17 Burst results for "Regina Hanson"

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"And I know that? Young gentleman want someone who is brave enough to say what they really feel in thank publicly and I wanted a few people I know that we'll do that. Even. At the expense of Ma. Possible. Writing. Career. Has. Trump's presidency further divided his country. I believe Janda Xiao doubt has. I believe he is not the core of the problem certainly in instigator. However without that. So many of us would not have known how band things. Okay. So maybe it was a necessary part of the process. When you comes to reelection. I'm holding say. It he will be the. and. The Biden Kamala will be in all. and. If I had any positive words for your listeners, it be pleased I'm here if a Republican or Democrat, I personally am an independent. Never, ever ever missing election again for the first time in my life, I didn't vote Because I felt like it was voting for the lesser of two evils and so I was going to rise above it. Not Go to. Out, auks biggest mistake ever made him alive. I. Don't think I've been more humiliated that you need decision on made a lot. And I've had a couple of Jesus. So we all need to vote. I believe that. I'm in Harrisville win. Very grateful for the fact that our first female vice president will be. I. Think it's early on I. Think it's time looking forward to it. So, everyone. Get out there vote your conscious. Ms Hanson pleasure having you. Thanks for coming on..

Trump Janda Xiao Ma Ms Hanson vice president Harrisville
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"I have no problem with putting a different spin on the sixteen nineteen projects. If they WANNA say the country was starting seventeen seventy six for the declaration of independence on problem. What I do have a problem with is a white man's story negating black experience in the fact that this country was built. On the Batmans that. We have a lot of people who lived in poverty, black and white. Farmers sharecroppers worked hard for nothing barely had close. Barely had a change of Sunday clothes. For decades and decades. So Harvey has certainly. Especially when it comes to form a been a way of life for too many people for too long. However. To negate the black experience is to negate who we are and most importantly. Promotes. That racism continues. We have got to have black history in our schools and there is no should be black history Mont.. Shouldn't be figured. Only throw out A. Few stories to. Check off the box of our. Curriculum his met. Every story has a black experienced to it and part of our problem and lack of empathy regarding racism in this country is it. We do not listen to voices we must edify the black experience. And we have to hear those stories to know that we have to do the interviews to know that you slide during the great. Depression, we had stenographers going out in recording black music what we now consider Blues Negro spirituals. This stuff is documented but never share. Guess, what America is. Still if we're still numb appreciated for anything internationally, it's our music it's jazz and Blues and all that. Bulls down to the Negro spirituals gay all comes from the Black, community? Yet most of our population doesn't realize that we don't appreciate. While before, we wrap up this interview because we are in the wonderful year of twenty twenty I was to ask you what do you think about the election has gone on? I've never been more afraid in.

Harvey Mont Depression America
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"The things that you need for a hundred floor, much less his five thousand. And unbeknownst to him. Every year, they would scratch out the amount of he asked. Lower. Go to the USDA. It in just enough to keep him working in the fields that never enough to make a clear profit. Thus indebting him to the bank. And also is still a Milan which he builds a home on. A story, you hear the emotion in his voice. Is he wells up because is grandfather had worked at land his father had worked at land and every time he went to his mother's home that was sort of across the way around the corner. He had to see. The home he had built. Falling apart in shambles offenses the house painted defense is falling down whoever is farming it now, not taking care of. It was such. A great example to me of the pride that a farmer takes his land. The color of skin matters not and they robbed this fan of that because he was black, he had too many acres in the did not want him to succeed and was the year two, thousand and two. Right. So you mentioned earlier how you would like it. So the sixteen nineteen project is. taught in schools but one thing that has come out recently as there were numerous Pulitzer Prize winning historian one of them being James McPherson author of the civil war. Which is considered the definitive book on civil war and he came out and said that the sixteen nineteen project has been. Mixing have. Not Been entirely truthful Even he said the claim that the Sixteen Nineteen Was the year that America was founded just not true So without mind, do you think that the sixteen nineteen products still be touched be changed What are you thinking about that? The fantastic question. You're always so many compromises when it comes to what we teach our children..

Pulitzer Prize USDA Milan James McPherson America
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Front again, that it was an answer to prayer I think the New York Times to the surreal solid. An creating this and it just needed the every classroom. Recent Dane. Lacking, watch children jump have enough. Votes to look up four. They don't have enough black herodes zoning the twenty first century than we saw Black Panther a movie. Where widened black kids could go see an all black cast. In them have a positive role model that. Is Sad. We have and I'm sure you guys know because you study history five percent of women's stories get through history is a white man's story I think we all can admit that very honestly, and that's what we're taught our entire lives. The problem with that is was everything continue ended enables us to cheat committing the same crimes. And deficiencies that we always have. Now. Let me elaborate on that. If you don't know and understand the subjugation of entire race and how it weakens your society. Then what's happened a law will continue to happen in your society as a whole be weaker result. Why women invented the ironing board the curling. The cotton gin I mean. We have all these incredible stories for never taught in school, which means every little girl out there. Is taught basically nobody was ever done anything and it's a lie. Is a huge lie in it subconsciously puts in our white chows mind that black people are incapable of success, which is also a lie. We have all these stories. Of. Incredible. Perseverance they quite frankly or more empowering to me when I. In that of a white man who came from privilege or had the opportunity to go to your bank and get along without any trouble. Like. Hard Sixteen Nineteen Project News a beautiful story Believe it was episode four and five about a young foreign Louisiana had worked his way up Thomas five thousand acres and long story short. Bank stolis land every year, he would go and apply these USDA approved loans for seed for fertilizer for all.

