20 Episode results for "Rees"

The Greatest Biopic Thats Never Been Made?

The Nod

38:45 min | 1 year ago

The Greatest Biopic Thats Never Been Made?

"Episode of nod is brought to you by Auden, a new line of bras and underwear available only at target automates bras designed for comfort and support. They come in sizes thirty two double eight of forty six g and they're all under twenty two dollars. You can try Auden in-store or online by visiting target dot com. That's target dot com. This up. So the nod is brought to you by the all new Toyota Raffour, if you think, you know, ref for better think again underneath wrath fours. Rugged good looks our abilities expand the potential of where you can go on or off road. So yoda's new raff or limited is meant to elevate. The driving experience with vailable features like an upgraded all wheel drive. A multi information dashboard display and refined interior design with comfort and convenience in mind. Get to know the all new ref for for yourself. Visit Toyota dot com slash red. For for more details as Toyota dot com slash are av for. From Gimblett media. This is the not a show about black culture from black. Mrs biggest fans, I'm Brittany lose America. America. Yes. I don't mean it dredgers this by in February something terrible happened. What happened to the bio pic green? Book wine the Oscar for best picture causing black people everywhere to grown almost collectively. In unison. The movie told the story of black classical pianist, Don, Shirley, and his driver. Frank Villalonga as spent a year driving through the south experiencing racism along the way. Yeah. If you just a small taste of why black people, might course at the idea of movie like green book. Well, okay. I haven't haven't seen the movie, but I do remember one specific moment from the trailer that I was like this is I'm done here where the driver is supposed to be this like white. I don't know if he's from New York, but it seems like a good fella type guy. And he's like, oh, you know, what forget about it that type guy and he's like trying to get Don Shirley, played by the God Herschel alley on this step in this case where so he's trying to get Don Shirley to eat fried chicken. Yeah. Never had fried chicken my life to chicken. We have a very narrow assessment of Tony the story rings false to me. If you're telling me this man who otherwise eats meat doesn't eat fried chicken. That's ridiculous. Yeah. It just doesn't make sense. No. It doesn't make sense that conversation even happened. And I understand them driving to the south was supposed to solve racism exactly if feels like the movie itself was just trying to make why people feel better about being kinda races. So the fact that green book was one made and to one what is considered to be the highest honor that can be bestowed on a film is a grave and serious travesty. But there's something else I have to point out. Okay. To me. It's not the greatest film travesty of the year. Oh, no. There's a true travesty that people should be outraged about bringing something that should trouble people who love Phil people have black folks. People just stand for Justice and all things good. Do you Britney, my friend? Do you know what that travesty is? No the. The greatest film travesty of twenty nineteen isn't that green book won an Oscar? No, it's not it's not that. It's that Adela Reese bio pic has not been made all this time. It's been two years since she passed. Where's it at home? I guy you're gonna tell me one came out. I was going to be like 'cause you know, she's from Detroit. I know this, you know, she went to the same high school as my parents Imants, dad Lenore is mom, my uncle George lily Tomlin, Diana Ross. And Jack white did you know that I did not know that of natural progression for members of your friends and family to stages screening and Buzek is is amazing. But but no, I did not know has talent Detroit has talent it does. Okay. Okay. So I take it. You're familiar at least a little bit with delleri a little bit a little bit. Yes. I've never. Scene touched by an angel though before did, you know that really know that that stands in stark contrast to most of the people who've heard of della Reese, yeah, I mean, most people like remember della REEs as the sassy but comforting angel tests on that show touched by Roma Downey with Roma down the racial because in the back over the back pages of jet magazine every week they they mentioned every single television show that coming on that week, whether it was a rerun or special or whatever that featured a black actor, so she was always in the bag shoes in the back for probably about ten years because she played the character of tests on CBS for nine seasons. And that show was massive like everybody watched it. Millions of people, including my mom, my mom. Yeah. Everybody's family washed show and tuned in to hear tests kinda swoop into the lives of people in crisis. And just you know, tell them how much God loves it. Here's actually a little taste. East of della REEs ask tests, oh, talking to a sick man who needs some affirmation. I am an angel. I was sent by God to bring you a message. No, you have not disappointed God because you can't prize. He never expected you to be anyone. But who you are. Wow. That's a really beautiful sentiment touching very comforting feel touched maybe by angel. So I. You're stuck with me trying to 'em. I keep going. So I play this clip because we most think of what a della REEs bio pic what cover they can only picture this chapter of her life, which is a shame her life was so inspiring and groundbreaking that is a travesty and injustice that no one has made it into the Oscar winning film. It is to be. And that is why Britney okay. I want to present to you today. Two. Three reasons. The three reasons why the story of della Reese 's life is the greatest bio pic you've never seen. This is actually exciting to me because I know a lot of her early life. And I know obviously, I know some about her life and for why she had a podcast this. Yes, she did. Welcome to Hello, Reverend della speaking with the Reverend Dr della Reese, let from podcast you gotta listen to the episode where it's her in my Angelou. There's just literally like on the phone like they're not talking about anything. It's so good years. We've been together. I'm always known that. I could depend on you. And I've always known that. I wanted you to depend on me more than you. And it's never changed. I did not know that you came here to give me some news. How about that? But yeah, I don't really know. I can't tell you anything about her life beyond pas- going to Wayne State university until she was like older, I don't know anything about her actual life in between. Ready ready? All right. So the first reason why the story of della Reese is life is the greatest bio pic you never seen. In the musical numbers in this film would be in credible. Tell me more. I think I know this when tell me more. So the thing that most people don't know about della REEs is that the woman was a Sanger. Yes. Like, she just had the pipes. Yes. So here's a clip of della REEs singing, someone to watch over me a somebody. See? He. To the. Someone. So let me tell you how she got her start. It involves the name, you might know. You know, maybe you've heard at one time. Have you heard of Mahalia Jackson once or twice? Okay. So Mahalia Jackson. Yes. One of the great Sanger's of all time when the grace gospel artists of all time actually discovered della REEs when she was thirteen imagine being discovered by Mahalia Jackson, like what other what other boost can you get confidence? I will you couldn't tell me shit you. Really? Wow. Now, the interesting kind of side about this is that della REEs, she when she talked about this. She talks about this time as her actually hating hill Jackson. It's like kinda ingest because she took her out on tour, and like to be she just wanted to go out and be popping like della wanted to Guam, Delaware. Yeah. She wanted to go out and like meet boys in like on tour. She's thirteen but Mahalia Jackson wasn't playing that. But that's nice though. You know what I'm saying? I mean, look back you still toured the country with male you Jackson. Yeah. But also, I mean is is that like touring the country with your elderly auntie. Sometimes mixed bag. Anyway, eventually she came out from under Meles wing. And then she started to transition into a singing jazz in army, which might also not know is that from nineteen fifty seven to nineteen seventy she recorded twenty one albums and handmade. Twenty-one according to every two weeks, basically. Like the woman was working prolific album albums. She had ten singles hit the top one hundred charts. I mean, shoot it's like two our constant constant like I mean, it's like you do that much sums got hit. So hits included. The aren't the came out in nineteen Fifty-nine. Don't you know, which hit number two on the pop charts? Number one on the arm beach arts. It was an adaptation of a song from the opera lab. OEM by Puccini. Here's a clip I was hoping play clip. In with. That is nice. That's a beautiful song. I mean, she she clearly liked is one of those people who like like in. That's all you can tell like, oh, she can as a soft. But you can also hear that that the girl can let it rich. She has a really nice Alto voice. Della REEs was really about this music. She was really really talented singer. So talented that in the seventies. She actually became one of the first gossip formers to book shows in Las Vegas. It's really amazing. Because what we just heard was like an RN be love song in the fact that she's able to go back to gospel. That's new Kirk Franklin broke, the mold, but that's interesting issues able to go back to Vegas in book. Gospel shows guests in Vegas, though, that's will show right? They probably needed it. True. So let's take a step back for minute just picture della REEs starting out small gospel performances being that young girl with a grown woman voice touring the country singing gospel as a spicy. Teen going toe to toe with Mahalia Jackson. And then you have the scenes where she's all done up in the beautiful gowns of the sixties, traveling all around the world arm be and then in Las Vegas with her name in bright lights, showing everyone. What time it is? With a voice that just brings you to tears. Does that sound like something you would wanna see on the big screen Britney Noah as a person who is paid to see Dreamgirls? Yes. And sparkle even cause we love Whitney. I would obviously go see this kidding me. As so that is the first reason why the story of della Reese is life is the greatest bio pic, you've never seen the musical numbers in the family. Just be incredible. They'd be spectacular. I can't argue with them. But that's just the first act. After the break, we see a side of della REEs that's about as far from an angel as you can get. You only know della REEs from touched by nature. Mess up your whole shit. This episode of the nod is brought to you by Auden, a new line of bras and underwear available only at target here at the nod. We have strong feelings about bras recently, the nods editor Emmanuel berry producer, Kate Parkinson Morgan and senior producer sought Abderrahman. We're discussing the highs and lows of brush opping, which reminded of one of her first shopping trips as a new mom when I was nursing I decided to like splurge a nice bra from like a nice bra store for you. Thank you. I don't want to say the name of the store, but it was like a place that was just specifically for bras. And it had just like all the different colors and styles and patterns, and I was like looking for the nursing bras. And they're. They just come in this one color Tope. That's it no pattern. Just hope and it was a signal that was like you are not a person anymore. You are just a milk factory. You just need this for like, it's not for you. Yeah. So I was just like. Oh, okay. Cool. This is up bras store, and they have one version of nursing. That's really bad. Yeah. Sometimes you just need to wear something pretty to feel more like a person Auden bras, come in a variety of colors and styles, including seamless racer back brawl. Let's and they even make nursing bras to and all of them are under twenty two dollars. To learn more. Visit target dot com. That's target dot com. Welcome back. So as we know music wasn't the only thing in della Reese, his story, which leads me to reason number two that della Reese is life is the greatest bio pic you've never seen. The movie would feature one of the most epic and hilarious fight scenes of all time who she fight with. In. We'll get their shoes. Very sanctified of her podcast. You didn't mention any of this on the podcast. So this is where I have to admit that this reason is cheating just a little bit. Yeah. Yeah. Because they didn't actually fight in real life. Okay. Just say doesn't sound very pass through ver. But in the bio pic think of is kind of like a movie in a movie, right? Right. Right. Okay. So della Reese popped up tons of movies and TV shows of over the years, but there's one role there's one role and probably one scene of hers that really really deserves to be celebrated, and that's when she showed up most of the greatest black comedians of all time and beat the holy hail out of Eddie Murphy. So in nineteen thousand nine della REEs appeared in a little movie called Har lights. Yes. Nineteen thirty eight the nights belonged to Harlem have you seen Harlem? I haven't seen it in a very long time. I only see busy pieces because I wasn't allowed to watch. It came out. You can match. The movie is is an R rated movie language, not suitable for children. But when it came out it was heralded for collection of some of the greatest black comedians of all time. Eddie Murphy, Richard pry where FOX Robin hairs proper. Here's I know. Go ahead. You also have Arsenio hall. Charlie Murphy, even jasmine guy, the movie's cast was truly a powerhouse is also just really really funny. It's a funny movie. But you know, who shows all of those people up that I'm inching. Do you know Hillary's della Reese, got one about one you're on a it on a row. So the movie itself is like a thirties era gangster film where Richard Pryor. Eddie murphy. They're running like this kind of like legal casino and nightclub and della REEs plays Vero, she is like the clubs Madame. So now if you only know della Reese from touched by then. Go miss up your whole shit because della REEs is character. She just she wheels. Foul language all cared. Just do but della REEs character, especially wields found language, I isn't art form like she's just she's masterful at it. But the thing that should really be celebrated is this one scene is one scene where della Reese steals, the whole fucking movie in it, Eddie Murphy, casually accuses della REEs character of stealing of skimming money from the club. Now, I don't know about you. But I grew up knowing that you don't accuse a black person of dealing stealing. You don't do that those things that will get you fucked up. That's true. And della REEs is character Vero was no different. Here's a clip. Are you on stealing is stealing girl? Come on and sit down shut the fuck up you shut the fuck up. Benny. I wouldn't tell you to kiss my ass to do probably can't find it. You blind motherfucker. She Leers walking around room Cussing people out that step out back. It was just a misunderstanding. Misunderstanding quick just accuse me of stealing. Bring you ask me bring it on come on already scared. Right. That's not those aren't the words. You