported my views for so long. Rather than doing that. It ends up actually driving people toward Newsmax in Oh, yes. And as you were saying, you know these other alternative alternative platforms. You what does it say about where we're at a guess as a society? Rene duress.

Fox News Russia Echo chamber James Tweets Parlor Twitter president Joe Biden Renee John Massey Donald Trump Dove Facebook Um Ted Cruz Newsmax Republican Party
"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:26 min | 7 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Joe Biden to the White House has the potential to shift the country's relationship with the rest of the world will check in on reactions in Central and South America and former President Barack Obama on his new book and his hopes for Biden administration. That's next time on here and now. And it's all ahead for you right after Forum here and now on this Monday morning, 11 to 1 this afternoon on member supported KQED public radio. This is forum. I mean, akin, Facebook and Twitter have clamped down on election misinformation. And it's public claims of bias against conservatives, even while right leaning voices continued to top Their lists of popular count content. Now conservative social networks are gaining new members and in droves, they say, and we're learning more about who they are, what they are and their implications for our already fractured politics. We have Arial parties with a senior writer at Wired and also joining us now is Rene duress to research manager at Stanford Internet Observatory, where she investigates the spread of malign narratives. Across social networks and assists policymakers in understanding and responding to the problem. Thanks so much for joining us, Rene duress to It's for having me you know, One of the things that are real part is mentioned eyes that censorship comes up a lot that conservatives feel like they're being censored, and it's like a running grievance, and I remember Ted Cruz Back in June, slamming Silicon Valley for censorship and actually promoting parlor and I wondered if I could play a little bit of that for you and get your reaction. Big tech is out of control filled with hubris. And flagrantly silencing those with whom they disagree from conservative media organizations to the president of the United States. And millions of Americans in between. These actions don't just threaten our First Amendment rights and our free speech. Threatened the integrity of our elections and the future of our democracy. With another presidential election just months away. I'm working in the Senate every day toe hold big tech accountable to the American people. And to make sure that your voices are heard. That's why I'm proud to join parlor. This platform. It gets what free speech is all about, and I'm excited to be a part of it. Let's speak. Let's speak freely and let's end the Silicon Valley Censorship is 78 jurors. It is that one of the key grievance that really make these platforms compelling or really draw a lot of people. Yes. So the grievance think the conservative are censored grievance, particularly coming from Ted Cruz. Unfortunate. It's not born out by the actual data or the statistics on the platform, but it has become a very popular narrative. That does drive people to feel that they have been unfairly treated mistreated. And so it makes these calls to join alternative platforms quite compelling. Senator Ted Cruz. Interestingly, if you look at the publicly available statistics about his interactions on Facebook, one of the committees held a hearing recently, um I believe he's the Senate Commerce Committee on day. One of the things that that we looked at ahead of. That was how the engagements were shaping up for all of the different senators on the committee. Over the last year. And Senator Cruz, in his across his two pages had about 17 million interactions, which was close to I think No. Cash. The next most popular senator was Senator Amy Klobuchar with four million. So Ted Cruz was by far the senator with the most interactions on Facebook. He does quite well on Twitter s O the idea that Senator Cruz is in any way censored and needs to leave either of those platforms, eyes farcical. If you actually look at the The actual data, But the narrative place quite well, yes, the narrative place quite well, even when it isn't true, And that really is, in many ways, the point and the danger, right? Renee duress so that it really doesn't seem to matter anymore. What is true? Well, that's right. And that's because this is your one of the ways that people come to believe in narrative is through persistent repetition. And so since it became clear that the platforms were beginning to moderate and it's it's important to note that the moderation is not viewpoint based. It's often behaviorally based, and unfortunately, there were certain types of behaviors that the platforms determined to be harmful. That were kind of disproportionately carried out by conservative influencers. And so several of those people you know, such as the fake account networks or kind of coordinated cross posting two pages to try toe, you know, sort of juice their engagements on Facebook there A number of these behavioral Um, actions that were taken. That led to Facebook, taking down a few networks in mid 2018, and that was what really kind of precipitated this idea that the platforms were disproportionately targeting conservatives. Well, let me go to collar fill in Burlingame. Hi, Phil. Join us. All right, You know, Can we talk about free speech, You know, free speech doesn't include the right to yell fire in a crowded theater. To slander or the seas and only U. S. Citizens have protected speech. You know, Russian trolls have no us free speech rights, You know? What are we gonna have a conversation about what speech is protected. Bill thinks I mean this use of saying that parlor is a free speech platform. But we hear from our real partisans. Exactly what kind of speech is prioritized there? I mean, Have. We sort of lost the concept of what it really is. I mean, it's also very debatable, but it's also also had strong foundations in our nation and that leave the table to somehow. Have and hold without seeing the most recent proliferation that we've seen. Well, I think it's really important to not lose sight of the fact that free speech and free expression are cherished values and you know, paramount to our democracy on do you know globally, something that we've tried to export as as Americans for quite some time. The idea that Democratic governments that participation that freedom to express oneself is kind of a core human right. The challenge, and I think what people are uncomfortable with me in the age of social media is that you have phenomenal reach that goes along with your speech. So what That means is somebody post something, And there's an algorithmic amplification effect. Which means that the speech is no longer the equivalent of you know you expressing yourself in a public square. There are share buttons and like buttons, which again the original intent was to signal kind of like a signal quality. This is something that other people should be paying attention to. But since those engagements can be faked, what happened was, you know, bad actors realized that they could game the structures to amplify their content to give it disproportionate reach. In fact, And then when the platforms have curation and recommendation engines that further amplify certain types of content, unfortunately, quite often the most sensational types of content that also created on incentive, you know, kind of misaligned incentives where being sensational, being outrageous was rewarded by the algorithm. Faking some engagement to make the algorithm amplify you to then get real engagement. So sort of the fake likes begetting real likes. Was also a dynamic that was happening. You know, the caller mentioned Russia and, of course, well, that's a small percentage of the activity on the platform. One of the things that you're able to do today that you that you know people never really had the ability to do before is to run targeted ads grow a targeted engaged audience. Russia was constantly beseeching its audience toe like and share like and share like and share because they recognized that this dynamic would ensure that their content reached far more people. Organically. Then they could reach with paid ads. So the dynamic of what we call participatory propaganda, you know ways in which people participate in the dissemination of the content ways in which instead.

