30 Burst results for "Relook"

College Social Distancing Guidelines No Match For The Jasonator

The Topical

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

College Social Distancing Guidelines No Match For The Jasonator

"Across the country are forging ahead with the fall. Semester unlike anything we've ever experienced but new data today is showing that the safety procedures put in place by many schools may not be going far enough to prevent Cova nineteen for more. I'm joined by OPR chief senior rightist correspondent, Mark Hammond. Marcy. What sort of risks are relooking at well as the Department of Health and Human Services has determined that despite a concerted effort by colleges, the social distancing guidelines that have been put in place are still simply no match for the Jason Ader I spoke with HHS Deputy Director Alex Collins to get a fuller picture throughout the fall semester. Adversities may initially go a few days or even a week without any outbreaks but as soon as the Jason Ater shows up with a case full of Bruce and that devilish grin on his face, the infection rates begin to spike almost immediately.

Jason Ater Jason Ader Deputy Director Alex Collins Department Of Health And Human Cova OPR Mark Hammond Bruce
Discipleship: Hearing Who We Are with Jeff McDaniel

Legacy-Dads Podcast

15:55 min | 9 months ago

Discipleship: Hearing Who We Are with Jeff McDaniel

"Jeff, what are you doing your PhD in right now? Right, now it's in communication I am looking at A. Self efficacy in how we can help people change voluntary behaviors towards discipleship. The. The problem is eighty. Five percent of churches in America are either plateaued or declining zero churches in America are multiplying. And there's gotta be a reason why. So CS Lewis said scientists nothing more than I pointed my telescope it in this direction at this time towards this planet, and this is what I saw. So even social science is nothing more than critically looking at what God is doing and how God made us. So I'm taking a seminary degree, an MD, matching it up with a social science. And trying to see what God is doing and how we can better make disciples makes sense makes sense and so we we kinda talked we were talking about last week Kyle, this in a what if and this is something it came up in conversation wasn't even planned that we were saying what if you know God is pushing this cove is a mechanism to get us to relook at how we do quote Unquote Corporate Church gatherings or discipleship, and that's where we thought. Hey. You're the guy that's been doing this. You've been preaching this for years saying We need to get away from this corporate entertainment. You know consumer model in back to. First Century Early Church Christian discipleship so can you talk a little bit about some of the stuff you've been talking about working with where do you see the problems and then you know, what do you see? We can talk a little bit about You know, what are some solutions here?

America Jeff Lewis Kyle Relook
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 9 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

Tara Brach

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Loneliness as a Portal to Sacred Presence

"Amnesty and welcome. This is the sixth of a series. And I have no idea how long it'll go on called sheltering in love and last week and this week the focus is on really facing the pain of separation and loneliness the vet Murthy was our recent surgeon general in the United States up until twenty seventeen I also a physician and he did a road trip across the United States. Talking to people. All different types of people now is written a book called together and I mentioned him because he's a key figure and bringing into our societal awareness. The huge huge suffering really. How loneliness is a major public health concern. And he talks about how for so many that he encountered whether it was drug addiction or poverty are arena fiscal diseases that the root suffering was a sense of isolation being stuck in struggle and all by oneself. He shared a number stories but one that struck me. He met with a man several years after this guy had won the lottery and this man told Murthy that the day he won the lottery was the worst day of his life and when Murthy said well explain please. He described how he had been working in a bakery and he had know he was needed there and appreciated for what he did. He had friends in his neighborhood and after winning he stopped working. He moved into a gated community. He got really really lonely. He developed diabetes. He felt pretty continuously angry at what he perceived snobbery of other people. That live there for many of you listening that this isn't hard to understand or imagine and what strikes so much is that loneliness is a disease that hits all classes people in all sorts of life circumstances. There's a really well known teaching story that I love were student asks a spiritual teacher. What's the difference between illness and wellness? The teacher writes those words up on a board any circles the eye of illness and the we of wellness. And we know it that we're not happy when the world is centering around I. Those are not the moments that were happy. The trajectory of the spiritual path is shifting from an identity and a self concern and focus where our fears and our thoughts and all our intentions and motivations really around furthering and defending a self. It's a shift from that. To really recognizing in a cellular way that were connected and then the experience of that is a caring. That's all inclusive. That's one of the definitions. I have of radical compassion. That it's that awake sense that we belong and of course we care for each other. We belong to each other. What's so interesting to me. Is that many evolutionary psychologists and philosophers. Also consider this the trajectory for our species that there's an increasing movement and capacity for collaboration and for compassion with the understanding that we belong to this web of life. What happens in this web affects? All of us sensing were part of Earth. Were part of what's described as guy at this whole system that's synchronized and self organizing on the same boat. So we claverie. 'cause the truth is we belong now of course as I say this you may be instead of thinking of the the long arc. Maybe more focused on a short stretch of time that we've been having recently and it certainly doesn't appear claver to give and embracing and caring of each other which is why this week and last week Really relooking at the suffering of separation and loneliness that many are calling an epidemic and we talked last week about how loneliness surely forgetting our belonging quite literally makes us sick it shortens our our life expectancy and that given where such a social species we have a longing to belong and very real pain of loneliness and it's in our DNA to feel that because for most of human history it was really dangerous to be separate or outside of the group not a member not feeling our membership So it's easy to see how in current days loneliness is exacerbated by this global crisis by the pandemic there's so much anxiety so much fear around health and economy. We see each other. Were afraid of of getting this. Potentially deadly virus from each other. So there's distancing and many are living alone it's a real setup one person Couple of days ago from our DC. Meditation Community who lives alone told me she said. I'm afraid I've had the last hug in my life and I wasn't even aware of it at the time and that really struck me just that sense of really. What if I never feel held again? There's so much suffering the comes with feeling lonely. It often appears as depression. You might not even be in touch with the loneliness. It appears as depression which is a pushing down that rawness. 'cause loneliness is so painful. I'm it appears as anxiety because the more separate we feel the more we feel vulnerable. The more we feel threatened. It's not as appears as anger blame because when we feel lonely really we feel rejected in some way and threatened by others that makes us angry and bottom line core. We feel shame we feel shame because to not belong translates to most of us as something's wrong with me lot of pain. Statistically it's shown that the loneliest age group is eighteen to twenty but it's really all ages now I heard a story that I love It's about this gentleman who knocks on his son's door and he says Jamie he says Jamie. Wake up and Jamie answers. I don't WANNA get up. Papa father shouts get up. You have to go to school and Jamie says I don't want to go to school. Why not ask the father three reasons this Jamie I? It's because it's so dull second. The kids tease me and third. I hate school and the father says well. I'm GonNa tell you three reasons you have to go to school and I because it's your duty second because you're forty five years old and third because you're the headmaster not everyone goes around like on lonely but we all have this existential tendency to feel separate. This is this is deep in us. I find that Rumi says the best on this. He says that everything that comes into being gets lost in being drunkenly forgetting its way home and what he means by lost in being is that we lose the sense of our belonging to the hall and we identified with a separate self this I and all of our thoughts and activities just circle around what I want what I need. I'm afraid of this furthering and protecting ourselves. Now what's kind of important to understand? Is that if in growing up. Our basic needs for safety and love and understanding are Matt. Then that self-focused is there. But it's a wholesome one. It's not exclusive versus sticky. So we can still remember in a very fundamental way are belonging but when our personal lives when in our personal lives. Sir Spin stress and trauma and very little healthy bonding healthy attachment bonding with caretakers by nature. We become more self fixated more self protective more aggressive in kind of defending. And that's where we get really imprisoned in the I That separate lonely feeling with so much suffering

Jamie I Murthy United States Depression Papa Father Rumi Meditation Community DC Matt
Tom Steyer talks voter turnout