Thomas New York Times USDA Louisiana Project News
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"This is Chris because. I feel like it comes. From white privilege in people who are willfully ignorant. And what I mean by that is. A father had a saying he only had acreage East. Say once you learn to read and write the rest of you. Responsible for educating. Ourselves. In one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six, Gerald. Ford said we need a black history. Nineteen seventy, six, I was born in seventy adding grow with history. Was until I went to college started taking African American history courses that are really started learning about black. History. And I think most people in this country are in the same. They don't know. Until Day take the time and do the due diligence to find out the truth they have no idea what black community is experienced to this day and slavery continued. To this day. Are you referring to the prison system of laws in the Thirteenth Amendment? Absolutely and the fact that black women are paid as much as white women in the fact that when you're black neighbor goes down to the bank, get alone even if his credits or is identical to yours, he's going to be paying several points more interest. If he is even given allow while the stories in. Appearance were selling some property in Alabama over from Georgia that they retired there. And They hit added onto a little brick house put it up for sale and in order what couples Cancun wanted to by. The year was about nine, hundred, ninety eight. So wasn't that long ago. The bank would give the couple alone. Because it was a wide area of town and my father told me this like. A mother Sherman there was nothing wrong with a credit credit whisper sting the bank would not weapon by the home in a wide areas to. Curious this is going on not just in the south it continues to stay in the north is will. It's no big singer called black tax. Everything costing more and they get paid less and yet we wonder whether still living in poverty instead at such a high percentage. BECAUSE OF SYSTEMIC CRISIS So, going back to black history, the sixteen nineteen project, which for those in the audience who are unaware say Your Time's leaves Hod casts which suggests that America was founded in sixteen nineteen, and in our last interview, we had Andrew Roberts on who. Called it. I believe ludicrous. So. What is opinion on the Sixteen Nineteen.

Gerald America Cancun Chris Ford Andrew Roberts Sherman Alabama Georgia
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Not at all. And probably less violent. It is necessary. And it's our fault that we've. Let it get to this point. So, do you believe that labelling system as inherently systemically racist against people of Color takes away their incentive to work hard and strive for success. Almaz traveling out loud when you said that. Is the most pretentious ludicrous saying have you ever heard in my life? What's happening here? Go ahead, Josh Vegan station. This this is just a criticism. From the right and this is a question that. We were told to ask so. Yeah. So this is. Just wanted to get your opinion on this if. I'm glad you asked it and I've never offended by questions always happy to answer anything. This is Chris because. I feel like it comes. From white privilege in people who are willfully ignorant. And what I mean by that is. A. Father had a saying he only had acreage Used to say, once you learn to read and write the rest of you. Responsible for educating ourselves. In. One thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six, Gerald Ford said we need a black history? Nineteen seventy six I was born in seventy adding grow with any black history. Was until I went to college in started taking. African. American history courses that are really started learning about black. History. And I think most people in this country are in the same. They don't know. Until Day, take the time and due diligence to find out the truth they have no idea what black community is experiencing to this day and slavery continued. To this day. Are you referring to the prison system of laws in the thirteenth, amendment? Absolutely, and the fact that black women are paid as much as white women. In the fact that when you're black neighbor goes down to the bank, get alone even his credits or is identical to yours, he's going to be paying several points more interest. If he is even given allow while the stories in. Appearance were selling some property in Alabama over from Georgia that they retired there. and. They had added onto a little brick house, put it up for sale and in order what couples Cancun wanted to by. The year was about nine, hundred, ninety eight. So wasn't that long ago The bank would give the couple alone. Because it was a wide area of town and my father told me this like. A mother Sherman there was nothing wrong with a credit credit whisper sting the bank would not weapon by the home in a wide area to. Curious this is going on not just in the south, it continues to stay in the north is will. It's no big singer called black tax. Everything costing more and they get paid less and yet we wonder whether still living in poverty instead at such a high percentage. Because of systemic crisis. So going back to black history, the sixteen, Nineteen project which for those in the audience who are unaware say your time's leaves. Hod. Casts which suggests that America was founded in sixteen nineteen and in our last interview, we had Andrew Roberts Robertson who called it I believe. Ludicrous. So what is opinion on the Sixteen Nineteen.