wanna hear? She just said not ten minutes ago. The God never expected you to be any different than you. Are you just didn't expect him to love you? And now this. Exactly. So as you heard delegates Eddie to go out in this alley. So they can fight one on one. The alley is cramped pepper with trash cans, and then you got della and Eddie they're in their boxing stances with the all time. Great comedians, like Richard Pryor, red FOX surrounding them in this circle dressed in these pristine tuxedos. Now naturally, you're rooting for della in this epic three minutes. Three minutes battle. So long fights. Come up com on a gold outfit. Foxtail hanging off. Eddie Murphy think he did it. He thinks somebody. I'm scared like he should know better than this. Wanna talk about say insulted me. And I got to kick your ass right now afterwards, I don't know hard feelings. Straight to them out. Roll. What you ain't nothing wrong. With me. What the fuck is wrong with you. You don't accuse me of stealing anything. I'm Steve not here today. Joe face. Pressure story. You're your fucking. This way, you know, you fucked up. That's what I'm talking about. Now. Eddie Murphy looks show because let's get it. From that punch. Like, she liked it. Literally just three piece uppercut him into a trash to learn to respect me. Damn and the next changes just combos all fused. And I'm going to kick your ass again. Crazy bitch. He threw a trash can on her. And she's about to get back. On a hit people with garbage. Eddie Murphy looks for real afraid. The. Razer way. She pulled the blaze. I play no more. You put that fucking raise a blow your goddamn pinkie toe off. You're going to shoot men pink ghetto you going to be the nine to- having his limping bitch. And Harlem, you know, stop fucking with me. Now put the rate of the way. Shooting. Shoot quickly. Take your best shot. Ultimately, della losses fight because Eddie Murphy DJ shoot her toll off. What are you gonna do? Yeah. But to be honest, when I think back to the scene, I never think about it as her having loss, I often like forget, she actually got shot because in that moment that is not the point. She demanded her respect amongst all these men by beating the hell out of Eddie Murphy for like, two minutes and forty five seconds. It is amazing. It is epic. We stand. Also, I when do you get a role like that at that point in your life? You know, like, I mean, really literally people didn't necessarily think of her as its magnificient comedic talent. Yeah. But in Harlem nights, she is in a movie with people who with men who are considered like the great comedians time as she was able to show up like that. You know what I'm saying? What else could she do? Right. Like, I could do was sleeping with ancient song angel touch by night. Lord, hammers this. How you doing? Saying is shoes able to touch by angel in her sleep. Okay. Eddie murphy. Richard Pryor REDD Foxx people who did stand up forever, Robin, Harris stand up for ever. And somehow, you know what I'm saying? I'm just saying the talent was there talent the talent jumped out she has the range literally areas. Ooh. Ooh. I just it's like I love learning all this about her. But also, it's just like also makes me very stressed because I'm just like oh my God. So this black woman came in like a sexagenarian probably in had just in delivered. Right. I'm like what does she have been given anything like equaling the same attention opportunities as the men's shoes in the scene with? Oh, her whole career. Imagine imagine stressful stressful. It is it is. But I'm happy to say that the last reason hopefully cheer you up. After the break. Della does something no black woman before her has ever done. I don't know. Maybe I would have different dreams myself. If I even knows that del Reza's the first person have those sorts of opportunities. This up. So the nod is brought to you by the new CBS all access original series that twilight zone featuring Academy Award winner. Jordan Peele that twilight zone drops on CBS all access April. First in judging by the recent trailer. This all new show will definitely have you questioning what dimension you're so Britney. Yes, air, Do you believe in multiple dimensions dimension where everything is exactly the same as the one? We're living in has maybe one or two things that are different. You mean like a version of the nine were actually reptile people or like a dimension where podcasts aren't listened to? But instead, it's highly produced aromatic experience. That's ridiculous Britney. I'm thinking more like a dimension. Where you and I are like holler something a little more subtle, but but you can get a glimpse of another dimension by checking out the twilight zone only on CBS. Alexis. Visit CVS dot com slash nod to redeem your free trial today that CBS dot com slash nod for a free trial of CVS all excess. This episode of the nod is brought to you by the all new Toyota RAV four you think, you know, wrath for think again, the new ultra table route four comes loaded with more innovative tech rugged capability and sophisticated style than ever before it comes with the vailable features like all wheel drive capability and multi terrain traction giving drivers the ability to tackle just about any urban suburban and great outdoor venture with superior handling and control plus every twenty nineteen route for model. Features an end tune three point oh audio system complete with wifi connect and apple carplay compatibility making it even easier to listen to your favorite podcasts. I can think of one so iota has revolutionized design at the raff or limited so delivers an elevated driving experience with available features like a panoramic glass roof in eight inch touch screen multimedia display and more get to know. The all new wrath for for yourself. Visit Toyota dot com slash ref. Four for more details that's Toyota dot com slash wrath four. So we're going to move into the last reason are you pumped are you ready? I'm ready. I'm invigorated right now. All right. So reason number three that della Reese is life is the greatest bio pic you've never seen. The film has one of those special moments that could inspire a generation. I I believe you. I mean, the thing is I don't know that much about her life. So I'm like, what is the thing? You know what I'm saying? The thing. What is it? Get right. Okay. Okay. In nineteen sixty nine della REEs, she kinda decided to transition away from us as kind of like our primary thing to TV she had options. So she was already star at this point. It had been regularly appearing on the late show circuit often shows like Sullivan tonight show, and she was such a good guest that in nineteen sixty nine. She got an offer an offer to do something that no other black woman in history had done reading this. The breaking barriers part. She got an offer to host our very own. Daytime TV talk show. That's right. Seventeen years before Oprah with long her own history making TV show, della REEs, hosted dela a daytime talk show that ran for nearly two hundred episodes. I did not know about this not many people, don't wait. So cases, she had talk show talk show. Imagine jeeze. She's like, the I basically I like woman have like a was in national talk show. Absolutely now didn't play every single market because it was nationally available syndicator what tragically there's very very little footage of this show for a couple of reasons. One at the time people didn't really take note of the historical significance of the show in to the way that video tapes at the time would be reused like often the tastes were expensive. So they would just tape over stuff over and over and over you. Oh my gosh. A lot times a lot of the tape has been lost or recorded over. It makes me so sad. That makes me really sad. They're literally only two clips of the show in existence at the moment. They're publicly available white. Yes. See one you are where you're gonna be like Nelson shit outta here. So okay here is della Reese on della. Ooh, it's very short. But she is introducing the school funk band war. You remember? I'm a I. Have the world is a ghetto on binal. I'm a big fan of. There's an Englishman who became well known to the young people in America is the leader of a group called the animals. He now has a new sound and a whole different bag of music, but you please welcome Mr. Eric bird, and and his new group called war. So I don't know about you. But if it like really touched me one to see delleri sex. She's got this beautiful like gown like dress with this. Like, I dunno because shawl Schaal sash situation of some sort like are over her shoulders shabby, you know, it's like a prayer cloth for the chest. Yes. But like she she looks beautiful like she's she's done up. So well, she is like standing out in front. The spotlight is on her. She has her orchestra in the background. Just like very seventies set is it was it was amazing to see her in this period and understand the significance of what she was doing. Also, the other thing is interesting too. So I would guess that she has to be what in her like late thirties early forties in this clip. I think about like just how significant that is not just have like a black woman, a black woman who seems a lot of popularity making black music for black people and to be. In her like forties. Thirty late thirties. Early forties having this sort of career major career shift and like being able to break this barrier. That's like that's really significant. They don't like to give Hollywood don't like to give -tunities two people above the age of twenty six still today. Yeah. So this is like this is really significant. So the show was show was popular. But sadly, it was canceled after one season. But in spite of that della will go on to make history again by becoming the first woman period to guest host the tonight show with Johnny Carson seriously. Yeah. So she would she would do like the late night circa all the time. She was like a popular guests there, and she would do so well that Johnny Carson like went and tapped her one of those nine hundred, you know, he decided Taipei hosted she gets shoes. I one period we choose the first woman period period. Not just black woman. Interesting. It makes me so sad too. Because like, I didn't know about that. You know, what I know? And like, I don't know maybe I would have different dreams for myself. If I had even known the show like that exists that del Rio was the first person have those sorts of opportunities able to see it. Yeah. Yeah. Since it's inspiring. But it is heartbreaking, but also inspiring. Okay. So now. They just put the young lady lillies saying she's going to be on like just replacing Carlin Carson Daley on the NBC lately might show I'm happy for her is great. It's also long overdue to have not just a woman of color. I just a young woman of color, but any woman period like a on a big network late night like big network late night show. And I know it's like like writing with something I've always been interested in hosting something. I was to become interested in. I remember like when I was a teen. And it was like the main person that I was looking up to who was seemed like they were headed for that track was like Tina Fey, but still there's still like a level of remove I would say, but like to just think about the fact that there was a black woman back in the day who is so engaging just as a guest that people were like, we gotta give her own show before Oprah. I always had this idea of what was possible. And it's very limited. You know, maybe I would have thought of myself as somebody who could you know, hostal? Television show. It's it's difficult to imagine for yourself something that you can't see and for so long. I thought I wasn't seeing this because it hadn't happened. But it did nobody's really talking about it with the with the level of seriousness and praised that they should have been exactly for decades literally for decades generation. Yeah. Yeah. You know, I'll be like we laugh, but in this sounds corny but seeing images like that and really more. So just like knowing these stories they make they make a big difference in you know. You know, in you know, the feature that you see for yourself. That's real, you know, and that's all the more reason why she deserves a bio-pic people deserve to see this. They deserve to see that inspiration to know the barriers as she has broken. Two. Free reasons. So in summation information, the three reasons why della Reese is life is the greatest bio pic, you never seen one. It will contain some the best musical numbers of all time to the movie would feature. One of the most epic and hilarious fight scenes of all time in three it would contain one of those special moments that could inspire a generation who knows maybe conspire someone like say Oprah, and that's just that's just her career stuff. There's there are other highlights. She was married three times. I wanna know what was going on to anybody famous. Now. Nobody really those are the guys that get those are going to take your money, exactly. She was put in the hospital after accidentally walking through a plate glass window literature has scars all over her body. How poor della? Yeah. She also wrote like a bunch of weird kind of prosperity gospel books. They were kind of scammy. But, you know, do you though, probably because she married those men I wouldn't be surprised if in either took her money and she needed to get some money back. She had RIA, look how you live or day minister Rockwood SE, the story just has it. I want the movie right now. I would definitely paint those apps go to RPI expanding twenty. I'll pay you know, sometimes you're like I'm gonna go to movies. RPX? Yeah. No, I would pay that they had only RPX I will go see this movie. Still. This week. We have to give a special shout out to someone who's been with the nine in one way or another since its infancy are now former editor Emmanuel berry, we will miss your kindness leadership your taste in Korean dramas and your love for the Vive Latino playlist. We wish you the best of luck in your future. Endeavors, and we cannot wait to hear what you come up with next. The night is produced by me air getting's with bringing lose and k Parkinson more. Our senior producers Sarah bureau this episode was edited by manual, very and Sarah sayers additional editorial support from poor. Hey, chess fact, checking Mexican show is mixed Cedrick Wilson, our theme music is back or digital music credits. Check the show. It is well enough rendered sense of sexual tension. The reader will read almost anything beloved author Sally Rooney knows how to keep her readers hooked. And it's a trick that's been around for centuries Allston is a master of that as well like all the sexual energy of the novel is put into somebody moving share or like looking across the room certain way, and it's amazing for more Sally Rooney and further meditations on the sexual potential of furniture. Listen to the cut on Tuesdays from Gimblett media and the cut. Thanks are sponsor Toyota in the all new Raffour. If you think, you know, Raffour think again, learn more about the freshly design ramp four by heading over to Toyota dot com slash Raffour. For more details. That's Toyota dot com slash raff four. Thanks to our sponsor the twilight zone available April. I only on CBS all excess cross over into another dimension for yourself checkout. The twilight zone on April first only on CBS all excess. Visit CBS dot com slash nod to redeem your free trial today that CVS dot com slash nod for a free trial of CBS all access.