Stephanie Miller

08:46 min | 1 year ago

Tom Steyer talks voter turnout

"I start an organization called next Gen Emerica yes it is the large registering young you need to vote dot com you did seem to rattle much organization in the country and one of the things we did in twenty eighteen was we pick thirty eight congressional district held by Republicans and we focused on people under thirty five yeah and we more than doubled the turnout from four years before that's the largest generation in America bigger than the baby boomers they were voting at half the rates of other Americans we said in order for Democrats to retake the house we need this generation to show up yep and so when I think about why we flipped all those seats and those were the seat you know that we chose the ones that we thought were flip a bowl but we're definitely in play the answer's turned out there the number of Democrats who turned out in twenty eighteen to twenty thirteen with two thirds more I know you're gonna be a Chris Hayes later today tune into MSNBC to see Tom joy Reid was just on our show this week she has a new book out and she said we have minority rule in this country she said because we don't vote and white evangelicals crawl over broken glass to vote and that that is one of the I mean that's one of many factors but she's right we what was the turn out Travis was for white evangelicals it's close to a hundred percent of them turn it turned out and that's why we sing for us to win there are many more joys exactly right there are many more of us we need to organize and show up and that's what I've been doing for ten years we've been organizing people to be registered to be engaging the issues and to show up and vote and we've done that you know we I think when we focus on the huge percentage of Americans who don't vote instead of the very small percentage of people can't decide if they like Mr trump yeah we get all those people and that's forty percent of America not the two percent of campus I think our sense of urgency I think I have we both have fascism early warning systems in our blood we found out it on our impeachment but bill road show spontaneously the both of our dads were Republicans and Nuremberg prosecutors and John Cooper tweets history teaches us that wimps don't be fascists appeasement doesn't beat faster stronger McConnell the twenty twenty election will not be free and fair in fact they're counting on that I'm if there is a conclusion to be drawn from Nuremberg it's this when you see something really wrong you fight it every day you don't show up every six weeks or every six months and register protest you fight it every single day every time it rains it's ugly on your chairmanship yesterday talking about what happened part of what I found so powerful about his testimony today was not just when he was asked about the law but when he was asked about the affects the morality the lack of patriotism of this conduct and perhaps one of most chilling moments I think our committee was when he expressed the fear that this become the new normal and of course I think what is animating that fear of the director would certainly and that's it animated for me is the fact even after the nightmare of the last two and a half years the president of the United States will still not forswear receiving foreign help again hi okay so now how do you what what okay first of all what we do how do we get times are on the debate stage next time let's get him into the debate look up there to rules which what's website what we do Tom Selleck dot com and we have a little time start your dot com and give me a box and we have a link to that at your website and at your Facebook and Twitter pacey I did the show me the money yeah right you to help me help you I need a hundred and thirty thousand donations okay and so I'm asking people to give me a Buck to get me on the stage so I can make the case for taking back our democracy and actually speaking up for the people let the people relook at I this you for how many times I've asked you for money one time just do it let's talk about what first what would you do what how do you what is your strategy for running against trump supporters from call he will weird al look I think you can tell who is certainly I think I'm the perfect person to take this guy on the good twin comes to the economy he's a fake and he's a failure and I have no problem yeah people don't seem to feel comfortable I spent thirty years studying economics through investment and through looking at countries no economic system works he is a disaster in competent person I just had a like not moment I'm gonna be your campaign manager okay there was no but you and this is how you run against them calling us socialism personal I'm like why don't we ask them what about their party's drift toward fascism but this and you are the perfect I would call you a compassionate capitalist look so we can say we are not socialist but we are but but you know you do so much you give so much of your money there is a difference there is the pure greed of Donald Trump who's never done anything for anybody but himself but when you think about this Stephanie see if this works for you this analogy that I use sometimes I say look the United States is like a car we have democracy and we have capitalism a marker see is how we're supposed to steer the car and decide where to go the people get to choose right we get to choose what the laws are we get to choose what the rules are but the thing that is the engine of the car is capitalism and so that it has to be able to run to make us move forward but it can't steer the car yeah when the engine starts telling the car where to go you get what we have now which is the people's interests are being served but we still need that engine to go by so I don't hate the engine I just know this it can't run the car we can't have cook we can't have drug companies telling us what the prices of drugs are going to be don't you love how much they hate when liberals are going to capitalism we made the wrong kind of billion dollars the funny thing here is Mr trump has a operating procedure that led him to bankrupt all these casinos makes huge promises yeah he borrows money leverages it is a frightening it goes bankrupt and he walks away yeah and that's we're in the middle of him trying to turn the United States of America into one of these failed it Lennix thanks yes he is with the trillion he's whatever right that's who we is he's a fake let's talk about the five rights which you called the right to an equal vote the right to clean air and clean water the right to learn the right to a living wage and the right to health that sounds a lot talked about it because it sounds pretty good plan to me one of the things that is true is we talk as if this country were a failure with the most successful country in the history of the world yeah we can afford to put ourselves in a place that is better than any people ever we do have to take on these corporations and get back our democracy but if we do that we can afford healthcare for everybody we can afford a quality public education from pre K. through college with ongoing skills training we can afford clean air and clean water and we can afford a living wage for every working American we can't afford that right now we have the money we have to take back the democracy to do it but I'm saying that is a baseline of security for every American we're in a position to create unimaginably great times for ourselves we do have to beat these corporations and we have to control the climate yeah we've got to stop talking like we are succeeding this is the most successful country ever let's give ourselves some credit beat the challenges we need and let's win and make and create when Americans have always created the country in the world Tom and I I I so appreciated and resonated with what you did during this last election what you talked about earlier is with next Gen and need to vote about getting younger people excited and motivated I've been saying on this show I mean I'm old as dirt and I I am so inspired by the a season the receipt to leaves in these fears young women that we got into Congress that obviously terrify trump and the Republicans but I you know what it's like a see she seems like a flash from the future to me like I I you know she knows how to connect with young people on social media she makes me believe that we can do big things again look what we've talked to hundreds of thousands of young people and ask them why they don't vote and they always say the same thing the system doesn't work no one tells the truth neither party addresses our needs it doesn't make any difference and I'm like oh no yeah that can't happen that's the end of democracy if people have that attitude we need to go out there and talk about what can happen if we tell the truth if we go out and retake the government what we can provide in a way that everybody's life will be materially different and materially better and we're in a position to do that right now we just have to

Gen Emerica Billion Dollars Hundred Percent Forty Percent Thirty Years Two Percent Four Years Six Months Six Weeks Ten Years
In The Gate #416 - Mining for a Gem

In The Gate

10:49 min | 2 years ago

In The Gate #416 - Mining for a Gem

"Away. Great news. There's a quick way. You can save money. Switch to Geico. Geico could help you get great coverage at a great price. And it only takes fifteen minutes to see if you could save fifteen percent or more on car insurance. Go to Geico dot com today and see how much you could save. Kelly. Rube is not the first person we've ever interviewed on this show who earned a master's degree but decided to train horses. Instead, she is however, the only one who gave up an academic career to hunt foxes now, she has a formidable Preakness contender always mining. We'll talk with Kelly rudely. Plus, it's time for a refresher on how stewards interpret the whole d Q rule. I'm guessing, you know, why? And we're going to do something. We've never done before on this show. We're going to go through some Twitter chatter. That's spewed out after the you know what? And what it means for the sport going forward? Stay in your lane or you'll be disqualified from listening to this show. The about to be IRAs. Off. This is in the gate ESPN's. Thoroughbred racing podcast. My name is Barry Abrams. You can follow me on Twitter at be Abrams boys or on Facebook at Barry Abrams, boys. You can also get us on our YouTube channel by searching in the gate podcast. You can get us on soundcloud as well yet us at the. I tuned store or tune in dot com. You can get us on that little pink pod catcher app on your phone. You didn't even know you had. And now you can subscribe to win the gate in the listen tab of the ESPN app for the full in the gate experience of scribe now in the listen tab of the ESPN app. Welcome back your dreams where your ticket out. Those were the opening lines of the legendary nineteen seventies TV show. Welcome back kotter where the main character played by Gabe Kaplan returns to his New York City high school to become a teacher. Our next guest has done the reverse Kelley rube. We grew up loving horses and upstate New York grew up to become a middle school science teacher and then left. That stable career to return to the stables on TV, Mr. Qatar dealt with a group of teenage guys who seemed comically incapable of maturing into adults Kelly rudely now a thoroughbred trainer has an equine version of a teenager as three year olds in the spring, basically are, but this guy has done some growing up in the last few months, always mining. We'll have to make a three wide bid and he's willing to do. It always finding up to try for gold as Zinni off the scene now in position less than three alongs to go and always mining now in front from try for goal turning for home in Federica Teissier sakes, all ways mining set down and opens up a four length lead on try for goal always mining with a six now a seven Lang lead always mining robbing home past the Laura line and headed to the Preakness always mining comes into the Preakness on a six race winning streak albeit in races. Quite as rigorous as those on the Kentucky, Derby trail, none the less. The three year old gelding is answered the rhetorical question about dreams that you hear on welcome back kotter who'd have thought they lead you back here where we need you and buy back here. We mean to Maryland where Kelly ruble is based at fair hill with a chance to claim one of the American spring classics, and we welcome trainer Kelly ruby here too in the gate. This horse has made twelve starts already maximum security. Maybe you've heard of him has made five including that whole Kentucky Derby thing. The last nine of always mining starts have come in laurel in the last six of those have been wins, all enlisted or overnight stakes. What's been your philosophy on how to bring them along? He he was purchased by my current owners after his maiden win. So he's only been with me since he ran on the grass in Maryland last summer. So, you know, we've kind of just strategically followed the past the Maryland route tickets where we're at today. What mood the light bulb turn on forum last October when this winning streak started? I wish I could answer that. He's always been a very nice horse. I mean anyone is made nicely. I think the goal was always to stretch out. And they were very limited races for two year olds when we ran them on the grass. So after that we also have to just sit tight and wait till they had a route race for us. And obviously he relished the mile you grew up in central New York, which is not exactly horse country. I know I went to Syracuse. What made you even want to get involved with horses up in that perpetual league gray bleak part of the world. I don't know. I guess it was ever since I could walk or talk I'll ever wanted to do with the around horses. So it was just naturally in me. But yes, it was a little limited. I started writing at a quarter horse barn actually started competing on the quarter horse survey doing jumpers and hunters and from there, but an event horse and started shipping down to the Maryland, Pennsylvania area. And that's kind of how I ended up in the air. Area fair hill. But listen to your parents, you earn two master's degrees. Two masters degrees. It became a middle school science teacher. Now, first of all, they're possibly be a more draining job in the world. And being a middle school teacher. I actually really enjoyed that age the students are you know, there's just starting to develop themselves much like a young horse. So I thought they were a lot of fun. But yes, it's exhausting, and it wasn't necessarily something. I could see myself doing in the future. Which is why I went back and got my second masters for administration inside that for three years. And then decided you know, what horses are meant to be. We what happens you were wearing a suit as an administrator and everything and did you just have an piffle. Or was it a gradual thing it was gradual? You know, even when I was teaching. I went into the administration because the fact that I'd already voted so much of my time, and my education towards the education were also what could I do move up the ladder in that respect? So I tried the administrative row and decided that it was just for me it allowed more flexible hours than my current job. But it just wasn't something. I had a passion for jelly rudely. Rainer of Preakness contender always mining. Joining us here on the gate now before you get to fair hill, which you mentioned you leave teaching school for FOX hunting in Pennsylvania. Is that a thing that was just a job to kind of regroup and see what I was going to do with my life. But yes, I was managing harm, and we accented I we didn't really have an opportunity in where I grew up. I never FOX hunted in my life. So it was a unique experience in something that I greatly enjoy. But it also got me my start with Barclay tag here at their hill. How I started galloping for him here. He had a string at fair hill and my gal for him and then eventually moved up to become his assistant. How do you go from FOX hunting and Pennsylvania to fair hill and being an exercise rider? Well, I mean that job was just pretty much to move me to this area to figure out what I was going to do. And that's. When I met Parkway and became an exercise rider for them with the goal that I would eventually become an assistant and kind of learn the horse racing world from the ground up. What did your parents say about what you chosen to do? With those two masters degrees. They were not thrilled. They still think I'm a little nuts. And the fact that you know, I work seven days a week. And I haven't had a day off and many years, but we've had a little bit of success. They're starting to kind of be what my my goal was a long, and they're you know, they're coming around. But still it wasn't ideal in there is at the time. Well in light of that. How nervous will you when you finally decided to go out on your own? I wouldn't say I was nervous. You know? It was a goal, and I like I'm somewhat of a driven person. And so I had a goal. And I knew when I became an assistant as the idea was to learn as much as I could to have an eventual string of my own, and you know, it came around gradually and worked I way into it. And so it was just a natural flow. Really? I'm guessing you're hoping that the success of always mining will lead to more business how big a stable do you have? And how big would you like it to be? I have about forty horses in training right now. We've had more in the past. I'm a very hands on person. I checked every horse's legs every morning. So I don't know how we'd like to go. We'd like to continue to improve the stable and have a nice allowance level stable. So you know, it just depends on I don't know that there's a magic number to stop at. It's just when I feel like I can't stand up everything that I'm going to have to take a minute and relook at it. It is always morning still in control leads almost two legs. From is six furlongs twelve three sixty s lift to go with like the distances. No problem at all. For always finding always minding kept attest opening up a half dozen on Joey his second and tai-bo third. Always mining wants to run all day, always minding to win it by six or so we've talked on this show recently about the stickiness of the future of the Preakness. But considering that always mining. Is one six in a row with loyal race course and made nine of his twelve career starts there. I'm guessing you personally wouldn't be too opposed to running the Preakness there this year. This year. That'd be perfect. That's going to happen. I mean, how concerned are you that he can bring his race track with him? Even though it's still in the state of Maryland. Actually, I think the Tenneco course going to set him up nicely. It's got a nice long stretch. And he just has a very large scale thing stride. So I I I don't see this the track change to be a problem. We're going to have to do it. Eventually, then I'm guessing you don't mind seeing that just about all of the top derby contenders are going elsewhere now that plays well for us, absolutely more. We certainly wish you the best of luck here. Kelly ruby. Thank you so much for sharing a few minutes with us. Thank you. Thank you haven't. We're going to take our first break here on in agape when we come back. It's time to revisit that whole d Q rule and how it's interpreted on guessing, you know, why we need a refresher. So go