Facebook Senator Cruz Ted Cruz Twitter Rene Joe Biden president senator Senator Amy Klobuchar Barack Obama KQED South America Senate Russia Stanford Internet Observatory writer Silicon Valley
"rene duress" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

06:03 min | 8 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

"Whatever when you're two weeks ahead and you put out the video that you made two three weeks ago. Are you so disconnected from that project that you don't even feel like promoting it. Well no, but also. The promotion happens differently here. Now, like we we prepare the material for the promotion like the downs and all that stuff with the video, and then we have a scheduler where we put it in all schedule then. And so? It. kind of that stuff is prepared ahead of time. and. Then we just kind of like back off and move onto the next thing, and then that one is prepared in the now is prepared. So it's it's a little different in that. It's not president of like top of mind but I also don't really have to interact with it that much once it's you know going out, it's the subsidy setup But. Yeah. So we're we're looking at. The next couple of months and actually I guess through the end of the year, we're trying to plan out all the different things we're going to do and start to prepare those and some of them were Kinda. Bigan. Are GonNa take some extra effort so We're beginning to work through those and we're doing some different types of videos that we've never done before, which is fun and also a little weird. Going into a video mailing. All right. Well, how are we going to do this like we've never had to figure out how to whatever? And instead of just jumping into the production side of it like we have in the past were stopping a little bit and thinking through. All right. Well, we wanted to have this tone. We want to cover these types of things and how arena you actually do that camera ahead of time, which I think is good. Thinking ahead not not a bad thing but. Yeah. So that's kind of what we've been up to. I don't think we really have any kind of a topic. Today. I have There's a lot of noises happen. Behind me there's people in the office but I've been thinking a lot about social media stuff lately in we I was listening to Novum questions, which is destined and Matt's Podcasts X. Podcasts if you don't listen to. But they talked about the social dilemma which would watched and brought up a couple of weeks ago I think I still haven't watched it yet, but I listened to their conversation about it but even before that. I've just had this kinda like sour taste in my mouth toward. Social. It's weird. I started trying to make a differentiation this morning in my head between social media and like promotional media because I think maybe what we called social media has become promotional and they just overlapped in a way that we weren't maybe as a people expecting. But I've just had this like sourness toward it over the last year. And have wanted to just really not be a part of it and not from A. You know a Lotta people talk about misinformation and that is a problem. I'm not talking about that ought to people talk about you know the perceptions that people have of themselves based on looking at other people. I'm not talking about that. It's just like. I just don't WANNA be. The sounds a little scary to say I, don't WanNa be as connected to people as I have to be to do my job online. Not Person Like I want to have personal connections. But when you do the social media thing at scale, you have this like open door connection to anybody that wants to say something to you whether you receive it or not whether you respond or not e still have this. Portal directly to your face for everybody who's ever seen anything that you've done and I think there's something about that. that. Doesn't sit right with me. And that's on top of all of the other social media. You know issues that come with it that I think are covered in the social dilemma and I think a I haven't seen this social dilemma. Then a lot of people keep asking me because Rene Duress is in it and we we've all met renate there s a or camp and when not related, and she's not my wife, a lot of people right to sell your wife in the Social Salama. Rene we just share the same name. I mean we might be related through DNA but we don't know. But we met. Through. Make magazine of places because she used to work for O'Reilly media but anyway. What I'm fine. I'm fine I find that some people and this is no groundbreaking statement. Some people just share too much of themselves and they get a little hooked on it and you could watch the addiction starts to take place and I'm not saying that I'm not addicted in my own way to instagram and everything else. I. Think I am but when people start. The real in depth emotional side of them and you know when they start talking about like. Situations with their family but then they turn around and say, Hey, this is how you make stuff it. That's what it gets a little bit strange I my buddy who I hung out with the other at the airport on instagram he doesn't really like instagram but at the same time, he feels a little bit disconnected from business and it was like you gotta get instagram. You've gotTa Cheryl. This whacking is that you want to sell. His and he's like I just wish that you didn't have to have an you know this is Where the world is going unfortunately or fortunately it depends on how you know how benefits you as you don't have to talk about your personal. Judgments should personal instincts just talk about the art in which you want to promote a like instagram to me is like my art gallery and in to get a little bit personal but it really is in many nearly always related to making it ma- making things and making. You know your career your life. If that's what you WanNa, do I have a lot of other personal things that I don't talk about casually I get frustrated like the other day I used it as a tool to ask people what's going on with my Mac.