Dr della Reese della REEs Eddie Murphy CBS Britney Noah Toyota Reverend della Della della REEs Mahalia Jackson della REEs Auden Oprah America Oscar Richard Pryor Gimblett media Adela Reese Don Shirley Harlem
32:1 - The Unsustainable Ratio

Global GoalsCast

43:55 min | 1 year ago

32:1 - The Unsustainable Ratio

"The world has existed for forty five million centuries. But this is really the first century when one species, the human species can determine a planet fate. We're use Moore's horses. And we are having a heavy footprint, which is affecting the biosphere and affecting the climate consumption rates. Meaning consumption rates of water fuel and other resources nettles in the developed world on the average about thirty two times those in the poorest countries. And that means that one American citizen has the impact of the world. Thirty two Kenyans. It's becoming increasingly impossible to have a stable world with big differences, in standards living's around the world, the only stable outcome is going to be a world with much more equal standards of living around. Welcome to the global goals cast explores, how to change the world that world of ours, particularly the rich world is consuming more than our planet can sustain eighty hour lease. There's already know us well, as we do that we are born in eating and tossing away so much that both the air and the seas will be ruined he, we do not make changes. They also know that, while there is some action going on. We are not moving fast enough. Yes. So what we're going to show you today are two different ways. We can approach the problem from two pretty stellar thinkers, Jared diamond and Martin REEs. Plus we're going to share with you a sustainable energy solution that already serves a million people in Africa and is scalable right now to billions of people all around the world. I this message from the sponsors who make this a sustainable podcast. This episode is sponsored by MasterCard. And our thanks to CBS news digital and to Harmon the official sound of global goals cast. Welcome back. I'm eating lush. I am cloudy Romo Edelman very lucky to be sharing. The same actually physical plays. It's a recording. I know special here we are in can at the Cannes lion festival at six o'clock in the morning. Yeah. Actually, in a very little room that is not sound protected like our studios, so we apologize for that saying, we're strong like superman and George zero woman was gills lounge trees to be here with this great. So we're going to have a great API so today because we're going to be talking about how the end of the century may feel like a long way off. But actually, it is within the lifetime of the people alive today. Our Keats eighty will be in their nineties, by the tour of the century. Oh, this crazy to imagine that our kids will be that old. You know. So one of the questions, we will ask is. How can we learn to think long term, or at least longer term to protect the world of the day after tomorrow, the one our children and grandchildren will live in an I think cutter that you will be a cool granny like totally? You can picture it right? Like Behan is the motorcycle, the boot the question really is what kind of a world will we believing their motivation behind the episode sustainable development goal number twelve responsible production and consumption. We hardly hear about this goal. I need my not sound very dramatic like ending over tea or educating everyone, but actually Isa's remark on like every other goal, it is connected to so many other goals. Climate change, sustainable leasees life in the we want to understand the problem. And we want to take a stop and how. Press it. So I sought out Jared diamond. He's a professor at my alma mater. UCLA go Bruins and a Pulitzer prize winning author of books on why civilizations succeed and fail. His new book upheaval looks at our modern world. I kicked off by asking him about the world's population growth. Human population is a subject that was at the forefront thirty forty years ago when many people said, it's the biggest problem for the world since then we've learned. No, it's not the biggest problem for the world. What counts is not the raw number of people, what counts is the total consumption rate because there's enormous variation between people's consumption rates in different parts of the world consumption rates. Meaning consumption rates of water fuel, and other resources metals in the developed world on the average about thirty two times those in the poorest countries. And that means that one American citizen has the impact of the world thirty two Kenyans a mentioned, specifically Kenyans, because there are many Americans who feel indignant and concerned about the growing population of Africa. And yes, it's a tragedy for Africa. But as far as the impact on the world. And is concerned fifty million Kenyans equivalent to one point seven million Americans can is trivial for its impact on the world. That's why I say what counts is consumption rates rather than population. Climate change is often. Equate climate change is arguably the worst effect of over consumption were burning way more fossil fuel than the atmosphere can hold safely. There are those who say technology will save us from having to cut consumption engineering, the damage back out of the atmosphere diamond disagrees there were proposed GOP engineering solutions of scattering iron particles in the ocean, shooting things into the atmosphere and calculations of made that they to produce such and such effect. And behold, they do have that affect in the laboratory. The problem is that have a manipulation works in the laboratory is not necessarily good predictor of how it will work up in the atmosphere and the prime example of that is chlorofluorocarbon gases in the laboratory CFC's absolutely been on. It turned out something unpredictable. That's sees released into the atmosphere destroy the ozone layer which protects us against ultraviolet light. And it's a really serious. It took about twenty years to establish the chemical industry, kicked and screamed and say said, no CFC's innocent turned out. They were not as and took twenty years to convince people, and I will give you one more example, because today, it seems so ridiculous. One of my teachers at university, he was officially old that he was alive in the first decade on the nineteen hundreds when automobiles were replacing horses on the streets of New York, and Boston, and as automobiles began to replace horses people were thrilled because horses deposit manure and the Clack Clack the hooves on the street is noisy until what automobiles came in people said, thank God with automobiles cities are now going to be clean and quiet. Unexpected side effects of or. Let me read you a quotation from your book. So does this mean that climate change is unstoppable? No, of course, not climate change is being caused overwhelmingly by human activities. So all we have to do in order to reduce climate changes to reduce those human activities. That means burning less fossil fuel getting more energy from renewable sources such as wind solar, and nuclear. So it sounds easy, right? The principles easy. The only difficulty is in persuading people to do it. That's for say persuading people to burn less fossil fuel, and that requires two things less energy consumption, overall and more of that energy coming from non-fossil fuel sources to really is very simple. And there are people who are inclined to do it now. We have to get more people inclined to do it. Government action can help by making it illegal to do various things, for example. My understanding is that big cars, like humvees with low gas mileage, like six miles per gallon in the United States may incur, low automobile taxes, they can be classified as fallen vehicles all other things, which means that, that it's cheaper to buy a humvee than to buy a Prius. Whereas in Europe big vehicles are tax equal. To the cost of the car's health, that's to say, if you choose to buy humvee, that you're privilege, what you will pay double world market price of the humvee to drive Humby, a that is a way to discourage people from buying gas guzzling vehicles in insure a combination of government action at personal decisions can reduce burning fossil fuels. So the other issue is, of course, the apparently low cost of fossil fuels. So how do we include those indirect costs of? A liter of fossil fuels, or a gallon of gasoline. Simple way would be to include in the price of fossil fuels the damage cost of the fossil fuels, incur, if fruit Zampa l- a farmer chooses to spread oil overs field for some reason, and the oil leaks to a neighbor's fields. And the neighbor sues the first former the neighbor will win the war suit and will make the first pharma pay for the damage done to the fields of the second farm fossil fuels doing that. They're producing costs for the entire world. But when you buy your gasoline, California for four dollars and twenty three cents a gallon in Los Angeles now, yes, the gas cost for all twenty three cents a gallon, but it causes thirty five dollars per gallon of damage to the whole world, and that thirty five dollars or to be included, if you want to drive a car, and burn, gas and have your Humby by all means do so, but you should have to pay the thirty five dollars for the damage that you'll causing. What do you say about the indirect costs of renewables, so people who don't like solar farms because of the impact that has on the desert tortoise, for example, in California or birds killed by windmills? What about the indirect costs? They're just renewable do have indirect costs, which need to be taken into account, the solar fields in the decifit, California. They do remove habitat for desert tortoises and therefore the appropriate for so foams also to set aside two and fifty thousand dollars per square mile Sola fallen in order to mitigate the damage to the desert tortoises, and as for windmills. Yes. Windmills do kill Margaret birds and bats last estimate. Eyeso- windmills, kill some forty five thousand birds per year in the United States will an outdoor cat. It turns out kills three hundred herbs per year, and therefore, the windmills, the United States, all the. Equivalent of what one hundred thirty five cats the to mitigate windmills, you can mitigate windmills, if you eliminated hundred thirty five cats. Yes, we should do that. But that's pretty cheap. Of course. I would rather eliminate one hundred thirty five cats. Bells around. So we're in Europe here, and there is a strange to Kadhamy between Europe and the United States Americans have a higher rate of energy consumption, which is twice Europe's, and that's despite Europeans enjoying higher standard of living than Americans. True that Americans have roughly double the rate of fuel consumption of Europeans. Part of the reason of course, is the distances in the United States, Lauder and your jet plane burns more fuel. If you fly from Boston to Los Angeles than if you fly from London to Manchester. That's part of the reason the other reason is that Americans are very wasteful of energy, particularly with respect to our automobiles and we do not make Americans pay for the privilege of driving their humvees in their other gas, guzzling automobiles until recently the existence of poor people elsewhere in the world didn't constitute a threat to the overindulgent over consumptive, lifestyles of those who lived in the United States, but that has changed. Those poor people out there in the past sixty years ago didn't pose a threat to Americans because number one. They didn't have television cellphones and they didn't know about the wonderful joyous lifestyle in the United States firsthand and Secondly with the methods of travel. First time I came to Europe in nineteen fifty I came by ship nowadays. When would never dream of coming by ship to Europe on new fly fly by airplane, people move, much more easily round the world, and that means among other things that they can immigrate immigrate much more easily, so there's much more immigration pressure. It's understandable, that people from the -veloping world, wont, move, because they have much less satisfactory lifestyle. And they know that the government is not going to solve the lifestyle within their lifetime with them lifetime and the children. So, of course they want to migrate. But migrating also means increasing the impact of world or what means is that the a stable world requires a more equal world. It's becoming increasingly impossible to have a stable world with dig differences. In standards of living around the world, the only stable outcome is going to be they world with much more equal standards of living around. World does have a track record of solving really thorny problems. And some of those problems include delineating overlapping economic zones along the coast. In shallow water, wherever you get to countries that are Jason to each other with seacoast the likely to have overlapping coastal economic zones, and it is really thorny to decide how to delineate the economic zones of adjacent. Countries. Nevertheless, negotiations were carried out all around the world with the result that there is agreement on economic zones between every neighboring country that has echoes that was a really difficult problem. But then again, she -ation succeeded another negotiate us from that succeeded was establishing a framework for mining minerals from the seabed on the floor of the of the mineral Najah lls, which essentially, pure minerals, the technique. Was available from wining the minimum Najah on the ocean bottom decades ago. But there wasn't a legal framework. Meaning that if you sent out one country sent out or ship to suck up minerals, here, another country could send out a chip two hundred feet away and suck up those same minerals. Therefore, there was not nobody wanted to invest in the economics of, of harvesting minerals from the ocean floor. But now in the last few decades, the is a legal framework, it was again, forty to negotiate one of the things that made it difficult to negotiate is that all of those landlocked countries like Zambian, Mongolian Bolivian lows were screaming, this does us. No good. Those countries that have seacoast the other ones that can suck up the minerals and there's no way we can suck them up. So, of course, we're not going to agree to a plan that allows those countries in the seacoast suck up the minerals, they were negotiations and the result on the Goshi Asians, which took a decade or couple of decades. Is that the landlocked countries? Bolivian zambia. They get fifteen percent of the royalties that are produced by the coastal country difficult negotiation. Those examples of the world, resolving by negotiation difficult problems of competition between nations since we saw those difficult problems that gives some grants for optimism that we also saw climate change non sustainable resource use one can Jack well, climate change is more difficult than those problems that we've solved this more difficult than the middle on the ocean floor. And yes, it's probably true that climate change is more difficult. But the fact is that there's a framework and the framework has succeeded in many difficult cases. We also live in a world in which corporations companies, some of them have much larger GDP's, if they were to be a country Zambia you mentioned is in terms of its GDP is actually much lower than a lot of the companies listed on the S and P five hundred or the footsie one hundred so what role. Do you see that corporations that business can play in this world twenty years ago, I would've answered the role that business plays in the world is evil because Sambia, if not only smaller than Coca Cola and Chevron but Zambia doesn't do evil to the rest of the world. We were Coca Cola and Chevron and WalMart do evil to the rest of the world. They do. No good. And they're environmentally damaging the among the worst effects on the environment today. That was what I would have said, twenty years ago and there was some Justice to what has changed since then is first Jared learned. I'm I'm on the board of directors. World Wildlife Fund US. And I've been on the board of directors, the conservation international on the boards of these big environmental organizations or CEO's and leaders of Coca-Cola the head of the board of trustees of were wildlife on US was the CEO of Coca Cola and on the board of conservation international is rob Walton son of Sam Walton head of WalMart and Unilever has also been a big play with worldwildlife on I've discovered a couple of things one that they found it in the interest be environmentally clean. That's not to say that big corporations are environmentally clean across the board. Yes. S Ulan will some really bad things. But also some big corporations are among the most powerful forces for environmental good in the world today. And that's something that lots of Radha. Environmentalists don't want to hear about, like can discuss anything with my wife but not WalMart. So it seems that globalization, which is sort of how you end that book is both a blessing and a curse, and I wonder how you come down on it. When you think house is gonna play out maybe, not for you and me. But for our descendants, I'm laughing because when you said, globalization's both blessing curse now deploy so many things now is a blessing and curse. Curse? How can we maximize the benefits of globalization? While minimizing the damage, globalization means that ideas and technologies do spread rapidly around the world. That includes good constructive technologies as well as bad technologies spreading around the world. Globalization means that, that country's today. No longer have the option of collapsing. One by one quite a few of the most powerful societies in the past collapsed, due to environmental damage. They were auto sufficient, they depended largely on their own resources. And so, when the classic Maya civilization of the Catan, the most advanced civilization, the new world before Columbus collapsed. Nobody knew about in Europe and probably nobody knew about in the valley of Mexico either today. Society's can't collapse one by one because they are supported by other societies. That's an advantage of globalization. Drawbacks of globalization. Once we've talked about, namely the spread of diseases around the world, and the unstoppable movements of, of people, the challenge for us is to reduce the bad effects of globalization and to increase the good effects, just as the challenge for any couple to increase the benefits of marriage and to produce. Disadvant-. Thank you very much. I, I really appreciate your time. You're welcome. It was fascinating hearing Jared diamond describe his conversion from thinking corporations were a lot of the problem to believe in corporations are part of the solution. Just after I talked to him the financial times came out with an interesting chart that showed that only fifteen percent of the five hundred biggest businesses in the world are, on course, to reduce their carbon consumption