Gerald Ford America A. Father Cancun Andrew Roberts Robertson Chris Sherman Alabama Georgia
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"I don't think it's hard to train a police department to kill with their hands instead of guns because we're seeing all over the place. Yesterday morning I woke up to a video of a police officer who had detained I believe it was a seventeen year old African male. And he was cold. So we had his hands in his pockets and he just attacked him history beating him the guys and I see you. Because he had his hands in his pockets he was probably scared. I certainly would the in his shoes. We have a real problem in this country. With Racism Board police force is just a part of. So. Moving away from the police force the protests that are going on. There seems to be two size to on one hand. You have the peaceful protests which if I had to guess your favor of but on the other there seems to be riots going on at once not when you think about these rights are they justified? Are they helpful or they bad was your opinion on them? As I mentioned earlier. A lot of the violence is going on if these peaceful protest marches are pulled off. Premises trying to come in and negate. The bill in Movement I WANNA say that four months. Of course I support in would prefer peaceful protests to violent protests on when anybody. But I absolutely understand. Where the frost. Movement is come. Jefferson said. And trying to remember exactly his quote. The quote after Shays rebellion vowed? Charity. Yes. Yes. Ouch now neither one of us can remember it, but sometimes, it's very were. The tree of freedom to bleed the blood of. Time. I remember it perfectly apologize for that but is a favorite. It's very true. I find it almost repulsive that people you hate if the move meant. When what happened in? was absolutely no difference in the American revolution. Not at all. And probably less by. It is necessary. And it's our fault that we've let it get to this point. So do you believe that labelling system as inherently systemically racist against people of color, takes away their incentive to work hard and strive for success. Almaz chuckling out loud when you said that. Is the most pretentious ludicrous saying have you ever heard in my life? What's happening here? Go ahead, Josh Vegan station. This this is just a criticism. From the right and this is a question that. We were told to ask so. Yeah. So this is. Just wanted to get your opinion on this if. I'm glad you asked it and I've never offended by questions always happy to.

officer Racism Board Almaz Jefferson Shays
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"I don't think it's hard to train a police department to kill with their hands instead of guns because we're seeing all over the place. Yesterday morning I woke up to a video of a police officer who had detained I believe it was a seventeen year old African male. And he was cold. So we had his hands in his pockets and he just attacked him history beating the guys and I see you. Because he had his hands in his pockets. He was probably scared to death. I certainly would be in his shoes. We have a real problem in this country. With Racism Board police force is just a part of. So. Moving away from the police force the protests that are going on there seems to be to size to on one hand. You have the peaceful protests, which if I had to guess your favor of, but on the other, there seems to be riots going on at one not when you think about these rights, are they justified? Are they helpful or they bad was your opinion on them? As I mentioned earlier. A lot of the violence is going on if these peaceful protest marches are pulled off. Premises trying to come in and negate. The bill in Movement I WANNA say that four months. Of course I support in would prefer peaceful protests to violent protests on what anybody. But I absolutely understand. Where the ferocity of this movement is come. Jefferson said. And trying to remember exactly his quote. The quote after Shays rebellion vowed. Charity. Yes yes. Ouch now neither one of us can remember it, but sometimes, it's very were. The tree of freedom to bleed the blood of. Time. I remember it perfectly apologize for that, but it is a favorite. It's very true. I find it almost repulsive that people you hate if the move meant. When what happened in? was absolutely no difference in.

officer Racism Board Jefferson Shays
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Who were prone to violence. These need to be removed and it's not going to be an easy process to do because everyone knows how to go into psych evaluation or testing. Say the right things. So a very common criticism from. The right is that. a lot of the police officers in these major cities are predominantly minority themselves you know in cities like New York, and and Boston and Baltimore and Atlanta L. A. They're all predominantly Latino black it's usually like six fifty to sixty percent are are minority of the police force So what a lot of people in the right ten to say is it has to do with a lack of training or a lack of. A lack of Understanding of how to be a good police officer in less of a race racism. Factor involves So would you like to comment on that criticism? Of, course I would. I think the issue is twofold. I do think that we send police officers out with two little training with guns in their hands Just, a few months is not enough and it isn't enough to evaluate someone's psyche. was very important to be aware. Is this studies have shown almost forty percent of police officers violent in their own homes? Now Again. Because if you had a police officer male or female, it is abusing their own family what do you think they're going to do long streets? Something touched on in one of my videos on Youtube series image earlier on. Racism. In it's called let's get. Real about racism. Is that. There are police officers who join just. So they have an outlet for violence in. That's what we have to stop in. Again, they can take the test say all the right things. But if they have a history of violence, they.

