17 Burst results for "Reinhold Messner"

"reinhold messner" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

06:31 min | 2 months ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"What's that going to look like in the future? Because if you're Oregon or you're Washington and you can be a part of a PAC ten that still has access to the playoff. That's not a bad deal because all of a sudden you look around USC is gone. UCLA, at least a decent program they're gone. So it's pretty much Oregon and Washington in terms of football powers. Everyone say hello to the train on some of the wow. I was like, what is that? This is actually, so finkelstein and I have been doing these weekly shows on the YouTube channel. And as I was opening the show yesterday, the train whistle blew like anyway, it's amazing. Great, but no, I would say that has should play a factor in it. If you're Oregon or Washington and you're thinking about, all right, what can we do to position ourselves better? Well, let's maybe take a step back here, get a better sense of what the playoff is going to look like because if we're still going to have access as a quote unquote power conference to whatever the college football playoff looks like in the future, that's not a bad deal because it's you two and the 8 dwarfs left from a football standpoint. And that would be a pretty sweet deal as a coach of one of those two programs to have access to the college football playoff. We got a few music ones interspersed through here, so I'll take this first and I'll be quick on it Russell Bowman asks, I need Matt norland is full breakdown of the four Ben folds 5 studio albums from breast to worst. I will give you this. I'm not gonna do full breakdown. We gotta keep this thing moving along. But if you're unfamiliar with Ben folds 5 breakout hit in the 90s with brick, but that wouldn't make my top 25 unfolds 5 songs. Whatever and ever Ahmed is my number one. Although that probably changed in recent years because for a good 15 years, the unauthorized biography of reinhold messner was my favorite folds 5 record. That is now number two. The self titled album, which was their debut, would be number three, and then they had a record come out. They went on hiatus and they got back together and they did a crowdfunded studio album, the sound of the life of the mine which came out in 2012, that record's almost ten years old. Are you kidding me? That would be a strong four. These are really four really good records. If you are unfamiliar with Ben folds 5, they were the 90s were an amazing time people because different bands and different artists with different compositions and like Ben folds 5 maybe they don't have a guitar player. They were base piano drums, three piece. That's it. A three piece without a guitar player became a viable pop rock act in the 90s, incredible. Favorite song, selfless cold and compose, Kate, don't change your plans. Jane, battle of who could care less, where some are B, Jackson cannery, sky high. Those are some of my favorite Ben folds 5 songs. Before we go to the next question, any bench poles 5 fandom whatsoever in new David Cobb. No, I wasn't listening. What did you just say? Okay, there we go. I need to know. Next question. Cody Marvin asks, what's the floor for Anthony grant's sophomore crew and Dayton? Seems like they're bound to make a big jump with everyone back. Well, they got a pretty good floor. If you're unfamiliar with the flyers, let's get into a little bit of the niche here. Daron Holmes back, tomani Kamara back, malachi Smith. Not the malachi Smith. At Gonzaga, different one. Kobe Elvis, one of the top ten names in the sport. The flyers are going to bring back a higher percentage of their minutes than a lot of other NCAA tournament contenders. And it seems like it's going to be a one two with St. Louis and Dayton for top billing in the a ten. I haven't I have not yet done my rankings on face value. I think I think I would lean slew over date, but it'll probably be close. Now remember, like I say, Dayton should project us and then simply tournament team, there have been plenty of instances over the past 6, 7, 8 years where teams projected to be top two in the a ten going into a season and seem semi safe as NCAA tournament contenders. They wound up falling short of that going to the NIT or worse. So that has to be on the table because that has actually been something of a pattern in that league. But my blind projection on the flyers is, I don't know, I'll say, I'll say the Dayton gets an 11 seed, 2023 NCAA tournament, any thoughts on Anthony grant's flyers, mister Cobb. Yeah, so actually deron Holmes and malachi Smith were two players that kept coming up when I was doing the frosh watch this past season, which is a weekly ranking of the top ten freshmen in the sport. They were on the fringe for a good part of the season. I don't know that either one of them ever cracked the ranking on a given week, but I know Holmes was right there and consideration almost every week. Malachi Smith, great year as well. So one, it's awesome to see a quote unquote mid major, keep the majority of its roster intact in the transfer portal era. That's warms my heart. Then if the question is floor, I would say, you know, they were 24 and 11 last year, you know? So floor, 20 wins. Which is a pretty doggone good floor. But ceiling, I mean, 6 or 7 seed in the NCAA tournament with a chance to make a run through the first weekend. I think that's 6 7. I would say floors NIT. Not that they can't fail to make the NIT just with everything they have coming back. I think that's pretty hard not to not do. Top four nelli, name sounds familiar, asks, why is Gary Paris so scared to put Illinois in his top 25 and one? Is it because the program is already too powerful? And he fears it would become an unstoppable juggernaut with his support. Tom. It's baffling, my man. It's baffling. All right, this question was for GP. GP is not here to defend himself. Isn't that a damn shame? All right, the align I have Matthew Matthew Meyer by a Baylor. Terrence junior via Texas tech. They bring back Coleman Hawkins power forward, RJ Melendez. Illinois has the 9th rank class coming in, led by point guard sky Clark who I can not wait to watch play. Ty Rogers is a top 50 top 75 player power forward combo guard Jayden neps is a four star. They've got enough to consider them top 26 overall. Again, I haven't begun my process of the one to, I mean, are we up to 362, 363 teams? This is insane. Stop adding teams to division one. I hate it. 363 are you kidding me? I gotta do that at some point. I guarantee you I will have Illinois in my top 30 though. They will definitely be in my top 30. I don't know. I think I'll probably put them top 25, I don't know, maybe. Matthew Meyer, I don't know if any of us picked him last week when we did our dribble handoff

Ben folds malachi Smith football Oregon Washington Russell Bowman Matt norland flyers reinhold messner Anthony grant Dayton NCAA Jackson cannery Cody Marvin finkelstein Daron Holmes tomani Kamara Kobe Elvis UCLA USC
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

06:08 min | 10 months ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"In 1986, there was a physicist, Anthony wooldridge, and he was on a charity run and saw what he thought to be a Yeti. He took photos with a small camera, and what's, I think, telling as he took many photos and the creature didn't move at all. And then he said that he also saw footprints leading to it. In the photos, at least that are published. I can't detect the footprints and this creature that was 500 feet away roughly that didn't move. Looks to me like just a clearing in the snow that reveals The Rock underneath that happens to be shaped like. No. Roughly a humanoid figure. So this is another issue we should mention. There's something called pareidolia, which is just basically the human eye and the human brain. Our evolved to together spots animals where there aren't animals, anything that might attack and eat you. So we are prime, that's why we see the face in the neon car. That's why we see Jesus and toast, et cetera. Exactly. And the course I think suggested that it might have been a tree trunk or something like that. To me it looked like a clearing in the snow. And again, to their credit, they have you write what are likely explanations for these various sightings? This was interesting. They talked about reinhold messner. Many mountain climbers revere him as one of the greatest mountain climbers of all time. And he got really into the whole Yeti legend. He went back there multiple times. He's also the record breaker of being on the first team to ever summit Everest without using bottled oxygen to help him get up there. I know, right? Crazy. Don't try this at home in 1978, especially if your home is on Everest. Don't try it there. Well then maybe you're more used to it. All right, well, if you're listening this on Everest, I do want to hear from you. Don't try this on Everest. So he talked to people like he did like a lot of independent research and trying to go back on multiple emissions to see if he could find the Yeti. But he ended up concluding that it was a hybrid of stories about the Himalayan brown bear. Oh, okay. And other species, you know, there's goats. There's other things that people see around there. And also just the kind of tales that get passed on to both scared children and also warn people against getting away from your group when you live in a harsh climate. 'cause I can kill you. So people safe with fear. So yeah, that is kind of the prime suspect for Yeti sightings is the Himalayan brown bear. Okay. This was also another interesting kind of connection to what we were talking about with commercialism. Vladimir donets, again, I could be saying that reports that many Yeti tales and interests in Yeti tourism have been ginned up by Russian marketers trying to increase money invested in the mountain villages of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. He says that at multiple villages like each village was assigned a witness to tell tales to visitors who would come there, like they would try to get wealthy patrons to go visit these towns. Okay. And then they would kind of assign people like, oh, you're gonna be the village tail teller, you know, the mystic and tell them these stories about this creature that has been spotted here. And they would presumably know they were false. Yeah, planted like, hey, this is your job. If anyone comes to the town, you tell them to go speak to the old woman and the building at the top of the hill and she'll tell you the stories. Wow. Yeah, so he kind of exposed this. Nefarious. Yeah, totally. And then he points out the obvious that you would also need to have a breeding population. All right, so that was the Yeti. All right, module 7. El chupacabra. Okay. All right, so I was excited about this one 'cause I remember learning about algebra when I was young and getting books from scholastic about cryptozoological creatures. And it means the goat sucker. Yeah, this is one of the ones that you don't hear about that much. I don't think. I would say it's kind of upper tier cryptos, zoological creature. It's like one of the banner ones, but it's like Pluto. When Pluto is still a planet. We might classify it out of this category, but yeah, I'll chupacabra. Most people know about it. So this one, I think, has a really interesting history behind it, and this course did a good job of bringing that to light. So there were numerous attacks on livestock and they would find the animals with like three puncture wounds in their necks, and then no blood anywhere. So oftentimes, this has been attributed to alien behavior when this kind of thing is found. But guess when the term chupacabra was created to describe one of these attacks? 1982. Oh, very good guess. 1995. Oh, wow. Right. In Puerto Rico. It was by a DJ. So he was the one who said, oh, wow. Chupacabra. 1995. So okay, interesting. Already. 1995, those 12. Okay. I was. You were 13, think? Yeah, I was 13. I'll say in a bit why this really confounds me. But yeah, the first reports came from Puerto Rico in the 90s, but now of course there's been spottings in Chile, Maine, Russia, Philippines, soup copper gets around. Oh yeah, 'cause I do associate it with a Spanish speaking population. That's surprising. Okay. Kind of once it's just in the public consciousness. It can get anywhere. But we haven't talked about its physical features. It's often described as being kind of dog like in shape. Yeah. But often walking on its hind feet. Okay. And having red glowing eyes? Yeah, I picture like a stoned coyote. There you go. Yeah. According to some tales walking on sign feet and often with like spikes on its back. That's another feature that's common to the so does the headache. Depictions. Oh, okay. Scaly skin, long claws. And other reports are just more like, oh, it's all like a dog. Or I just saw something with red eyes, but it all gets kind of looped together. That counts. The first person to have claimed to have seen the creature was Madeleine toleto, a resident in this.