Maryland Kelly Pennsylvania Barry Abrams Geico FOX Kelly Ruby Espn Twitter Rube Gabe Kaplan Youtube New York Kentucky Kelly Ruble Syracuse Kentucky Derby School Teacher
Abigail Disney calls out Disney CEO Robert Iger's astounding pay

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Abigail Disney calls out Disney CEO Robert Iger's astounding pay

"I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellany of the Hollywood reporter, and Matt I think some people at the Walt Disney company in the upper echelons or having a breakdown Abigail Disney whose grandfather was Walt Disney's brother ROY has written an editorial following some earlier tweets calling out Disney CEO and chairman Bob Iger, four his astounding pay. He made sixty five million dollars in two thousand eighteen she points out that's one thousand four hundred and twenty four times the median pay of Disney worker, not the bottom rung the median pay. And you know, she is making a point that that is a bad, look, right, and immediacy ios have famously been paid much higher than their peers in the last couple of decades for many years, Leslie Moonves at CBS was the highest paid CEO corporate America this year. I'm betting David zaslov at discovery will likely be the highest paid CEO in America despite their stock. Doc, not doing so hot lately, but Disney is different. And it is a public facing company. Unlike any other has a relationship with people who go to the parks who see the movies who have a strong affinity for the brand. So the fact that Bob Eiger is making so much more money than the rank and file at Disney. Does mean something in does resonate. And we're seeing that in the media right now. Yeah, it's a Sarah symbol of income inequality. I'm old enough to remember. When begets father ROY who was waltz nephew led an insurrection against management at Disney and ended up ousting Michael Eisner, and you'd never seen anything like the magic of Disney name in that context. Mom and pop shareholders old people young people came to this shareholder meeting because they were fed up. Roy Disney had made the argument that you know, Michael Eisner had wreck the Disney magic. Now. This kind of a dark twist Disney hasn't really responded to this and Abigail. Disney tweeted yesterday. That she was getting some signals that Disney was looking for dirt on her. And I will note that Disney in the past banned the LA times for a period of time for reporting on its tax arrangements with Anaheim, which was a wild overreaction and would not stand. They came after the Hollywood reporter when we reported on John Lasseter claiming that we had four were forced to publish a correction, which did not happen as we pointed out in our story. This tends to be a little a little reactive in these situations. And they've put out some stats that show that they have raised the minimum wage at the parks, and they're doing things to lift up some of the lower level employees. But the point that Abigail Disney is making is that it's not just idir if the upper echelon executives at Disney were to forego some of their extremely high bonuses they could provide significantly meaningful compensation for the lower level at the company, and they just benefited from this. Massive tax decrease that the Trump administration past and instead of giving employees a one time bonus, which they did they could have raised wages. Yes. And I think they're not the only company in that situation. Thank you, Matt. Thank you, that's felony editorial director of the Hollywood. Reporter. He joins me this Monday at one thirty. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood break this season unless notes from KCRW how does it feel to be like a girl playing instrument is? Well, how's it feel to be a man asking the questions? I mean what? Had I said, no to this invitation from John Fahey, I would have for the rest of my life wondered what I had missed. We'll thinking about Billy Tipton at very interesting time because I don't know that young people and older people agree on the meaning of trans. I love you for the greatest, Sean. I love that. It is an unholy album made was holy methods. Hey, everyone. I'm just a hopper a music journalist and author and your host for season two of loss minutes. Unless notes relook at music's untold stories the season is packed. It's about legacies. How do they hold up? And how do they change over time disco say off the truly means beyond disco? Learn how decades on a song can find new meaning something different than when it was written. You feel like it's up defying women feel. Yeah. Now, fifty six, and it's freaking embarrassing embarrassing to seventeen years old. You can't just write it off as being settled. Here from pioneering women who've been written out of music's history. I get there and producer says, no, no, no, we're not doing your music. We have a script here. And we want you to do the sound. Plus find out what happens when we apply. Our twenty nineteen politics to nineteen seventy four songs, we didn't think about it as we were all band were out to the point. We just lived the music. The first episode of the season of loss notes arrives April twenty fifth. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts.

Roy Disney Abigail Disney Walt Disney Company Hollywood Walt Disney Matt Bellany Reporter Kim Masters Bob Iger Ceo Corporate America Leslie Moonves Michael Eisner CEO David Zaslov Bob Eiger Billy Tipton John Lasseter CBS Anaheim John Fahey
The impact of hearing loss

Second Opinion

05:53 min | 2 years ago

The impact of hearing loss

"Rudy is a seventy two year old retired electrocution he and his wife live alone in a small house over the past couple of years Rudy has become more isolated. He no longer sees his friends goes to the movies or watches TV. In fact, he met many of the diagnostic criteria of depression. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion in the exam room was I turned to reach for my stethoscope on the nearby counter. I kept talking to Rudi I realized though he couldn't hear me when I wasn't facing him. I turned back in asteroid if he'd noticed any trouble with his hearing reluctantly, he said he had but had ignored the problem because it made him feel old and he didn't want to wear a hearing aid. I tried to suggest that he might seem older without hearing eight people might think he was ignoring them or not paying attention. It was Helen Keller who was blind and deaf. Who once said that blindness separates people from things deftness separates people from people for people over the age of sixty forty percent of a hearing loss that affects the quality of their life. Hearing loss has a more profound effect on the quality of life, then diabetes, heart disease or thrice hearing aids can be life, saving not only extending the length of life. But also the quality of life. A recent study in JAMA showed that if people have an uncorrected hearing loss. There is a forty percent higher risk of depression. Also for people with a hearing loss healthcare costs or forty six percent higher. They have forty percent more hospitals ations, and they stay on average two days longer compared to those without a hearing loss. Unfortunately, hearing aids are will outside the reach of many Americans most people. Wait seven to ten years before they get evaluated for a hearing aid. And only thirty percent of people who could benefit from a hearing aid will ever get one a hearing aid cost between two thousand and four thousand dollars per year. And they're not covered by Medicare or many private insurances. Now, you might wonder why Medicare the insurance for older Americans wouldn't cover hearing aids will Medicare's forbidden from covering hearing aids. Because in one thousand nine hundred sixty five legislators considered hearing loss normal part of aging, and according to the thinking at the time, why would an insurance intended for diseases cover something that was normal. Well, the sales of hearing aids which require prescriptions have been enormously profitable for manufacturers. But as with other disruptive technologies the world is changing fast over the. The counter hearing aids are now available at a fraction of the cost and many are linked to smartphones. That also offer transcription and other services. It also seems that everyone these days has earphone sticking out of their ears and facing cool. So perhaps the stigma is also changing well Rudy ended up getting one hearing aid. That's all he could afford. According to both Rudy and his wife his life has changed radically for the better. He's back to socializing watching TV at normal volumes and going to the movies as for me. I am now far more careful to ask everyone. Whether they've had any trouble with hearing. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this season unless notes from KCRW how does it feel to be like a girl plane in instrument of this? Well, how's it feel to be a man asking simple questions? I mean what? Had I said, no to this invitation from John Fahey, I would have for the rest of my life wondered what I had missed. We thinking about Billy Tipton it very interesting time because I don't know that young people and older people agree on the meaning of trends. I love you for the greatest, Sean. I love that. It is an unholy album made was holy methods. Hey, everyone. I'm just gonna hopper a music journalist and author and your host for season two of lawsuits. Unless notes relook at music's untold stories this season is packed. It's about legacies. How do they hold up? And how do they change over time disco say off the truly means beyond disco? Learn how decades on a sunken find new meaning something different than when it was written. You feel like it's up justifying women feel. Yeah. Now, fifty six, and it's freaking embarrassing embarrassing to seventeen years old. You can't just write it office being on. Here from pioneering women who've been written out of music history. I get there and producer says, no, no, no, we're not doing your music. We have a script here. And we want you to do the sound. Plus find out what happens when we apply. Our twenty nineteen politics to nineteen seventy four songs, we didn't think about it as we will all go band. We were out of the point. We just lived the music. The first episode of the season of loss notes arrives April twenty fifth. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts.