officer Boston New York Atlanta Baltimore
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Who were prone to violence? These need to be removed and it's not going to be an easy process to do because everyone knows how to go into psych evaluation or testing. Say the right things. So a very common criticism from. The right is that. a lot of the police officers in these major cities are predominantly minority themselves you know in cities like New, York and and Boston and Baltimore and Atlanta L. A. They're all predominantly Latino black. It's usually like six fifty to sixty percent are are minority of the police force So what a lot of people in the right ten to say is it has to do with a lack of training or lack of. A lack of Understanding of how to be a good police officer in less of. Race. Racism. Factor involves So would you like to comment on that criticism? Of course I would. I think the issue is twofold. I do think that we send police officers out with two little training with guns in their hands Just a few months is not enough and it isn't enough to evaluate someone's. Psyche. Very important to the aware. Is. This studies have shown almost forty percent of police officers violent in their own homes. Now Again, because if you had a police officer male or female, it is abusing their own family what do you think they're going to do long streets? Something touched on in one of my videos on Youtube series image earlier on racism. In it's called. Let's get real about racism. Is that? There are police officers who join just. So they have an outlet for violence in. That's what we have to stop in. Again, they can take the test say all the right things. But if they have a history of violence, they.

officer York Boston Atlanta Baltimore
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Issue. So. You kind of just mentioned that. Racism is not unique to the south. If I may just have critique your title people in the South are not really being big fans of being characterized as races. They were rather learn from their past and move on. So just. Do not think the south still deserves this label, but it is still a part of the region or. Clarify this for me. You are correct in. I don't want anyone to mistake. Racism is southern issue. because. It's not a seven issue. It's more blatant in the south. Think there's less guilt in shame about the south. I think it is interwoven into our history and our past. And we have not done the work. To grow past yet. So. To Kinda just for our audience, would you mind? Kind of speaking of some of the examples of racism that are going on in this country right now. Just to clarify for the audience. I'm happy to actually did a ten video series on Youtube. That started several months ago. It's more fine in this series details what's been going on in the Black Lives Movement and why we've had arrived. During this time. It has absolutely been a perfect storm. And what a mean by that is if it works for the fact, if the overworked parents who usually spend seventy hours a week between their job, running their kids to baseball practice and everything else. if it wasn't for the fact that most of them were at home due to cope with it. And they had the energy in time to pay attention to what was going on. I. Don't think the black lives matter movement would have exploded as much as it did and I'm grateful for and I have a lot of appreciation for our social media outlets. Because everything isn't on national news in that sense. CNN CNBC. With that set. Videos on instagram or face. Of people who were peacefully marching peacefully protesting there was one instance a believe it was in the south it may have been in Atlanta. where. Police officers came. To a protest, they dropped to their knee in a sign of respect. And forty minutes later. Starts Shooting Rubber Bullets at People Were peacefully protesting and they completely turned on the protesters after making a.

Black Lives Movement baseball CNN Atlanta. CNBC
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"Issue? So you Kinda just mentioned that. Racism is not unique to the. South. If I may just have critique your title people in the South are not really being big fans of being characterized as races they were rather learn from their past and move on. So just. Do not think the south still deserves this label, but it is still a part of the region or. Clarify this for me. You are correct in. I. Don't want anyone to mistake. Racism is southern issue. Because it's not a seven issue. It's more blatant in the south. Think there's less guilt in shame about the south. I think it is interwoven into our history and our past. And, we have not done the work. To grow past yet. So. To Kinda just for our audience would you mind? Kind of speaking of some of the examples of racism that are going on in this country right now. Just to clarify for the audience. I'm happy to actually did a tendency video series on Youtube. That started several months ago. It's more fine in this series details what's been going on in the Black Lives Movement and why we've had arrived. During this time. It has absolutely been a perfect storm. And what a mean by that is if it works for the fact, if the overworked parents who usually spend seventy hours a week between their job running their kids to baseball practice and everything else. if it wasn't for the fact that most of them were at home due to cope with it. And they had the energy in the time to pay attention to what was going on. I don't think the black lives matter movement would have exploded is much as it did and I'm grateful for and I have a lot of appreciation for our social media outlets. Because, everything isn't on national news in that sense CNN CNBC. With that set. Videos on instagram. Or face. Of people who were peacefully marching peacefully protesting there was one instance a believe it was in the south it may have been in Atlanta. Where police officers came. To a protest, they dropped to their knee in a sign of respect. And forty minutes later. Starts shooting rubber bullets at people. were, peacefully protesting and they completely turned on the protesters. Making a.