Anthony wooldridge reinhold messner Vladimir donets Tajikistan Kyrgyzstan Puerto Rico Chile Philippines Maine Russia headache Madeleine toleto
"reinhold messner" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"The business. Expo dot com. Well early in my life. My father and i used to hike the appalachian trail. And now i've become a long distance cyclist challenging myself has taught me a lot about who i am. The people i team up with. But i would never imagine doing what my next guest has accomplished. Alison levine is a history making polar explorer and mountaineer. She served a team. Captain of the first american women's everest expedition climbed the highest peak in each continent and skied both north and south poles a feat known as the adventure grand slam which only twenty people in the world have achieved in two thousand eight. She made history as the first american to complete a six hundred mile traverse across west antarctica to the south pole ellison. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you so much for having me well. You've done a lot of things that most of us have never dreamed. But actually you've done one thing that a lot of us have dream. You were the inspiration for a craft. Beer called conquer the route chocolate stout. I want to hear that story. I okay okay okay. So i was the keynote speaker at the craft brewers association annual conference in. I think it was really dc. The dc and there were five thousand craft rules there and so i was on stage. I was telling my story about serving as the team. Captain for the first american women's everest expedition. 'cause there's all kinds of great business lessons you know involved in including everett's you know. There's a lot of parallels between climbing that mountain and a balance that entrepreneurs face every day. And so i told my story on stage in this woman named carol wagner. Who was the owner of a bold missy. Burritos at brand new craft brewery that was opening in charlotte north carolina. She came up to me with her staff and she said we laud your story so much and she said what is your favorite kind of beer. And i said Chocolate stout and she said we're gonna name a beer after you and i said what are you. What are you talking about it. She said all of our ears are need after women who've made history and we want to get a beer after you so it was a conquered. The route chocolates doubt and You i joined. Sally ride zion. Anaya add Some other win They need beers after. But unfortunately oh annie oakley have the beer but unfortunately did not survive the pandemic so the owner carroll wagner has owns all the ip rights to the beers in a names it appears and so she hopefully will do something else with them but pulled missy brewery the actual brewery itself no longer charlotte which is heartbreaking. Hopefully he's got a few cases of it's still stored up. I do it was so good. They used you know organics chocolates. Is you know. They're really into sustainable. Using all ingredients that have been sustainably. sourced Yeah they're they're a great littleborough so sad to see that they didn't make it but i'm hoping that they'll come back at some point. You know. i feel to mention that you are the author. You're mentioning the leadership lessons of the new york times bestselling book on the edge leadership lessons from mount everest and other extreme environments. So i gotta ask you. I was doing a little research. Five foot four. What's a nice jewish girl from arizona. How'd you get involved in mountain climbing extreme sports. It just seems a mismatch right. Okay so as you just shared. I am from arizona and when i was younger. I was always intrigued by the stories of the early arctic. Antarctic explorers the mountaineers now but snell would watch documentary films. I think because it felt like an escape from the oppressive summer heat in phoenix So i it felt like an escape from these places. And so i've read the books and i'd watch the films but i never actually thought i would go to any of those places because i was born with a hole in my heart so long story. Short i. I was diagnosed at age. Seventeen with a whole. My heart. I was i was born with. I had one surgery when i was seventeen. That was not successful. Had another one. When i turn thirty and a few months after that surgery this lightbulb went on my head and i thought okay. I want to know what it's like to be. You know this explorer reinhold messner and drag one hundred fifty pounds sled across the center miles of anarchy guys and i should go to antarctica in do it if i want to know what it feels like diabetes mountaineers going to these remote mountain ranges. I should go to the mountains instead of watching films about them and if he's other guys can can do this stuff then you know. Why can't i do it too. So i climbed my first mountain at age. Thirty to fifty five now and i haven't stopped since it's amazing to me because i've become a long distance cycler but i didn't start until i was fifty seven so it's the same kind of thing but i have to ask you. Do you ever get cold. Because i hate the cold. I get cold all the time. And especially because i. I have something called called raynaud's disease which is a neurological disease that causes the arteries in my fingers and toes to shut down the nerves clamp down on the arteries it in my extremities so it leaves at extremists prospects. So i have to be very very careful in these environments. I use hands all the time. There are days when i'll see people out on the mountain climbing and just been liner gloves. And i've got on big huge down mets a that. It's challenging from an exterior thirty standpoint. But i have to protect my hands and feet when i go to any of these cold place. That's amazing. I've watched all the documentaries. On of course now the ever tourism about people going to ever isn't anything like that or is it totally different when you climb everest. Well i'll tell you. I didn't the crowds on the mountain. Either time when i was there in two thousand and two or in two thousand in two thousand and two. That's when i was served as the team. Captain for the first american women's everest expedition. We got to within two hundred and seventy five from summit and had to turn back because of bad weather took me eight years to get up the gods to go back and try it again. You know and kind of get over that failure but in two thousand and ten. I did not see a lot of crowds on the mountain. Either so i think it's been more recently. There have been more permit that have been issued by the ministry of tourism in nepal. But the problem isn't necessarily the number of permits that what they call a good weather window so there's only certain days that are predicted where the weather's gonna be good and that's when people all choose to go for the summit and there would the crowds have been reported during certain years. It's basically been where there have been fewer good weather windows so fewer opportunities to be able to go for the top where the the weather is going to cooperate. That's part of the problem. But in general. I do think they are issuing too many permits. They need to set a limit on it and keep saying that they will do something to limit the crowds. But they don't seem to be able to actually follow up on that that commitment they need the money in tourism especially now after covance. But i love the story you told during your x speech where someone said. Well you went to everest. But you didn't get to the top choices. I guess she didn't get to the top ever so you can tell a story about being i think. He was at j. P. morgan.

arizona Alison levine eight years carol wagner Seventeen seventeen nepal six hundred mile Anaya Antarctic Thirty fifty seven antarctica two thousand new york charlotte north carolina phoenix one hundred fifty pounds first first mountain
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Life in 16 oz.

Life in 16 oz.

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Life in 16 oz.

"The there's everest the west ridge. Tom horn horns. Can't even remember these last names. And then of course What i i thought was phenomenal was reinhold messner. The crystal horizon. Just there's there's tons of beautiful books. I think one of the guys. Chris boddington did the hard way another great book that i read about. Just it's insane. How these climbers men and women old and young massive groups or solo have taken this the highest mountain in the world. Which last time i checked it. Twenty nine thousand. I dunno twenty nine feet. It might have changed a couple of hundred feet based on how things moving geographical and technology and all that stuff. But what's funny about it is i. Think airliners airliners fly around thirty five thousand feet or something it's It's it's crazy. How close anyway. After reading all that. Of course. I talked to sherry and she got me all like side. So how did she get into this. Why did she want to do it. I guess would be the question. What was your motivation. I think she's a bit of a bucket list person you know. She's i mean she she's seen she's seen the movie. She's read the books and she knows who like for instance scott fischer is who at one. Point was one of the phenomenal guides. That had been doing great stuff in leading think mountain madness was her name expeditions. Up everest and other places for many years in drew a reputation for being a bit of a crazy out going kind of guy and people loved him and he was on that ninety six expedition in he was one of the. The climbs died so she brought his name up but she cherries was mentioning things like a cagua and machu pichu. And i mean it. Sounds like she likes to travel the world and go to interesting places. Climb climb around you know. Just do different. Types of exercises of france sent maratho- half marathons in different countries. So what was funny again. I got way ahead of myself. Talk in his sherry because we were talking the same language when it comes to trying to bag peaks. And i just said well. Just give me a little bit a bit about your philosophy in regards to how you tackle altitudes situation. Obviously we don't live there in that type of Range in and how do you even train to go.