and noth- to be in line with the Paris accords. So a lot of work steel to be done. In one place, we always joins peration from is you. You are dear listeners, eighty did you hear about our listener piece board? Jason hallmark. I did what a courageous man. He was inspired by our episodes last season, which Robert swan and his son made a challenging track to the south pole relying, only on sustainable energy, but hallmark had a challenge of his own. He was diagnosed last year with multiple sclerosis, but he didn't let that stop him three. As after the diagnosis he applied to a program. He shared about here at the global goals gust. It's called leadership on the edge. And he is spending ten days in June this year in the program to witness climate change in the Arctic. I'm bringing the lessons from to Pittsburgh. I have chills. Jason, we hope you're having a great trip. Drop us a line were very proud of you for taking action, an Email moment. We will hear from another big thing care about the future. Lord Martin Reese hit of the center, for existential risks, astronomer Royal of the United Kingdom and from enterpreneur, who has the signed solar powered electric greets so that Africa can grow without adding to the carbon problem. I another great executive from our sponsor MasterCard. With the girls for tech program that actually MasterCard launched in twenty fourteen. Again, we're going to create a new set of actors in the technology space that heretofore, just haven't been there and less. We make sure that women and girls have access to the learning to the tools to the education. That's required to not only succeed in this new economy that actually shape the new economy. We won't realize the potential of what's possible. So girls for TAC is creating future problem, solvers. That's how we see girls in the future and right now. So we have to make sure that the stem principles are shared equally, and we have a goal actually, to reach two hundred thousand girls by twenty twenty we're halfway there in twenty five countries because we're a global company with network all over the world when two hundred ten markets, when your company like MasterCard, who has reached everywhere, ubiquitous, you have an opportunity to reach everyone everywhere. That's to mean as saying from MasterCard later on. We'll hear from tar Nathan on how MasterCard used its fintech skills to ever humanitarian aid. But now we go from UCLA to coverage we do not always spend so much time in the ivory tower, I couldn't I couldn't resist interview with Martin REEs, because I have wanted to interview him for ages, my only regret is that I couldn't find a way to get in his views on black holes or whether we should send people into space or leave it to robots. Theme of my book on the future. Is that the world has existed forty five million centuries? But this is the first century when one species human species can determine the planet fate, and this is two reasons. One is that there are more of us my more empowered by technology will use more resources. And we are having a heavy footprints, which is affecting the biosphere and affecting the climate, sir. Martin talks about being deep in the anthroposophic that moment were in right now. When one species the human race is so empowered and dominant that it has the planet's future in its hands. I asked him if that means we're creating measurable physical changes to earth, that are on a geological time scale. Well, the short geological time scale really and one of the point is the biosphere and the climate have been changed. Convey slow time was an how changing on a human timescale of less than the century, which is very, very much faster and that's why species contract to climate change, and while easy to mass extinctions, and sadly, we are risking destroying the book of life before we've read it if we have mass extinctions Jared diamond spoke about internalizing, the external ity or making the coast of a car included impact than virement. Martin REEs spoke about taking another concept, the discount, rate, currently using finance to deter mind, what is worth spending now to achieve some value in the future. And what happens when you apply that approach to our impact on the environment where everyone values immediate benefits rather than deferred benefits. And of course, this is the standard discount rate that you. Use in all Ekonomi decision making how much more you value, having something now compared to one year or ten years or fifty years in the future. And of course, this discount rate, which is used by banks and everyone else is determined by Comcast nation of economic factors. But the point I would like to emphasize is that the discount rate, which is appropriate in making many economic decisions is not the one which is appropriate when we are thinking about the future of generations as yet on board. And when we think about them, we've got to not value less. What happens at the end of essentially, the now, we've got prepared to spend money now in order to alleviate any burdens people Denver sensual have, and I think the psychological reason for this is that we do care about the life chances of babies born today. He'll be alive in the second century. And if. Shameful if the legacy that we left a future generations was a depleted and more dangerous world. Part of the problem is that making the sessions for those who will leave in twenty one hundred requires making real sacrifices today. I mean, spending sacrifices lowering basement rates lower income sumptious, a lower discount rate, but we have done it before I asked her Martin if it's fair to say that climate change isn't a scientific challenge anymore because we actually know the science. We know enough science to know this, a substantial risk of something really bad by the end of a century. And that's why we need to take precautions to remove that risk. The most important thing we could do to reduce the risk of long term climate change would be to accelerate research, development into all forms of clean energy to I the recessions done the quicker advantage had made and the cost will come down. And if you think of India, where they now depend on energy from smokey stoves bunny wouldn't dumb. They need more energy. They need a grid of some kind. And if we can celebrate the development, clean, energy, those cheap, then they will leapfrog directly to clean energy and not build co foul pow stations, then do otherwise, so to accelerate energy developments is, I think important logo and that would be hard to think of a more inspirational. Challenge for young scientists and engineers than to develop clean energy quickly for the whole world there, obviously, needs to be commitment from governments and more regulation, and more encouragement for business to invest in these areas as well as for universities to invest in research. But how do you make that happen? What the, the governments can provide the right incentives and a carbon tax, particularly a fiscally neutral carbon tax, where the money raised in taxes used to no other taxes, that's attractive idea. But the portent requirement is to make the public care. So to politicians, feel, they can take these long term decisions on prioritized a long-term without losing votes. And that's the important thing, which we are lacking. So we need more charismatic individuals who can actually dissuade the public that we need to do this and be good in the long. I think when we look back through history, we know that most major changes were initiated by a few key figures, and then became mass movements and then the politicians took them up until action. That's true of slavery. It's true of civil rights. It's true of gay rights, and we hope to become true of the environments, but as a part from that I think we do have to incentivize the kind of behavior, which is help for environmentally by appropriate taxes and regulations. So it's always part of each episode to present someone who's out there trying to solve the problems. We describe today, that person is aviation Helgeson an entrepreneur, who is doing one of the things Martin Reese called for accelerating clean energy in poorer countries. The average African only one or two percent of the power of the average American and the thinking was that if people could get started with clean energy, and use that as their primary source of power, and that adding more clean energy was the cheapest and most reliable way to get more power than people would keep using it in the electrical system would grow up in a distributed manner. People know what electric city is people. No electricity is everywhere. The question for them is, how do I get it in my house and can I Ford it? And if I get a solar power system, will it work, and well, it keep working people focus on the solar panel, really the essence of an off grid solar power system is the smart battery, and the battery needs to last for years. So the reason people typically choose our systems is because he's they have Nope electric grid connection or that electric. Good connection is on. Reliable or, or unstable self sufficiency is very, very important people in these environments, because you never know what tomorrow will bring. I asked savvier how it works and why it's affordable. We designed the capacity based on your needs and particular segment. So one common example, might be a solar power system where you could power your lights and TV in fan, but couldn't power an air conditioner, fridge to an American that might be unacceptable to a middle class African or Indian household that could be exactly what they need to solve their electrical problem. And designing for the specific use allows you to hit cost targets that allow you to be as affordable as ten dollars a month. So one other aspect, we focus on integrating, the financing into the hardware so works like a prepaid mobile phone, where people pay in small increments. And when they make a payment via their mobile phone, the solar power system in their home on locks and produces power. And this allows us to extend financing at low rates, even to rural. African customers who don't have traditional credit? We don't always realize when we have discussions about consumption or over consumption. We don't always talk about over consumption of what and is that resource finite or or not finite. So electric city is not really finite. We can produce many, many multiples of what we consume even if we were all huge energy glutton's, because there's lots of ways to produce power and the good news today is that a solar panel on a rooftop is the cheapest source of electronic city for the vast majority of people in the world, so the trick than becomes an integration problem. How do we integrate that solar electricity which happens at random pans during the day when the shines to serve a billion people with reliable, power and allow people to build networks of self generated power, and this becomes very, very powerful because then communities of any? Scale, whether it's just myself and my neighbor, whether it's my town, they can electrify in a way that's entirely under their control. Most people aspire to own home rather than rent, but almost everyone in the world, rents there, trysofi now I can imagine quite a few people would prefer to own that either themselves or cooperative Lee with other members of their community. It one image sticks to my mind of like from all of the episodes, everything that we heard the problem is not population growth. It is how much we consume mean if we all consume like Kenyans, the planet will be okay. But we all seem like Americans than the world is going to be toast yet. Kenyans understandably one to improve their lives, and that means consuming more. I think that both Martin recently made the point that we need to find some middle ground. Some poor countries will interest some Sean, but that means that even more pressure should be put into the richer countries to reduce their levels of consumption that was mind blowing for me, it's not about the population growth sumptious. Yeah. So that means that everybody needs to make changes and that includes the corporations like oil, companies, I was amazed to see the beep. P report recently, the new chair of BP Helga loon saying that the world can't continue along its current path, and that a faster transition will require a huge re engineering of the energy system that's going to present a significant challenge for the world's biggest oil and gas companies. And did you see just yesterday a collection of those big oil and gas companies were together with the pope in the Vatican signing an agreement saying that they were going to adhere to the Paris agreement? So Martin Reese talked to me about how the world needs more of these big personalities like the pope, like David Attenborough using their influence to have people and companies make changes. So I was pretty excited to see that. Yeah. And I've seen it here. I mean like people are moving away from depending on governments only sees leadership is not that clear anymore. So people influencers such as, you know, companies CEO's people that they trust, like David Athens are. Taking gonna take the state and we've seen insurance companies like Munich Re saying we have to recognize climate risk, much more than we do, which, of course would increase the justification for us paying now to protect us later back to Martin reece's point. The UN is planning a summit on this topic in September. The secretary-general up onto his neck. And this will actually he wasn't in the Pacific Ocean of to his niece for a cover photo for time magazine just to dramatize the plight of Pacific island nations, that are drowning like the ones that we've spoken to before, like allow my power, our one eighty what they think of the impact that documentaries have had on the consumption of fast food, for example. Do you remember supersized Ninoy cows bureau? See, maybe there's a need to have more commensurate on plastic carbon fresh water aqua fires, and all about the cycle of consumption. I still don't have a sense that we cracked, the zeitgeist, I agree. I mean, I, I have seen just in the tube in the last week, more and more ads for different products from Unilever, for example, who I know is promising to be a hundred percent. Recyclable. A real cutback on single use plastics, I've seen some incredible new innovation. It does need to be taken up a lot faster and we are here recording from Canada. Where are the can advertisement festival on any yesterday was my first day judging go. Well, I saw a lot of tea like last year on air on plastic ongoing sumptious mon- about how companies should totally disappear stores, for example, and how that I think that that's going to become even more sexy in removing forward just walking down the cross it. I've seen a lot about equality about diversity about inclusion, so it does feel like the words at least are getting out there and their listeners if you know of commensurates that we should be highlighting on the stop is if you know of any activity that we should be highlighting let us know. And on the global goals Cass, we always give you three facts you can take away to look smart in front of your mother-in-law and three actions that you can take and today those come from our partner apolitical from Robin, Scott. It's such a pleasure to join this important podcast to share. Sweet potion facts and three simple actions for driving responsible consumption and production. The fact is that our current population of seven point seven billion. People is expected to grow by a massive twenty six percent by twenty fifty that's according to the UN lake's, population report, which brings me to the book, drawdown surprisingly ranks educating girls and family planning as the six and seventh most important strategies for reducing climate change. The sad fact is that responsible consumption, increasing the invokes Pacino t's, not sacrifices take Amsterdam sharing economy initiative, which is building shed services that not only help us reduce waste, but it was a save us money and bring out communities places together. And in a world where jobs increasingly being lost mation, the International Labor Organization estimates that the green economy could create twenty four million jobs by twenty thirty. Now onto three actions. I reduce the animal products. You conceive animal agriculture accounts for whopping fourteen percent or more global emissions so garden by him guys. New me Tilton like impossible. Doug, is this not only reduces you'll meat consumption? It also incentivizes private investors and governments to put more money into innovation around alternatives to meet second read the book drawdown, which tells you all things you can do and shouldn't do what matters most. It has some amazing facts like how you despise of your pitcher. Writer really, really matters third vote for politicians was policy solutions, such as descend, others wellbeing budget, which takes the focus of GDP alone. The scale of this challenge requires the scale of policy, so fun, April co on Twitter and apolitical dot CO, two examples of policies that are working around the planet for the planet. Thanks for listening and for Karen. And now a little more from our sponsor MasterCard. What the MasterCard eight network was was a digital wallet. That enabled a beneficiary who was sitting in a remote place, whether in Yemen in a disconnected environment with no mobile phone coverage with no power, no electricity. The ability to receive digitally their food in their humanitarian benefits. What this does is because they're receiving digitally, it gives that beneficiary. The ability to redeem at a local marketplace, just like you are, I would it enables them to redeem their benefits for fresh fruits and fresh vegetables, and to actually make healthy choices for their families. The other side of that really is what it does for the organizations that service, and that serve these beneficiaries, like the, the NGOs, who partner with, and that is it gives them a more cost effective way, a more auditable more transparent. Way to provide these benefits. That was tarnished. If MasterCard who sponsored the entire season of global goals cast, we thank them for being with us the entire way. That's it. This is bestowed on two of the goals gas. Thank you. Thank you to all our guests. Thank you to all of our listeners. You can find that more on our website, global goals, gas dot org. Please, like unsubscribe where ever you get your book. Guests on follow us on social media at goals gas. See you in season. Three the three Cy know. Music in this episode was by Neil hill, Andrew Phillips and Jelica Garcia, Simon James, Katie krone, and as she pillow. This episode was made possible with the support of MasterCard CBS news, digital and Harmon the officials sound of global goals cast. We want to give a special thanks to our interns, for the summer Darcy Nelson. Addie gates, be, and Ashley SQL we could not have done this without you and thank you to Keith Reynolds from spoke media for lending us. His ear.