Black Lives Movement CNN baseball Atlanta
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"So without further ado please enjoy this episode of Our podcast alarmed by today, we are sitting down with author of racism real reason I left the South Regina Hanson, Ms Hanson how're you doing today? Rain Hurry guys doing I'm doing great. Pretty good myself. So for those in the audience who have not yet read your book, can you tell us a little bit about it? Absolutely this is in our. It's brave is less than twenty five thousand words anti initially wrote it. My first thought author is this isn't going to be long enough is it? It isn't gonNA be substantial enough. And then I thought about. The fact that our readers are dropping like flies. We don't read as much as we used to, and there's nothing wrong with getting your message out there effectively and efficiently and twenty five thousand words or less. So that's what I did. It starts in nineteen thirty, six with my father's father being run out of a little town called Georgia. And he was a white male. In the runs through history predominantly in Georgia. In conveys different stories of racism, my parents. Either saw were experienced. As well as what I did in school. Includes a Klan rally in our little small town on Saturday around nine, hundred, eighty six. And Your stories that are weaved together to give a message that. It's still a problem. We need to overcome it and we can overcome that we can't be blind to it. I really cut my. Myself on a chopping block here. I left no stone unturned. I questioned myself my own motives, my own weaknesses. When I should have done better when I did. Okay. It's all in there. And I'm very grateful for the fact that the response is opera. See. Have Been. Particularly from the buck community. which was sern. and. They said, we really appreciate your honesty. And the fact that you dove in headfirst. And left nece terms. Are So. Just to recap the, why did you write this book and more specifically what inspired you to write it? Excellent Questions Josh on this campus, my entire life these stories were festering in my soul if you will right and to give you an idea of how long I'll be fifty in a few weeks. So these were always there. and. I wanted to put them in a book but I, thought author we're going be in a different memoir in a very dear friend of mine from national. Tennessee said to me Gene Abou that turned it names for me. These don't work in the story you're.

Regina Hanson Georgia Klan Josh Tennessee
"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

The World at Large

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on The World at Large

"So without further ado, please enjoy this episode of Our podcast alarmed by today, we are sitting down with author of racism real reason I left the South Regina Hanson MS, Hanson, how're you doing today? Rain. Hurry guys doing I'm doing great. Pretty good myself. So for those in the audience who have not yet read your book, can you tell us a little bit about it? Absolutely. This is our. It's brave is less than twenty five, thousand words anti initially wrote it. My first thought author is this isn't going to be long enough is it it isn't GonNa be substantial enough. And then I thought about. The fact that our readers are dropping like flies. We don't read as much as we used to, and there's nothing wrong with getting your message out there effectively and efficiently and twenty five thousand words or less. So that's what I did. It starts in nineteen, thirty, six with my father's father being run out of a little town called Georgia. And he was a white male. In. The runs through history predominantly Georgia. In conveys different stories of racism, my parents. Either saw were experienced As, well as what I did in school. Includes a Klan rally in our little small town on Saturday around nine, hundred, eighty six. and. Your stories that are weaved together to give a message that. It's still a problem. We need to overcome it and we can overcome that we can't be blind to it. I really cut my. Myself on a chopping block here. I left no stone. unturned. I questioned myself my own motives, my own weaknesses. When I should have done better when I did. Okay. It's all in there. And I'm very grateful for the fact that the response is opera. See. Have Been. Particularly from the buck community. which was sern. And they said, we really appreciate your honesty and the fact that you dove in headfirst. And left nece terms. Are So. Just. To recap the wide, did you write this book and more specifically what inspired you to write it? Excellent Questions Josh on this campus, my entire life, these stories or festering in my soul if you will right and to give you an idea of how long I'll be fifty in a few weeks. So. These were always there. and. I wanted to put them in a book but I thought author we're to be in a different memoir in a very dear friend of mine from national. Tennessee said to me Gene Abou that turned it named for me. These don't work in the story you're.