Dr Michael Wilks Rudy Medicare Rudi Helen Keller Diabetes Billy Tipton Jama John Fahey Kcrw Sean Producer Forty Percent Four Thousand Dollars Sixty Forty Percent Forty Six Percent Seventy Two Year Seventeen Years
Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

60-Second Science

01:29 min | 2 years ago

Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. There's solid and there's liquid and now there's something inbetween called chain melt, the Tomac level you have this interaction and this mix up between liquids and solids Andreas. Herman is a condensed matter physicist at the university of Edinburgh, what he and his team of discovered using computer simulations is that under certain pressures and temperatures potassium can be both liquid and solid at the same time. Specifically, they squashed simulated potassium atoms with really extreme pressures two hundred four hundred thousand atmospheres, that's at least two hundred times greater than the pressure. In the depths of the Mariana trench at that pressure. The atoms form two interlocking crystal lattices add heat to that you don't need too much. Just a little bit above the boiling point of water in one of those lattices begins to melt while the other remained solid and Walla chain melt the. Sales are in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences Herman says there's no reason to stop it potassium. Either. Half a dozen other elements have this crystal structure to as for what will do with them. But we haven't relooked by application is quite with untold research. I would say one thing's for sure any real world tests will face immense pressure. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata Herman Mariana Trench Christopher Don National Academy Of Sciences Physicist University Of Edinburgh Sixty Seconds Two Hundred Four Hundred Thous
T-Mobile's Phone BoothE Exceeds Expectations

Latest In Tech News

07:42 min | 2 years ago

T-Mobile's Phone BoothE Exceeds Expectations

"Also running up a couple of other April Fool's day pranks while you're some other companies at got into it apparently T Mobile's phone booth e mobile edition came out and announced this a cardboard box with the window that rests on your shoulders and transforms any space into a personal sanctuary for phone calls. I love it t mobile putting this little joke in. I know exactly what they're referencing here. Some other easily triggered folks who need a little safe-space. I'm thinking I could be wrong if my f- I am whoop. De do. It's just a joke. Guys, grow up. Seriously. If it is a problem, maybe all lead. One of these cardboard boxes the stuff your head into anyways. Google is also using machine learning to listen to nature. So, you know, the the assistant while now you can say, okay, Google talked to my tulip. They actually have video that that goes along with it. It's called introducing Google tulip. I won't be playing any of the videos, by the way, if you wanna watch the video of the read any of the articles cover today at on over detect news gadget dot net for slash nine five. And you get the whole show notes or if you're listening in the podcast app. Your choice, you should be able to tweet swipe or tapper. However, you get more information than you should be able to get all the show notes right there simply tap on the article that you wanna read about continuing on it looks like do lingual. Is introducing dual lingual push push. Notifications can be pushy enough in pop up on your phone. Imagine having them show up in person at your front door, which is apparently what duo lingo, the linkage learning experts imagined. So it's actually pretty funny. Video is just every time. There's this push notification on your phone somebody actually showed up on a door and knocks. And like were you want get out here you come down a flight of steps? Anyways. Rad power bike riders have been called cheaters for relying on electric power to enhance their mobility while now they can beat their workout to with the RAD fit a stationary bike. So y'all can get your electric stationary bike exercise going on with RAD powered bikes. Also, a red box is going to be introducing red box drops why drive five blocks to find a nearest red box. Video rental kiosk when you can have one dropped by drone right in your front yard well red box on demand. Uses. We'll get twenty five percent off their first on-demand rental on Monday. Just for thinking. This is hilarious. But kind of an interesting idea just a drone with the whole machine. If you're not if you're listening to audio guys you're missing out does a whole video that goes along with this video to this can be found at YouTube dot com, Ford sash techniques gadget or Facebook dot com for slash tech. News gadget is actually showing a hovering drone picking up the whole red box box. They'll drop it off confronting house. Kind of an interesting idea red boxes usually known for making. A little bit over the top. But not to outside the realm of being realistically attainable. Let's just say that. So. I guess freshdirect is. Introducing collie flour milk, apparently for those of you who don't want almond, coconut soy or regular dairy. While calc is taking non dairy milk to a new level. As freshdirect is milking collie flower for this prank. Also rivals of aether friends who loved the fighting game. But wish wasn't animal dating simulator. Instead get their wish with lovers of aether. No, fighting just friendship, and you'll have to check it out on steam to find out more information about that Roku. Also got onto fun by saying, well, you can't find a TV remote because the dog buried it in a couch cushions. Well, that's because this Roku press pause remote is actually for the dogs. So now the dog that keeps stuffing in hiding. Your remote can actually be the one responsible for changing the channel. So now, you just have to train the dog in order to use it properly not use it as a true toy in you guys have another option there also rapidly growing Seattle startup convoys. Tackling time space concerns. Not just in a trucking business, but in how and where employees conduct meetings checkout meeting circles, apparently is a little circles that they drew all over the place in random places in. Apparently, that's your meeting space. So. Awkward circles in have a meeting so Lockheed Martin decided to get onto fun. And they said, no one can hear you screaming space, but they might snow you first Lockheed. Martin wants you to smell your best with vector a fragrance for the deep space explorers of tomorrow, bringing a good first impression of earth with them. So. Speaking of space Apollo eleven moon Walker Buzz Aldrin, went beyond his usual. Get your Tamara slogan to give rain of some exposure on April Fools day, a couple of days earlier Aldrin visited Seattle to join Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos at a gathering in honor of the museum of flight's destination moon exhibit. Decided to tweet out. I'm excited to announce today in April, I have successfully petitioned NASA to rename Uranus to something more appropriate or you're in what am that's buzz for you, always Gupta. One small step for man. One giant leap for mankind. Apparently to humor is going right along with it. Also, watch Tech's getting in on the fun. Forget the wireless mouse Logitech is giving the biggest piece of tech hardware, a reboot by introducing the wireless hamster can actually have to wash that video to find out. What the heck Dame? But it's wireless hamster you honestly, by the end of it. You're going to be sitting there scratching your head going with the heck did I just watch also REI adventures promises exciting trip through travelers around the globe. But what fun is that? If you have to leave your cat or dog or donkey at home, while our pet ventures are active adventures designed with pets in mind, and well, apparently Tinder got in on the fun to and said well can't trust at the guy. Tinder is actually. Six feet tall and not really five foot six while they take a wipe at height wine with height verification. So apparently, there's fairly Tinder got some backlash about this whole entire thing. Apparently to you can't height. Shame people come on guys joke. Why can't determine what kind of hype that? I'm at. Okay, I'm gonna continue on with the story because I'm gonna jump off on a rabbit show, really quick. Without it triggered folks that apparently live out in holes of the internet is a joke. Guys, come on. So apparently, it's a height verification. We have to hold the phone, and then you have to take an accurate photo yourself in it'll measure, actually, how tall you are. And then it'll post it, and it will lock it. And then you can't change. It is actually pretty funny. And let's see in a secret southern California facility. A reclusive sound Gardner. Plucks air pods from trees in audit a soil watch eighty-three-year-old, Ken Yamamoto, cultivate, apples headphones. Don't just put the headphones in your year. Take time to appreciate it. He said relook at it and consider where came from or he's known as the sound Gardner. So finally, it looks like a while promotion from Amazon restaurants seemed to take nibbles to the next level. Now, you can have it delivered. Introducing mini sizes for everyone who has ever just said, I just wanna taste today. Only on Amazon restaurant's get free delivery of many and regular size items promo code in our story. So at Saul the most of the roundup news for April Fool's day.

Tinder Amazon Google Seattle RAD Lockheed Martin T Mobile Gardner California Saul Tech Nasa Logitech Facebook Ken Yamamoto Youtube Jeff Bezos Relook Aldrin
"relook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"These are a lot of people under a huge amount of stress, and you know, sometimes when you're in the NFL, you gotta take a hit. And that's what what happened here. She later came to me and kind of apologized, you know, we worked out and we had a good working relationship from then on. But yeah, I think people are overeating times piece into that moment being about covering things up, and it's more about kind of the internal expectations management, and and who was informed in the loop. I think it's easy to kind of overpaid it on that specific antidote to come up with an assumption about what was going on. That's not true. Okay. Fair enough. So let me ask you about a different aspect of that time story. This was the aspect where it said that on multiple occasions and in multiple different ways. Facebook downplayed problems like misinformation, hit speech Russian election interference out of concern for how relook politically and in particular out of concern for riling up Republicans or or getting the Republican majority on Capitol Hill angry at Facebook some of that was attributed to. Joel Kaplan who is the director of policy how did that play out for you were there circumstances in which you're aware that political considerations were were part of the calculations here as opposed to just consideration about what's best for users or what the right thing to do. The people who often we had negotiate with to put details reports or or the blog posts that we did was the policy team, and they did sometimes push back on that. Nobody ever expressed to me doing this. Because the Republicans I do think the before the election. The public discussion of the overall fake news problem was probably mooted by the fact that the company did not want to be seen putting its finger on the scale. And when I look at all of the twenty six team, it feels like there's a bunch of very powerful institutions, including Facebook. But also, including the mass media, and including the FBI and the White House who were all assuming Hiller who's going to win. All of those groups have significant portion of people who wanted her to win. And there is a lot of decision making based upon the theory of we can take care of this later after Hillary's president. Everything's right. That's that's we have from the FBI not coming out and disclosing all of the rush investigations going. Non that's what you see in the media kind of really amplifying anti Hillary messages, including anti Hillary messages planted by the GRU themselves. And that's what you see Facebook of trying to quietly take care of this problem and not come out and make a statement that might be interpreted Esain support for Trump is a fake news phenomena, and basically Hillary lost in the world changed in a lot of people have looked back at those issues of that perhaps they were trying to overpay it towards a neutrality that meant that they weren't being neutral in that. If the situation was reversed that certainly this information would have been disclosed. And I think that's something that the company is going to have to continue to deal with in these situations. No matter what you think the political impact is going to be Facebook in the tech companies are going to have to have this is the standard by which we will decide whether we disclose something when we figure it out because clearly trying to do the we're gonna hold our information. So that we don't put our thumbs on the scale. Even if you were in the right place making that decision at the time that is always gonna look like a cover up later. No matter what the outcome is. You're talking about for instance. There was that moment of New York Times story back in twenty fifteen when there was opposed by Donald Trump that was flagged as potential hate speech..