Tom horn reinhold messner Chris boddington west ridge scott fischer sherry france
"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

High Adventure Podcast

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

"After seven hours of trying to climb the chimney section of rock and ice. Maurice tumbled back into his tent. This is where you again recognize. That experience could have made a difference though. The chimney is daunting for novice mountaineers and experienced climber could have climbed the chimney fairly easily in about an hour job but with no crampons no experience a chimney like this would literally be impossible realized he needed help but if he was going to achieve this objective he quickly formed a plan to help him do that. Reading his diary is like reading a story. I want to interact with this character one. Interact with maurice in. Tell him things in warn him. But i'm from his future and sitting here in warm office. Even if i could give him advice from the future. Don't think he'd listened to me. His new plan was returned to camp three rest for a couple of days and convince rinsing to return with him to help him get up the chimney onto camp four. Where from there. He was sure he could reach the summit alone in order to do this. He'd have to backtrack over in dangerous terrain he'd have to navigate the cold war and the snow bridge that so horrified him on the way up. And that's it was still there. If the storage was gone he was trapped. Luckily those seeming much more fragile. The snow bridge was still there as where the steps he cut into the cooper things were again turning his way. Once again ambition determination and faith were carrying him. Twang was still not physically. Able to go on rinsing who had previously climbed up to the twenty seven thousand foot level knew that with the equipment and experience that marie had there was no way that he was going to succeed and he refused to go along. We discussed in episode to the interaction between maurice and the sherpas during his time. Was this blind ambition and selfishness. Was he offering any glory to the shirrefs. Well not really. He wanted help to appoint then. His plan was to surge onto glory alone. Both sheriff has grown up in the region and at high altitude. They're thinking was much clearer than maurice's trying to convince someone that what they're planning is dangerous can be wasted words when the person believes they are safe and protected behind the veil of faith maurice wrote. It's not faith wavers. When it's prayers remain unanswered was marinas. Faith really that strong or could he now have doubt all his theories about how to climb. Everest have been disproved. he's space conditions that no prayer has mitigated. But still here he was. He rummaged through his kit and found the flag of friendship the silk pennant signed by all his friends and that was given to him when he took off from england he realized now he was going to have to go back there and do it by himself. He carefully folded the flag and grab some oxygen and a bare minimum of supplies. Murray's figured if all went well he could climb the mountain in four or five days. His own experience should have told him that nothing had gone as planned since the day. He stepped foot in the everest by playing three years before he was alive but things had not gone well. Getting close to goals can be intoxicating. The risks and disappointments fall away for the thoughts of glory and redemption. That will be waiting at the end of the journey. Reinhold messner wrote about the decision making on everest and how it feels to be so close but facing self-destruction messner writes and i quote up here. Life is brutally racked between exhaustion and willpower self. Conquest becomes compulsion. Why don't i go down. This is no occasion to. I cannot simply give up without reason. I wanted to make the climb. I still want to curiosity ambition of wanting to be the first. All these superficial. Incentives have vanished. Whatever it is that drives me as planted much deeper than i or the magnifying glass of psychologists can detect day by day hour by hour. Minute by minute step by step. I forced myself to do something against which my body rebels. The night of may twenty eighth maurice slept. Well it could be that. He'd had the distinct feeling that he was not alone. The sherpas were asleep in their tents. Several yards away but maurice felt sure. There was sleeping beside him. He took comfort in knowing that he was not an would not be alone. Faith or fantasy in these moments. If it's real to you then it. Israel on may twenty ninth. Maurice was up and preparing to leave. The sherpas pleaded.

Maurice Reinhold messner everest Murray Twang marie Israel england
"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

High Adventure Podcast

10:20 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

"One he picked a level spot on the rocky moraine and set up his tent before the sun went down and got his tommy stove. Going on abreu day one was done and relatively successful. He'd come on as far as he had originally planned but he was feeling strong and confident and felt he could easily make the summit by april twenty first and that being his thirty sixth birthday april seventeenth and day. Two of his climates. Started off a little rough. His goal was to reach. Rutledge is camp three into follow the east ron but glacier to a point of about twenty two hundred feet above his current campsite but after more than an hour on the tommy stove the water he was heating for his tia. Notes was not more than lukewarm. Making it pass. Rutledge is camp one. He found route finding to be more difficult than he was expecting. He was heading into the glacier in this would be his first real mountaineering experience and likewise his first experienced trying to navigate a glacier after walking the marines on the edges of the glacier. He realized that there was going to be no other choice but to actually climate his pack was really heavy and he was layered up in wool clothes and was sweating in this clear frigid air. He decided to shed some weight and he left behind one of his two. Tommy stoves the reason for two stoves is as big. Mystery has maurice's himself. He also left behind half of his candles. Candles were his main source of light and believe me. They were led headlamps in nineteen thirty four. These things were all he had and in the mountain in the cold in the wind in a tent. Living by candlelight at just adds a whole other layer of difficult trying to pick his way through the pinnacles and the troughs of glacier was hard he lost all sense of direction by midday. he was completely lost. Struggling to breathe with a pack lightened to about forty pounds. The one good armed world war one veteran with was fighting for every step but fighting is what moris did and he did it well. If giving up was ever considered it was never written in any of his daily diaries. As the unstable ice creaked and moaned became even more difficult. Through a combination of altitude and lassitude maurice lack the knowledge and experience to understand how to remedy this situation an hour at higher ground outside the glacier would have revived him but with no about near experience and no serious mountain travel in his background. He didn't have the slightest idea of how to help himself. Once again he stopped at three o'clock. He set this time stamp himself. Enough time to set up camp and get as much as possible and try to make a brew but he was already falling behind his goals. He'd climbed only twelve hundred feet not yet made it to rutledge camp to that night he wrote in his diary had a hell of a day on east. Rumba glacier been floundering about doing fifty times more work than necessary reduced load two times but only have done half the distance. I had hoped high a bit under nineteen thousand feet looking forward to getting to camp three from which the climb then really starts shall do my utmost to get there tomorrow on day. Three april eighteenth. Maurice was nearly two days behind itself prescribed schedule. He was up early and another breakfast of lukewarm. Tea and notes. He was trying to stay true to his plan diet. But this wasn't necessarily a good thing. Calories in hydration aren't important part of health in the mountains. Maurice plotted slowly and awkwardly through the troughs of the snow covered glacier. The weather began to change in. Snow flurries drifted down and the temperatures began to drop where he's pushed on. Under the weight of his heavy pack in his cork lined boots and wool sweaters. It was a slow and tortuous day at four o'clock where he said only made it halfway up the glacier but he had made it to camp to a good hot meal might have done a lot to revive him but exhaustion and depression had overcome him. He realized that he would not be standing on the summit on his birthday he sat in the cold on. The darkening. slopes of everest is snow began to fall heavily. He was at nineteen thousand feet. In altitude issues were beginning to manifest decision making was slowing and maurice sat for a very long time and until it was almost dark before he set up his stanton his camp for the night he had expected to be a camp three. At least by this day he managed to set up his tent and crawl into a sleeping bag for a what was going to be a long cold night. The next morning he was up in rummaging through the supplies that have been left by the rutledge expedition. He had hoped to find some food. And perhaps some cigarettes but only managed to find was a pair crampons. If morris had even a little mountaineering experience he would have realized that crampons were far. More valuable than cigarettes are even a small bit of food. It's astonishing even think that he began his climb without crampons. If you're not aware crampons are the spiked boot attachments. That allow climbers to climb steep snow and ice by kicking the toast bikes into the ice and stepping up. Moving on from camp to maurice struggled navigating the terrain a more experienced mountaineer would have taken a slightly different path through the glacier. But this is where maurice's experience waned and his faith had taken over any mistake now could cost him his life faith and or luck were all. He had at this point on april nineteenth. He wrote in his diary another hellish day about an hour. After striking camp it started snowing and hasn't stopped yet. Had to camp again. Only three quarters of a mile from the previous position got dreadful. Thirst on this damned glacier. Don't know why am eating good deal of snow and ice on april twentieth. The weather was clear but bitterly. Cold maurice on the previous day had scouted a possible path through the glacier. He was making progress but lassitude was causing a depressing fatigue and he was now suffering both mentally and physically and just eating snow and ice is not going to give him the hydration. He's going to need but this didn't stop him from stopping occasionally and admiring the incredible beauty that surrounded him he wrote. The glaciers are marvelously. Beautiful gorgeous duck egg blue too tired to take out the camera but we'll get them on the way back to be alone. Nearly twenty thousand feet surrounded by part of the earth that no human had ever touched and hearing nothing but the sounds of the mountain was emotional and a bit overwhelming. Maurice was awestruck but he was not intimidated entire trip now. Hinged on maurice reaching camp three and hoped was a supply dump that included enough food that will allow maurice to continue to the summit. He had read all the accounts from previous expeditions. Those accounts emphasize the difficulty of the upper slopes of the mountain and the north call the difficulty of navigating the east wrong but glacier and getting to the base of the north call had been understated. Which for me had been devastating to the information. He based his plans upon without pictures. It's hard visualize. What worries was seeing. The glaciers fragmented sprawl of spires towers of ice are hard to describe. It can be over one hundred feet tall impossible to see over or around. It's only by detailed maps or exploration that climbers can find the way through the maze of ice and blind called sacks that make up the glaciers in his account of the one thousand nine hundred. Twenty two expedition john. Noel described how the teams sherpa porters established a series of camps up the mountain. The second which he called frozen lake camp was at nineteen thousand. Five hundred feet in the third snowfield camp was at twenty one thousand feet. Noel wrote between frozen lake and snowfield camps glacier was twisted and broken into a belt. Some two miles wide of broken splintered berg's of ice some towering to a height of one hundred feet. Here the men would strap steel spikes onto the soles of their boots and set out of the strangest pass magical they would find their way turning and twisting in every possible direction past the towers and pinnacles of ice avoiding fisher's fifty feet deep descending walls of ice one hundred feet in depth following old widened crevasses climbing ladders. We cut into the ice guided by a line of little flags. We fixed to wooden pegs. Hammer the tops of the ice hillocks. These showed the way when storms and miss conceal the more distant landmarks and snow covered the foot tracks. We name this region fairyland device. Actually it had been a work of many many days to discover a path by which we could penetrate the maze. Berg's and cliffs in crevices blocked the way a dozen times to the first exploring party and we're circumnavigated only by retracing the steps starting afresh from some new direction following his nine thousand nine hundred eighty solo climb of everest. Reinhold messner wrote a passing through the glaciers on his way up to the advance base camp below the north col. He wrote on the third day after leaving base camp. We continue on our way along the central moraine which his melted atrop- between the walls of the glacier so we pass between icebergs iraq's ice walls in tibet not only the clouds change in the wind but also the mountains the hills and the ice..

