10 Burst results for "Rene Directa"

"rene directa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"rene directa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Ads and will be very grateful. We shouldn't make any mistake. That any vaccine even in a world where everyone was endorsing it would have faced some hesitancy and the stream of negative information. That's come in particular from prominent news outlets and political leads is likely to reach many more people at a higher volume than these particular facebook information source. I'm into juristic. And this is the fair podcast. July twenty second two thousand twenty one this week. We're bringing you the breakdown of the heavyweight bout of this century battle over vaccine misinformation in the left corner. We have the white house known for its impressive. Arsenal and bully pulpit. This week ask for the fighting came out swinging with claims. Facebook is a killer and not in a good way in the right corner. We have facebook known for its ability. Just keep taking punches while continuing to grace our screens and rake in the cash. The company is hit back with gusto. Seeing facebook actually helped people learn the facts vaccines period either. Them land knockout blow. Is this just the first round of many matchups on this episode of arbor truth series in our online information ecosystem. We devote the conversation to the latest slugfest between facebook in the white house. Evelyn dewick and i spoke with renate arresthe. The research manager at the stanford internet observatory and brendan professor of government at dartmouth university. Both of whom have been working on questions. Online health misinformation. This is the expert rundown. You won't find on twitter. let's get ready to rumble. it's the law fair. Podcast july twenty second facebook versus the white house rene directa and brenda nyein. Weigh in renee and brennan. Thank you so much for joining us to discuss this week's heavyweight bout which is the white house versus facebook. The good thing is that of course. This isn't a nuance topic. That people have strong feelings about so. I'm sure we'd definitely won't upset anyone before we get into it. I did want to set out the background on how we got here. There are longstanding tensions between this administration and facebook Listeners might recall. President biden's angry comments about facebook's handling of falsehoods about him during the twenty twenty presidential campaign. A but this particular round began this july with the release of the surgeon general's advisory on confronting health misinformation of following bat. The white house made some aggressive statements about facebook's role in spreading bad information around cova nineteen vaccines biden said that facebook is killing people. Facebook said let's stop finger pointing biden said facebook shouldn't take what he said personally. We'll dig into the specifics later but to start off renee. How would you frame what the administration facebook are actually fighting about here. What's at stake. what's at stake is. We're in the midst of a pandemic and we're increasingly at a point where vaccination rates have plateaued and so. There's a lot of concern about how to pick those rates back up again and one of the things that we understand about vaccine hesitancy is that it's not uniformly distributed right. It is specific to particular communities particularly communities have different reasons for experiencing hesitancy and right now today. Many people get their information from social media. They engage they communicate. They formed strong ties with people on social media and so the administration is trying to understand. What are those people seeing. What are they hearing. And how can these hesitancy narratives be countered brandon. Is there anything you'd like to add to that. In terms of what listeners understand baseline level before we get into the details on the political scientists so emphasized politics. The vitamin station is under pressure politically to increase the vaccination rate both because they fell a bit short of their target. And just because they like to promote his high vaccination right as possible and they're casting about looking for ways to do that and probably villains to identify. An facebook is an organization that they have more leverage over. Then say fox news of the republican party. This is a fight they can pick where the external pressure they bring bear. Might i would imagine. They conjecture influence facebook's behavior on the margin and so they're going to put the spotlight on them and of course our in our media environment were all too happy to oblige in our ongoing pattern of focusing on facebook exclusion of the rest of the online information environment. So i think that's really useful framing of villains it's kind of good versus evil. Not at all reduction as framing. I think you know. Basically the way that the argument was playing out over the weekend was is facebook kill people or is facebook saving lives so it in that binary of which one is it brendan and you can only pick one. Well i reject that binary. And i refuse to play that game. I don't think we should think about. Facebook is having one effect. This is the largest communication medium in the history of human civilization. that does not have one simple effect. And i don't think it's especially helpful to think in terms of whether it's killing people or not. I think there's a reason that even by the himself locked that comment back what we have to think about is. What do we know about the effects of facebook and how it could influence vaccine hesitancy on and that's it turns out to be a very complicated story when we don't know we don't have very good answers to given the data that are available to us in part because facebook has it made as much data available as outside researchers like me would would like so. This is not a question that we have clear answers to their real reasons for concern and folks like rene done incredible work on why we should be concerned but i think what we have to avoid is very simple story where facebook is responsible for vaccine. Hesitancy which i think is not at all supported by the evidentiary record or simply the history of vaccine hesitancy which long predates the existence. The internet will let alone facebook. So i definitely wanna come back to this question of facebook's keeping or not keeping data on these issues but before we do that britain i'm going to piggyback on your reference to rene work and rene wanna turn to you you've been watching online misinformation about health and vaccines for a long time. Well before cove in nineteen. Could you describe how you saw. Antitax community swarm and develop online. And maybe sketch out what. The relationship is between these pre existing antitax groups and cova d- vaccine misinformation specifically.

facebook white house Evelyn dewick renate arresthe stanford internet observatory dartmouth university rene directa brenda nyein President biden renee biden brendan cova brennan twitter brandon republican party fox news rene
"rene directa" Discussed on The SynBioBeta Podcast

The SynBioBeta Podcast

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"rene directa" Discussed on The SynBioBeta Podcast