Facebook Hillary NFL FBI Donald Trump Hiller overeating Joel Kaplan New York Times director White House president Esain
"relook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"These are a lot of people under a huge amount of stress, and you know, sometimes when you're in the NFL, you gotta take a hit. And that's what what happened here. She later came to me and kind of apologized, you know, we worked out and we had a good working relationship from then on. But yeah, I think people are overeating times piece into that moment being about covering things up, and it's more about kind of the internal expectations management, and and who was informed in the loop. I think it's easy to kind of overpaid it on that specific antidote to come up with an assumption about what was going on. That's not true. Okay. Fair enough. So let me ask you about a different aspect of that time story. This was the aspect where it said that on multiple occasions and in multiple different ways. Facebook downplayed problems like misinformation, hit speech Russian election interference out of concern for how relook politically and in particular out of concern for riling up Republicans or or getting the Republican majority on Capitol Hill angry at Facebook some of that was attributed to. Joel Kaplan who is the director of policy how did that play out for you were there circumstances in which you're aware that political considerations were were part of the calculations here as opposed to just consideration about what's best for users or what the right thing to do. The people who often we had negotiate with to put details reports or or the blog posts that we did was the policy team, and they did sometimes push back on that. Nobody ever expressed to me doing this. Because the Republicans I do think the before the election. The public discussion of the overall fake news problem was probably mooted by the fact that the company did not want to be seen putting its finger on the scale. And when I look at all of the twenty six team, it feels like there's a bunch of very powerful institutions, including Facebook. But also, including the mass media, and including the FBI and the White House who were all assuming Hiller who's going to win. All of those groups have significant portion of people who wanted her to win. And there is a lot of decision making based upon the theory of we can take care of this later after Hillary's president. Everything's right. That's that's we have from the FBI not coming out and disclosing all of the rush investigations going. Non that's what you see in the media kind of really amplifying anti Hillary messages, including anti Hillary messages planted by the GRU themselves. And that's what you see Facebook of trying to quietly take care of this problem and not come out and make a statement that might be interpreted Esain support for Trump is a fake news phenomena, and basically Hillary lost in the world changed in a lot of people have looked back at those issues of that perhaps they were trying to overpay it towards a neutrality that meant that they weren't being neutral in that. If the situation was reversed that certainly this information would have been disclosed. And I think that's something that the company is going to have to continue to deal with in these situations. No matter what you think the political impact is going to be Facebook in the tech companies are going to have to have this is the standard by which we will decide whether we disclose something when we figure it out because clearly trying to do the we're gonna hold our information. So that we don't put our thumbs on the scale. Even if you were in the right place making that decision at the time that is always gonna look like a cover up later. No matter what the outcome is. You're talking about for instance. There was that moment of New York Times story back in twenty fifteen when there was opposed by Donald Trump that was flagged as potential hate speech..

Facebook Hillary NFL FBI Donald Trump Hiller overeating Joel Kaplan New York Times director White House president Esain
"relook" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"relook" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Seven ten W O R once again eleven is our time. We'll get to the weather in just a moment. Still a number of congressional races too close to call. Let's get an update on that from NBC radio national correspondent Mike Bauer. Mike. Do these races are Senate races? Right. Where you're looking at Joe. I mean, there's some interesting parts to this wall. Everyone's voted the results that we're looking at enrolling rolling in here are indicative of certain things, but they're civil racism revolve. You got three for the US Senate twelve for the US house and one from Florida Georgia governor, I'm sorry. Those races have the potential to meaningfully change the narrative in this direction. For example, Democrats could pick up forty house seats instead of the twenty nine or turn a disappointing showing in the Senate into a draw. So there are some really tight elements to this Republicans. We know picked up two seats in the Senate, but that net gain could go anywhere from zero to three when the races in Arizona, Florida and Mississippi get resolved in Arizona that Martha mcsally the Republican currently leads Cureton cinema by about one percentage point. However, the Republic estimates it over six hundred fifty thousand votes have yet to be counted, including eighty to one hundred in blue leading Pima county and then five hundred thousand in Maricopa County, so we don't know how that's gonna come up. And that's what we do know that's going to take a little bit of. Time. We're gonna have to start getting updates on that beginning every day at five pm starting tonight. And then you're gonna have in Florida where Nelson initially appeared to have conceded early on Wednesday morning now Houston someplace within a half a percentage point behind. Rick Scott in Florida. So he's demanding the recount they're going to relook at that element of it. And then I Senate wise, Mississippi, you're going to have a runoff on November twenty seven as none of the candidates secure that fifty percent that they needed to have on Tuesday. So we're still looking at these races is being very tight in in Georgia. We know that one for the governorship. There is huge that one is going to as a number of votes that are still outstanding. So we're waiting to see how all this is going in towards the end of the week here, by the way, I guess in that Georgia governor's race. If the winner doesn't get fifty percent, they go go at it again. Right. Yeah. They have to go out another run off to that. And that seems to be where the element is right now because you've got camp at fifty point three percent of the vote and a hundred percent of the precincts reporting. But that doesn't include some absentee ballots so things could sway the other direction. Brought that down under fifty percent. Good NBC radio national correspondent, Mike Bauer. Thank you..

US Senate Mike Bauer Florida Georgia NBC Rick Scott Mississippi Pima county Maricopa County US Arizona Martha mcsally Joe Cureton Nelson Houston fifty percent hundred percent
"relook" Discussed on Pull Up with CJ McCollum

Pull Up with CJ McCollum

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Pull Up with CJ McCollum

"Donovan Mitchell, call it if you have one hour to learn something from an NBA legend, who in which Gil would you choose? Koby per sure. Hockey layer footwear for an hour. I think that would be one of those things that would all along way for me. Do you look at anything specifically Donovan this year to improve. He sheds. For the entire game and play offers NBA bean, you know, main action for me being able to play both sides of the bar then. 'cause one thing I really wanted to do, I think there's a lot of very talented players out there who go onto the radar looking at Tatum looking at Terry Rozier, Eric Bledsoe is a competitor. Chris Middleton Janas says a top five player in the league. Obviously Kimball Walker, but those type of players take up most of the highlights. Welcome to the air Dickerson episode pull out. That's right. Number twenty nine. We have come a long way and still have a long way to go its officially time for the NBA season. The off a lot of great games starting tonight. And when you hear this on Wednesday, at least two gains will have finished and games, three, four, five on. We'll begin playing. So really looking forward to this season starting. Obviously, we tip off on Thursday against the Los Angeles Lakers. The new look Lakers in relooking forward to performing again at a high level playing in front of our, our home, our home court, some of the best fans in the NBA at motor center and. Honestly, it's a blessing to be able to play this game going into your six at a high level being able to represent, you know where I come from and being able to represent the franchise. Obviously, there's some sad news with the passing. Paul Allen the owner of not only the Seattle seat Seahawks, but also the Portland trailblazers, philanthropists guy who did things the right way when power. So many in, as I said on my Grandpa's, he changed at life trajectory of so many people not just from a financial standpoint, but by providing resources to throw their countries providing resources for for the government to research, coral, reefs for the government to research different medicines and just continuing to try to figure out ways to make the world a better place. So he's someone who will be missed now we in the Pacific northwest, not only for the Portland trailblazers, community franchise, the Seattle Seahawks committee franchise, but the world. Are you talking about a man who made a difference in left the world better than it was when..

NBA Los Angeles Lakers Koby Donovan Donovan Mitchell Seahawks Chris Middleton Janas Portland Hockey Pacific northwest Kimball Walker Gil Paul Allen Eric Bledsoe Seattle Dickerson Tatum Terry Rozier one hour
"relook" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"What's that was the coolest thing in the world. Oh, my God. Yeah. Wait and a platform to jump onto it. It was just floating in the middle of lettuce flag. It It was was like, like. in-flight will. Trump'll in and out. Jump in jump of, and then there was. Yeah, canoes kayaks. But the thing is the kids of the the learned often anymore to do any of that stuff. So off time it's just the counselors just bouncing around the Trump lean. Sorry. They didn't care they want to go in. And then there was bikes. There was like there was a nature of only had alarm on A Roberts in it. That was the nature of it was quite limited. I watched a kid. So this kid. He, he had some difficulties and he was stroking the Lama and even look so happy you saw from this number. That sounds so much Mike masturbation took it a real life lava and it was like it was doing real good. All this nice moment. And then I know Kate punched the llama what square in the face, like just punched him and the llama did not see it coming leather Lama when you went down hot and it like couldn't tell the Cato, Viva because he thought he stroked two in really thought it punched sister. Like the signing stories that Lama sent home because he got punched egos sent by the century because he deemed a threat to the kids because he was tack them now because they attack me. Well, tonight there's no evidence that you can do anything, but it's just like all punch. Now you might be angry, send him away. So he lost his job and go punched a sim reason. We have for keeping Guantanamo Bay open them abandoned us. Now we can't let them out. We didn't even with the not terrorists are people who are like, but now they would be the west before, but we've just really fucked. We got our fall, but we got, we got send this llama home. Relook Llamas, then the night. Rob it just rob. It lost his Lama front. I reservoir zip wire is so fucking fund Sarget wasting autistic children, but very good. Really? None of them what's going, but what's yeah, they didn't going this of heights. But some of the younger ones, the. It was great. Yeah, you just holding onto these strap you into that must've. Yeah. Destruct you know, making just hold on. And whilst we do there was like giant Jenga stuff phone with Diablo. The thing I learnt on the. The two sticks in the string, and then the Spinney thing that does on the string. Skua data. It's like a circus. He think it's like a circus and you kinda spin it on the string. What do you have the. What are you pass protective for your computer to know how that because you're at home alone. I mean with. What I know. I'm going to ask your pets look up the blow. Are you looking up. That's a good second structure yet. Is like. Yeah, it's not thing. Yeah, it's fun to six. All those on the string..

Lama Mike masturbation Sarget Guantanamo Bay Trump Relook Llamas Rob Diablo Spinney Kate Viva
Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