instagram Rene president Novum Matt
"rene duress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:36 min | 9 months ago

"rene duress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Research manager Rene to rest and noted in the aftermath, many of those posting and re posting had forgotten the Maxim Hanlon's razor, which states that one should never attribute to malice. That which is adequately explained by incompetence. Now as the general election rolls in on the tide of both malice and incompetence to rest worries that the social media citizenry is in for yet another election nightmare of our own making. Rene. Welcome to on the media. Thanks for having me. As an expert in Russia's 2016 social media sabotage. Computational propaganda. I think it's called these days. You know about the explosive mixture of social media algorithms, foreign actors and gullible or hyperpartisan domestic spreaders of lies. So what is your most frightful 2020 election Chaos scenario. The flood his own threat, right? The deluge. Too many misleading videos. Wild claims viral trends for anyone to know what's really, I think a lot of that is actually going to come out of legitimate domestic folks, You know, blue check influencers large media accounts. Foreign trolls are possibly going to be in there, but ultimately it's gonna be a lot of legitimate voices. Just asking questions or flooding the zone with kind of wild claims, making it very hard for people to know what's really blue Check influencers verified accounts where the speaker is presumed not to be passing along. Bad dope. Yeah, exactly. I mean, there's a sense of trust. When you see these blue checked accounts, there's a sense that this is somebody who's been verified. And even though technically that verification on Lee means that you know Twitter's confirmed that you are the person you say you are That's kind of come, Teo having additional degree of clout, right people see it is someone who knows what they're talking about. This hand lands razor thing in Your New York Times piece. This week, you talked about that phenomenon popping up in 2016 over malfunctioning. Voting machines, which was inflated into what You know any election some electronic voting machines somewhere, there's gonna be some miss calibration and the touch screens going to go haywire in 2016 people had taken a video of them trying to tap on the screen for President Trump. And they kept highlighting Secretary Clinton. Instead, the Internet research agency, the Russian shop that did all the mistress, all right, They had these troll accounts amplifying all of these videos, laying the groundwork to say that Secretary Clinton's team or people or, you know the cabal had packed the machines so that they were going to defer votes away from President Trump. Even the blue checks themselves are not inoculation against bad information, blue texture or human too, You know of situation happens, people are trying to figure out what actually occurred even if there's videos It's still becomes kind of a Rorschach test rate of what do you see in that video? Nobody is going to sit down. Sit back, wait for the full story to reveal itself. That's not what we do in the age of the immediate People are going to be trying to get their commentary out there as quickly as possible, particularly on platforms like Twitter than things. We're going to hop to Facebook and go viral there as well, a narrative spread today. Now I won't go back to Iowa because the misinformation spring mainly from the political left magical thinking and bespoke reality and roar Jack tests And the psychology of glomming onto anything that validates your own worldview is not limited to all right. Provocateurs or, you know Megatron thumpers. It reminds me Of the now debunked stolen mailbox graveyard story that was spread by progressives looking for smoking guns of U. S. Postal Service Votes oppression right then. That's another example. Where, you know, there's a A photograph. Maybe there's a caption that somewhat misleading or even one of the things that we see is old stories that kind of like rise up out of the graveyard. They're kind of given new life, but it is very much a bipartisan problem because it's not a political issue is just a human psychology issue. It's Ah, This is a story that confirms my biases, my inclination that those other people over there the worst people ever and here's Ah Me more a photograph or a snippet of video that confirms that we have witnessed years of lip service amid inaction and sometimes obstruction by Facebook, especially And Twitter. You as a researcher have to work with these platforms to get access to your raw data. First of all, are you getting what you need from them? Are they genuinely trying to protect societies worldwide from menace? What do you think that they're corrective steps or just window dressing to keep their profit engines running full bore? Yes, they are doing a lot more cooperation now than there was in 2016 2016. There was really nothing. And 2017. It was a bit kind of hostile is we were all kind of Pleading for the release of data. Now we're more at a point where there are teams of researchers that will work alongside the platform. So, for example, last week, Facebook announced to take down of three different operations. One in Pakistan won the Internet research agency targeting the U. S. And then the third was an interesting case. It was a U. S public relations firm operating in Bolivia and Venezuela. Facebook's integrity teams identified those operations and, interestingly, the Internet research agency. One came from a tip from the FBI. So that's an example of government working alongside platforms in that particular case. We take down that Facebook does the data center then made available to certain researchers in advance. My team at Stanford looked at the Olivia one and at the Pakistan won and we communicate back to them. You know, if we see something where we say, Hey, I think that you may be missed these accounts or hey, These accounts are included, but we don't understand why Maybe you want to double check that we do this with Twitter as well. That collaborative process allows us to have a better understanding of what's happening. And also, then we put out our independent assessment to the public and will communicate with the media as well on what we're seeing and contextualized it with other operations that we've seen in the past media, government, independent researchers, sometimes civil society and platforms. Are all communicating about the information that they have in there, Seeing until now. I think I've asked you reasonable and fair questions. Permit me to ask you an unfair question. You've explained how misinformation thrives on our assumptions that are foes are capable of the worst possible things. Now what if what if, on Election day and thereafter what if the foes of enfranchisement and liberal democracy Are doing the worst possible things. What if your social media nightmares come true in part because our In real life nightmares due to Yeah. Ultimately, What we are trying to do is not only debunk social media rumors, it's to ensure that what is actually happening. Is not covered up in that deluge of nonsense, right? You do want to clear the deluge that people have an understanding of what actually happened in the world. I think that's ultimately the goal. It's not to just be fact checkers and debunkers. It's to identify if manipulation is occurring. It's to ensure that those whose job it is to investigate, it are able to do that job as effectively as possible without being bogged down with misleading leads. One example that I'll point to historically of social media being used to cover up Riel atrocities. There's two cases. The first is MH 17. When the Malaysian Airlines jet was shot down the social media manipulation angle was a cover up to distract from culpability and to try to derail both. You know the public sentiment and also the appetite for investigations into what had actually happened there. And then the second would be the murder of Jamal Kashiwagi again, where you see an increasing number of accounts just tried to flood the zone with alternative explanations for what occurred to derail the actual process of investigating what had happened. You want that investigation to happen, And you also want people to trust the results of the investigation. If people have been fed a whole pile of misleading stories, the truth is going to seem like just one more among them. That's the real downside to flooding the zone. It makes the truth. Just one more story, Rene Thank you so much. Thank you. It's great to chat with you. Rene Duress..