"Recommend form groups and promote videos. It zero consequences zero liability. You can provide incentives for this to change and for us to return to a society that values our neighbors value science values. The notion of humanity moving forward together by changing legal framework. And so put very simply. I believe that we need to change in the us section. Two thirty which shields the social media giant's from liability for some of these very destructive actions with the following you lose your liability if you promote any content any friend relationships any group affiliations algorithms weekly so everybody likes cream about free speech. Great you can have all the free speech you want. Consistent with the original intent of the framers which is if you can hand printed on a late eighteenth century printing press or you can grumble it in a local coffee house greater. There's the scope of your free speech. You basically remove liability protection from the social media giant's for anything beyond an early nineteen eighties bulletin board system and so a citizen assistance. Your free speech is protected. You can say the virus most insane thing you want but it is highly unlikely that more than eleven or twelve other people will ever hear. So has anybody pick this up. Who is the point of the spear in terms of legislation on this a number of senators in credit for this Number of senators. I think have independently focused on this idea. Representative anna issue in silicon valley has a pretty clear articulation of this. That i would love to see. Even further refined an amplified. But this is a very very simple. Very simple change. You can do whatever you want. You just can't amplify and so there's Their number of Their number of people including brilliant woman named rene directa a lasting Capital our or casey s. Ta who have summarized this as free speech not free reach love it. That's great and so john to tie all this together. The basic science that has provided in you end me very material. Career options the basic science. That can drive radical abundance with climate resiliency with equitable access and distribution for the global population. Not just a few people in a few neighborhoods in western countries. That science is funded at all. By a societal consensus and its volume of funding in the respect for its outcomes and the willingness to commercialize it is driven by societal consensus and so deep tech innovation depends on that positive pro social societal consensus to fund basic science to respect basic science to commercialize basic science. Especially in the interest of human hell and an abundance and the fulfilment of human need so refocusing social media on amplifying that positive message and shall we say d tuning. Just not rewarding. The negative message is important. And i'll say one final thing because you mentioned this obliquely the united states england france germany. The the western world has enemies. Some of those enemies are crazed nihilists like north korea. Some of the enemies see themselves as great power rivals the messages on western social media that denigrate science that encourage people to live in fact free world to attack their neighbors if they advocate science or reason that try to get people to be small minded vindictive to not dream of a better future for humanity. Those messages you may not purely originate with our adversaries. Our societies are imperfect a lot of our unreason. A lot of our heat is a last organically sourced but the amplification of that in its refinement in its weaponization is very often. Disturbingly often driven thing and taking away. A profit motive for leading to our destruction is is is important in it. Supports all the stuff that you and i care about. Entered advances humanities matt. We could go on for hours. This has been a fascinating discussion about deepfake about investment and particularly about regulation of the technologies. Thank you for joining us on the symbian podcast today. Thank you so much on really was a pleasure. I want to thank matt all cova joining us today and thank you the listener for checking us out if you enjoyed this leaving. I change review off more importantly share the same by podcast with a friend. This is john signing off and hoping that all your dna dreams come true..

today john england early nineteen eighties north korea matt one final thing more than eleven late eighteenth century zero Two thirty united states france germany zero liability twelve other silicon valley cova hours of senators symbian
"rene directa" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

Tech Policy Podcast

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"rene directa" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

"Welcome to what. I think is going to be a very special episode of tech policy podcast. I'm corbin barthel here with me. Also my good friend baron soka. We're gonna be talking today about one of the great of our time. We're in the middle of a great acceleration in the advance of technology with that. Acceleration has come a rapid uptick in the rate at which evolving forms of information flow through and shape our culture and society. One of the people thinking most deeply about this phenomenon. Is rene directa. Our guest. Today rene as the technical research manager at stanford internet observatory in lieu of a longer biography. I'm going to introduce rene through her work. It is such amazing stuff that she does. And i follow it closely and the rest of you. Who are interested in this kind of Area should as well and it also gives me a chance introduced three of my favorite essays of hers. They are a good framework for our discussion. Because they get into the past and the present in the future of our big dive into some call it the anthrax sena the acceleration that i mentioned the first is called mediating consent. It's available at ribbon farm and it starts us back really five hundred years ago at the rise of the printing press and the appearance of the vernacular bible and it gets into the disruption that that passed advance information technology caused. And it's good to remember that we're not the first to be experiencing such an event then gets into the more the present and the rise and the explosion of geographically transcendent pseudo realities with that really means is people with niche interests including things like conspiracy theories can now find each other online and connect and coalesce and an advance. Their interests Sometimes in ways that are detrimental to society as a whole next article. The supply of disinformation will soon be infinite and that the in the atlantic. And it's a great article on the coming of generative text. I generated writing..

baron soka Today today corbin barthel five hundred years ago rene first three atlantic rene directa one stanford internet observatory One of
"rene directa" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"rene directa" Discussed on Power 3.0 | Authoritarian Resurgence, Democratic Resilience

"More difficult to get accurate reliable information to the public in an ongoing emergency situation to understand how researchers can shed light on this problem in order to help civil society in public officials. Respond dean spoke with rene directa the research manager at the stanford internet observatory rene. I've heard you describe the lack of access to social media data as an overarching limitation. Our understanding of disinformation in your writing specifically cited the lack of data that goes beyond user engagement specific pieces of content. I was wondering if you could give me some examples of what we might learn if we had brought her data access. Tell us a little bit about your proposal for what some might call multi stakeholder system for getting different sectors to share information and work together on this problem so i think one of the key challenges is identifying. What the problem that we're interested in solving is so there is indication that social media group dynamics are creating echo chambers that they are perhaps leading to radicalisation of certain parts of the population. There is concern about information operations from state actors while that is not as much of an issue in the us in the two thousand twenty election. That is still very much an issue. For many parts of the world in which state actors continue to try to influence either their own citizens domestically or of their borders other countries. So there's the information operations challenge. There are issues with right now. The global pandemic and how social media network activism is being. Used to do things like you know shutdown vaccination sites Groups that found each other on facebook and coordinated on facebook. Don't stay on facebook. These things have demonstrable real world impact at this point. But we don't have a very good understanding of the mechanisms in the dynamics by which those forces are being shaped. So what i mean by that is we can see things like engagement. If we use the vaccine conversation as an example we can see that much of the content related to the covid vaccine that is getting a significant amount of engagement is coming from anti vaccine echo chambers but at the same time if most of the engagement stays within the echo chamber. It's people who are just kind of continuing to propagate the same messages amongst their own community that they've had for years and years nearest now so what we want to try to understand a little bit more is do these messages. Make out.

facebook one rene stanford internet observatory years two thousand twenty election dean
"rene directa" Discussed on Just Think

Just Think

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"rene directa" Discussed on Just Think