Hanson Georgia Klan Josh Tennessee
"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:46 min | 3 years ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"Kids. I'm Jane Lindholm. And today we're talking about how Halloween came to be a holiday with professor. Regina, Hanson Halloween is celebrated all over the United States and Canada. And in some parts of Europe at sometime celebrated now kind of. Reverse of how it originally arrived from Europe. We've now exported it back to the UK and other places in Europe and other countries have different but somewhat similar traditions around this time of year in Mexico and some other Latin American countries people celebrate the ideal of Smith us the day of the dead when people honor and remember loved ones who've died a lot like All Saints day. And also day other religions and cultures also have days honoring the dead though. They don't always fall on or around October thirty first and November first we're learning about some of the history behind this Halloween tradition today. So what about carving pumpkins? Let's dig into that favorite activity right now. My name is Nasu. I am having ruled I live in Wisconsin. Why do we make Jack Landers? Hi. My name is jaycee. I come from Hilton New York. I'm nine and my question is why do people carve out pumpkins on Halloween. This one of my favorite stores because again, it's got a mystery to it. And although it's interesting because light is very important in all of the traditions around the harvest and around honoring the dead the Jacqueline specifically started with the Celts. They would carve creepy faces into turnips, and they put a coal inside it they walk around with these lanterns, and it was supposed to scare away the spirits of the dead. Just like I said before. But also this continued when Halloween and All Saints day became a religious holiday people kept doing that to one of the traditions as been kept all the way along the line from the beginning of the when it used to be called Sawan, but when the immigrants came to America to things the weren't as many turnips because people just didn't eat turnips. But there were lots of pumpkins pumpkins are much much easier to car. Carve because they're bigger they're rounder and their hollow. Exactly. And they make such a nice light to and they smell so good. So it was like a a good trade. Right. And you can roast the seeds and eat them. I mean, so many good. Oh, it's awesome. Right. And then you can make a pie afterwards. That's what I do. There's a mystery of why they call it a Jack lantern some people say that it's because of an Irish story where there was a guy who couldn't get into heaven or hill. So we have to walk the earth and he carries a lantern with a face on it. So that's one of the reasons why people say, but there are other reasons too. But yeah, pumpkins are a lot easier to work with. And I think that's that's that's the main reason why we have pumpkin Jekyll engines instead of turnip Jack lanterns while we're on the subject of pumpkins, Sydney from Skokie Illinois has a question. I I hear and Mike what can Oregon pumpkin pumpkins are indigenous to north central and South America. I've mentioned that word indigenous in other episodes, it means native to or originally from so pumpkins come from the Americas. Pumpkins have been cultivated for a long time, meaning grown specifically by humans instead of just growing wild pumpkins are a member of the curb it or gourd family, the same plant family as squash cucumbers and watermelons, we usually think of pumpkins as orange and roundish, but pumpkins are basically just to kind of squash. And there are lots of different kinds of squash white or green lumpy or smooth some are grown to be big, and hollow for carving, and some are fleshy and sweet for making pies, some are grown to be huge where I live, and maybe where some of you live. There are competitions to see who can grow the biggest, pumpkin. These pumpkins can't even be picked up by just one person. They're carried to a county fair on a big truck and sometimes picked up and moved by forklifts this fall a man in New Hampshire grew the biggest pumpkin ever recorded in North America. It. Wade two thousand five hundred twenty eight pounds. That's the weight of about thirty six average ten year olds one pumpkin thirty six ten year olds the biggest pumpkin ever recorded in the world was grown a couple of years ago by a man in Belgium, and it weighed about one hundred pounds more pumpkins are now grown all over the world. And most of them are grown for eating not carving or winning competitions before we leave Halloween behind. There's something to think about when you're dressing up in costumes and going trick or treating your taking part in a very ancient celebration. It's fine. However, you celebrate it, but I think it adds to the richness and excitement and mystery of it if we remember its roots because it's in some ways, I think very exciting and fun to know that people were doing some of the things that we do now even a thousand years ago. What if like me you don't? I really like things that feel scary. Do you have advice for people like me who find Halloween a little bit creepy about how to maybe think about it in a way that will make us feel more comfortable? Yeah. I think a good way to think about hollowing. And this is also the ancient Celts did this. You know, you don't have to watch scary movies and things like that to enjoy Halloween. I think you can think about it as a celebration of the harvest and happily make your pie and your pumpkin spice, and all the things that people enjoy think about it as a way to get cozy before the beginning of winter also would mention that there are some families that don't celebrate Halloween at all, and they have reasons for that. And we should respect those as well and don't make children who aren't celebrating Halloween feel bad because they don't that was Boston University. Professor, Regina Hanson, answering all of your Halloween questions. And as she said some families. Don't celebrate Halloween by choice, and for some of you listening. You might live in countries that don't celebrate Halloween at all. So. What do you think of this strange holiday? If you have a question for us have an adult record you and send your question to questions at boat why kids dot org? We'll do our best to get an answer for you. Special. Thanks this week to Regina Hanson. But why is produced by melody debt in me, Jane Lindholm at for Mont public radio. Our theme music is by loop rentals. We'll be back in two weeks with an all new episode until then stay curious.