Facebook Twitter Rene Duress Pakistan researcher Russia Secretary Clinton President Trump Research manager Maxim Hanlon Iowa Your New York Times FBI Secretary murder Stanford Malaysian Airlines
"rene duress" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"rene duress" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"Certainly you see with younger Republicans. A lot more concern about climate change, but. You're absolutely right. I mean it remains very polarized, and I don't think you can understand it. You know it's not in I I don't think it makes sense from ideological standpoint I think it makes sense from a tribal stand my we have divided, and and it feels good to believe the same things as the people you are affiliated, and it's tense to to not believe the same things and you saw. That's a source of hardship, and you know the reason. It's such A. A big problem here is that this isn't just about making the world better for our grandkids. It's about avoiding catastrophes for our grandkids and so that's why you know. Eight is finally rising to the surface within the Democratic Party. I mean it's been ignored or downplayed for too long, and certainly in the national campaigns it was never perceived to be important, enough or winning enough issue to get a lot of attention now we see largely driven by the Youth Movement Insistence that yeah, it's. It's time absolutely time. It's thirty years pastime that we get very aggressive about this, and and so I don't know what happens now with with covert with George Floyd. Obviously there are other issues dominating the news right now, but I really hope we hang onto this issue as critical one for the election, and and don't stop there because this is going to continue to require lots of pressure to make sure that we. We make the changes we need. Yeah I don't think it's going to go away I. Think, but the other issues do come to the forefront, but what what you said I think is really interesting is that it gives you comfort to agree with other people that are in your party and your group, and that's something that is exacerbated by social media and manipulated by social media, and it's one of the weird things about it is. A Corporation could legally. Create hundreds, if not thousands of fake pages and then use those to make. Sure, you're wherever the Internet research agency from Russia that had an impact on two thousand sixteen elections and. Rene Duress to did some pretty fascinating work on that where she did a deep dive into how these accounts whether it's facebook or Instagram, or what have you been manipulated and how the how they use them? Where the in one point? They had a pro Texas group meet up. At the exact same time as a pro Muslim group on the exact same block like they manipulated it like there was no child's play. Exactly it was like they were moving pieces on a chessboard and they they'd literally set up altercations and you would imagine that. I mean I. Don't know what these fossil fuel companies or or any kind of company that's involved in any some anything that would be. Considered sketchy environmentally. I don't know how many manipulating sites they run or manipulative social media accounts. They run, but I would imagine that's got to be part of the game plan. Because online discourse, it's so easy to throw monkey wrenches into the gears, his three thro- sand into the gas tank. It's so easy to sorta monkey with the the numbers and change the ideas that are being discussed and change the narratives that it's. It's A. It's just a way that you can sort of shift the public's interests and opinions on things I mean if you're willing to lie and manipulate you act, you have a obviously a huge advantage, but there's also just the basic human tendency that when we talked people, we already agree with. We tend to then become stronger in our opinions, and so we we get polarized basically, and that's even before social media. Media, so then you sort of weaponize that polarization that tendency and you've got an algorithm that says well. If you like that video, how about this video and suddenly people are getting. You know totally radicalized. You know on on climate, change or on other issues and so yeah, I mean it is. It is a huge problem. How do we overcome the social divisions the social distrust? How do we overcome the denial? and you know I think if if the patterns in in the book come to the fore we will, society will find ways to build trust again. It'll probably have a lot to do with maintaining long-term accountability, and not just a flash reaction to what you hear, but it could very well take decades and. We will have a lot of damage done in the meantime. Wonder if there's going to be a time where there are laws against social media manipulation like that because right now they're not and there will be yeah. It seems like there has to be because if you see. I can't imagine I'm not naive enough to imagine that. What's happening with the Internet research agencies and that's not happening here. It has to be and they. They understand the effectiveness of it. It's been well documented. The idea that corporations are going to step back and go well. That's on our business assigned what we do. I mean that's an incredibly effective tool, and if you're GONNA use it to manipulate opinions on whether it's climate, change or anything, you don't pharmaceutical drug overdoses, whatever whatever it is that you want to manipulate people with. I would imagine that that's a gigantic issue, but. It's not something that really gets discussed in terms of in terms of passing legislation to prevent that stuff. Yeah, and hopefully it gets more and more disgust because it is very scary, it turns out we humans are easily manipulated and were easily manipulated even before social media, but now there is this incredibly sophisticated engine to drive us apart to drive us in the direction that those best at manipulating us want us to yes, and it's addictive, which is even crazier?.