"Or for what company, but my entire job is to schedule the commercials, and there are times on radio where I will say that, like might news talk station runs, rush. Rush limbaugh. Sometimes they don't want to run in. Rush limbaugh. You know, sometimes they do you know kinda depends. That's about the only time it really adds being placed next to, you know, content. Exactly really is affected in the internet. That's just kinda Raymond in you want that target. Did niche, right? You want the algorithm to target the knees that's going to buy your products not necessarily decide who you want through servicing a radio station, exactly. Or TV station. But that's that's just a big tangent. That I didn't necessarily mean to go down. It's all good. I legitimate in there. So we'll, we'll hold hands. I going back to the path year. So. Yeah, education to me is the best way to combat this, especially because I do see this as a national security, concern Americans have been Prut. We don't know. We don't know quantitatively, all of the effects that Russian interference had. It's not just Russians. It was also a some Iranians. You know, the Chinese can also be involved, you know, whoever the national security boogeyman of the day is. Oftentimes, that's what it can be Israeli just a boogeyman. But we have to we have to educate Americans on how to discern this information, right? How prominent do you think this, this misinformation is from other state actors? I think it's so the I think it's actually really prevalent just because if you go into, like Twitter mentions it, you know, it's a lot of just kind of blank avatars almost, you know, it's and when you click on you just kinda see. Like this one focused thing. It's not really a person there are people behind them, creating the content creating the messages. But it's not really an organic. This is what a person would be doing with social media account, unless they were some sort of, you know, this is like a business account kind of thing. And I think we just see it a lot. I don't know how many people really interact with it, but we see we consume it a lot. Right in the comments. You know, YouTube and Facebook, you know, you scrolled through, you don't know how many of those accounts are real, you know, if you go to like advice article, how many of those people are real people in unless you're going through and clicking on every single one of those, you're never gonna know and. Yeah. And why would interest easier to assume they are because why would you click through every single one of them? And so, I think that's why it's more. I think that's why I say it's prevalent. I don't know how much. People are rarely taking into a fat, you know, taking into account. What is, you know what they are saying, but I think it does have like these little micro effects on the on people. Yeah. I'll point have you hit the it gets into critical. Mass rate. I see this. So I've always had an issue with the comment section under President Trump's anything, whether it be Twitter Facebook on Facebook seems to be worse to me because. I have my feelings about the president. But if you go into those in the comment section it's just ninety percent praise. You know what I mean? And it's kind of weird because if you look at the grammar structures of all the all the praise comments, and you'll get the, the, the language that's used as often. Interesting, the, the extra spaces. I expect that out of I don't know five percent of the population in people who I know plenty of people who don't who aren't very literate, right? But I don't expect it from ninety percent of a comment section. Right. And I've always found a little weird, and I think that's an easy place where people can see something inaction. Yeah, that's the that's one of the things I, I really do encourage people, I know Sam Harris did an interview with Rene Directa wired has all sorts of stuff with her or issues on PBS. The report that she put together is, is absolutely fantastic. In. So she, you know, she was mentioning a lot of the sophistication behind all these accounts, all these posts really runs the gamut, sometimes it's, you know, regular vernacular English other times it's like perfect Harvard essay level English. That is just way too much for like a. We know it's fake for serving. Yeah. Exactly. And then, like they're also saying it, sometimes it reads like ESL. English as a second language, which is not a, you know, say you just kind of you, everything, kinda skeptically. In the other part, you know, your ass how prevalent it was. Sometimes, you know, it's not even just like the political stuff. Right. Sometimes it's accounts that they've created to run for, you know, two or three years, they were playing along. Con we're it'd be just, you know. Guitars, or cars, whenever and then it became something political that, you know, oh, I'm outta follow. Follow this now. It's just active again, kind of right, they're flying some long cons and stuff like that as well. So that, that's another part of how prevalent it is. So. In terms of the education, I've been kind of thinking back to my college education. I graduated from the university of northern Iowa I with a degree in digital media and a lot of the. Lot of our classes were about ethics in media literacy in understanding, the effects mass communication has on society kind of been going back and trying to piece together, what would be a good policy like public policy to help teach people, you know, how to how to read the media in mass communication, in such a way that they are less vulnerable to these, I can't haven't been super successful. In coming up with that policy. And I was kind of curious, if you had any thoughts on that, like, from a government standpoint. Or just in general, just in general, like, what are some steps, you know, education comes from, you know, coming from the government to comes from a mass media, you know, NBC ABC kind hired obstacle. Excuse me. It's paradoxical because mass media by definition is not nuanced. So how'd you, you know? Via mass media do an education campaign, that's based on nuance. I think the best thing that I've been talking, mostly about the social media company, so I'm gonna talk from their perspective. I think the best thing they can do right now is say. We are these platforms. We run off of advertising. And we cannot commit to a business platform that makes us a publisher right? No. We, we just can't moderate on that scale. We, it's not profitable. So we're going to take a. Constitutional approach for lack of a better term, another words as long as it's legal, and as long as you're not partaking, other illicit activity, we are not going to actively take you down, and then they can add a couple stipulations like if it's blatant, hate speech, if it's blatant racism, if you know what? I mean, even though it may be protected under the first mammal word. We're going to stop these things, and they make the rules as clear as possible, and they also admit their self moderated, but also tell advertisers. We cannot distribute ads targeted to particular content. You either have to. Go through our algorithm to where we bring you the best customers. We can, we will de monetize hateful content. Whenever we see it, but we we're not gonna to monetize things that are perfectly legal. Tim pole is getting demonetized right now. You what? I mean a you know temple is. Yeah. Yeah. Journalist. Yes, you can have your thoughts about Steven Crowder have, and you can you could probably make an argument to actually legitimate Democratice him. Whatever you cannot make an argument for temple to be democratized. It makes no sense. You know what I mean? So I think the best thing to do from education standpoint, is that these companies have to take on were going to reel it back. We're going to take a constitutional approach their American companies to, they should probably uphold to American standards. I know I can get in trouble for saying that. But at the end of the day, it's it they have to be more loose. And then go in restrict in as host of doing what they're trying to do now is go way, too far in and try to restrict out because what they're doing risking go way too far in is they're forcing the government to get involved and the government's going to have to get involved in the name of national security. They have to it's kind of like a took an ornate problem, right? It once the government gets involved, then certain ideas do become illegal, and then you have this ironically enough. Now, you have this even worse situation where opinions are state mandated. And as soon as they're state mandated on Twitter, how the hell are you going to undo that, you know what I mean? Yeah. Yeah. That's a, that's a tricky thing because nobody wants the wants. Well, I shouldn't say nobody. Reasonable person a reasonable person in people in media. Do not want the government involved in those things, right? They just don't. They think it's bad enough. The FCC regulates radio, content and TV content. That is accessible through AM FM in television airwaves. You know, the that was the whole point of Howard Stern going to satellite. So against it'd be very tricky in those terms in, but it's a discussion that has to happen because, you know, getting away from Russia. In just real quick. Just because it's a fact that Russia did get involved. But just because Russia, got involved is not me saying implicitly that Donald Trump had anything to do. Yeah, I understood as just a quick Russia's involved in a matter, who's the president. Exact I think people often forget that we are involved in Russia. No matter who's the Russian president, like we're not. We don't have clean hands here. Yeah. In very in, you know, very few states really do have clean hands in terms of fake news, or the boozy way of saying it propaganda. Well, the way just as a real quick, aside, I hate the term, big news because it just sounds like people like you want. Sounds way too, like middle class educated propaganda. Let's let's call it something else. Fake. Big news. Exactly. Like I said, it's kinda like Doug's sister, just like that's really boozy. But getting away from that y- you know, in terms of like national security, another area that we can look at this from is recruitment into radical Islamist organizations, such as Iceland. You know, that's, that's played a huge part. Aycell has a talking about formal your column. Aycell I go for the jugular, calm Daesh, they hate it. I what's Daesh stand for guy, no idea. But I know they don't like it. If they don't like it. I'm gonna call them that they Astles. Yeah, we look at day in the their, their PR efforts is what will call them. Other actually quite sophisticated. They were invasive the way that they would kind of weasel their way into Facebook and Twitter in read it and all these other places in kind of disseminate information, and kind of do a slow radicalization. You know, radicalization oftentimes, not occur within the mosques, sometimes it did. But it also occurred online. Yeah. On YouTube, a massive stomping ground for YouTube and Twitter with the two big ones. I knew about for that particular organization. Yes. So these are one of the this is, again, one of those things that, you know, we have to kind of T ourselves how to read and understand the messages and dissect the information in..