Jane Lindholm Regina Hanson Europe professor Americas Regina UK Jack Landers Wisconsin Mexico United States Nasu jaycee Hilton New York South America Jacqueline Canada New Hampshire
"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:21 min | 3 years ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"History packed into what Regina Hanson just said. So let's break down and go through it, the Celts had special celebrations at the end of October other cultures also had festivals like this to celebrate the harvest, but also to usher in the winter and honor the dead. These people had their own spiritual beliefs or religions, but people who followed the religion known as Christianity became very powerful. And started exploring other parts of the world and settling and also trying to spread their religion to these other people who were living in the parts of the world where the Christian explorers and settlers. Is removing to one of the ways the Christians tried to get these new people to become Christian was to kind of blend. These other holidays these pagan holidays into already existing Christian traditions, Christians celebrated something called All Saints day on November first honoring people who had gone to heaven. All Saints day was sometimes also called all hallows day. Hallo means holy. So the day before all hallows day or All Saints day was all hallows eve think about how words sometimes get shortened and joined together like instead of saying do not you might say don't or instead of we will you can say we'll well, that's how we got from hallows eve to Halloween all hallows eve the day before all hallows day became Halloween and some of the traditions. We still have. For halloween. I became familiar in this holiday known as all hallows eve, they lit fires lit candles. They made special on lanterns out of turnips that they put Kohl's in car faces on the scare way the evil spirits. They made noises like with bills and thanking pots and pans and things like that to scare away the evil spirits, and they also honored the dead and gave them gifts. Like there were these things in the middle ages called soul case because you kind of like cookies that people would dress up like they were the souls of the dead, and they go around Soling. And then people would give them these cookies to make them go away, basically, a Hasso that sort of the start of trick or treating and maybe even the start of what today we now think of as dressing up, and I mean, very different kinds of dress up because today we're doing things like dressing like what we might wanna be. When we grow up or dressing up like a dinosaur or like a character from PJ masks or your favorite show, but they were dressing. Up and getting treats even hundreds of years ago. Yeah. And they just wore whatever, they the, you know, even the first Halloween traditions when they came here to America from from Europe, people were just were like sheets and pillowcases on their head, you know, put holes in them. And that's how you see like those ghosts like the ghost looks like a sheet with holes in the eyes and things like that. That's all the kind of things that people used to wear when these traditions were beginning Halloween, at least as we know it in the United States was brought to the country by immigrants people who moved here from other places so immigrants from Ireland Scotland and places like that came over with their tradition, which was much more wild than the tradition. That kid celebrate today, and they used to actually play a lot of pranks and things like that they came over here, and they brought their tradition with them and also people from certain Christian traditions, like Othello schism Episcopalians and things like that. They brought their religious element over with them too. So that they would have church on on All Saints day. And they would pray for the dead the dead on all souls day and things like that. But at the same time, there's also this old tradition of people going around making mischief on the on Halloween on October thirty first when Halloween changed into a celebration focused on children and away from a wild crazy night favored by young men. It started to take on a different kind of feeling and it also became a holiday that candy makers got involved in we're talking late eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds now that was around the time of the early twentieth century. We actually started making commercial candy like companies started making candy specifically for how mean and also they started to be helming decorations that you could buy stores hollowing cards. So that you could buy in stores so really part of it was trying to team sort of wild element Apollo wing, but also with Goodway for companies to make money. So yes Halloween has become a big moneymaker for companies. They sell costumes and. Candy, greeting cards and decorations, those kinds of things can sometimes make adults rule there is but a lot of adults really like Halloween to how we really is for everybody. If we want to celebrate it as a religious holiday. I think that's great. If you want to celebrate it as just totally for fun and just for kids as great an and even nowadays, even grownups many grownups have gone back to celebrating Halloween as a way to bring out the part of them that maybe they hide uring the year, or maybe they will always wish they were a rockstar or maybe they always feel like a butterfly one day these feel like being a butterfly, you know, they get to dress up like a butterfly on Halloween. And so those like that too coming up we'll carve into some of the other Halloween traditions like Jack lanterns, but first here's a message for the adults listening. We have support for this episode from little passports, a monthly subscription service for curious kids each package includes games. Souvenirs and activities from a new country designed to spark curiosity in cultures around the globe. Go to little passports dot com slash why. It's Halloween season. And we've got some spooky stories to tell you about. Don't worry. Not too spooky. Just spooky enough on the podcast. What if world host, Mr. Eric and a young listener make up a story about what would happen if unicorns lived in a Halloween Bush and on the past and the curious a true story about a writer who tried to make himself seem like William Shakespeare and another tale of criminals who tried to steal the body of ABRAHAM LINCOLN checkout. Both what if world and the past and the curious wherever you get your podcasts, this is. But why a podcast for curious kids.

Regina Hanson Soling Kohl Goodway United States Mr. Eric writer Europe ABRAHAM LINCOLN William Shakespeare America Ireland Scotland one day
"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