Jared diamond MasterCard United States Europe Martin Reese Martin REEs Jason hallmark Africa Martin UCLA California World Wildlife Fund US Harmon CEO
Baha'u'llah born - Nov. 12, 1817

This Day in History Class

06:50 min | 2 years ago

Baha'u'llah born - Nov. 12, 1817

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson and it's November twelfth. But how LA the founder of the Baha'i faith was born on this day in eighteen seventeen. I've also heard his name pronounced slightly differently. Among adherents, he was born in Tehran, Iran and from birth. His name was Missouri Hussein Ali he was born into a noble family, and he was known for his skill as a horseman at a poet. He also was an excellent calligrapher he had very little formal education as we might think of it though. And that was really typical for a young man of his station at the same time. He was known to be very bright and very intelligent and knowledgeable about all kinds of subjects including having an extensive knowledge of Islam. He was also known for being very compassionate, especially when it came to matters of injustice, he got married at the age of eighteen and he would take other wives as well later. On his life. He was expected to be a civil servant like his father was and after his father's death. He was offered a position. But he turned it down. He really thought there was too much corruption and materialism and the civil service he preferred to try to make a modest living managing the property that he had inherited when his father died, and he also wanted to use what he did have to help other people as much as he could he became known as the father of the poor by the time. He was in his early twenties when he was twenty seven he learned of a young man who was known as the bub, which is Arabic for the gate or the gateway people believed that the Bob was a messianic figure a figure who was intimidated among Shia Muslims and the Bob also heard of Baha and sent him a scroll. We don't know. Exactly what this scroll said. But whatever it did say it had a dramatic effect on him. And he became one of the Bob's followers who call themselves bobby's in eighteen. Nine forty eight Bala who hadn't yet taken. This name was arrested and punished for following the Bob then the Bob was executed in eighteen fifty for treason. A lot of his followers are also killed at this time and Baha became his successor. The two of them had never met in person, but they had corresponded extensively and before his execution. The Bob had sent beheld all of his papers two years later, though, the how was falsely charged in a plot to kill the Shah of Iran, and after that he was imprisoned in Tehran and a police called the black pit while he was imprisoned. He had divine revelation that he was the prophet that the Bob had been foretelling after his imprisonment how low was banished. It was the first of a series of banishments. He started out going to Baghdad and then to Constantinople then Adrian OPEL where he survived an attempted poisoning at the hands of his half-brother after about ten. Ten years in Baghdad in eighteen sixty three beheld the publicly declared himself to be the divinely chosen leader. The Bob had previously for told. It was coming says first public declaration of this. He was a messenger from God and a manifestation of God and this led to sectarian violence. He was banished once again from the Ottoman empire. And he was sent to Aker in what's now, the north west of Israel, which was at the time a prison city of the Ottoman empire. Imprisoned to there though, he started expanding his teachings and those the Bob into the religion. That is now known as behi- he wrote religious texts there and developed a following as he was gradually allowed more freedom and more people were allowed to come into Acker and see him a core. Part of the behi- faith is that God has revealed himself to humanity throughout history through a series of messengers. And each of these messengers has. Founded a religion these messengers include Abraham Krishna Zoro, Astor Moses, Buddha Jesus and Mohammed so Bhave, which means glory of God in Arabic, and is the name that he took for himself is the most recent in these series of holy messengers that are central to the behi- faith, but Howlett lived in Aker for the rest of his life. And today that is the behi- holy land. He died in eighteen ninety two and his eldest son became his successor in his work and his teachings. Thanks to Eve's Jeffcoat for her research work on today's podcast, and thanks to Casey, p Graham and Chandler maze. For their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts and wherever else to get your podcasts, and you can tune in tomorrow for one of history's many bloody days. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you podcasts.

Bob apple Baghdad Iran Baha Asheville North Carolina Tehran Hussein Ali Anna REEs Dilling Fagin Laurin Vogel Harvard LA producer Twitter Katie golden iheartradio Aker
Gunfight at the O.K. Corral - Oct. 26, 1881

This Day in History Class

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral - Oct. 26, 1881

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin vocal bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dylan Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. Neil episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson, and it's October twenty six the shootout at the OK corral happened on this day in eighteen eighty one in tombstone, Arizona tombstone and they teenagers was a BoomTown. Thanks to the discovery of silver there in eighteen seventy nine. The name reportedly came from a warning the only thing you're gonna find in those hills is our own tombstone people. I mean, people did find their own team stone, but they also did find silver with this silver discovery. The population of tombstone grew to about seven thousand people in the span of two years up from basically one hundred people before that. And as was true of so many other boom towns tombstone had a reputation for lawlessness. There were lots of saloons and brothels and lots of fighting and lots of people rustling one another's livestock. The herb family were part of the law such as it was in tombstone. Why at our Pugh had been a police officer in Kansas works. Security as at a saloon. It was also the deputy sheriff his brothers Virgil and Morgan were stage coach guards and Virgil was also a deputy US marshal. They all had a reputation for being pretty ruthless. Sometimes maybe being more focused on power than on actually enforcing some kind of law, and then on the other side of the equation where the Cowboys they were part of the town's criminal element. They included I and Bill Clinton, and Tom and Frank mcclary. They were all particularly notorious and a lot of times they were grouped together as the Clinton McLaren gang. There was ongoing back and forth. Between the herbs representing the law in the Clinton McCoy gang represented outlaws in the months leading up to this shootout, some of this was the herbs as law enforcement hunting down the Clintons or the McLarens being conjunction with some kind of crime. Sometimes though, it was the two sides really just trying to get the upper hand over the other one in general because whoever had the most power was really going to control what happened in tombstone there. There was also some shady under the table dealing going on between the two sides, either as a genuine effort by the herbs to get information from the Cowboys or maybe as a covert effort by one side to set the other side up. Sometimes it's not really clear tangled up in all of this was sheriff John Behan wider pit wanted to be sheriff. That was a position that was appointed. When he realized how much the governor favored Behan he had pulled out of the race under the idea that Behan within give him a lesser appointment of some sort which did not pan out. There also suspected at various points that Behan was in cahoots with Cowboys all of this descended into violence in October of eighteen eighty one both sides had been trading insults and death threats and sometimes fisticuffs over about twenty four hours leading up to the shootout after I Clinton and Tomek lari came into tombstone to buy some supplies the herbs and their friends dot holiday saw the Clintons the McLarens and Billy Claiborne near. Fremont street into m- stone that was near but not inside of the ok corral. The sheriff told the herbs with these other men were on their way out of town. But the herbs were spoiling for a fight. And it is not clear who fired the first shot, and I Clinton and Wyatt urp gave completely different versions in their testimony. But in the end, Billy Clinton, and Tom and Frank mcclary were all shot. Tom was killed immediately. And billion Frank died. Not long after Virgil and Morgan urban doc Holliday were all shot as well, but survived the sheriff arrested the herbs and dot com today, and they were all charged with murder, but the Justice of the peace later found that that homicide was justified. You can learn more about all this in the September fourteenth two thousand nine episode of Steffi missing history class and thinks tar Harrison for her audio work on this podcast. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts and wherever else to get your podcast. You can tune in tomorrow for an executive order that led to massacres. This is our Yana huffing gun. And I'm here to tell you about the thrive. Global podcast what I see down with some of my favorite people to find out. How the thrive in all parts of their lives. I've had great conversations with everyone from Jennifer Aniston, and Malcolm Dodwell to Katy Perry Neander grass Dyson and have learned an amazing number of the Knicks to be our best in I'm logged in. Well. Search and follow the thrive global podcast. Iheartradio are subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.

tombstone Bill Clinton John Behan Frank mcclary Cowboys Virgil Tom apple Clintons Clinton McCoy Asheville Anna REEs Dylan Fagin North Carolina Neil Laurin producer Jennifer Aniston Billy Claiborne
Battle of Cajamarca - Nov. 16, 1532

This Day in History Class

07:00 min | 2 years ago

Battle of Cajamarca - Nov. 16, 1532

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dilling Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. New episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson. And it's November sixteenth, but battle of Kabul Markelle took place on this day in fifteen thirty two and it's also described as a massacre. This was committed by Francisco Pizarro and his men against the Inca people of what's now, Peru when this happened the Inca empire had just been through an enormous epidemic and a civil war and the epidemic could actually sparked the civil war emperor. Wanna Capac both of his governors and multiple other important leaders had died in this epidemic. And then why not Capac named one of his sons as his successor? But that's son died in epidemic himself before you could even be notified of the decision. And then his father died also before news got back to him about the death of his son. This interrupted the imperial line of succession, and nineteen year old husker went to war against his half-brother out a wealth of both of them being sons of the previous emperor, the resulting civil war went on for four years without a wellpoint ultimately winning this war had just ended. When Francisco Pizarro arrived on the coast of what's now, Peru. He was following the example of her non Cortez's conquest of the Aztec empire. He was planning to take a small force inland and capture outta Wolpe. Hugh Inc of you'd as a divine ruler. That was actually what Cortez had done with the Aztec emperor Moctezuma the second Moctezuma was killed when this happened. Although it's not clear exactly how or by whom Perot and his force of just one hundred sixty eight men took a treacherous mountain road from the coast inland to Markelle, which is where auto Alpa was in camped. The city itself was almost empty with Ottawa's force of between forty thousand and eighty thousand men not far away. Once they got into the city Perot concealed his men in buildings that were arranged around Marcus central square, and then they invited out while but to have a meeting with them the night before this meeting Ottawa Alpa had held a ceremonial dinner. To celebrate his victory over his half. Brother, and this dinner went on late into the night in involved, lots of intoxicating beverages. So when he entered marker the next day he was carried on a litter with about seven thousand retainers, and they weren't necessarily at their best. Most of them were also unarmed because they were not coming there with a fighting force or with any idea of having any kind of battle at Wolpe was a divine emperor. He expected to be treated that way. By this visitor to his empire inside the city out of wealth. But was greeted. By a fryer. You talked to him about Christianity and also delivered a Spanish document that was called the requirement. The requirement was meant to inform indigenous peoples that Spain had given its representatives the moral religious and legal rights conquest. Of course, the requirement was often delivered in Spanish, and that was often the language that the people they were talking to did not speak. There was though an interpreter in Markelle that day. During this exchange with the friar the friar had a bible and sources really differ about what happened, but they all end up with the bible on the ground either having been knocked down or thrown or dropped. And when that happened Pizarro's men burst out from hiding, and they massacred nearly all Abbas retinue and they took him prisoner because ours foresaw almost no casualties in this. Well, Ottawa Alba's force being mostly unarmed were just massacred outta Wolpe was designed as prisoner until July twenty six fifteen fifty three when he was put on trial after there were allegations that he was mounting an attack force. He was executed. Pizarro attempted to use the emperor's that followed a Welte as Pepe DHS, although one of them named Manco Inca ultimately rebelled against Spain and established a completely separate Inca capital two. Buck Amari is considered to be the last Inca emperor. And he was executed on September twenty four th fifteen seventy two less than twenty years after out of wealth is executing. You can learn more about this in the April fourth twenty eighteen episode of Steffi missed in history class called hallmark and the end of the Inca empire. Thanks to Casey, Peter. I'm in Chandler maze. For their audio work on his show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts. And wherever else you get your podcast, and you can tune in tomorrow for a murderous castle. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter in my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in men from a new perspective each episode Eskin comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology. You'll find blood bents and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb chauffeur babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you podcast.