20:33 min | 2 years ago

Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

"Network. Hi, I'm Vivian Williams for the mayo clinic news network, opioids continue to be in the news. A mayo clinic study found that despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients. The research published in the b. m. j. shows that opioid prescription rates have remained flat for commercially insured patients over the past decade rates. For some Medicare patients are leveling but remain above where they were ten years ago. Dr. Jeffrey Molly is the lead author of the study and scientific director of the mayo clinic division of emergency medicine research. He says the data suggests not much has changed in prescription opioid use since about five years ago. Now based on historical trends of opioid use pain medicine specialist. Dr. Michael Hooton says, there are Maine's an unmet patient need to better target the use of prescription, opioids. Leads the centers for disease control and prevention has previously reported that opioid prescription in the US has increased dramatically from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand ten mayo clinic is broadly researching opioid prescribing practices to find ideal doses for individual patient needs. The researchers say the goal is to achieve the best possible patient outcomes and experience with minimal exposure to opioids. This research has been translated into opioid prescribing guidelines, tools for medical practices at mayo and beyond. And in other news, what you might call the dog days of summer, maybe something more menacing for a person prone to migraines. So how and why does summer weather sometimes trigger these headaches? That's a great question. Says Dr. Rush me, hawker sing, a mayo clinic neurologist. She says that patients ask her that all the time and there's just not a great answer for some people. Extreme weather conditions may cause imbalances in brain chemicals. Which eventually can lead to severe throbbing pain of a migraine. Sunlight could also be a trigger and other weather triggers include high humidity, extreme heat and dry air. Dr. Hucker cing says, these conditions may lead to another migraine creator dehydration. Lots of people forget to drink enough during hot weather and dehydration concert, be risk for migraine attacks to happen. Her advice to people with migraines is to avoid extremes in summer weather and everyday schedules. She also says to be consistent with your eating habits and your sleeping habits, the mayo clinic news network. I'm Vivian Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom jive and I'm Tracy McCray for teenagers issues like peer pressure, academic expectations, and changing bodies. You're going through that right now or at your. It was a long time ago that I was a teenager Dr side. Thank you. All those things can cause a lot of ups and downs, highs and lows. But for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings. There is symptom of depression. Depression can affect how your teenager thinks feels and behaves. And in extreme cases it can lead to suicidal thoughts, the centers for disease control and prevention reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people. Age ten to twenty four. Fortunately for most teens, depression symptoms can ease with treatment such as medication and psychological counseling in here, disgust teens in mental health is mayo clinic pediatric psychiatrist, Dr Paul cork and welcome back to the program Dr Croke and it's good to see you glow. Thanks for having me today. Thanks for being here. So Dr, Carr, convince increasing number of suicides in this country has to be of some concern is very concerning and it's it's probably complex causes. It's something that's being as you point out, talked about and written about quite a lot quite often. And it's been been estimated that the the overall rates have nearly doubled less twenty years. Much of that involves teenagers. As you pointed out with young people, it's the second leading cause of death. Sadly there are in the neighborhood of, you know, forty, five thousand completed suicides annual in the US young people account for usually about ten percent of that. So there there's a host of things to think about. And I, I would argue that my field in particular we need to, we need to brace this as maybe failure that we need to relook at things and continue research in ways to do better his problem in the future. So you said suicide rates for teenagers as doubled over the last twenty years. So have the rates of depression doubled as well. That's one of the one of the considerations. The thought is that actually exhibiting depression is increasing as well. But there are other there are other factors to to present a balanced view here. There has been the argument made, perhaps we are just getting better at quantifying and qualifying into things, and we have more mental health professionals. Now, psychiatrist to identify these things. People are talking about mental health as well, and there's hopefully less stigma and people feel feel freer to talk about it as you point out. There's also as far as causes that are driving this potentially. There's been a lot of speculation is life becoming more fast paced and stressful for for teenagers general? Some of us at our age. We have sometimes difficult time wrapping our brain around that. But indeed, if you look at look at some of the things that are going on in the challenges teens face today, it's not. It's not benign another. Another, very very, I would argue poorly understood but important consideration is the internet. Did you. Title social media things like Facebook, Twitter, and the platforms that I don't even know about the using, how does that contribute? I mean, what's the relationship there? Well, the thought the thought there have been there have been studies Dr shops that can that suggest that that more time spent on that thing contributes to depression, but it's probably not that simple. I mean, the arguments been made, and this has been looked at that overall. Maybe maybe teenagers into some extent, adults are spending more and more time on these platforms with these technologies and overall feeling less connected in the genuine face to face empathic sort of fashion. The other pernicious aspect of these technologies. Something that I see in my day to day practice often is that there's a fair amount of negative behaviors broadly describe it that there's what's called cyber bullying. It's rampant with a lot of the lot of the young people that I work with and it some thought that there's been some suggestion that it the effects of this may be more. More lasting severe than face to face based face bowling, for example. So Dr shaves alluded to the fact. I've got two teenagers at my house, so I'm gonna ask a question and went to expect a choir of angels to start to rise up around me as I ask it, how can apparent distinguish normal teen moods, team behavior swings from signs of depression hut. Can you tell the difference? It's a great question and it's a, it's a deceptively simple to in that as you point out teens in general, have a host of neurologic integral suck logic changes because can bring his getting up and can contribute to meeting us and predictably. They tend to think that moms dads are less interesting to be around in the less at this age. Can you imagine didn't happen? I'm sure I know that's why I'm so confused by it, but getting on getting more on point with your question, pervasive changes in what you could you could refer to personality, so dark, dark, irritable moods that are there. All day long day after day after day that are per she added in more than one environment. So if there's feedback from teachers, schools, sports teams, the, you know, Joey, your Sally is just not not the same as they were before declining functioning academics is a as usually big telltale sign that previously a or b students suddenly see your or student changes in peer groups, changes in behaviors, changes in sleeping patterns, and then a focus on dark kind of things. Thoughts are or talk about suicide, for example. And the again, a related question I think would be, what do you do about these these various social media platforms and internet use? And that's another another thing I think broadly, did you stay engaged with your your children and it's not easy in teenagers. A couple of things I wanted to ask you about first of all access. I mean, there are so many more people who seem to be depressed, isn't access to a mental health prof. National more difficult because there are more so many more people out there and not enough of you. And I think the second part of that question is even if you are pretty certain that your child is is depressed. There's concern about how effective the treatment is in what the treatments going to pay. Those are great questions, and the short answer you're absolutely right on the first count that access is to mental health professionals. Psychiatry in particular is not not at all what it should be, and it's even more problematic for young people collectively, we are trying to address that. No mayo clinic is led the way things, for example, that are called collaborative care models or integrative behavioral health where we actually do things like we embed psychiatrist within a large network of primary care clinics for very different kind of role than what we're used to. It's more of a role of supervision coaching consultation on cases, so that family practice doctors, Tournus and pediatricians, for example, get more more depth and more comfortable with. Treating identifying treating things like depression, anxiety, youngster teenager, good things. All good. And to get your to get your other question identification and the definition diagnosis of this is challenging and for parents, it's often the way we do. This is often hard to understand in that we don't, you know, it's based on interviews and questions. There's no lab test or x Ray for this, but ongoing monitoring in mild cases, watchful waiting is appropriate where, again, parents and teachers have awareness. We do very simple, but important things like help youth structure, their sleep hygiene, their habits, their study patterns. But overall, if if symptoms are moderate to severe, they're impeding functioning and academic social and family treatment is important in the first. The first line for depression is usually a combination of psychotherapy, things like cognitive behavioral therapy or what's called interpersonal therapy and the judicious use of medications, and how can parents support thirteen. NHS ongoing communication about about their life in general encouragement, sometimes reminders to to take care of their health overall and setting that example as well making time for family dinner every day, those kind of things. And if parents think it is an emergency, they should call nine one one. Well, unfortunately, depression in suicides in America and including among teenagers is on the rise. It's important though to if there is a problem to get access to mental health care, even though it may be difficult and you've got some effective treatments. Exactly. We've been talking about teenagers and mental health when mayo clinic pediatrics, Kaya trysts are all Corcoran Dr. Clarkin thanks for being with us. Thank you decker shaft. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we'll look at some new research on diet and dementia. You're listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom shy and I'm Tracy McCray Tracy. We know that a diet that's filled with fruits and vegetables is good for waistline, but it's proving to be good for our brain as well. A recent study published in the journal of Alzheimer's disease showed that people with normal cognitive function who followed a Mediterranean diet had lower amyloid deposits in the brain. As we've learned before on this program, amyloid deposits in the brain are one hallmark of Alzheimer's disease in here to discuss is the lead author of the paper, mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr, Maria vassal, Laki, welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. That was pretty, you're Greek is pretty good. Thank you. I assume you are Dr Solanki. Great to have you with us. I, you know, I married into a great family, and so I set nice people. We have. So what's good for the body is good for the brain? Is that what we're saying? This is what we think that is accumulating evidence suggesting that died has been officially fact for the brain to and for against the climb. The my says, well, although we don't have definite evidence for that, but that is good body of literature supporting that. Is that what prompted you to the study? Yes. In the mayo clinic study of aging, we are studying cognitive decline and also by Marcus of Alzheimer's disease. So one of them would be the the position in the brain, and we had this cons and the date do study that inside of the association with diet. So when we talk about amyloid deposition in the brain amyloid is a as I recall, it's been a while protein, right? Yes. And we knew from autopsy studies that patients who had Alzheimer's disease before they died, had these deposits amyloid for whatever reason, there's an association between the two. And now if I'm correct, we can actually. Detect those amyloid deposits under numerous Gan, correct. We, we detect them in, for example, in pets can so we introduce some only gives through the blood and they go and highlight areas of the position. So we have the scans and we know the as where we have elevated amused and you said that you studied people with normal cognitive function. So how do you determine if someone buddies brain is normal and they can be in the study? So in them out participants in the mayo, Cain, excite the venting. They go a very comprehensive competition with nine defense near psychological tests, and then they are evaluated by physi- centers. Well, we also take information by informant the partner. So we have a lot of information. And then by consensus, we gather all the information and the nurse that helped the the coordinator, the physician and the psychologists, they decide based on data that we have. Whether someone would be within the normal function range or someone would have a little more cognitive decline than than we would expect for their age or whether someone would being the dementia, what was the age? They average age of this today participants. So for this Pacific style, the was seventy years and older. So the me Nate is about seventy eight years old fifty, five percent of them were men and what do the studies show ultimately? So we asked them about their eating habits. They last twelve months. So the head Thuan cer- about one hundred and twenty eight different questions on the food groups that they think that the amount and also how often they would. And we found that vein vigils were falling closer, the Mediterranean diet, and those that had the higher Sam shown of vegetables were less likely to have elevated levels of amyloid position in the brain. Now we have to point out that this is a. Sectional study in our terminology, which means this is like a photograph. We don't have the dimension of time, so we don't know what came first and what game second. So as we say in our area of research, we cannot assess the Kazadi between the two. However, we, this is information that supports previous information that we know that that has been officially fact. There's also the possibility that another factor could be in place that we haven't measured that we don't know about yet, but this is a first sign that our study showed supporting evidence of beneficial association. We all talked about it and we've talked about it on this program, but refresh our memories of regard to the Mediterranean diet. We know that it's mostly fruits and vegetables, but what what can't you eat or shouldn't you eat if you're on that diet? So it's it's a very colorful diet. It's high consumption. Oh fruits and vegetables, legumes nuts, also moderate to high consumption face less consumption of meat and saturated fats and more fat in the in terms of olive oil are consumed in the diet. Also, there is optional. Moderate use of alcohol is well mainly wine. And usually it happens in social occasions where it was wine on the list or not on the list. Why was on the list for them died when we started status the nineteen sixties. Now, alcohol is is optional in a way because for some of the conditions, we should not drink. It's very, there's incredible if we cannot control the amount of wine. So it's really optional. All right. The question is people who followed this diet for their entire life. People who live in the Mediterranean, I guess, do they have a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease than we have? I don't. Don't have a definite answer that as far as research is concerned, very rigorous clinical trials research. So we don't have definite evidence to suggest dietary interventions in our life. Today we have though a big amount of survey tional data in some clinical trials that would support that good violence died like the Mediterranean diet, but also other diets like the dash diet or the mind. Diet were societas with slower cognitive decline. Certain familiar with either one of those, the dash and the what was the other. Mind so that does diet. These, they enter approaches to stop hypertension and the mind is Mediterranean dash interventions for new the generative delay. So haven't studied this. Are you pretty much convinced that murder? Mediterranean diet is a good idea not just before overall health, but also to prevent cognitive decline. Are you convinced? I think we need to learn much more, but with we have enough to follow the advice of the gates now to have a good balance, healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet, but that is one of them. The good thing is that although we don't have any new commendation based on this data, and although we said it's like a photo Akra sectionals Patty, it adds an additional motivation that what is good for my general health. What is good for my cardiovascular can support my brain health, and that can happen directly may be. Through defense mechanisms or indirectly, supporting my cat. Vascular system puts also would be very important for brain health and dimensions. What's next in your research? So what we would like to do and other sets us also doing is to follow people onto the to see whether we follow the Mediterranean diet or any other beneficial diet pattern, whether changes in our bio markets in the brain. I'm for example or changes in our coq nation, beneficial changes associated with a good balanced diet. We've been discussing how diet may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and dementia with mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr. Maria vessel Ocoee. Thanks for joining us Dr. Bustle Ocoee. Thank you for having me, and that's our program for this week. Find more information on the mayo clinic news network to this, your health and medicine questions. Anytime at hashtag Mayo Clinic Radio, you've been listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network producer for the program, Jennifer. Era for Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom. I'm Tracy McCray. Thanks for joining us. Any medical information conveyed during this program is not intended as a substitute for personal medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting healthcare professionals for more information. Please go to our website, radio dot, mayoclinic dot org. Please join us each week on this station for more of the medical information you want from mayo clinic specialists. No.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Radio Depression Alzheimer's Disease United States Migraine Dr Tom Jive Vivian Williams Tracy Mccray Opioid Abuse Maine Dr Side Medicare Dr. Hucker Cing Dr Shaves Dr. Michael Hooton B. M. Maria Vassal
"relook" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Calcutta meltzer macau gut relooked like a third world country we got all those people we got beggars in two blocks in the middle of the day yeah i wonder how much of that is job related or policy because we have the lowest unemployment and wages have gone pretty high recently isn't that correct though that is not correct average wages of knock on a very much at all on the i'm thinking about the wages here in san francisco we're talking about san francisco but across the country it hasn't that's correct at the wages in san francisco haven't gone up if you are worker for the hilton got if you if you are an engineer for google doing well but if you're but if you are you know if you're schoolteacher police person yeah fire person a nurse you know which is off of the nurses are often on strike might be sideways sideways and you know and we do have even in the most wonderful professions enormous troubles with alcoholism and drug abuse burnout physician burnout if your listeners do a little search term physician burnout crazy it's horrible if they look up one of the my favorite new york times articles when are the fifth i think it was the fifth most downloaded article last year the lawyer comma the addict all my god that was crazy it was a wilson sensini lawyer who was addicted to heroin or something he was he was a dicta all kinds of drugs and he died from an infection by the way i know his widow actually is a freelance writer for stanford one point so i know her personally and he has his try this is a person who's obviously six figure compensation trying to keep up correct and and by the way when she is now writing a book because when you do the fifth of those downloaded story.