Twitter president Russia Facebook YouTube Rush limbaugh Donald Trump Raymond Aycell university of northern Iowa Prut Astles Sam Harris Iceland Rene Directa Steven Crowder Tim pole
"rene directa" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

Making Sense with Sam Harris

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"rene directa" Discussed on Making Sense with Sam Harris

"Welcome to the making sense podcast. This is Sam Harris. Okay. Very short housekeeping here. Many things happening in the news. The Muller report just came in. I think I'll do a podcast on this one. There's real clarity around it uh, get some suitable scholar on. So I will defer that for the moment and just introduced today's guest today. I'm speaking with Roger McNamee Roger has been a Silicon Valley investor for thirty five years. He is co founded successful venture funds, including elevation where he's partnered with U2.'s Bano as a co-founder a whole day BA from Yale an MBA from the tuck business school at Dartmouth. But of relevance today is that he was an adviser to Mark Zuckerberg, very early on and helped recruit Sheryl Sandberg to Facebook. And he is now very energetic critic of the company and many of these platforms, Google Amazon Facebook. Et cetera. We focus on Facebook in particular. We talk about Google to some degree. But this conversation has a very deep look at all that is going wrong with digital media. And how it is subverting tomography making it harder and harder to make sense to one another. It's a growing problem that I've discussed many times on the podcast. But today's episode is an unusually deep dive. So now without further delay. I bring you Roger McNamee. I am here with Roger McNamee Roger thanks for coming on the podcast. Oh Sam what an honor to be here. So I got connected to us through Tristan Harris who who's been on the podcast, and who many people know has been dubbed the conscience of Silicon Valley. And but I also realize another podcast guest. Who I also got through Tristan is another one of your partners in crime Rene Directa who gave us a fairly heroin tour of the Russian influence into our lives through social media and other hacking efforts. So, you know, both of those people, and they have they really been allied with you in your efforts to deal with the problem that we're about to talk about which is just what is happening on our social media platforms with bad incentives and arguably unethical business model. Sales. So as to all to reliably corrupt are public conversation, and you very likely undermine our democracy. So let let's just just start with your background and and house at that. You come to have an opinion. Yeah. And and knowledge to back it up on on this particular problem yet. So Sam I began my career in the tech world professionally in nineteen eighty two. And when I when I was going back to college in nineteen seventy eight I dropped out for a period of time. My brother had given me a Texas Instruments. Speaking spell, you know, the toy for teaching kids how to spell, and it was brand new that year in Hansa to me in Christmas time, nineteen seventy eight and says, you know, if they can make this thing talk with a display and keyboard, you're going to be able to carry around all your personal information device. You can hold in your hand and probably will take that law. So this is one year after the apple two three years before the IBM PC. And I think rough. Seventeen or eighteen years before the palm pilot, he planted that seed in my head, and I couldn't get rid of it. And I spent four years trying to figure out how to become an engineer discovered. I was just terrible at it. And so I got a job being research analyst covering the technology industry, and I ride in Silicon Valley just before the personal computer industry started. And that was one of those moments of just pure dumb luck that can make a career in a lifetime. And in my case it did both. So

Roger McNamee Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Silicon Valley Sam Harris Tristan Harris Google Sam Yale Muller Sam I engineer apple Mark Zuckerberg research analyst Rene Directa heroin
"rene directa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:48 min | 2 years ago