Maurice Rumba glacier rutledge camp Rutledge snowfield camps glacier rocky moraine abreu rutledge expedition Reinhold messner Tommy berg ron depression Noel everest fisher morris iraq tibet
"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

High Adventure Podcast

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on High Adventure Podcast

"The high adventure podcast and on instagram it high adventure podcast. As always. We post these episodes on Youtube in video in those channels are under a company name of accidental productions. If you're trapped indoors and looking for something to watch, take a look at assault on El. Capitan are film based on the second ascent of wings of steel you somebody's most controversial climb. It's out there on Amazon prime in streaming sites everywhere. We've also just retooled and relaunched our website. Accidental productions dot net. Take a look and tell us what you think. If you've listened to previous episodes. I'm hoping that the dots of adventure extreme athletes are starting to connect. From me to Maurice, Wilson to Edmund Hillary Steve Fossett. To My friend Smith and to reinhold, Messner who will talk about in a later episode? There are personality traits they have in common, but there also seems to be unknowable motivations that connect all these athletes. I think you can put Michael Jordan in that category as well. One observable thing they seem to share is the joy and energy. They get from chasing a goal that to most on the. Seems unattainable at worst and extremely difficult at best. And our last episode, Maurice was cruising long making progress. After some early mishaps, he seemed to have found his rhythm. The slowdown in Tunisia was a short one with his escape from authorities in fuel from a rusty container in his tanks, ISA's faith was continuing to carry him safely or. or dangerously to his destination, depending on which side of the fence you're on. Your fuel had water in it. You're lucky to be alive. The mechanic engaged is told Maurice before draining the contaminated fuel from the Everest. The remaining flight over Africa was monotonous in fairly uneventful, aside from the brazen son that left. Maurice's face blistered and weathered the flew without incident into Cairo. Exactly a week after leaving London was right on schedule before leaving London Maurice. It applied for and was told he had received a permit to fly over Persia or what? What is now called Iran? He was told the permit would be waiting for him in Cairo and relaxed and ready for the next leg of his journey. He called the British legation to make arrangements to pick up that permit. The clerk who answered the phone was enthusiastic and said Oh. Yes, MR, Wilson I think there's something here for you. But before Marie could speak. The line went dead. A couple of seconds later he was reconnected, but this time and obviously much older man was on the line, and he told Murray's quote. I'm afraid there's no permit for you here, but if there's any way I can help. Just let me know. The phone again went did. Where he spent the next twenty four hours in Cairo being passed from one government department to the next Maurice began to realize that his hubris arrogance in London was coming back to haunt him. Remember his statement to the press after he was told not to fly India. His statement was stop me. They haven't got a chance. Well. It turns out the British air. Ministry might have a little longer reach than he'd anticipated. or he surmised that the air ministry as well as a couple of other government agencies might be a bit embarrassed by his success so far. They told him he had lacked the skills and not to go. But here he was in Cairo and making good progress toward his goal. He presumed that the government would be even more humiliated if he'd safely landed in India, thereby proving that they were wrong in their assessment of skill and more importantly of he himself. You can't help but wonder why. The British government was actively trying to stop Maurice. Their official stance was that Maurice was endangering himself in that they would not be complicit in helping a man who, in their words was committing unintended suicide. A more likely reason was the embarrassment that British government in the mountaineering community would face if this solo guy with no experience had made it to the summit of Everest. The British mountaineering establishment with the help of the British government had mounted several reconnaissance missions expeditions to try to reach the summit. The enormous and expensive undertaking sent well-known inexperienced climbers large groups for months at a time to attempt Everest. With government support the British sent recon and climbing expeditions in nineteen, twenty, one, twenty, two, twenty, four, thirty, three, thirty, five, thirty, six, thirty, eight, nineteen, fifty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, one, and the summit, was finally reached by Edmund Hillary Nineteen fifty-three. Hillary was a New Zealander, but he was part of a British expedition. That's ten large scale expeditions before the summer was finally reached all supported by the British government. How would it have looked if a solo guy from Bradford? Who? By fasting and walking would have made it to the top of Everest. Once again, the hypocrisy of the government was evident Oris had been promoted quickly and his time in the military, he'd been wounded brightly, so was recognized as a hero. But he also had some unconventional ideas about mountain, traveling cluding putting your survival in your faith and in God Was the government truly trying to protect Maurice or were they protecting themselves and the summit for one of their chosen climbers. When discussing George, Mallory, it's clear. He shared the same passion, ambition, and even obsession with Everest. But Mallory is part of the climbing establishment and deemed acceptable and worthy of standing on top of Everest. Maurice was an outsider who had not only no interest in joining an expedition. He had public disdain for their methods in their approach to climbing the mountain. It could be argued that Maurice. Wilson was just far ahead of his time. Forty five years later serious climbers would attempt Everest more in the style of Maurice than they would in the assault and siege style of the large expeditions. But in history, Maurice's been all but forgotten except for the. Odd article that shows up periodically with titles like madman of Everest and winging a prayer. Could end. Should Maurice be mentioned in the same conversation as the countless other climbers who tried and failed at Everest? Or shoot remain a footnote and a punchline. His unconventional methods deserve studying scrutiny but I think should be recognized as one of the Great Adventures of the twentieth century, and absolutely should be mentioned in the same conversation as Mallory. Maurice, Wilson and George Mallory had a lot of personal traits in common one thing that George and Maurice did not share. Was the use of vulgar arms..

Maurice Everest Cairo British government London Maurice Wilson assault Persia George Mallory India Youtube London Amazon Edmund Hillary Capitan Michael Jordan Africa Tunisia Edmund Hillary Steve Fossett Hillary
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"So, Chuck, you remember in the likeness episode, the Loch Ness Monster episode We talked about how There's like a new search going on where they're sampling the loch itself. Examining it for DNA. Apparently applying modern genetics in genetic analysis to cryptozoology is like the next chapter. And rather than saying, like, Well, that's it for us. Our big fraud is over with Cryptozoology star like awesome. Good. We finally have the tools now to find out to get to the bottom of this stuff and actually discovered new New specimens or new species, So they seem to be quite happy about it and quite excited, Although that there a lot of their beliefs hang in the balance and could just be have the legs cut out from under him by science. That's true. So Science wins in 2013. There's a geneticist at Oxford named Brian Sykes, who said All right, Yeti ah, holders of Yeti. Peace is send them to me. Do you have any hair? Yeti teeth, Yeti tissue. Send it to Oxford University, and he got it. He got 57 samples. They picked 36 of those two do some DNA analysis on and ah, most of these turned out to be animals that we all know, like bears and cows and horses. A time, though he found a couple of samples. From Bhutan and India. That he said were 100% match for jaw bones of a polar bear from the Pleistocene era. Yeah, and this kind of excited people because this may have been, I mean, not the yeti. But this may have been sort of a combination of hybrid of a polar bear in a brown bear. Cause this is when they were diverging genetically, and that in itself would be a pretty cool find. Yeah. Yeah, it would be a new type of bear That was a direct descendant from bears that went extinct about 40,000 years ago, and it be a type of polar bear. They aren't polar bears in the Himalayas. There's black bears. His brown bears is Himalayan bears his tree bears. But there's not polar bears so and the fact that like he accidentally found this by putting out this call for fur samples of Yeti or Bigfoot or whoever. Just made it all the all the sweeter they like. He had just accidentally discovered a new type of polar bear living in the Himalayas. Yeah, but sadly, that was not even the case. Some more scientists came along later They did re analysis and I think what they landed on was, you know, unfortunately, these I think you're getting a bad reading because of a damage sample. What these really are They are just brown bears. They're brown bears. Yes, Um other people followed up because it's not like it was any kind of hoax or anything like that, like it's like write. His last name is White Sykes. Sykes. Sykes is like a leading expert on analyzing mitochondrial DNA, wrote the book of the Seven Daughters of Eve, which kind of introduced the world to genetic analysis through and DNA, But, um He just made a mistake or leapt to a conclusion, I think is the the the thing that everyone's being too polite to maybe say, But he shared all of his data on Jen Bank, which is this huge database and other people came and analyzed and said now It's just regular bears and then other people analyzed. Instead, he adds, totally just regular regular brown bears that we already know about you. But that science at least was getting involved. And scientists kind around. They were like, you know what? This is great because we're using real science Finally. And regardless of what the result we get like we're doing it the right way. And that's really kind of the thing that counts. Like, Don't don't be disappointed that we're not finding the yeti. Because if it's not clear to everyone listening, it seems like the yeti or are almost always just bears. Yes, that not just the the the like tissue samples or the fecal samples of the hair samples, but also the tracks the sightings, all of it. They're probably just Himalayan bears, brown bears and black bears. And that's actually the opinion of Reinhold Messner, who actually is such a mountaineer around the area. He has Ah! Ah Museum in the mountains and his one of his yeti samples were one of the ones that Sykes analyzed his turned out to be the tooth of a dog. But he says that doesn't surprise me because I think they're all bears. I think all of his bears, including his own sighting, he became infatuated with searching for the yeti. Because he spotted something in the Himalayas that he couldn't explain, and then threw his own methodical research. He wrote a book about it. Hey, talk to other people about it. He did his own studies, and he kept his mind open and his mind became converted to it's all bears. Yeah, pretty much the Russians. Got involved, You would think Oh, and what, like the 19 sixties Now they got involved about eight years ago and went searching for the yeti in Siberia. On what they came back with. Were things like. Look at this. He's twisted tree branches were made into beds are sleeping pods by the yeti, and they twisted these branches and look at this. It's evidence, but it turns out that they were clearly man made. There were tool made cuts, and they were located on a not in a remote area at all. And just, like, right off the trail, I think, right? Yeah, and what people think is Oh, they just cook this stuff up to try and bring tourism to Ah, not very tourist friendly area. Right Siberia like they? Apparently there's a longstanding tradition among Russians and former Soviets of basically drumming up tourism by playing on people's beliefs in the Yeti and the abominable Snowman. And I think there was a period of time. One of the people interviewed in this great BBC article about the Eddie the the Russian scientist says. There's a period of time where it was like, very fashionable for the Inteligencia of Russia and the Soviet Union to basically go on trips in the summer looking for the abominable snowman. And they would show up in these towns and every town had a designated Yeti witness and the Yeti witnesses job was to basically regale them with tall tales that were supposedly true. Take them on these tours into the forest. On Ben, make a bunch of money off of them and say Thanks a lot, champ. Sorry. We didn't see anything this time, but that they, apparently in 2011 the Russian government orchestrated Another one of those through this conference, and from the conference, they announced to the world they had found indisputable proof that Yeti exists from this bed and these broken branches and supposedly a few hairs attached to a clump of mass. But some other people who were attending anthropology anthropologists, biologists were like no, it's Totally made up. This is all just a big tourist PR stunt. Yeah. Which is hilarious..