Francisco Pizarro Wolpe apple Cortez Peru Markelle Spain Perot Asheville Wanna Capac North Carolina Kabul Markelle Anna REEs Dilling Fagin Capac Laurin Vogel Ottawa Alpa producer
Bolivia Must Decide On New Leader After President Flees To Mexico For Asylum

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Bolivia Must Decide On New Leader After President Flees To Mexico For Asylum

"This message comes from. NPR sponsor. Xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X.. By get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply Bolivia's former president. Evo Morales arrived in Mexico today to live in exile. He resigned Sunday amid protests that began after serious areas flaws were found. In last month's election now the senator next in the Bolivian Line of succession has announced. She will assume the presidency and peers. Philip Reeves is in the capital city the of Lopez and before we begin Phillip Here's what we know Morales resigned. His government collapsed anyone constitutionally designated to replace him step down. So what have you learned about this senator. WHO's announced her intention to lead the country? She's called Janina. She's fifty two. She's the second vice president. She's a lawyer with a media background and she's a fierce critic of Morales she had earlier announced that Bolivia's congress was going to convene this afternoon to formerly decide who would stand in as interim president. And here's the thing. Allies of Morales hold a majority in Congress and they don't necessarily want her a lot. All of them didn't show up today. So the problem forming a quorum yet despite this she went ahead and took control of the Senate and assumed the mantle of interim president saying she wants elections as soon as possible now members of Morales Party. The Movement for socialism were there when she made that announcement. It's not clear to me at this point whether her move will stick or whether Congress will accept this given the absence of a quorum. There's certainly been an angry reaction from morality supporters some some of whom tried to reach the Congress building after the announcement was made and they were met by police and soldiers firing tear gas at them. You've underscored the challenges that you'll have with all of the Morales support still in Bolivia's Congress. What do we know about Bolivians more? Generally well this is a very unstable volatile point in the history of this country. You just have to travel around this city to see that a lot of roads blocked off by makeshift barricades Arkadiusz. The city's pretty much shut down in the city today. The were very large numbers of police on the streets in full riot gear. The army's also on the streets it's those people who've been protesting for several weeks against morale is after the election. That was last month are celebrating. Because he's gum but but others are angry. Many of the people at the demonstration that was held today by supporters of Morales in the city are indigenous. Bolivians like Madonna's himself. They revere him because he did much to lift. Indigenous people out of poverty during his fourteen years nearly in power but one particularly disturbing. Something happened during that. Protest military jets flew very low and very fast over the crowd on multiple occasions while I was there and this was evidently meant as a show of force but it didn't seem to unsettle them one of their chance. Was You know we are not afraid. Given what you've described even with this interim turn presidency. Has the danger passed. No by no means I mean this is a very unstable situation. People here are worried about that. I spoke to one woman even today. Who didn't or doesn't align herself with Morales or with the opposition? She says she's no faith. That civilian politicians can resolve this situation. Adamantly and settler leader that can really manage a peaceful transition to new elections. She says she's worried. She says she's afraid and from the scenes gene today. I think she might be right to feel that way. That's NPR's Philip Rees reporting from La Paz Bolivia. Thank you welcome Sir.

Evo Morales vice president Bolivia Morales Party Congress interim president NPR senator La Paz Bolivia president Lopez Congress Mexico Philip Reeves Philip Rees Senate army
Wonderful! 82: The We Didn't Prepare This Week Extravaganza