"rene directa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Friday's mass shooting in New Zealand with Qasim Rashid, a human rights attorney and writer and also Virginia state Senate candidate, Joe Donovan, director of the technology and social change research project at Harvard and New York Times tech columnist, Kevin Roose custom. Let me come back to you for a moment. Jay tin tweeted right now, she referring to you is delivering so much truth regarding white supremacy online and the Christ Church crack tragedy much needed. No one Friday, a reporter asked President Trump. If he thought white nationalism was a rising threat in the United States. Here's what the president said. I don't really I think it's a small group of people that have very very serious problems. I guess if you look at what happened in New Zealand, perhaps that's the case. I don't know enough about it yet. They're just learning about the person and the people. But it's certainly a terrible terrible thing that was President Trump speaking to reporters on Friday, and now Qasim there's a lot of evidence to suggest that what the president said is not true, according to the anti defamation league white supremacist murders, or at least reports of them. More than doubled in the US in twenty seventeen the AD L also found that far right extremist groups and white supremacists were responsible for fifty nine percent of all extremist related fatalities in the US in two thousand seventeen so. It seems like this is almost a wake up call for some people. It gets worse because in twenty eighteen they were responsible for for one hundred percent of Americans murdered by extremists. And so the problem is getting worse. And there's a recent study by Georgetown University that showed that white nationalism and white supremacy extremist groups are growing faster on Twitter than even ISIS. And this is when ISIS was in their heyday. And we're seeing it permeate. I think one of my colleagues made a comment earlier about, you know, the video gaming industry and the impact their this. Kevin Kevin, I'm sorry. This is a lot of the data shows that this is where they're going to recruit not to look for kids who are white supremacist because no child is born racist. But to actively recruit manipulate and traffic them into white supremacy. So this idea of d platforming works when it is monitored in a way where we're not elevating extremist groups so back to your point earlier about what do you do when a terrorist attack like this happens? You don't elevate the terrorist as some media outlets are doing you elevate. Those who survived the attack you tell their narrative, you help people understand the pain they're going through. And why this type of ideology can't be allowed to continue that gets directly to appoint the Jeremy made on our Facebook page, Jeremy rights government agencies in the mainstream media are covering this event. Exactly how the shooter wanted them to. That should serve as a wakeup call. But it won't because the civil esscalation seems to only be getting worse which was his goal. Marie amara. Hernandez wrote on our Facebook page considering the livestream in manifesto are related to the shooting. How should journalists deal with this terror attack? How can responsible reporting prevent more shooters from copying these attacks for global media? Attention Joan Donovan you studying media manipulation and online extremists for a living. What would you say tomorrow? Yeah. I think responsible reporting needs to look to history and how we've we fought journalists have fought this before. And it's exactly what customers saying is that journalists have an opportunity here to really shift, the focus and shift the public conversation to talking about Islamaphobia is talking about the ways in which content online circulates and. You know to be clear before the events, we still we were struggling online with a a very vicious debate about Islamophobia and anti-semitism online and soon there's no doubt in my mind that that political climate in those conversations play into someone who is and planning attacks. And so we have to be really careful about the kinds of ideas that we propagate online and journalists are often act as a megaphone for some of these movements. And the issue is social media. Of course, is that we all have access to what we would imagine to be an equal playing field. But it's really not we've spent a lot of time now online and built a lot of our own networks, and some people have undue influence and other people have to go to these very extreme lengths in order to be heard and to be seen online. And so what we need to do is really shift the way in which journalists cover. These events by not talking about the assailants name by voiding talking about the forums and the places in which this these people congregate and their ideas. Their ideas are tired. They're worn out. These are troops that have been around for very long time much. They're much older than the internet. And so the point here is to focus on Muslims. Focus on the llama, phobia and get social media companies in line with changing the terms of service in in enforcing them. Kevin I love to get your sense on some of these troops and memes. But before I do that Joan it seems like this is a different kind of a challenge than we faced say in the civil rights era, James Baldwin once said not everything that is faced can be changed. But nothing can be changed until it is faced. And I don't think that the country would have had nearly as much support for things like the Civil Rights Act with the Voting Rights Act if they hadn't seen video of protesters being hit with water hoses? He tried to cross the Edmund Pettus bridge, or if they didn't see that Baptist church burning were four black girls were killed like if we didn't see it. If we didn't see it for ourselves or the ruby bridges being yelled at and heckled at by people in New Orleans as she tried to go to elementary school. If we didn't see it. We couldn't face it. And we can't change it. But it's different online. So as a journalist, I'm conflicted. I understand I understand the part of journalism that is very visceral is what this attacker is really playing on though. And we can't allow people who stage media spectacles to drive the conversation in the in the sixties and seventies is the clan really turn to a lot of performance of violence, especially with cross burnings. These things were staged for journalists to take pictures of. And then when they printed them in the morning newspaper the terror spread across the town. Right. And so journalists have to understand that there. Playing a different role now in the way in which the public is polarized. And so journalists need to understand their audiences better. And I would say that to the point about the violent needing to see the violence in order to compel social change. I don't know if that's actually true. I think that. The concerted effort of different politicians and working with church groups to move the civil rights legislation forward. I think is a much more important story here and fit political will is something that I think we lack right now, especially around regulating social media with regards to what we see online. Chris tweeted during college in the late arts I used to frequent places like four Chan at the time. I thought the rampant hate was mostly done in jest, I remove myself from that community wants it dawned on me that it wasn't Kevin Roose said love to get your sense of some of the media pitfalls that exist in this attack specifically because the shooter's online screed in particular contained a lot of stuff troops in means. And so on that seemingly is just there to kind of baked the public and beat the media, right? So listen, I'm a journalist. I. Take a job very seriously to inform the public, and I'm a fan of a lot of your work. Joan. I really really appreciate the work that you do. But I think this is one place where we disagree because I actually I think that journalists did pretty well in in covering this. I think that there were some pitfalls that people could have stepped into purposeful sort of booby traps inside this manifesto that were designed to get people sort of misdirect reporters and people who might be looking for answers and explanations here, but I think we do have an obligation as journalists not to serve just blindly amplify things. But to explain them in contextualized them, there's this concept that one of our colleagues Rene Directa has has called the data. Void which is basically if there is a big news event that millions of people are looking for information on and they go to their search engine or to YouTube or Facebook, and they are actively searching out information. If there's no good true authoritative information out there from legitimate. News outlets. Then there's this sort of void where the only content that will show up in the search results is the stuff that is celebrating this or is politically motivated or is slanted or is untrustworthy somehow. So I think in this atmosphere, sadly, like until these platforms clean themselves up. We as journalists have sort of a tactical obligation to put true information into the system. So that when people go looking for it, they're not just seeing the garbage that that maybe will lead them even further astray just one like clarification about the gate avoids concept. That was actually a paper, we wrote it data and society, Michael Gobi ski Microsoft researcher. And Dana Boyd are the sort of the authors of the concept than it actually fits really nicely with the way in which we think about data as. As something that, of course, we need to have better search results, but it was a paper written four platform companies to understand another vulnerability in their system, which is that certain keywords, reviewing left and manipulated by white supremacists. And they were doing it so in order to be provocative, but also to in snare and polarized different journalists and so. While I love Renne's work on this as an extension of that. If people wanna read the the research, paper and society has it up online customer, she'd what is your sense of how the internet can be helpful in moments like this. I understand the concerns about how journalism of various kinds can either be helpful or harmful. What is your sense of? What is most useful in online communities at times? Like this the solidarity building goes a long way, and you look at the example of the prime minister of New Zealand, and the way she's extraordinarily and gracefully handle this and demonstrated from the very get go strong leadership inviting people together to build those bridges of understanding in of dialogue. But I think I cautioned that that can only go as far as we're able to take it, you know, YouTube, for example has been told on certain users that these are white supremacists espousing Nazi ideology and they've been around for. For over a decade. And so what we do after an attack is ultimately minimize significantly. When we're looking at the last eight ten twelve years, and so that's what I mean that the become these these remedies that are really inefficient or ineffective in the long run. We hold vigils. We have solidarity marches. We hold hands around the mosque or a synagogue like after the Pittsburgh attack. And these are all good things are positive things. But if they're the only bright lights in a full year of demonization of referring to Iraqis as semi literate primitive monkeys as a friend of Syrian refugees as serpents as referred to immigrants as invaders and media keeps exploiting that in publicizing that then one visuals not gonna really solve much. And I think that's a conversation. We need to have does journalist needed need to talk about the both sides of weather calling Iraqis. Primitive monkeys is a good thing or not. I mean, that's not something you debate. You. Shut it down. But yet we had prominent journalists. Brad. Stevens of the New York Times said that this is part of the free culture of free speech. No, it's not as dehumanisation and it needs to be condemned. If we want any hope of reformation or people coming together and staying together when something bad happens. And I think it was Fox News host Tucker Carlson, who you're going to as a primitive monkeys. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A..