09:16 min | 3 years ago

"regina hanson" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids. I'm Jane Lindholm this week things are getting a little bit spooky not really. But we are going to be talking about. How why do? We celebrate Halloween soon. Feds had Halloween. Why do we make Jacqueline in the United States and Canada Halloween is a big deal many kids and a lot of adults love it too. It could be a lot of fun. We do know that some of the stuff that goes along with Halloween can be scary for some kids. There's a lot of talk of ghosts and monsters some people like to watch scary movies, people dress up in costumes, and sometimes that can actually be a little unsettling to. I wanna let you know in advance that. There's nothing scary. In this episode of the podcast. We're actually going to talk about how the Halloween. We celebrate today. Especially in the US got started. It's a history show. And we're doing that. Because those are the Halloween questions. You have sent us a lot of you want to hear about the origins of this weird and sometimes silly holiday and to get some answers, we found someone who likes Halloween so much. She wanted to study it. Hi, I'm Regina Hanson, and I teach at Boston University. And I'm a scholar of all kinds of scary and creepy things that's not really her official job title, though, Regina is a college professor who teaches literature the study of books and writing, but she's always been interested in scary and magical things so that's the kind of stuff she likes to read and write about celebrating Halloween is a kid was actually one of the things that drew her to those subjects in the first place. I think partially it was I enjoyed going for Halloween ever since I was very small being out at night where you couldn't always see what was going on. But you're out having an adventure in in the nighttime and the wind blowing and also. The books that I read when I was little even starting with a picture book when I was little cold Georgie, which was about a little ghost who lived in Vermont. I think those with things that drew me when I was little and Regina Hansen says her family, really loved Halloween too. So she grew up liking the holiday and the fund she had with her family and friends. What about you do you like Halloween? What's your favorite part dressing up? Maybe going trick or treating when I was little we used to have a party in my town where there was a big bonfire and sometimes we would do things like Bob for apples at someone's house. That's when there's a barrel or a bucket filled with apples that are floating in water, and you have to grab an apple using just your mouth, no hands sometimes your hands or even tied behind you. It sounds simple, but it's actually pretty hard. And it's kind of funny to watch other people doing the bobbing for apples when you're doing it. You tend to get water up your nose, and you just are frustrated until you get a hold of that apple and then success you feel like you've one now. Several of you were curious about why we do all of this Halloween stuff. And if you live outside of the US, this yearly celebration on October thirty first might not be familiar at all. So let's begin with. How it all started? Here's seven-year-old fern from new ski Vermont infants had Halloween. My name is Nora. I'm seven years old. I live in lititz, Pennsylvania. And my question is why do we have Halloween? Hi, my name is Oscar I am seven years old. I live in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. And my question is how was Halloween invented probably the first people to celebrate a festival that we now know is Halloween were people call the Celts who were from the northern part of Europe. And if you're Irish or Scottish or Welsh than your kill and they used to have special festivals when the season turned especially on the hug when in may, call bell tain, and that was when the summer. Was starting and they had one a November first which was called Salman. And that was when winter was starting, and what's really interesting about it is, you know, we know this from the fall, especially if you live in the northern part of the United States in the fall, that's when everything grows and all the food is delicious food is getting ready for thanksgiving there. We're going to eat and all that stuff that's happening. But also the nights are getting longer and it's getting ready for the wintertime. So even for us many people, especially if you live in the United States, you sort of say, yeah, it's a weird time, it's filled with all kinds of great things. But also getting ready to get a little dark and sort of go into your house in cuddle up and everything's like that. So it was kind of the same for them. Other people in other parts of the world were also celebrating the turn of the season and the getting ready for winter and the harvest it's a big deal, and what many of these celebrates had in common. Was there? Also thinking about. Death because we thinking about winter. So then they're thinking about maybe this is a time of the year when the people who went before us who we love are coming back to sort of see us, you know, that it's a time when we could get to honor them a little bit more. So this happens in Mexico. They have a day of the dead celebration. And other parts also of Latin America in Italy. They have one also the ancient Romans had a festival called Pomona in Pomona has to do with the goddess of apples and fruit trees, so all of these cultures had some kind of harvest festival that in many cases was also a festival honoring the dead. This autumn festival. Regina was talking about. Someone was celebrated two thousand three thousand years ago by the Celts people who lived in Ireland Wales and Scotland and some parts of France, someone is the Celtic word for the end of summer at this time of year, the Celts would have a big bonfire and celebrate the end of the harvest and the beginning of the long. Long cold dark winter and part of the celebration of salmon was thinking about people who came before people who had died in addition to the bonfires sometimes people would wear costumes, and they'd all come together in these big community gatherings. Sounds a little bit a little bit like Halloween, doesn't it? But that's still a long way from where Halloween is today. Hi, my name is Kylie, and I am eight years old. A tear yo Canada. And I have a Quested. Why do we celebrate Halloween? Hi. My name is mayor and seven years old. I live in the MSCI Minnesota a Mike alleged in is why do we celebrate Halloween. So how did we get from the Celts and others two thousand years ago up to the modern day these various people were celebrating their harvests slash death honoring the dead festivals. And what happened was the introduction of the religion of Christianity which had its own traditions. Also, having to do with honoring those who came before of the Christians had an idea that some people when they died they went straight to heaven, but other people didn't get to go straight to heaven. They went to a place called purgatory where they sort of waited around. And then finally they could go to heaven, but for them to get you had to pray for them. So what happened was when the Christians came to what now are Linden Scotland Wales they brought with them this tradition and it got mix. And up with the Celtic tradition of Salman and a similar thing happened also in Latin America when the Christian missionaries came to those countries, their Catholic religion, Christian religion got mixed up with the these ceremonies honoring the dead the ceremonies weren't always held on the same day that weren't always held at the harvest. But they put them on the harvest it used to be that Christian celebrated the dead on in may. But they changed it about like, I don't know maybe nine hundred AD something like that. They changed it to being on the same day in Europe as someone so that they could say, look, we're doing this thing. We're all doing the same thing together. Maybe you'd like to be a Christian, and so the traditions changed in some ways because now instead of honoring sort of the gods and things like that from before they on doing the Christian saints. So on November first that was called All Saints day. And that was the day that you wanted all the the good people that were already going to have an and then November second. And was also zday when you prayed for the people that weren't quite in heaven yet. So the day before October thirty first was the eve of All Saints, or what they called all hallows in English all hallows eve or Halloween, and that's how we get our day of Halloween now just like emptying the seeds from pumpkin before you carve, it there's a lot of history

United States Celts apple Regina Vermont Europe Pennsylvania Jane Lindholm Latin America Regina Hanson Jacqueline Regina Hansen lititz Bob Bethlehem Linden Scotland Wales Salman Mexico