Rose Buddies

47:18 min | 1 year ago

Wonderful! 82: The We Didn't Prepare This Week Extravaganza

"Hi, this is Rachel McElroy. Hello, this is Griffin McElroy. And this is wonderful slip into something a little more comfortable. Okay. You're slipping. Yeah. What I do. Closer changing. Spiderman. Yeah. So I'm using websites change all my clothes in something. A little more comfortable. All right. So now, I'm just in one big sleeping bag that I've zipped up right to my neck. So I can't use my hands to adjust any of the knobs or dials. Do you wanna slip into something a little more comfortable? And it's weird. When you it's a requested for another person to do it. I've just learned. Thank you. I'm very comfortable. You are wearing a sort of one's the. Yep. Sort of very soft ones the law get up. So yes, it doesn't get much more comfortable than what. Hey, everybody. Listen, we fucked up. I'm traveling this week. And I think I had the realization came to me like a dream last night of Ono. We didn't that a time to record wonderful. We're doing this on a Sunday night, which is an interesting energy everybody else's watching dragons, eat like kids or whatever's going on on got today. I can't pretend like I'm not watching. I am watching. There's probably seventy percent chance of dragons getting a kid right now. But we're recording the podcast, which makes me even happier than game of thrones. Does is that you. Yes. It does. That's nice. It's close. Do. You wanna talk about game of thrones. And why you baled I feel like maybe we've addressed through the whole first season you did. And then we started the second season. And there is a scene where a smoke monster comes out from between women's lakes, and I thought vagina lives, I thought this isn't really for me anymore. I don't. Think I've never seen somebody make so decisive decision of a television show just not being their Cup of tea because you you would appreciate it up to that point. But then you saw that. And you're like, okay, I like fantasy when it kind of exists within my realm of understanding when I kind of be like, okay? Well, that makes sense because of this. But when it shows starts to really, you know, ask a lot of me. Yeah. Then I tend to ask to go you like that hard fantasy fucking joker Georgia are are right and Schiff for the Matt. So we fucked up, right? And we didn't have time to probe. So I think we're just going to do all small wonders this episode. I actually I literally have a draft and my Email of topics and that I never could turn into whole segments. Okay, per fame ready to pull from that before we get into that. Do you have any microscopic wonders unless we don't even have to expound on it? We can just sort of like float it. I think they do this in church like ceremonies when it's just you wanna like lift up. Somebody just like you don't have to say what's up, just like webbed belts? I know. I'm not supposed to explain. But they're coming back in a big way. Trust me. Are they really webbed belts? You can put the thing anywhere. Weep Finns these are like little balloons your release little balloon little like those little paper lanterns, really lovely. Butterflies I'm kicking your asset this it's like, not even close. You know, I mean, Espresso supressive Espresso crash bandicoot. Oh that apple cake. You made for Passover was really over apple cake for the Seder. It was so moist though elixir guitar strings there, so slippery. Oh, I'm just looking at things around the cop up to that. To get into like real small wonders. Yeah, I think you go first as we can again, let's just like keep it, casual I hope you already for us to really let are freaking hair down and slip into something even more comfortable than the sleeping bag that I'm sort of Pugh painting inside, right? I'm ready bodies turned into jelly inside this sleeping bag on it. Come out. I mentioned butterflies earlier because today through a slice of watermelon and a corn dog and fudge bar. Oh, that's fun tomorrow and have a bellyache and you're gonna eat through one. Nice green leaf. Uh-huh better. Yeah. I wanna eat through that green leaf. Okay. Well, my first one. Yeah. Yeah. Us magazine has this feature called what's in my bag. Okay. Where the idea is that they they dump out celebrities bag, and then they talk about all the products they use that they couldn't live without and carry around with them. And I always liked to see what simples bags. It's my obsession. I love it. I love that. It's fake. Like, I know that not everybody cares around like an entire bottle of perfume in scarf. Mike. Maybe enjoy just the layout of seeing that bag and singing all those little items spread out on the page the verge used to do a feature. I think polygon did one two just like dump out your bag and show us what your travel essentials were. I think it was. I think it was before an e three this may have been at joystick actually, everybody would post like pictures of what their their their load out was before they went, and it was so like, oh nice. Really satisfying. What that is. I really liked actually I saw one of those weekly features you're smiling. He think is gonna be a joke is a real one. Okay. Okay. They did. Mike Myers and some pornography came out news. Like, that's not my bad, baby. Okay. That's a real truth. Okay. Just set a real truth of this show. I've exposed my real truth. And you're the phaser Gary REEs, I feel like you're not letting me stand in my truth. Teela do years about assembling something with instructions I'll gosh Griffin. This is like this is my shit. This is like a gift on top of a gift for you. Rachel got me. A big old grill old gas grill for my birthday and don't come at me with his charcoal shit. I've owned five charcoal grills in a row over it. I'm ready to move up to pro propane pain. Getting it. Dial bobber dial in babe bomber Wilbur. Over where do they go? No, you lots you had it so good. Anyway, this thing showed up in fucking four hundred discrete seasons. And it took me two and a half hours to put it together. And it was so good the whole time. This was the first ahead of apple that came with it that you could like slide around like this three D image of it was actually super helpful. But man, this IKEA furniture, whatever I complain about how long it takes. But God, it is so satisfying taking this big pile of metal garbage. And then like your first step. You're like, I don't know where any of these things are in this big pile of garbage. But then you start working through it. And then it gets easier and easier to find stuff, and then you built a grill you ever like into those like models people make no I loved Legos. Okay. Less the the kits less the kids more. We had a big box Legos that I would bust out every time we watched a movie, which was very frequently in our home. And so I think that. Inspire me when like I moved out of the house and had to start building things usually I key things. I would say like I got this. And then I would build a bad chair. And then I'd be like, okay, I need to really stick with the instructions now, I'm really I'm really good at it. I why you like always have to do something else while we're watching something. Yeah. Probably explained your big box Legos big box. Also, ANSA Larry small wonder and really it's a big wonder. I'd have actually talked about it before a drill a good power drill on my God. That is maybe the best housewarming gift. We have Chris grant got me a very nice drill. And I use that shit for everything even the instructions like use it. You don't just use a screwdriver for this. If you use a drill, you might get it to powerful. And that's the thing. And it does happen. But I still say don't tell me how much fucking power I require whole. Okay. I like blending them. Both like they did a dragon ball z fusion. Pain. Who are you combining? Oh, so you're combining Tim Allen kill this is Hank town. There's a little Andre the giant improvement. Can I give you another swallow shit? Yeah. Shrimp. Oh, yes. Is it like my small wonder, but it's literally it's pretty small. It's small you. Don't get much smaller shrimp except for crowd ads and do a whole feature on this point. And it just didn't go anywhere. But I'll share with you some information perfect small wonder because you really can't talk for a long time. So shrimping started Alabama and Louisiana and the seventeen hundreds a longtime make sense only three ounces of shrimp provides twenty grams of protein damn and over seventy five percent of your b twelve that you need for the day. I need so much twelve. That's amazing. Here's another little fun fact about shrimp. They taste amazing. They're very good. Emails of the freshwater, shrimp, khardina and Sieff era are capable of storing sperm from multiple partners, and this can produce progeny with different paternity. That is the wildest shit. I've ever heard delightful, it's delightful. But can you imagine the episodes of shrimp Maury than happening under dec- turns out, you all are the father? You're all the follow you, and you are both the father on. Yeah. It's cool. Don't worry about it. Shrimp. Also have a high levels of omega three fatty acids and low levels of mercury. Okay. Shurmur awesome. They're very good for you. But what's your favorite preparation of shrimp? If you're going to eat a shrimp right now what he wanted guy. I mean, just lots of butter. It's hard to beat Scampi for this kid. Just so much butter. Also like like a barbecue like a barbecue shrimp. Yeah. Yeah. And there's a funny thing you say there with a Rachel says this funny thing with a like a like a crocodile Dundee accent that she does where she talks about this specific preparation of shellfish. And I love it. I think it's really funny, but she's to you really got a good a couple of drinks. Are you talking about? Aytac in about when you do it. Shrimp on the Barbie. On hold on. I think it's actually shrimp on the. Oh, just combined. It's buys to call back joke. Tripper great. I really love shrimp. I always wanted in pasta for sure tacos, shrimp, tacos or Dhaka's are legit. That was the first thing I cooked for Rachel. It's true. Look at it in your heart, your member, I made my rhyme sauce. It was it was it was not great. I use corn tortillas. It was a big sloppy mess. But listen, listen that poopie they got. That's no good. I think we can all agree that that's not ideal. I know sometimes you'll buy it. And it says that it's defame, but it's still Dookie right in there. What are you guys dealing with that cue mansion if your spine was full of Dookie awful, awful thought awful next thing. Let me also say this also say this I got a lemon garlic shrimp, pasta linguini little guy for dinner a couple nights ago, and it was really tasty. But don't don't leave the tails on in at pasta. Why did they do? Why did they do do that? I don't want to eat the tails much flavor you're saving by leaving the tail on. I don't know. But in a non rooting around on my pasta, like confused Winnie the Pooh, it's when they put muscles and pasta, and you have to like fish out of the shell. My second thing is the increasing online of fixation of various bureaucratic processes. Oh, can I give you a quick example of one of my favorite thing? Now when you go to the DMV, you can get in line virtually. Oh, yeah. And so you can like set an appointment and you'll get notifications. Tell you how far out you are. So you don't have to show up until right before your appointment. It's incredible shit high. Let me do you one better? Okay. Do you don't even have to do the DMV most of the time because you can renew your license and your car registration like, well, that's the thing. I know. That's awesome. That's what I'm all about. There's a thing that you can get when you own a home call the homestead exemption, basically says like I live in this house. So I'm not paying like business taxes for it or whatever. And the first time we did it you had to like go and like file paperwork like with the county or whatever. And now they've got this website, and you just pay people, and then it's done, and then you don't have to sweat it anymore. It's so incredible. When I was when I was like in high school and had to start worrying about shit like this like I dreaded it to the point where I inherited Justin's car, and we didn't have that on paper for a couple years now wasn't official for a couple years. And so like, I don't think we had a title for