Brian Sykes Himalayas Siberia But Ah Museum fraud Chuck Oxford University Oxford Reinhold Messner Ah Bhutan Soviet Union Ben Russia BBC India Jen Bank scientist
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Remember in the likeness Episode, the Loch Ness Monster episode We talked about how There's like a new search going on where they're sampling the loch itself. Examining it for DNA. Apparently applying modern genetics in genetic analysis to cryptozoology is like the next chapter, and rather than saying, like, Well, that's it for us. Our big fraud is over with Cryptozoology starlike. Awesome. Good. We finally have the tools now to find out to get to the bottom of this stuff and actually discovered new New specimens are new species. So there seemed to be quite happy about it and quite excited, Although that there a lot of their beliefs hang in the balance and could just be have the legs cut out from under him by science. That's true. So Science wins in 2013. There's a geneticist at Oxford named Brian Sykes. He said. All right, Yeti ah, holders of Yeti. Peace is send them to me. If you have any hair, Yeti teeth, Yeti tissue. Send it to Oxford University, and he got it. He got 57 samples. They picked 36 of those two do some DNA analysis on and ah, most of these turned out to be animals that we all know, like Bears and cows and horses a time, though he found a couple of samples. From Bhutan and India. That he said were 100% match for jaw bones of a polar bear from the Pleistocene era. Yeah, and this kind of excited people because this may have been, I mean, not the yeti. But this may have been sort of a combination of hybrid of a polar bear in a brown bear. Cause this is when they were diverging genetically. And that in itself would be a pretty cool find. Yeah. Yeah, it would be a a new type of bear That was a direct descendant from bears that went extinct about 40,000 years ago, and it be a type of polar bear. They aren't polar bears in the Himalayas. There's black bears. Brown bears, Himalayan bears his tree bears, but there's not polar bears so and the fact that like he accidentally found this by putting out this call for fur samples of Yeti or Bigfoot or whoever. Just made it all the all the sweeter that like he had just accidentally discovered a new type of polar bear living in the Himalayas. Yeah, but sadly, that was not even the case. Some more scientists came along later They did re analysis and I think what they landed on was, you know, unfortunately, these I think you're getting a bad reading because of a damage sample. What these really are are just brown bears. They're brown bears as some other people followed up because it's not like it was any kind of hoax or anything like that, like it's white write. His last name is Wyck Sykes. Sykes. Sykes is like a leading expert on analyzing mitochondrial DNA, wrote the book of the Seven Daughters of Eve, which kind of introduced the world to genetic analysis to and Mt. DNA. But, um He just made a mistake or let to a conclusion, I think is the the the the thing that everyone's being too polite to maybe say, But he shared all of his data on Jen Bank, which is this huge database and other people came and analyzed and said now It's just regular bears and then other people analyzed. Instead, he adds, totally just regular regular brown bears that we already know about you. But that science at least was getting involved. And scientists kind around. They were like, you know what? This is great because we're using real science Finally. And regardless of what the result we get like we're doing it the right way. And that's really kind of the thing that counts. Like, Don't write. Don't be disappointed that we're not finding the yeti. Because if it's not clear to everyone listening, it seems like the yeti or are almost always just bears. Yes, that not just the the the like tissue samples or the fecal samples of the hair samples, but also the tracks the sightings, all of it. They're probably just Himalayan bears, brown bears and black bears. And that's actually the opinion of Reinhold Messner, who actually is such a mountaineer around the area. He has Ah! Ah, a museum in the mountains and his one of his yeti samples were one of the ones that Sykes analyzed his turned out to be the tooth of a dog. But he says that doesn't surprise me because I think they're all bears. I think all of his bears, including his own sighting, he became infatuated with searching for the yeti. Because he spotted something in the Himalayas that he couldn't explain, and then threw his own methodical research. He wrote a book about it. Hey, talk to other people about it. He did his own studies, and he kept his mind open and his mind became converted to it's all bears. Yeah, pretty much the Russians. Got involved, You would think Oh, and what, like the 19 sixties Now they got involved about eight years ago and went searching for the yeti in Siberia. On what they came back with. Were things like. Look at this. He's twisted tree branches were made into beds are sleeping pods by the yeti, and they twisted these branches and look at this. It's evidence, but it turns out that they were Clearly man made there were tool made cuts and they were located on not in a remote area at all. And just like, right off the trail, I think, right? Yeah, and what people think is Oh, they just cook this stuff up to try and bring Tourism to Ah, not very tourist friendly area. Right Siberia like they? Apparently there's a longstanding tradition among Russians and former Soviets of basically drumming up tourism by playing on people's beliefs in the Yeti and the abominable Snowman. And I think there was a period of time. One of the people interviewed in this great BBC article about the Yeti, the the Russian scientist says. There's a period of time where it was like, very fashionable for the Inteligencia of Russia and the Soviet Union. To basically go on trips in the summer looking for the abominable snowman, and they would show up in these towns and every town had a designated Yeti witness and the yeti witnesses job was to basically regale them with tall tales that were supposedly true. Take them on these tours into the forest on DH, then Make a bunch of money off of them and say Thanks a lot, champ. Sorry. We didn't see anything this time, but that they, apparently in 2011 the Russian government orchestrated another one of those Through this conference, and from the conference, they announced to the world they had found indisputable proof that Yeti exists from this bed and these broken branches and supposedly a few hairs. Attached to a clump of moss. But some other people who were attending Antipolo anthropologists, biologists were like no, It's totally made up. This is all just a big tourist PR stunt. Yeah. Which is hilarious. You get Russia. He and Putin supposedly tried to do it again. In 2016. He announced that he saw three Yeti from a helicopter tour of Siberia. Oh, that's funny. I think so, Too s O. I mean, I don't have much else yet. Your bears right? Yeah, we couldn't..