George Floyd Texas Democratic Party Rene Duress Russia Youth Movement facebook Instagram
"rene duress" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We're here with Roger mcnamee's just talking about how Clinton Perkins don't talk to him anymore. But that's made of them. Would you want to do with this book till you write this book you worked with congress? He worked with European authorities. I think in many ways between you Susan fellers and others have sort of opened the open people to see that tech is not so benign. So I I give Susan way more credit than me, and you know. I give Tristan Harris more credits. Multifaceted approach the same messages Rene duress who works in our in this larger team, there's sandy parakeets. Who's now at apple, you know, there there's Tim Wu and there's a lot of like also you huge, right and David Kirkpatrick. There's a lot of people are contributing this thing, I what do you think it is? So in terms of the writing the book, and what I hope to get out of. It was really simple thing we were in a strategy session in Washington, somebody pointed out that you get to a point in the curve where you can no longer reach a large enough group of people face to face or around the table and converse that you have to start to have a different kind of media plan. And we got a lot of TV. But there was no way to sustain that. And they said somebody's got to write a book. And I thought Tristan was the right one to write the book, but he didn't really want to write the books. So again, everybody takes a step back. It's me I write the book. And so what's the goal? The goal is basically. I use the narrative arc of my discovery. So I'm Jimmy Stewart. This is rear window. I see something that looks like a crime scene. I pulled on the thread without any idea. What's going on? I learned and I use that narrative to teach people what they need to know to understand the business model how the algorithms work the cultures of these companies, which are the source of all the problems, right know, not because the whole stories in here, but rather because there's enough of story in here. So you can recognize the next parts as they come along. And then I finished the book by giving three chapters of guidance. Okay. You know, and the guidance is how to protect your children how to protect yourself. But it's also, you know, how to use your power with your elected representatives to get them to do the right thing. And then Lastly, I tell you hear the things I'm actually doing some which may work few some of which may not because I have a couple of them, so Google Google is the most intrusive surveillance company on the planet at least in sorry. I should say at least in the United States in China. They have competitors. But. Here. They're the most, but they're moving in their headed back there. So I have for the last year and a half played a video game against Google. It's version of frogger Google is the river in the alternative products at the logs, and I'm the frog. And so, you know, whether it's it's duck duck, go ghost to re or one password or exchange or safari, whatever it is they're all these products and every once in a while inadvertently, click on map some restaurant way. Napster good. And then I wind up fully in the river. And I have to go back to the beginning start..