san francisco engineer google writer stanford Calcutta new york times heroin
"relook" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

"Why are we teaching them something the money needs to be on them wasting time and rotting away everywhere thinking about relooking at the war on drugs than we need to start looking at what the world drugs has done to this country and that i specifically will focus on the black but over all all the alphabet agencies is giving us all the increase government is spending year to year over and over like there's a lot of infliction upon our country all you want but at the end of the day it's coming out of your pockets to paint all of this stuff and on display you can sit in wag your finger all you want guess saucy last week when i pointed out how had immigration don't lead to the drugs going into the black community a lot of conservatives guy real real real saucy you know what i'm saying because now the sun was somebody point yoshito you got a problem with it no i'm gonna keep on point shit out you don't get all and so you realize what's wrong with your party in first place so let's go ahead and go to our story for this segment before we go on all call two stories as we know politics because like i said we get them address in the culture we all remember the aspiring black woman by the name of rachel does all right and i describe her as as that not because she was black because she was the spiring be black firings thinner like receiving a bachelor's degree so last week after an extensive investigation into our finances she's being suspected of nine thousand dollars welfare fraud in could be facing fifteen years in prison now i don't wanna see anyone like that but on the brighter side of things i think she may have just earned her degree in your ears white people negro city l.

rachel fraud nine thousand dollars fifteen years
Russian billionaire Abramovich gets Israeli citizenship

BBC World Service

01:55 min | 3 years ago

Russian billionaire Abramovich gets Israeli citizenship

"Finding it they managed to search hundred thousand square kilometers in in just three months whereas the previous search search near a little bit larger than that but over a period of two years so they cover more ground they say that there are work very well and extremely challenging conditions both highseas and and very mountainous terrain on the seabed where they looked but they clearly looking in the wrong area and it simply opens up even more the mystery surrounding what happened particularly the end of an h three seventy there are conflicting theories about whether the plane was under the control of the pilots and might have glided along way or whether he fluid until he either lost consciousness or ran out of fuel and it plunged into the sea and the difference in those theories makes a huge difference in the areas that people can look so the possibility and many people have threes there are other areas close to the ones where where they've been looking where it could still be located and while the malaysian government has said for now will not renew the contract it has with ocean infinity and remember this is a no find no fee contracts the company doesn't get paid and it finds the wreckage they haven't they're not renewing that for the moment but this is a new government in malaysia they pledged to relook at the way in which m h three seventy was handled to publish for the first time and absolutely full report into their own handling of that of that accident and that disappearance and that in that sense they still the option being left open their that new evidence new thinking could restart research search at some stage in the future southeast asia correspondent jonathan head now some of the day's other stories with gareth raymond abramovich the russian billionaire and owner of chelsea football club has flown to tel aviv to take up israeli citizenship tom bateman reports the chelsea owner has reportedly been given an identity card under the lure of return which allows jews to become citizens of israel the chelsea owner worth a reported twelve and.

Malaysian Government Malaysia Chelsea Football Club Tom Bateman Asia Jonathan Head Gareth Raymond Abramovich Tel Aviv Chelsea Israel Hundred Thousand Square Kilome Three Months Two Years
"relook" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"A better deal that would be huge i think also we need a win on nafta and we need a win on some of these other trade arrangements in other words i think americans are very pleased with the disruption that trump has brought on some key issues because they feel those issues needed attention and a relook but now i think he between now and november he will need to win on one of those and then i think honestly you you may be i think we might all be surprised by turnout among republicans which is a very big issue a very big topic of conversation because it's been actually better than expected and some recent primaries and also about how well the republicans do i mentioned the blue wave which has been a wonderful fundraising for the democrats for a year but we see now that the democrats had a very poor april fundraising and the republicans had a good month and so in anticipation of the this generic poll switch the money's drying up for the democrats the blue wave is temporarily on the beach temporarily lists and that's all we can say next week it could go in another direction shows six seventy k b o but can't take your radio with you everywhere head to oh dot com.

six seventy k
"relook" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on The Canon

"Well that his affection for characters archetype would be perfect iran she's not relieving writing characters as much as idea writing ideas brought a bogey i mean you know you can just a complete opposite movie from this thing is our daily bread which is a king beater movie which is just you know about the about the working man but cable line to do the howard rock part and i feel like he he would have definitely made it but i think he also has that composer when you imagine the way that he plays saving and gone with the wind like scarlet hair can yell anything at him she can throw anything at him and he will stand sturdy knowing what he is in who we want the i that it did not know that an relooking at the movie you know i was definitely thinking of cain but for the cooper o'neil stuff sometimes i was thinking of written scarlet there is that you know she is scarlett o'hara esque in the fact that she's she is cheese bouncing all over the place and she's neurotic and she's full of energy and cheese you know and that that definitely the you know the love scene feels like the scarlet scarlet rhett love scene where that's as they you know they're fighting and hitting each other and you know you know she even won't points whips him whips him in the face and then they wind up you know they wind up getting it on it is steaming steamy steaming this movie i was wondering watching their love scenes oh this is maybe why paul ryan has a thing for it because there's writing crops and fossey women and dominatrix sex it away like this very this it's it's very sexual for code film although they actually we're kind of find with what iran i think called like in engraved invitation rape is her way of phrasing the love scene between petitio neil in gary cooper.

cain paul ryan iran rape gary cooper scarlett o'hara
"relook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At this time in kennedy with your wonderful summation of maurice shelves work with the economic outlook he drives at ford with an oped in the f t which is basically simon a primer on trade deficit trade surplus economics is anybody at the white house reading maurice sold well i'm sure they are the us treasury there's an interesting back and forth in washington between steven mnuchin the treasury secretary and the math about just what the imf should be relooking at and the i'm telling the us that kind of work through multilateral way and the us firing about the imf needs to step up it was kind of a weekend in which everyone was trying to find allies for this this discussion outreach in the corridors dr franco when you look at the what was the overall fearing was exactly this where people were kind of angling to know how they could counter any protectionist measures but will it die down in the end will we see kind of the cool heads of globalization or at least economy prevail or could he get messy hope they will prevail because normally under normal circumstances if i just showed you the non bills growth is good economic performance reasonably well labor markets operate even inflation moves towards the targets and people are worried and why the main reason today is the dangerous from protectionism not only because protectionism is a bad thing not only because of the fact that in an interconnected world protectionism means let's cut the veins and it's dangerous but also a new element came in the discussion which is investors are now slowing down they say there is a lot of uncertainty how will it resolve so beyond the trade it is uncertainty that holds investment and without investment we will not have growth and what we see now maybe temporary so i really hope that all of this is reflections of some negotiating tactics rather than a strategy of cutting the veins i mean it certainly seems that the finance ministers central bankers that we spoke to her so acutely aware of this concern that they would try maybe mitigate.

kennedy ford white house maurice us steven mnuchin imf treasury washington dr franco
Amazon profit more than doubles

Protect Your Assets with David Hollander

02:13 min | 3 years ago

Amazon profit more than doubles

"For the week the dow was off one hundred and fifty one points i was clearly the big loser for the week sap five hundred down point two three percent not a big deal the nasdaq was off point three seven again not a big deal and this was partly driven by some good news from the tech stocks that have been kind of language and we had amazon you've probably all heard the big news about amazon they had amazing prophets in fact their profits doubled i mean that's incredible new revenues just continue to accelerate the stock just for the week was up three point six percent it hit an all time high people i mean they say well they're starting to raise the price of prime those greedy anyway twenty percent or something you know they didn't raise razor for students anyway that's a good good deal but you know what i'm gonna pay twenty bucks more for my prime i like it so i'm sure it was the same thing they got us hooked that's what's happening there anyway there was some good news there and then also some real good news with the economy the economy first quarter rose two point three percent and people started asking why are you worried this time for a recession should we be getting out of the stock market right now and i dug into my little bag of tricks yesterday met with dr stephen lee we talked about this issue and he put together his the economic outlook he's an economist and anyway he says there's no recession coming not let me explain his reasoning we go back and relook look at charts and so we were looking at nineteen sixty eight and in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight what he uses it he uses the ten year treasury minors the one year treasury to see what the yield is the yield get closer or negative ben he says that's going to be a recession so he graph this out for me we're looking at nineteen sixty eight it looks like and there was a false warning but then nineteen seventy there was a recession you had one in seventy five eighty nine hundred ninety nine as we all know through two thousand and then of course two thousand seven i remember two thousand seven two thousand eight where we have the big sell off so all right nine actually right so these were these were what was going.