Brian Sykes Himalayas Siberia Russia fraud Oxford University Brown Oxford Reinhold Messner Bhutan Antipolo Putin Jen Bank BBC Mt Soviet Union India scientist
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To check your member in the likeness episode like this monster episode and we talked about how there's like a a new search going on where they're sampling the lock itself in examining it for DNA apparently applying modern genetics and genetic analysis to crypto zoology is like the next chapter and rather than saying like out well that's it for us our our big fraud is over with crip does you all just like awesome good we finally have the tools now to find out to get to the bottom of the stuff and actually discover new new specimens are new species so there'd seem to be quite happy about in quite excited although there is there a lot of their beliefs hang in the balance and could just be have the legs cut out from under him by science that's true so science wins in two thousand thirteen others a geneticist at Oxford name Bryan Sykes he said alright yet he holders of yeti pieces send them to me if you have any any hair yeti teeth yeah he did you send it Doxford university and he got it he got fifty seven samples they pick thirty six of those to do some DNA analysis on and most of these turned out to be animals that we all know like bears and cows and horses at the time though that he found a couple of samples from Bhutan and India that he said were a hundred percent match for the job owns of a polar bear from the Pleistocene era yeah in this kind of excited people because this may have been I mean not the yeti but this may have been sort of a combination a hybrid of a polar bear in a brown bear is this is when they were diverging genetically and that in itself would be a pretty cool find yeah yeah route it would be a new type of bear that was a direct descended from bears that went extinct about forty thousand years ago and it be a type of polar bear they they are polar bears in the Himalayas is black bears brown bears Himalayan bears distributors but there's not polar bears so and the fact that like the he accidentally found this by putting out this call for for samples of yeti or big foot or whoever just made it all the all the sweeter they like he just accidentally discovered a new type of polar bear living in the Himalayas yeah but sadly that was not even the case some more scientists came along later they did a reanalysis and I think what they landed on was you know unfortunately these I think you're getting a bad reading because of the damage sample what these really are are just brown bears there brown bears yes some other people followed up because it's not like it was any kind of hoax or anything like that white it's white gray his last name is white Sykes Sykes in Sykes is like a leading expert on analyzing mitochondrial DNA wrote the book in the seven daughters of eve which kind introduced the world to genetic analysis through and M. T. D. N. A. but he just made a mistake or lead to a conclusion I think is the the the thing that everyone's being too polite to to maybe say but he T. shared all of his date on Jan bank which is this huge database and other people came in analyzed and said now it's just regular bears and then other people analyzed inside yeah it's totally just regular regular brown bears that we already know about yeah but that is the science at least was getting involved and scientists kind around they were like you know what this is great because we're using real science finally and regardless of what result we get like we're doing it the right way and that's really kind of the thing that counts like don't right don't be disappointed there were not finding the yeti because it and if it's not clear to everyone listening it seems like the yeti are are almost always just bears yes that not just the the the the like tissue samples are the fecal samples or the hair samples but also the tracks the sightings all of it probably just Himalayan bears brown bears and black bears and that's actually the opinion of Reinhold Messner who actually is such a mountain near around the area he has a a museum in the mountains and his one of his yeti samples were one of the ones that Sykes analyzed his turned out to be the tooth of a dog but he says that doesn't surprise me because I think they're all bears I think all of his bears including his own citing he became infatuated with searching for the yeti because he spotted something in the Himalayas that he couldn't explain and then threw his methodical research she wrote a book about it he talked to other people about it he he did his own studies and he kept his mind open and his mind became converted to it's all bears yeah pretty much the Russians got involved you would think and what like the nineteen sixties now they got involved about eight years ago and went searching for the yeti in Siberia and what they came back with where things like a look at this these twisted tree branches were made into beds or sleeping pods by the yeti in a twisted these branches and look at this it's evidence but it turns out that they were clearly man made there were tool made cuts and they were located on on that not in a remote area at all and right off the trail and cry yeah and what people think is they just cook the stuff up to try and bring tourism to a a not very tourist friendly area right Siberia like they then apparently there's a long standing tradition among Russians in former Soviets of basically drumming up tourism by playing on people's beliefs in the European the abominable snowman and I think there was a period of time one of the people interviewed in this great BBC article about the yeti the the the this is a Russian scientist says there's a period of time where it was like very fashionable for the Intelligencia of Russia and the Soviet Union to basically go on trips in the summer looking for the abominable snowman and they would show up in these towns and every town had a designated yeti witness and the yeti witnesses job was to basically regale them with tall tales that were supposedly true take them on these tours into the forest and then make a bunch of money off of them and say thanks a lot show I'm sorry we didn't see anything this time but that day apparently in two thousand eleven the Russian government orchestrated another one of those if through this conference and from the conference they announce to the world they'd found indisputable proof that yet he exists from this bad in these broken branches and supposedly a few hairs attached to clump of moss but some other people who were attending Antipas anthropologists biologists really now it's totally made up this is all just a big tourist PR stunt yeah which is hilarious.

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"He said I want to see Eddie and they the local locals are like you know we totally would do that however the you can't get him down the slow and you'd have to hike really high up in those mountains and I know you're not down with that so sorry yeah exactly so I guess Alexander the great was like on board I can't believe we're still talking about this give me some wine yep pretty got a drinking contest and that was that so the yeti continued on in adventure for a tradition in in Tibet Nepal and Bhutan but in the west it kind of disappeared from view until the twentieth century it's so remember these are tall tales that the the sherpa teach their kids although there is supposedly some I guess general belief as well but I can't I can't quite penetrated but just imagine that it was just strictly tall tales okay sure but people told their kids than westerners came minutes of what is this you're talking about tell us about this and just bought the whole thing hook line and sinker yeah and things really took form in nineteen twenty one there's a journalist named Henry Newman mmhm he did an interview with some British explorers and this is a time of great exploration especially from the British these sort of decent I guess Indiana Jones like mountaineers who would go all over the world in search of these you know jungles and mountains in search of crazy Beeston and treasures and things like that right sure so he interviewed some of these guys and they said you know what we found these huge footprints up in the mountains and the locals there I guess Serpa said guess what interpr the plural sherpa did we never met I'm pretty sure yeah that was a good episode by the way everyone it was go back and listen to that one what was the title warm friendly living yeah can I quit sending the north Kay said so great yeah so they said that they are guides or sherpa guides call them the mito con mi which the translation the real translation is a little awkward man bear snowman but Newman confused all that he got the snowman part right right he translated that first part to mean mito M. ET age to mean filthy or dirty and then he changed that on his own to the word abominable right and that's the way we get the abominable snowman yeah he was like I don't like feel the snow man I'm going to change the name that I've already gotten wrong for his turn it into a bombing of a stone man it's a really great journalist but it's fascinating that you can trace it back to this one dummy yeah that's the whole the abominable snowman that's where it came from was this one guy and then obviously just completely captured the attention of the rest of the world when he he he wrote this because like this was not just like oh yeah they heard about an abominable snowman it was these give these explorers found tracks and they're insured the guides told them the trucks belong to this abominable snowman therefore their abominable snowmen living in the Himalayas and the explorer who was it who led that particular expedition was Charles Howard bury Howard hyphen berry B. U. R. Y. and apparently he and Newman were really big into promoting the idea of it abominable snow man man living in the Himalayas and it that it just be like this giant huge creature was shaggy haired very much akin to big foot but if you look at the the the the descriptions the traditional descriptions of the yet either they're much smaller and not nearly as huge as the the westerners kind of immediately made it out to be yeah there was one description one of the earlier written descriptions from nineteen forty two there was a researcher named Mira Shaklee and I believe that she got this information from two hikers that reported seeing the yeti right and this is what they said the height was not much less than eight feet so tall for sure but it's not like it was ten feet tall the head we're we're the head skis were two of them were described as squarish in the ears must lie close to this goal because there was no projection from the silhouette against the snow on the shoulder slope slowly down to a powerful chest covered by reddish brown hair which formed a close body for mix with long straight hairs hanging downward about the size and build of a small man the head cover with long here but the face and chest not very hairy at all this this this all sounds like they they always describe him as or it is by people right it means you know walking upright right but if you if you go back and look at that nineteen forty two description and how detailed it was yeah those hikers who gave the description you said that they they saw they solve this from observing to black specks moving across the snow about a quarter mile below them yeah and yet they could see that it had a thick under code in like a very long that's right isn't like this is just basically perfect abominable snowman citing yeah yeah agreed but but it's one of like many like after after that Howard berry expedition came back in and Newman broadcasts to the world people started going to the Himalayas in droves and they were just this is certainly looking for the abominable snowman Everest was there and everybody knew Everest was there and a lot of people wanted to be the first one to summit Everest the first westerner I should say to summit Everest so the while a lot of them were in the area they're like well look further the abominable snowman while we're here too yeah and some pretty legendary mountaineers and granted these are not like busy while adjuster anything but they're respected men in their field people like Reinhold Messner and one Sir Edmund Hillary both searched for evidence of the Eddie while they were hiking and Messner even wrote a book called my quest for the Eddie confronting the Himalayas deepest mystery right but I mean well we'll we'll we'll save the big reveal to the end right or the third act of this show okay.

Eddie
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Inspiring Adventure by Vertebrate Publishing

"And insurers lost their lives altogether thirty one. Men died before anger. Part about was finally climbed in nineteen fifty. Three by headman bull. Seventeen of those men worships this sequence of dreadful accidents earned nine got parbat. The sobering nickname killer mountain. Even after headman bull became the first man to reach the top climbing in a super lightweight. Dash that memory might have admired many of the significant new routes done on the peak were german. This was partly because of the obsession of one man. Call heroic coffer. He was the half brother of willie merkel who led attempts on nanga pat in nineteen thirty two and nineteen thirty four and perished in a terrible storm that took the lives of three climates and six ships then pot but was consequently headache office obsession. He led eight expeditions. There in all including the nineteen fifty-three climb when boo reached the summit. Much against lick coffers. Orders to more hugely important climbs were made by teams under helicopters command. A route up the delamere face in nineteen sixty two now known as the kim safa and the normal line of ascent and the first ascent of the rue pal face in one thousand nine hundred ninety when reinhold messner reached the summit with his brother guenter who died as they descended. The demere side of the mountain with the major faces of up parabat climbed there was just one major feature left to climb one so vast it badly merited consideration. But that's what. Each new generation of climate does considers the impossible and how it might be achieved knanga potter bats. Westridge is more commonly known as the massino. It takes his name from the satellite his western end..

willie merkel kim safa reinhold messner guenter headache Westridge
"reinhold messner" Discussed on The Mojo Radio Show