Google Tristan Harris Susan fellers Jimmy Stewart Clinton Perkins Roger mcnamee congress Tim Wu David Kirkpatrick Napster Rene Washington apple United States China
"rene duress" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Joins us from Baltimore. Scott. Welcome to the program. Meghna? So first of all tell us a little bit more about what you reported about what this group of democratic operatives attempted to do in the Alabama special election using social media techniques. What did they try to do? Well, I have to say that the people who did this were not eager to talk about it. And so I'm not sure we have every detail, but essentially they deliberately experimented with what you might call the Russian techniques on social media, one of the things they did was they created a conservative page though. They were not conservatives oriented to are designed to attract conservatives in Alabama, and they use that among other things to try to split the Republican electorate. They also use it to communicate with a write in candidate whose candidacy they supported with the idea of drawing votes away from the Republican ROY Moore in the ser- draining votes from him. And that was that was you know, certainly a a fraud. You move in the sense that they were posing. It's considered and they weren't conservative. And then something that remains a little murkier. But they in a report that obtained about this operation, they they describe it as an elaborate false flag operation that planted. The idea that the Moore campaign was amplified on social media by a Russian botnets, essentially, there were a bunch of stories in the mainstream press saying, jeez, there's all these Russians who were following ROY Moore on Twitter, and you know, it was sort of embarrassment for the Moore campaign. And they said maybe it was a trick. And no one really knew what where this came from. And we don't know exactly what was done whether these operators actually purchased as one can do, you know, sensually Twitter accounts and sent them after ROY Moore or how exactly work, but in any case, they seem to have done something to try to discredit the Morecambe. Pain on Twitter. Okay. So now to be clear one as your reporting one of the participants in this what hundred thousand dollars democratic hop. Ration- was Jonathan Morgan that chief executive of new knowledge, and and destroy mind. Folks. Get new knowledge is the firm that wrote one of these reports that was just submitted to the Senate intelligence committee about Russian interference or Russian use of social media. So let me ask you the reason why we definitely wanted to talk to you today's as I as I mentioned at the beginning, we spoke with Rene duress STA who's with new knowledge now, and you talk to her as well, even though she didn't work for the company at the time in two thousand seventeen what role does she have to play in the story. Let me make a couple things clear. One thing is as far as we can tell the democratic campaign. Doug Jones campaign knew nothing about this and had no role in it. And literally learned learned about it in the last couple of days when we started calling them. So they had nothing to do with it. And according to Jonathan Morgan the CEO of New Jersey point out new knowledge as a company had nothing to do with it. This was sort of a side project that he participated in and early on he asked reneged arresthe, essentially for advice on this. And according to both of them, he called her up and said, hey, we want to sort of do an experiment where we test out some of these sort of Russian style, techniques and try to understand them better. What are what are the some of the things we we could do what are some of the things you can do social media that we might sort of do in test and the and and he describes this as sort of an. Academic exercise. And she she claims that she was not paid for it. And and really was just sort of a very early consultant in this process will quote as saying that there were people who believe the Democrats needed to fight fire with fire and that she disagreed with that. But I'm just we have like thirty seconds here to go. I just one less thing. I mean, so this is quite an eye opening report piece of reporting from you. It is a little jarring to hear some of these Democrats say this is like an academic exercise..

ROY Moore Jonathan Morgan Twitter Alabama Baltimore Scott Senate fraud New Jersey Doug Jones consultant Ration chief executive Rene CEO arresthe hundred thousand dollars thirty seconds
"rene duress" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"He joins us from Baltimore. Scott. Welcome to the program. Mega. So first of all tell us a little bit more about what you reported about what this group of democratic operatives attempted to do in the Alabama special election using social media techniques. What did they try to do? Well, I have to say that the people who did this were not eager to talk about it. And so I'm not sure we have every detail, but essentially they deliberately experimented with what you might call the Russian techniques on social media, one of the things they did was they created a conservative page though. They were not conservatives oriented to are designed to attract conservatives in Alabama, and they use that among other things to try to split the Republican electorate. They also use it to communicate with a write in candidate whose candidacy they supported with the idea of drawing votes away from the Republican ROY Moore in the draining votes from him. And that was that was you know, certainly, a a fraud Yellen move in the sense that they were pulling. Considered and they weren't considered. And then something that remains a little murkier. But they in a report that obtained about this operation, they they describe it as an elaborate false flag operation that planted. The idea that the Moore campaign was amplified on social media by a Russian botnets, essentially, there were bunch of stories in the mainstream press saying, jeez, there's all these Russians who were following ROY Moore on Twitter, and you know, it was sort of embarrassment for the Moore campaign. And they said maybe it was a dirty trick. And no one really knew what where this came from. And we don't know exactly what was done whether these operators actually purchased as one can do, you know sensually Twitter account since know sent them after ROY Moore or how exactly work, but in any case they seem to have done something to try to discredit the Moore camp. Pain on Twitter. Okay. So now to be clear one as your reporting one of the participants in this. What hundred thousand dollars democratic peration was Jonathan Morgan that chief executive of new knowledge, and and destroy mind. Folks. Get new knowledge is the firm that wrote one of these reports that was just submitted to the Senate intelligence committee about Russian interference or Russian use of social media. So let me ask you the reason why we definitely wanted to talk to you today's as I as I mentioned at the beginning, we spoke with Rene duress STA who's with new knowledge now, and you talk to her as well, even though she didn't work for the company at the time in two thousand seventeen what role does she have to play in the story. Let me make a couple things clear. One thing is as far as we can tell the democratic campaign. Doug Jones campaign knew nothing about this and had no role in it. And literally learned learned about it in the last couple of days when we started calling them. So they had nothing to do with it. And according to Jonathan Morgan the CEO of New Jersey point out new knowledge as a company had nothing to do with it. This was sort of a side project that he participated in and early on he asked Rene Terresa, essentially for advice on this. And according to both of them, he called her up and said, hey, we want a sort of doing experiment where we test out some of these sort of Russian style, techniques and try to understand them better. What are what are the some of the things we we could do what are some of the things you can do on social media that we might sort of do intest and the and and he describes this as sort of? Academic exercise. And she she claims that she was not paid for it. And and really was just sort of a very early consultant in this process. Well, any quoted as saying that there were people who believe the Democrats needed to fight fire with fire and that she disagreed with that. But but I'm just we have like thirty seconds here to go. I just one less thing. I mean, so this is quite an eye opening report piece of reporting from you. It is a little jarring to hear some of these Democrats say this is like an academic exercise..