Joan Donovan New Zealand Facebook United States Kevin Kevin Kevin Roose New York Times President Trump Qasim Rashid YouTube president reporter Jeremy Virginia Christ Church Jay tin Senate
"rene directa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:21 min | 2 years ago

"rene directa" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is delivering so much truth regarding white supremacy online and the Christ Church crat tragedy much needed. No on Friday. A reporter asked President Trump. If he thought white nationalism was a rising threat in the United. States. Here's what the president said. I really I think it's a small group of people that have very very serious problems. I guess if you look at what happened in New Zealand, perhaps that's the case. I don't know enough about it yet. They're just learning about the person and that people have. But it's certainly a terrible terrible thing that was President Trump speaking to reporters on Friday, and now Qasim there's a lot of evidence to suggest that what the prison said is not true, according to the Anti-Defamation League white supremacists murders, or at least reports of them more than doubled in the US in two thousand seventeen the also found that far-right extremist groups and white supremacists were responsible for fifty nine percent of all extremist related fatalities in the US in twenty seventeen. So it it seems like this is almost a wake up call for some people. It gets worse because in two thousand eighteen they were responsible for word for one hundred percent of Americans murdered by extremists. And so the problem is getting. Worse. And there's a recent study by Georgetown University that showed that white nationalism and white supremacy extremist groups are growing faster on Twitter than even ISIS. And this is when ISIS was in their heyday. And we're seeing it permeate, you know. I think one of my colleagues mitochondrial year about, you know, the video gaming industry in the impact their this. Kevin kevin. I'm sorry. This is you know, a lot of the data shows that this is where they're going to recruit not to look for kids who are white supremacist because no child is born racist. But to actively recruit manipulate and traffic them into white supremacy. So this idea of de platforming works when it is monitored in a way where we're not elevating extremist groups so back to your point earlier about what do you do when terrorist attack like this happens? You don't elevate the terrorist as some media outlets are doing you elevate. Those who survived the attack you tell their narrative, you help people understand the pain they're going through. And why this type of ideology can't be allowed to continue that gets directly to appoint. Jeremy made on our Facebook page, Jeremy rights government agencies in the mainstream media are covering this event. Exactly how the shooter wanted them to. That should serve as a wakeup call. But it won't because the civil esscalation seems to only be getting worse which was his goal. Marie amara. Hernandez wrote on our Facebook page, considering the livestream manifesto all related to the shooting. How should journalists deal with this terror attack? How can responsible reporting prevent more shooters from copying these attacks for global media? Attention Joan Donovan you studying media manipulation and online extremists for a living. What would you say tomorrow? Yeah. I think that responsible reporting needs to look to history and how we've we fought journalists have thought this before. And it's exactly what custom saying is that journalists have an opportunity here to really shift, the focus and shift the public conversation to talking about Islamophobia is she talking about the ways in which content online circulates, and you know, to be clear before the events, we still we were struggling online with a a very vicious debate about Islamophobia and anti-semitism online and soon there's no doubt in my mind that that political climate and those conversations play into someone who is fomenting and planning attacks. And so we have to be really careful about the kinds of ideas that we propagate online journalists out often act as a megaphone for some of these movements and the issue with social media. Of course, is that we all have access to what we would imagine to be an equal playing field. But it's really not we've spent a lot of time now online and built a lot of our own networks, and some people have undue influence and other people have to go to these very extreme lengths in order to be heard and to be seen online. And so what we need to do is really shift the way in which journalists cover these events by not talking about the assailants name by avoiding talking about the forums and the places in which this these people congregate and their ideas. Their ideas are tired. They're worn out these troops that have been around for a very long time much. They're much older than the internet. And so the point here is to focus on Muslims. Focus on the phobia and get social media companies in line with changing the terms of service and in enforcing them. Kevin I love to get your sense on some of these tropes and means. But before I do that Joan it seems like this is a different. Kind of a challenge than we faced say in the civil rights era. You know, James Baldwin one said not everything that is faced can be changed. But nothing can be changed until it is faced. And I don't think that the country would have had nearly as much support for things like the Civil Rights Act with the Voting Rights Act, if they hadn't seen video of protesters being hit with water hoses as they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus bridge, or if they didn't see that Baptist church burning were four black girls were killed like if we didn't see it. We didn't see it for ourselves or the ruby bridges being yelled at and heckled by people in New Orleans as she tried to go to elementary school. If we didn't see it. We couldn't face it. And we can't change it. But it's different online. So as a journalist, I'm conflicted. I understand I understand the part of journalism that is very visceral is what this attacker is really playing on though. And we can't allow people who stay. Page media spectacles to drive the conversation in the in the sixties and seventies is the Klan really turned to a lot of performance of violence, especially with cross burnings. These things were staged for journalists to take pictures of. And then when they printed them in the morning newspaper the terror spread across the town. Right. And so journalists have to understand that they're playing a different role now in the way in which the public is polarized. And