The Mojo Radio Show

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on The Mojo Radio Show

"Before that period you said at what point? You're on a one way path becoming a criminal drug addicts and then. You realize if you didn't find some purpose in your life, you'd end up in prison or did. Tell me about the turning point, Don because a lot of people that's extreme, but a lot of people have that in the corporate life. Their family live their relationships. What was the actual turning-point viewed that that die. You made a decision to make a change. Junior high school. The people I associated with which just happened to be all the kids by neighborhoods. A bad kids. In hindsight they're bad kids to me back then just normal everyday kids, but We. All were involved in crime, drinking and drugs. And we did it for fun and excitement, because we thought that was fun and excitement. One of the turning point as that tour, the guys who come out in the gang that we hung out with their mother was killed in a phone booth by a rival gang and they should. Mother was stabbed to death in a phone booth. Another one my friends stole his father's air conditioned us to go buy heroin, and then I was thinking. This is not where I wanna go I don't want to be around. These people anymore and I also had a sense of patriotism. Thanks to my father, who was World War Two navy veteran night decided I was GonNa go join the navy and too many I feel very very fortunate that I found that path because the navy's. Navy's saved my life. The navy not so much, but the seal team's did because then you're with a bunch of like minded people people who had all this energy like excitement, and the like pushing the boundaries, but they did it for a good cause in one site found seal team. Everything in my life changed, and I'm and I'm so grateful that I don the seal team's as a career. It's just curious use. The would boundaries and. You've written a lot of books. You've said recently that you'll the book you'll probably the most proud of the one that the favorite book is reaching beyond boundaries and. There's a lot of discussion at the front of the book about mental preparation. Particularly climb that you admire. That guy called Ryan hulled missed. And it's you said. During the book had a process, which was a major key to his success, had he would break down every stage of a journey even in preparation. Is that something. You've applied your own world today down because you doing. Extreme events! You're doing a lot of long distance events. You seem to enjoy embrace the things that. Take a long time and take you to that place. Boundaries and preparation breaking things down. Hal Have you adopted that process. While Reinhold Messner is the athlete I look up to more than any other athlete on this planet. And I've competed over a thousand times in over thousand benched I made that as a goal that I repeat. I competed in all those events before the nineties began so I'm still competing so I set that goal too low, but if I showed reinhold messner that long list. Of what I felt were athletic accomplishments, basically laugh at me and he had stay well. That's great. You like doing these iron man's. He's Dublin Man's marathons. Whatever his what I do I find amount. It's never been climbed before I go up the north face, go solo and without oxygen and tell my friends and family. They should be back in a couple of months. To me, he's most. Athlete on the planet. He's recognized. Now is the greatest. All Time, and he's now recognizes probably the greatest mountaineer. The world will ever know. And when he breaks down the process of climbing, he does visualization beat. He can't talk to people who've done these climbs or anything like that because he's usually the I do a lot of these, so he breaks down any visualizes the packing the steps the hypothermia that he might be saved the pain, the fatigue in his legs, the headaches, the altitude sickness the the days weeks out on amount being alone leap breaks it all down. Any trains. Any trains really hard probably harder than any other mountaineer that we know. And when he does at these climbs, it's not the first time he's doing. Almost because he's visualized every step of it when I hear about people like Reinhold Messner, and some other great athletes who do that I started doing that myself and I did that for instance basile training. I wanted to be a CI I trained hard for years to be a seal that I did use visualization to help me out with that. Every day at the end of the day the the end of the night. Get back to the barracks. Thank boy. That was a tough day, but I thought it would be hard in my. I made everything harder than it had to be and I did that with climbing mountains I did with the five hundred six hundred mile, adventure, races and Double Ironman in the single man's even on the visualization. Had A capacity to make the event harder and more challenging than actually. Actually was, and that helped me out a lot. Because once they actually started the event and finished it than I think Oh my God. It wasn't as hard as I thought it would be. Don't you visualize things not going well another and the reason I asked. The question is another seal. Who wrote a book best? Audio tons bestselling book David. Gugans in count hurt me. Was the name of the book successful? He talked about the fact that he would visualize things not going well and then visualize himself finding a solution and pushing his way through it. Is that part of your processes well? No, it's not a really I can visualize things being extremely difficult than harsh. But not to the point of failing not being able to do it and I'm not sure if that's how David means I know he talks about. He's gone through buds. Three times I to a workout from the third time. Did so I think maybe that's why he did that and he's been very very successful as a seal But I, don't I like to look at the things that could go wrong but I. don't look at it to the degree of them, not working now. If, that's what you asked me what you might have asked me, but I'm not sure how David thinks. That way but I don't think I. Never Look at things as failing as a possibility of failing in the book talks a lot about mindset in the word you use was combat mindset, and you said in the teams you had that combat mindset which would help you see through the most difficult challenges just described that force is a combat mindset..

Reinhold Messner navy David World War Two navy Don Junior high school headaches heroin Ryan hulled Hal basile
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A powerful chest covered by reddish brown hair which formed a close body for mix with long straight hairs hanging downward about the size and build of a small man the head cover with long here but the face and chest not very hairy at all this this all sounds like they they always describe him as or it is by people right means you know walking upright right but if you if you go back and look at that nineteen forty two description and how detailed it was yeah those hikers who gave the description you said that they they saw they saw all this from observing to black specks moving across the snow about a quarter mile below them yeah and yet they can see that it had it I think under code in like a very long hello it's red isn't like this is just basically perfect abominable snowman citing yeah yeah agreed but but it's one of like many like after after that Howard berry expedition came back in and Newman broadcasters to the world people started going to the Himalayas in droves and they were just just certainly looking for the abominable snowman Everest was there and everybody knew Everest was there and a lot of people wanted to be the first one to summit Everest the first westerner I should say to summit Everest so that while a lot of them were in the area they're like well look for the abominable snowman while we're here too yeah and some pretty legendary mountaineers and granted these are not like busy while adjuster anything but they're respected men in their field people like Reinhold Messner and one Sir Edmund Hillary both searched for evidence of the Eddie while they were hiking investor even wrote a book called my quest for the Eddie confronting the Himalayas deepest mystery right but I mean well we'll we'll we'll save the big reveal to the end right or the third act of this show okay zero third act yeah it's gotta be okay we're in big trouble if there's not well when we take a break and then we'll come back and talk a little bit about a couple more of these reported sightings let's do it all right well.

Himalayas Everest Reinhold Messner Edmund Hillary Eddie Howard berry Newman
"reinhold messner" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"To check your member in the loch ness episode like this monster episode now we talked about how there's like a a new search going on where they're sampling the lock itself in examining it for DNA apparently applying modern genetics and genetic analysis to cryptozoology is like the next chapter and rather than saying like out well that's it for us our our big fraud is over with could does you all just like awesome good we finally have the tools now to find out to get to the bottom of this stuff and actually discover new new specimens are new species so there that seem to be quite happy about in quite excited although there there a lot of their beliefs hang in the balance and could just be you have the legs cut out from under him by science that's true so science wins in two thousand thirteen others a geneticist at Oxford name Bryan Sykes he said all right yeah the holders of yeti pieces send them to me if you have any any hair yeti teeth yeti tissue send it Dr university and he got it you got fifty seven samples they pick thirty six of those to do some DNA analysis on and most of these turned out to be animals that we all know like bears and cows and horses at the time though that he found a couple of samples I'm from baton in India that he said were a hundred percent match for the job owns of a polar bear from the Pleistocene era yeah in this kind of excited people because this may have been I mean not the yeti but this may have been sort of a combination a hybrid of a polar bear in a brown bear is this is when they were diverging genetically and that in itself would be a pretty cool find yeah yeah route it would be a new type of bear that was a direct descended from bears that went extinct about forty thousand years ago and it be a type of polar bear they they are polar bears in the Himalayas is black bears brown bears Himalayan bears this tree bears but there's not polar bears so and the fact that like the he accidentally found this by putting out this call for for samples of yeti or big foot or whoever just made it all the all the sweeter they like he just accidentally discovered a new type of polar bear living in the Himalayas yeah but sadly that was not even the case the more scientists came along later they did reanalysis and I think what they landed on was you know unfortunately these I think you're getting a bad reading because of a damaged sample what these really are is are just brown bears there brown bears yes some other people followed up because it it's not like it was any kind of hoax or anything that white it's white gray his last name is white Sykes Sykes Sykes is like a leading expert on analyzing mitochondrial DNA wrote the book in the seven daughters of eve which kind introduced the world to genetic analysis through and am to DNA but he just made a mistake or lead to a conclusion I think is the the the thing that everyone's being too polite to to maybe say but he T. shared all of his date on Jan bank which is this huge database and other people came and analyzed and said now it's just regular bears and then other people analyzed inside yeah it's totally just regular regular brown bears that we already know about yeah but that is the science at least was getting involved and scientists kind around they were like you know what this is great because we're using real science finally and regardless of what result we get like we're doing it the right way and that's really kind of the thing that counts like don't right don't be disappointed there were not finding the yeti because it and if it's not clear to everyone listening it seems like the yeti are are almost always just bears yes that not just the the the the like tissue samples are the fecal samples of the hair samples but also the tracks the sightings all of it probably just Himalayan bears brown bears and black bears and that's actually the opinion of Reinhold Messner who actually is such a mountain near around the area he has a a museum in the mountains and his one of his yeti samples were one of the ones that Sykes analyzed his turned out to be the tooth of a dog but he says that doesn't surprise me because I think they're all bears the think all of his bears including his own citing he became infatuated with searching for the yeti because he spotted something in the Himalayas that he couldn't explain and then through his own methodical research she wrote a book about it he talked to other people about it he he did his own studies and he kept his mind open and his mind became converted to it's all bears yeah pretty much the Russians got involved you would think and what like the nineteen sixties now they get involved about eight years ago and went searching for the yeti in Siberia and what they came back with where things like a look at this these twisted tree branches were made into beds are sleeping pods by the yeti in a twist of these branches and look at this it's evidence but it turns out that they were clearly manmade there were two made cuts and they were located on on on that not in a remote area at all and like right off the trail and cry yeah and what people think is they just cook this stuff up to try and bring tourism to a a not very tourist friendly area right Siberia like they then apparently there's a long standing tradition among Russians in former Soviets of basically drumming up tourism by playing on people's beliefs in the yeti and the abominable snowman and I think there is a period of time one of the people interviewed in this great BBC article about the yeti the the the this Russian scientist says there's a period of time where it was like very fashionable for the Intelligencia of Russia and the Soviet Union to basically go on trips in the summer looking for the abominable snowman and they would show up in these towns and every town had a designated yeti witness and the yeti witnesses job was to basically regale them with tall tales that were supposedly true take them on these tours into the forest and then make a bunch of money off of them and say thanks a lot show I'm sorry we didn't see anything this time but that they apparently in two thousand eleven the Russian government orchestrated another one of those if through this conference and from the conference they announced to the world they'd found indisputable proof that yet he exists from this bed in these broken branches and supposedly a few hairs attached to comp of loss but some other people who were attending after pa anthropologists biologists really now it's totally made up this is all just a big tourist PR stunt yeah which is hilarious Medicare Russia the important supposedly tried to do it again in two thousand sixteen he announced that he saw three yeti from a helicopter tour of Siberia because it's funny yeah I think so too so I mean I don't have much else yet you're bears right yeah we couldn't we couldn't talk about cryptozoology though without mentioning that coelacanth argument and and the thing about the yeti is that there was there was actually a species of ape called Gigantopithecus that was like a nine foot tall eight the biggest date that ever lived that lived in that very area and went extinct about a hundred thousand years ago so the people who really believe in this or like you now with that the coelacanth went extinct like sixty million years before we just think this guy went extinct a hundred thousand years before who's to say so that seems to be the thing that's carrying on this belief that and the fact that it's somebody put in one of these articles it all it would take is one yeti to prove that yet exist but no matter how much there's no such thing as evidence they can prove it doesn't exist so Hampel are always going to believe it just like Messi exactly and big foot exactly so there you go if you want to know more about the yeti go to the Himalayas.