ROY Moore Jonathan Morgan Rene Terresa Twitter Alabama Moore camp Baltimore Scott Senate fraud New Jersey Doug Jones consultant chief executive CEO hundred thousand dollars thirty seconds
"rene duress" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KCRW

"Call it fake news. Call it propaganda tonight. A look inside Russia's disinformation campaign, another onslaught of Russian propaganda this time flooding the internet for months, we've heard about Russian efforts to divide Americans and disrupt the twenty sixteen election. So how did coordinated disinformation campaigns play out in this election? Let me turn to Rene Directa. She joins us from our BBC studios in Washington Rene, you research online disinformation for the Austin based company new knowledge and to be clear, we're not talking about hacking here, we're talking propaganda disinformation fake news. So tell us what you saw in the lead up to the midterms the Russians were very much involved in the midterms. Again, this year they've never really gone away. That's just a evolution of tactics. I would say so what we see is increasing promotion of what we would call overt propaganda sites that are known to be attributed to Russian state interests, so artistes, but next some of their media properties, some of their think tanks the stuff that many folks around the world would recognize. It's propaganda, but American audiences are not quite as adept at recognizing it as such yet. The second thing that they do is the covert operations working to amplify existing stories. There would be news stories and highly partisan domestic press talking about for example, the cavenaugh hearings, and we would see these Russian accounts, he's Russian persona accounts active amplifying, those messages amplifying those stories so it was a little bit different than twenty sixteen. And that they didn't do the hard work of creating this site and the Facebook page and the media brand around a particular type of activist group. They simply engaged by amplifying real material written by real Americans that appealed to the audiences that they wanted to go after we also heard about Iran launching a coordinated disinflation campaign that was eventually spotted by Facebook. What did that look like that was an a campaign that was targeting the American left primarily, and in this particular case the Iranians reached out to the American League? Thinking that amplifying the messages of the American left amplifying, perhaps the chance of electoral success of the American left would benefit them. So this is sort of a find the people who are most ideologically aligned with you that are real amplify their message, and hopefully influence the electorate so with uranian pages, we saw them repurposing memes from sites like occupied Democrats did that surprise you. Because I mean, foreign policy isn't like a big draw during the midterms, and that assumes that Iran thought, well, there'll be a lot of people on the left progressives who want to see this deal start up again. I mean that seems a little tone deaf. I think that there is a is a long game. So increasing your audience, increasing the prevalence of a point of view that benefits you over time is part of what we see here. So for example, the Russian operation in two thousand sixteen began in two thousand fourteen are the gatekeepers Twitter and Facebook ramped up enough in their rigor and spotting the stuff, I think that they're doing much better. Yes. So it's not. Not perfect. But one of the things that has been really important to me to to watch since two thousand sixteen is the evolution of kind of Multistakeholder as I'm here. So we did see Facebook take down a collection of pages just last night with a tip off from law enforcement. We were told and that's fantastic. That's exactly the kind of thing. We wanna see we wanna see that cooperation we know that accounts that we have given to the platforms have come down. So that's the sort of thing that's the ideal state as someone who attracts disinflation. What are you going to be looking out for over the next two years? I think it's going to be groups. I've I felt this way for for years now, actually, I'm because that's where like minded people tend to cluster. So I I think that we're going to see less of the two thousand sixteen playbook of creating coal cloth media properties with sites and pages and Twitter accounts and much more infiltration of groups, and when you say groups about different Facebook groups, or I'm talking about Facebook group specifically, I think that there's an opportunity to infiltrate these closed communities to ex-. Cert- influence over communities that already do have some distribution and some audience Rene duress researches online disinflation and propaganda for the company new knowledge Rene. Thank you. Thank you. News headlines are coming right up. This is the world. KCRW.