so journalists need to understand their audiences better. And I would say that to the point about the violent needing to see the violence in order to compel social change. I don't know if that's actually true, I think that the concerted effort of different politicians and working with church groups to move the civil rights legislation forward. I think is a much more important story. Here. And that political will is something that I think we lack right now, especially around regulating social media with regards to what we see online. Chris tweeted during college in the late arts I used to frequent places like four Chan at the time. I thought the rampant hate was mostly done in jest. I remove myself from that community wants it dawned on me that it wasn't Kevin Roose. I'd love to get your sense of some of the media pitfalls that exist in this attack specifically because the shooter's online screed in particular contained a lot of stuff troops in means. And so on that seemingly is just there to kind of beat the public in beta media, right? I mean, so listen, I'm a journalist. I take a job very seriously to inform the public, and I'm a fan of a lot of your work. Joan. I really really appreciate the work that you do. But I think this is one place where we disagree because I actually I think the journalists did pretty well in. Covering this. I think that there were some pitfalls that people could have stepped into you know, purposeful sort of booby traps inside this manifesto that were designed to get people sort of misdirect reporters and people who might be looking for sort of answers and explanations here, but I think we do have an obligation as journalists not to serve just blindly amplify things. But to explain them in contextualized them, there's this concept that one of our colleagues Rene Directa has has called the data. Void which is basically if there is a big news event that millions of people are looking for information on and they go to their search engine or to YouTube or to Facebook, and they are actively searching information if there's no good true authoritative information out there from legitimate news outlets. Then there's this sort of void where the only content that will show up in the search results is the stuff that is, you know, celebrating this or is politically motivated or is slanted or is untrustworthy somehow. So I think in this atmosphere, sadly, like until these platforms clean themselves up. We as journalists have a sort of a tactical obligation to put true information into the system. So that when people go looking for it, they're not just seeing the garbage that that maybe will lead them even further astray customer. She'd what is your sense of how the internet can be helpful in moments like this. I understand the concerns about how journalism of various kinds can either be helpful or harmful. What is your sense of? What is most useful in online communities at times? Like this the solidarity building goes a long way, and you look at the example of the prime minister of New Zealand, and the way she's extraordinarily and gracefully handle this and demonstrated from the very get go strong leadership I inviting people together to build bridges of understanding in of dialogue. But I think I cautioned though that that can only go as far as were able. To take it. You know, you, for example has been told on certain users that these are white supremacists espousing Nazi ideology, and they've been around for over a decade. And so what we do after an attack is ultimately minimize significantly. When we're looking at the last eight ten twelve years, and so that's what I mean that the become these these remedies that are really inefficient or ineffective in the long run. We hold vigils. We have solidarity marches. We hold hands around a mosque or a synagogue like after the Pittsburgh attack. And these are all good things are positive things. But if they're the only bright lights in a full year of demonization of referring to Iraqis as semi illiterate. Primitive monkeys as a friend of Syrian refugees as serpents as referred to immigrants as invaders and media keeps exploiting that and publicizing that then one vigils not going to really solve much. And I think that's a conversation. We need to have does a journalist need to. Need to talk about the both sides of whether calling Iraqis primitive monkeys is a good thing or not. I mean, that's not something you debate you shut it down. But yet we have prominent journalists. Brad. Stevens of the New York Times said that this is part of the free culture for a free speech. No, it's not as dehumanisation and it needs to be condemned. If we want any hope of reformation or people coming together and stay together when something bad happens. And I think it was Fox News host Tucker Carlson, who you referring to the primitive monkeys. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A. Lot of different comments about the role of platforms. Anna in Ohio writes, white, Facebook and other platforms have to protect freedom of speech as a private company isn't their right to dictate what can be set on their platforms. Couldn't these companies say yes, you have the right to say whatever you want. But you're not gonna say it on our platforms. Colin tweeted, why do we keep pointing to platforms as the problem instead of the society hate groups, grow from is it the papers fault that the KKK writes on it. How do you expect social media platforms to monitor thousands and thousands and thousands of users simultaneously, Kevin Roose? I'd love your response to that. Because it is it is worth noting that the first amendment does not govern Facebook and Twitter. They can say you're not allowed to say this on our platforms. What do you make of the role that platform should play? Well, I think it's important to understand that these platforms already make choices to take down, you know, not allow certain types of content. You can't put. Porn on Facebook. You can't put graphic violence. You can't put animal abuse. Like, they make choices all the time. And I'll just note that several years ago. There was an attempt across the social media industry to deal with the spread of ISIS propaganda on these platforms, which had been identified as a key way that they were recruiting new members and and getting their ideas out and that effort was largely successful. I mean, obviously, not a hundred percent successful. But I think they they proved that if the tech companies got together, they actually created sort of a a repository of industry-wide known ISIS propaganda, and they dealt with it. They trained machine learning and they use moderation to to to take it off the platforms..