loch ness
"reinhold messner" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The head we're we're the heads because were two of them were described as squarish and the ears must like close to this goal because there was no projection from the silhouette against the snow on the shoulder slips slowly down to a powerful chest covered by reddish brown hair which formed a close body for mix with long straight hairs hanging downward about the size and build a small man the head cover with long here but the face and chest not very hairy at all this this all sounds like they they always describe him as or it is by people right means you know walking upright right but if you if you go back and look at that nineteen forty two description and how detailed it was yeah those hikers who gave the description you said that they they saw they solve this from observing two black specks moving across the snow about a quarter mile below them yeah and yet they could see that it had been a thick under code in like a very long that's right is like this is just basically perfect abominable snowman citing yeah yeah agreed but but it's one of like many like after after that Howard berry expedition came back and and Newman broadcasters to the world people started going to the Himalayas in droves and they were just a surly looking for the abominable snowman Everest was there and everybody knew Everest was there and a lot of people wanted to be the first one to summit Everest the first westerner I should say to summit Everest so that while a lot of them were in the area they're like well look further the abominable snowman while we're here to yeah and some pretty legendary mountaineers and granted these are not like do while adjuster anything but they're respected men in their field people like Reinhold Messner and one Sir Edmund Hillary both search for evidence of the Eddie well they were hiking investor even wrote a book called my quest for the yeti confronting the Himalayas deepest mystery right but I mean well we'll we'll we'll save the big reveal to the end right or the third act of this show okay your third act yeah there's got to be okay we're in big trouble if there's not well when we take a break and then we'll come back and talk a little bit about a couple more of these reported sightings let's do it right well.

Himalayas Everest Reinhold Messner Edmund Hillary Eddie Howard berry Newman
"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"reinhold messner" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Check your member in the loch ness episode like this monster absurd and we talked about how there's like a a new search going on where they're sampling the lock itself in examining it for DNA apparently applying modern genetics and genetic analysis to cryptozoology is like the next chapter and rather than saying like out well that's it for us our our big fraud is over with could does you all just like awesome good we finally have the tools now to find out to get to the bottom of this stuff and actually discover new new specimens or new species so there that seem to be quite happy about in quite excited although there is there a lot of their beliefs hang in the balance and could just be you have the legs cut out from under him by science that's true so science wins in two thousand thirteen others a geneticist at Oxford name Bryan Sykes he said all right yeah the holders of yeti pieces send them to me if you have any any hair yeti teeth yeti tissue send docs would university and he got it you got fifty seven samples they pick thirty six of those to do some DNA analysis on and most of these turned out to be animals that we all know like bears and cal's and horses at the time though that he found a couple of samples are from Bhutan in India that he said were a hundred percent match for jawbone's of a polar bear from the Pleistocene era yeah in this kind of excited people because this may have been I mean not the yeti but this may have been sort of a combination a hybrid of a polar bear in a brown bear is this is when they were diverging genetically and that in itself would be a pretty cool find yeah yeah route it would be a new type of bear that was a direct descended from bears that went extinct about forty thousand years ago and it be a type of polar bear they they are polar bears in the Himalayas is black bears brown bears Himalayan bears this tree bears but there's not polar bears so and the fact that like the he accidentally found this by putting out this call for for samples of yeti or big foot or whoever just made it all the all the sweeter they like he just accidentally discovered a new type of polar bear living in the Himalayas yeah but sadly that was not even the case the more scientists came along later they did a reanalysis and I think what they landed on was you know unfortunately is I think you're getting a bad reading because of a damaged sample what these really are are just brown bears there brown bears yes some other people followed up because it it's not like it was any kind a hoax or anything that white it's white gray his last name is white Sykes Sykes Sykes is like a leading expert on analyzing mitochondrial DNA wrote the book the seven daughters of eve which kind introduced the world to genetic analysis through an M. T. DNA but he just made a mistake or lead to a conclusion I think is the the the thing that everyone's being too polite to to maybe say but he T. shared all of his date on Jan bank which is this huge database and other people came and analyzed and said now it's just regular bears and then other people analyzed inside yeah it's totally just regular regular brown bears that we already know about yeah but that is the science Elise was getting involved and scientists kind around they were like you know what this is great because we're using real science finally and regardless of what result we get like we're doing it the right way and that's really kind of the thing that counts like don't right don't be disappointed there were not finding the yeti because it and if it's not clear to everyone listening it seems like the yeti are are almost always just bears yes that not just the the the the like tissue samples are the fecal samples of the hair samples but also the tracks the sightings all of it probably just Himalayan bears brown bears and black bears and that's actually the opinion of Reinhold Messner who actually is such a mountain near around the area he has a a museum in the mountains and it is one of his yeti samples were one of the ones that Sykes analyzed his turned out to be the tooth of a dog but he says that doesn't surprise me because I think they're all bears the think all of his bears including his own citing he became infatuated with searching for the yeti because he spotted something in the Himalayas that he couldn't explain and then through his own methodical research she wrote a book about it he talked to other people about it he he did his own studies and he kept his mind open and his mind became converted to it's all bears yeah pretty much the Russians got involved you would think in what like the nineteen sixties now they get involved about eight years ago and went searching for the yeti in Siberia and what they came back with where things like a look at this these twisted tree branches were made into bed or sleeping pods by the yeti in a twisted these branches and look at this it's evidence but it turns out that they were clearly man made there were two made cuts and they were located on on on that not in a remote area at all and what I can write off a trailer and cry yeah and what people think is they just cook this stuff up to try and bring tourism to a a not very tourist friendly area right Siberia like they then apparently there's a long standing tradition among Russians in former Soviets of basically drumming up tourism by playing on people's beliefs in the Jedi and the abominable snowman and I think there was a period of time one of the people interviewed in this great BBC article about the yeti the the the the Russian scientist says there's a period of time where it was like very fashionable for the Intelligencia of Russia and the Soviet Union to basically go on trips in the summer looking for the abominable snowman and they would show up in these towns and every town had a designated yeti witness and the yeti witnesses job was to basically regale them with tall tales that were supposedly true take them on these tours into the forest and then make a bunch of money off of them and say thanks a lot show I'm sorry we didn't see anything this time but that they apparently in two thousand eleven the Russian government orchestrated another one of those if through this conference in from the conference they announced to the world they'd found indisputable proof that yet he exists from this bed in these broken branches and supposedly a few hairs attached to a comp of moss but some other people who were attending answer PA anthropologists vials is really now it's totally made up this is all just a big tourist PR stunt yeah with this whole areas Medicare Russia the important supposedly tried to do it again in two thousand sixteen he announced that he saw three yeti from a helicopter tour of Siberia because it's funny yeah I think the two of us so I mean I don't have much else yet you're bears right yeah we couldn't we couldn't talk about cryptozoology though without mentioning that coelacanth argument and and the thing about the yeti is that there there was actually a species of ape called Gigantopithecus that was like a nine foot tall eight the biggest tape that ever lived that lived in that very area and went extinct about a hundred thousand years ago so the people who really believe in this or like you now with that the coelacanth went extinct like sixty million years before we just think this guy went extinct a hundred thousand years before who's to say so that seems to be the thing that's carrying on this belief that and the fact that it's somebody put in one of these articles it all it would take is one yeti to prove that yet exist but no matter how much there's no such thing as evidence they can prove it doesn't exist the mantle are always going to believe it just like Messi exactly and big foot exactly so there you go if you want to know more about the yeti go to the Himalayas and.

loch ness