Facebook Rene Directa Iran Twitter Russia Washington Rene American League BBC Austin two years
"rene duress" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"When you hear the wave of companies that came after you, you were part of this. I, you know, wave of internet companies and Sean Parker says listen, you know, when we created Facebook, or when we were scaling it and Timothy mingka's back this up and a lot of people who've worked there have said like we kind of regret what we did. They they did not pray at the altar of customer service. They prayed at the altar of customer manipulation and engagement at all costs. And they said, listen, we just wanted to take as much of your time as possible, and we just studied every way to do that. And that was down to the psychological level. What are your thoughts on the addiction of Facebook? And how they ran that company in contrast to your philosophy which was ethical moral slow steady customer service driven as opposed to. Let's just take every ounce of attention from these people, and we're seeing the unintended consequences of that you're documenting net with some of some of the people you've donated to our documenting net, which is this is correlating with anxiety. This is correlating with depression. This is correlating with a lack of reality, and the lack of truth Innis, and perhaps even. You know, the destruction of our democracy. There's a lot in there. Yeah. And I guess I kind of disagree with some of the harshness of the carrot character. Okay. The the social media platforms, basically, they're providing a really good service for people and people are voting for it by using it. They do need to monetize it because running those things cost a lot of money. Meanwhile, people are figuring out how to do things better. How to be more ethical about it how to be more transparent about it? It's really tough to do that. Particularly as the platforms are facing fire from the worst purveyors of disinformation. For example, in Washington. The purveyors this information are complaining about bias directed against the platforms. We're all the platforms are really doing is starting to enforce their terms against fraud and deception and disinflation. So maybe we need to see more on that. And to work the back channels between critics like Rene duress stra Zane up to her fetchy, folks. Like that who have really good on this criticism getting people to work together because we are in a national emergency. Maybe global we need people of goodwill to work with each other not to direct friendly fire at each other. Remember, I talked to veterans law knots infected by a terminology, but we we are in a real we're all in this together thing. I'm pushing people together even though diplomacy is not something I'm natural at because nerd. So to put my money where my mouth is I'm working with Omaha network and the Mozilla folks yesterday, we launched the responsible computer science challenge. Meaning how do you figure out how to put an ethics curriculum into computer science training? I was kind of lucky as a wanna be physicist. Because there is a lot of discussion about that among the creators of first nuclear weapons, and I am a wannabe physicist. Although in my first year, college, I decided I might need a job, and what will this? What is the mission? Here you're gonna take computer scientists to say, here's a moral framework to think about what you're building. Or maybe question what you're building? Because as we've discussed actually, it's it's become an unintended theme of this event, which is growth at all costs is now having a significant cost. Yeah. Well, the deal with this contest. It's a challenge where different folks will propose curricula for getting ethic straining into a computer sciences and related engineering. So the idea is to figure it out and then the start get it implemented in at different universities. And so on a lot of it has to do. Like the nuclear physicists were reflected afterwards, you think about what's going to happen regarding what you're doing because. You know, when you create say, tools, which could have enormous benefits, but also could be used for bad stuff. Think about the end intended consequences. I mean, you could start by watching. What's the Netflix show dark mirror black mirror? He asked should know better since I love TV. But. Watch in particular the episode called metalhead. Which one is that what was the premise? I did see this one. Let's say a robot dog. Yes. But not a nice one that meant that. Don't do a spoiler, no spoilers. But definitely my second favorite just for its sheer. Newel singular..

Facebook physicist Sean Parker Timothy mingka Innis Washington fraud Netflix Rene Omaha Mozilla Zane
"rene duress" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"rene duress" Discussed on KGO 810

"No he's clearly dealing with a variety of issues in his life and he's not addressing them and instead of dealing with wrong internally he's looking externally to blame others that's what this is very simple psychoanalysis here you got issues dude go address i'm told i mean this in the most loving and helpful way you should go see but therapist and start addressing them you'll be more more at peace with the world around you i mean that this dangerous territory yeah by the way rene duress to who researches computation propaganda and his policy lead at data for democracy wrote ilan's next custom company rate my professor but for journalists what a great idea that won't be gamed immediately in extremely predictable ways so there's according to cnn cba vdi yonathan i i'm so sorry if i just butchered your name cba media studies professor at university of virginia told cnn such a service might make sense if it employed a careful methodology and was overseen by independent journalism foundation yeah but alon is really independent he can't handle any criticism i'm blocked because i point out certain facts factual problems that are going on it's like consumer reports off all fake no because they didn't like my breaks and controls on the model three just what you need another thinskinned oligarch insurance in charge of journalism how's that m serious how's that can work out not so good brat not so good well it's me news organization was already rated right what's that they're already rated through ratings.

ilan professor alon rene cnn university of virginia