Amazon Dr Stephen Lee Two Three Percent Twenty Percent Three Percent Six Percent One Year Ten Year
"relook" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Always looking for data that's and we've allowed them that we've invited them into our lives and said look we want what you have for free and in exchange will be the bait fish so you can go out and catch other things but we get to use your product for free my issue is the way that they've gone about handling some of this not keeping a tight ship on some of the groups are worth working with and for pretending like none of this stuff happened that's the issue i have other people they are we don't want our our our data collected that's fine i get that there's ways of of of at least reducing it but you're not going to get rid of it one hundred percent unless you get rid of all of your social media and you're gonna go completely if you will just off the grid i still don't think they get it i still think that there's an arrogance that somehow this was okay i mean the initial response was one of the worst responses on the history of modern day crisis management i mean it was terrible is what it is i i it's just you be asked about it it's always the cover up that's the issue i think a lot of people have more so than whether or not they they did anything wrong because we know there right now if you've got facebook on your phone if you've got facebook anywhere they're gathering data on you they're gathering data on you period is social media platform companies have said they have no responsibility for any of the content i think we have to relook at that i think in many ways for media companies i think we have to relook at the fact that if if you move from one company to another maybe you should be able to move all your data yeah i don't know how much you look if you give people free platform people are gonna post thanks that's it in the country of freedom that we have here people will post stuff that's bs and lies and i don't think it's facebook that should be policing it you've got a police yourself right if you're mainly educated meaning your your education comes at a headline or meam and that's all you know about something that's on you that's that's one hundred percent that's not on me zay body else if.

facebook relook one hundred percent
"relook" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"There's substantial improvement in his career so you would hope that as a sign of him becoming an nfl quarterback of becoming a solid quarterback his completion percentage last year was fantastic his quarterback rating was great so these are things that you hope he can carry over into denver and then the guy like they're able they're able to have the freedom to extend dt von miller steps up to the plate and restructures his deal into more of a signing bonus which frees up more money now so that the broncos can have a little more freedom to do things as well i think the team is positioning themselves well so that it doesn't have to be a complete rebuild they can be competitive this next year who were the who's left for them to go sign that's that's a good question because there's not a whole lot i don't know there's a whole lot that is worth really throwing a lot of money out there after so gosh i would have to relook at my i i kind of put together a list a couple of months ago who i think they should sign and i don't have it with me i apologize but i think you know i was looking at defensive backs for a while there at the guy that they signed ho whatever let's see you know maybe that's a good addition i don't know a ton about him but i still would like to see if there's any decent linemen out there that they can bring in now last year they did that i don't know maybe the jury is still out on that maybe it still hasn't worked out great blue ronald leary was yes no that was amazing mistake correct.

denver broncos nfl relook ronald leary
"relook" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Fifteen if this time next year you make a relook the decision and if you feel stock still this time next year yeah take some of that money pens dead off but i think you're going to be so far along on paying it off the and so confident that you're going to knock it out without touching at that then you'll make the decision to roll it okay they say one yeah but i went holding a long winter roaming it doesn't matter where you want to do it but but backed up the point being let's get let's get your confidence in the numbers and in the traction and the progress that you're having towards the debt reduction before we make the decision to either cash or rollet it that sounds good and if this if that's eight months if that's 12 months it's not a magic number but i'm looking for a nerve you got your feet under your long enough that you go i can do this race yeah that's all i want to have your on target you're going to do a whole lot better than you thought here's your rock in it i mean you're eighty thousand a year you got control your own target you know what you do when you're making your money by five i mean you you're gonna win our cia iran i'm really excited about being smart with my money and didn't get free eventually it's my goal to were excited for your we're proud for you good job well done opens homes at triple eight eight two five five two two five greg is on facebook pieces davis i got i term life insurance policy what happens at the end of the term does coverage cease yes.

iran cia facebook time target life insurance policy
"relook" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Down the bat and he'll river and even in august it is like ice cold and it yeah but we would like a four hour trip down the river and we were all kind of a little grumpy and stuff and just to make things worse my husband put his hand down in the rocks because of low water and old lo and behold picks his hand up in the ring is gone so i guess from his your hand shrinking and everything you know from the cold water he lost his ring down there in the baton phil look for yeah really couldn't you're moving with the water there's really no way to turn back in and try to go back so it was just too you know one of those things he's like well i'm it's gone so i went in bottom another one you know and and i also bought him a silicone range so that way when we do stuff like that go swimming or do tubing he could put the fifteen dollars silicone wedding ring non and not have to worry about losing the expensive remember to switch drones while we have well i just gave them the silicone one for christmas though we haven't been in warm weather warm water yet to try it out silicone relooking doesn't look like they have a little different kind you can get one better like tam all one cetering braved ones that are like greyblue you know a whole different colors and they're really inexpensive this is a good solution razor dumb journalist we know them like looking at it with a home own it shows that you're taking shows you are off the market i've never it by the way i notice after i got married and had was wearing a ring i was never more attractive to women is then the seinfeld oh i don't know is a man it is the true i guess i people look at me and they assume young prescreened death your acceptable zimei to somebody to somebody her all right surely thanks for your call we're talking about lost wedding rings because this story was throwing a news story per se.

christmas phil fifteen dollars four hour
"relook" Discussed on The Ross Report

The Ross Report

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"relook" Discussed on The Ross Report

"Lawyer relooking four is a price it actually means something introducing true price from true car now you can know exactly what you'll pay for the car that you want including fees and accessories before you even get to the dealership i was not at that info as costa true car dealers will show you the true price on cars like the one you want all from the comfort of home and how do you know if you're through price is a great price because true car shows you what other people paid for the same car that you want end your certified dealers no this so there truth priced competitively so that they can win your business in other words make you the best deal so one you're ready to buy a new or a used car ladies and gentleman it's really simple visit true car to enjoy a more confident har buying experience what so you dean well us on features are not available in all states thank god jin is high i'm dini ruth host of realgm radio where every week i go in depth on passed the ball through conversations with some of the brightest while minds out there including kevin peltonen nate duncan chris harrington bonn tents and team experts from all around the world we try to separate the truth from the noise for players teams in nba draft prospect of like with the focus on the basketball itself if you wanna know what is coming next in the nba and why there's no better place to turn then the weekly episodes of realgm ruble you can find us exclusively at podcast one sports dot com or the new podcast one out and don't forget to subscribe rate in review on apple podcast art books avoid welcome ron harrison broadcaster i won't tell you that i appreciate all of you they're going to apple podcast and subscribing to our show you are aware that the caution nothing but it helps us immensely.

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"relook" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

Ross Tucker Football Podcast

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Ross Tucker Football Podcast

"So then after that how long room relooking and is there any chance that he somehow able to play the first six games last year like this year like whatever brady did a couple of years ago tell me here's what we have okay the appeal process is finalized and then you have to look at the port process and remember what the nfl did two years ago as soon as he appeal was decided they knew litigation was coming so they rush to court on favorable territory for the nfl and they filed their lawsuit to uphold the suspensions and it took a year for it all to get sorted out and then the interim the judge allowed tom brady to play and it's been what eight nine years ago remember star catholic having a pat williams did they would be suspended under the pa deep policy for taking it over the counter substance that ended up being like with a prescription dire rettig and they fought that and they all them if they lost but they delayed the suspensions for a couple of years in fact pat williams was tired by the time the suspension took four so even though elliott may eventually have to serve whatever the final result of the internal appeal is whether it's six games fourgames whatever there is a chance that he goes to court with ultimately a losing your case but he can be available for all of two thousand seventeen he'll at some point the cowboys had to make a strategic decision as to whether or not they just too soon miss the get is missing now missing this year and let's worry about you know what we can do without him for six games and then at least we know next year we don't have this hanging over.

nfl tom brady pat williams elliott eight nine years two years
"relook" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"relook" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"As always to be with you will hear till midnight three full hour got a bunch of shows as leverage aama excited about but that is kick off his show i thought would be hadn't had him on a while my good friend and a lot of time sms adversary barring but embody on the on the radio here rpg sit in feld pg welcome the show rocket is always good at join you at the generosity of your offer tonight that you are actually going to join me in helping solve the democratic party's woes and bring us back to prominence once the orasje because i talk about that all the time on air and i see you resale apiece in the washington post which i read your eta eight points data helped the democrat party in in a lot of them i i i agree with a lot of them because i preach a lot about only here on the show i talk about it will get into him here but there's a lot of atlanta common ground there it's so knowing what the issue is now trying to deliver that xi's you say that because a lot of these i think the most sort of issuebased one i said was i think we need to relook i i wish this had happened but donald trump to more voters in more states that added up two more points in the electoral college moreover all votes in the electoral royal college he claimed the mantle economic populism i thinks that was the main issue on but actually thought i would start with the one that i thought you might in some ways appreciate most all actually just read this from a lot they're going number eight we as democrats i've got my list ankara you tell me what's going to bring us back to the promised land is as we absolutely cannot be contemptuous or condescending or look down on voters who we don't want who don't one hundred percent agree with us yes i think it's fair to expect that some candidates hold certain values but we should not be applying purity test to the voters if a voter has a sincerelyheld belief on a given issue we should not and cannot afford to be dismissive i've said my piece the.

democrat party donald trump electoral college electoral royal college washington atlanta one hundred percent