Facebook Joan Donovan Kevin kevin New Zealand Kevin Roose Twitter President Trump US Christ Church reporter president Georgetown University Klan Jeremy New Orleans Qasim
"rene directa" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"rene directa" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"How to meditate you can read my book on the top. Waking up or you can read any one of a thousand other books, but I just want to encourage you to look into this. If you haven't because you will not learn to meditate by accident, and you won't learn it by jogging or hiking or playing music or doing any of the other things you do to feel good paradoxically. Once you know, how to meditate you can experience the same insights into the nature of your mind, while jogging and hiking and play music and doing all the other things you like to do. But you are very unlikely to have these insights and experience the associated change in your perception of yourself and the world without explicitly learning the practice of meditation. So if you haven't explored in this area, and you're looking for a New Year's resolution I recommend adding that to the list. And now for today's podcast. Today. I'm speaking with Rene Directa Rene is the director of research at new knowledge and the head of policy at the nonprofit data for democracy, and she investigates the spread of hyper partisan and destructive narratives across social networks. She's co authored a recent report on the the Russian disinformation campaign both before and since the twenty sixteen presidential election. And we talk about all that she's advised politicians and policymakers members of congress State Department her work has been featured in the New York Times and the Washington Post and CNN and many other outlets. She's a member of the council on foreign relations and a Truman national security project security fellow. She also holds degrees in computer science and political science from SUNY Stony Brook as you'll hear Rene was recommended to me by my friend, and former podcast guest Tristan, Harris. Recommended hers authority on just what happened with the Russian influence campaign in recent years and Rene did not disappoint. So without further ado, I bring you Rene Directa. I am here with Rene Directa Rene. Thanks for coming on the podcast. Thanks for having me Sam, I was introduced you through our mutual friend Tristan Harris, had you Notre stone just done, and I met in mid twenty seventeen I had written an essay about Botts, and he read it and he shared it to Facebook funny enough, and we discovered the mid about sixty mutual friends, even though we've never met and we met for breakfast couple days later, and he wanted to talk about what I was seeing the things I was writing about and how they intersected with his vision of social platforms as having profound impacts on individuals. My research into how social platforms are having profound impacts on policy and society, and we had breakfast hit it off and think had breakfast again a couple of days later, so fast, friends, Tristan is great. He's so many people will recall he's been on the podcast. And I think he's actually been described as the conscience. Of Silicon Valley has just in terms of how he has been sounding the alarm on the toxic business model of social media in particular. So you touched on there for a second. But give us a snapshot of your background. And how you come to be thinking about the problem of bots and also just the specific problem. We're gonna be talking about if the Russian disinformation campaign and hacking of democracy. Yes, that's sort of a convoluted way that I got to to investigating Russian disinformation. Actually started back in twenty fourteen. I became a mom, and I was a just moved to San Francisco, but prior and I had to get my kid onto a preschool waiting list. Which is not always. Yeah. Not like a nice preschool, just like a preschool. And I and I and I I knew California had Samantha vacs problems. And I started googling for the data sets California to pub- part department public health has public data sets where they tell you the vaccine. Nation recent schools, anyway, I looked and I thought God this is a is a disaster waiting to happen. And lo and behold a couple months later, the Disneyland measles outbreak infected happen. And I reached out to my congressman is the first time I've ever done that. And I said, hey, you know, we should have a law for this..

Rene Directa Rene Tristan Harris Rene Directa California lo San Francisco SUNY Stony Brook congressman Botts CNN congress State Department Facebook director of research New York Times Truman
U.S. sanctions Turkey's justice, interior ministers over pastor's detention

Bloomberg Markets

01:33 min | 3 years ago

U.S. sanctions Turkey's justice, interior ministers over pastor's detention

"On members of, NATO ally specifically to high ranking Turkish government ministers because Of. That country's decision to detain American pastor Andrew Brunson White House. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders at. The president's direction the department. Of treasury is sanctioning Turkey's minister of Justice and minister of interior, both of whom played leading roles in the arrest and detention of pastor. Brunson on Twitter President Trump unleashed fury against the. Special counsel's investigation calling on attorney general Jeff Sessions. To immediately end Robert Muller's probe sessions recused himself early on. Though Connecticut democratic Senator dick Blumenthal says the president's treat tweets crossed the line this. Tweet strikes me as, very close, to the. White House downplayed Trump's outbursts saying he simply. Frustrated with what, he believes is corrupt investigation foreign efforts to make Americans hate each other on social media continue that's the word from social media experts testifying on Capitol Hill as the midterm elections loom Rene Directa works for new knowledge A company that identifies fake accounts and fake news she told senators Russian bots are becoming harder for companies like. Facebook and Twitter to spot what they did change. Was they paid in US dollars in Canadian dollars so they are no longer, paying in, rubles they're. Probably no longer using IP addresses that. Are tied to Russia global news, twenty four hours a day on Aaron at tick tock on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and. Analysts in more, than one hundred twenty countries I'm Martin dick.

Andrew Brunson White House Twitter President Trump Donald Trump Robert Muller Dick Blumenthal Brunson Martin Dick Jeff Sessions Nato Sarah Sanders Rene Directa United States Connecticut Treasury Turkey Special Counsel Facebook