it because we lost it. And so we'd have to go and get another title until they were all these things, and I started to get tickets. And I was like, I guess I just gotta eat these tickets 'cause there's nothing. I'm glad I met you after that. Phase it I know I think I did that in Chicago too. I didn't I I don't think I ever got my car registered in Chicago. I went to the DMV which was like four train stops away and waited in line and got up there. And apparently did not have the appropriate paperwork to get my registration. And I was like, you know, what I'm moving in three months. So I'm just gonna ride this motherfucker out, and you guys can deal with it. But now, you just get on the internet, and it's like so good. You got a third thing deal. All right. How many things you have by the way 'cause I have like ten I've got a pretty long bullet list tight. Okay. Okay. So this is something I don't really have much anymore. But if I were to go to sonic. I would get. Yeah. Cherry lime made that nugget is. Nugget ice, you like it likes it. To get ice one. I don't like that crushed is. Because it just like Immelt so fast that gets up new straw. And it's not great. My second thing is in. I would love to see the split in a lot of urinals in a lot of different certain places. They will put sort of nugget ice in there to kind of dis-. What's the word? I'm looking for disperse the stream of p to kind of like re re not refracted, but like break-up the flows done. Just hit the back of the porcelain and splash everywhere. I never knew this. Yeah. Yeah. Nugget ice for you kind of. Yeah. Oh, no. It's not. It's definitely not as common anymore. I feel like I mainly saw it in a lot of bars in West Virginia. But like nugget in the urine all to like, save yourself. Just people dump it out, there drinks, it would be wild. If wine people had drinks with nuggets ice in it at a bar, then then they took it into the bathroom every. Time. I win. Now, this is a thing. And now like you'll see there's a lot of urinal tack that I feel like you'll never get to appreciate. But now there's these little have you ever seen those like pads that they will put cat food in. So that your cat has to kind of dig around to like find it, and it's like all soft rubber spice put that in like a urinal by. So that way like the P just kind of like hits it and stops. And that cool. No, okay. I don't I have my own pee all over the front of my pants. But I guess that's just what about cherry lie though. Do you like your? Oh, yeah. Are you hating me? I used to get slow Justin. I lived. Not maccarone. My buddy Justin lived in an apartment around the corner from a well, it was a super America. But then recipe superamerica turned into speedway IVA get slurpee from there all the dang time. Now all the dang time. I guess that's different. You're talking about. It's very different the good thing at sonic. So a lot of times they'll skip. When you get a cherry linemate. It's supposed to have a piece of lime in an actual cherry in it. And that's a real treat to get. Love those commercials to do the commercials are funny. Okay. What's your next thing? My third one. I don't like, oh, I'm going to really small bags of chips chips. I like small bags of chips like we'll single bags of chips. I like portion control reasons as portion control reasons, it's like, that's actually how many chips I like. Oh now when I was younger, I could like get a bag of Snyder's like those thin just like barely there potato chips and eat the entire fuck and huge ask bag of him in one setting. No problem. But now like I can't handle much more than like thirteen chips worth of sodium. Right die. And so I just like I like it. I like it. Sometimes I want sweet. And I feel like there's a lot of ways scratch that it's and when I want Sabry describe on these small bags of chips. So I think about what your dating profile would be like now. Yeah. And I feel like I can only thirteen chips would be like a bullet on there. Yeah. Fourteen. If if I'm dared to. Do you like to play? Do you like to play games? We'll now I saw like the saw guy don't do shoot. Do you want another? Let's both do one more. And then we'll do a money's on or whatever we call it on this one. Okay. I really like the musical into the woods. Yeah. I I am unlike Griffin and many of the for my family. I did not go up with a lot of exposure to musicals for whatever reason when they showed that performance of into the woods with Bernadette Peters on PBS. We taped it on VHS, and I used to watch it all the time. I loved that musical so much. Probably more than any other musical. Like if FOX me up I feel like the last like last like thirty minutes of that show. Just like puts me in a grand. I feel a child swimming pool with my tears with the final reprieves of children will listen like, no, I can't I hand you won't you can't do this to me. Now, I saw this in theaters next to my dad who was just like clutching my leg during that song. Losing it? Absolutely. Losing. Yeah. It's the music is great. It's very funny. It's you know, it's like it has a lot of familiar parts to it because it draws on. All those old old story books it it's one of those movies. That was like, oh, maybe I do like musical. Yeah. The movie station of it those. Yeah. It was good. It was it was very good. It was I think that the the musical is so pitch perfect like stage version, but my my fourth thing is Costco. I don't think we've talked about Cosco before haven't you can just go there. And you get a big old box of whatever, man. We just went today about buying seven bulk though, you're right. Having a big figure toilet paper. I do like knowing that. I'm good for toilet paper. But like we really should have got into the paper today. I'm realizing that now all my God. You're right. But we did get a lot of fig bars boxes of fig bars. Yeah, we got like twenty four pack claw. So don't even worry about us. We're good over here. We got full of fig bars and bubbly flavourless water. That's my favorite my favorite. Jack Johnson song. Oh, yeah. My fifth thing is Jack Johnson. Hey Griffin still you away. Yes. Got some sponsors. I one here's third love. And I'm gonna L you. Thank you. I just threw a brought Rachel. Hey, I am asking all of you listeners that if you figured out your boss is when you were seventeen and then just call it a day, you should probably go to third love because there's a fit finder. You can see if you're so right about that process. And they have all sorts of sizes and they have half sizes, and they have a tremendous selection of colors and different, you know, convertible wears and and I would recommend it. I heard they have a quiz that helps you find it the size. Yeah. That's I I did I mention that. I took a quiz on BuzzFeed. This was which Harry Potter game of thrones. And of injury my and then you did you follow the link to the an which bra would you wear? No, no, no. Well, you should do that. It was a different. I just wanted to tell you about a class. I took. Okay. I got like. Her mind he and Brion and her mining again. She's an adventure deal is it. Okay. Plus you also have sixty days to wear and wash. Whatever you get and you put it to test. If you don't love it, you can return it, and they'll just wash it and donate to a woman in need in that great. That's so great. That's so great. I'm going to read the rest of this because Rachel does a habit on her phone, but I do because I have a lot of different computers in this room. Go to third love dot com slash wonderful now to find your perfect fitting bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third. Love dot com slash wonderful. For fifteen percent off today. I feel like people listen to your opinions on third love more than me. So you say something like my name is Rachel and I approve this message. My name is Rachel and I have several third love bras, and I approve them and I approve you buying them. Let me tell you about our second sponsor. Yes of funny joke. Okay. Good. Good. Good. Or second sponsor is. Recruiter. Yes. Hell, yeah. I knew it was good. Did that pick it up? I can post that gain. Okay. Is it my pants? And then I said recruiter for our sponsor. They didn't request that who would who they didn't request it because I've got the only kind of bucking twisted brain that your wild over there. Anyway. Ziprecruiter makes it easy to hire people for a job because I mean, people for jobs is really miserable. But they have a process that simple fast and smart, they just send your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't stop there. They've got powerful matching technology that they use to scam. Thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invite them to apply for your job. They are so freakin effective that four out of five employers who post on separate or get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. So right now, our listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive weap- address, ZipRecruiter dot com slash wonderful. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash W. O N D E R F U L. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. A personal message good. This message is for Greg. It is from Joey. Greg when you shared the mcoy podcast with me all those years ago. I never could have imagined. How important they would become to me how much closer their humor and intellect would bring us and how many great goofs and hat, salty, tears. They would inspire. You're the most amazing older, brother. And I love you more than anything. Thank you for everything. Then nice. You know, my favorite bar that. I that message. Let Tom out our intellect play. Now. It'll like you don't hear that a lot with. Listen, I know all the presidents and all the state capitals. Okay. Go off Austin. Charleston. It's Chicago's a cap. Okay. I'll come back to Ellen. Okay. What about migrate state of Missouri? Oh. Missouri. I said the new state again next personal here's one in its four peeves. And it's from be who says, hey, peeves, you're such incredible person. And everyone around you loves and adores, you watching you flourish over the last couple of years has been such a joy, thanks for putting up with me loudly singing show tunes all day and night for the past six years. I love you loads. And I'm glad I get to hug and Smoot you every day. Oh, my love bay. I here's the joke. I hope it's not an actual be. If it tried to me, it would hurt it would sting. Ouch. Well, if it went face, I probably be okay. People are always talking about be stingers. They never talk about the teeth. The teeth are still really sharp. They prefer to sting, but it's the bible also get you. There is a very sweet message. But made me very scared, and you need to think about that. Okay. Thanks so much to the over twenty thousand members who joined or upgraded during between nineteen Mets fund drive to all of our monthly members. To celebrate hitting our goal this year. We're putting the twenty nineteen max fund drive pins on sale for all ten dollar up monthly members. As in past years, you'll be able to get some and support a great cause at the same time. The proceeds from this year's sale will support the national court appointed special advocates association national CASA does amazing work for children youth through a national network of nine hundred fifty member programs. We're proud to be able to support them the pin sale will run from April twenty ninth until mayton. And if your ten dollar up monthly member, your personalized code is waiting in your inbox right now. For more details you can head over to fund dot org slash pick. And once again, thank you. Oh, you got anything else for my small wonders? Yeah. Baby monitors. Oh, so vital. We have one that tells us the temperature in the room to which is really really handy because our house is impossible to keep it a stand richer. It gave me such peace of mind when we move Henry out of our room. And they can't imagine like not having it like could you think you think like of time period where you like couldn't hear or see or kid, and they were sleeping in a different room with a house, and they were brand new. I can't imagine it. I mean, because we're just rougher and tumbler, I guess so. Yeah. Can I tell my baby monitors super cool? But we just talked about my analyze and this next thing is going to really make it really going to drive. The third movement of Beethoven's moonlight sonata. And then I've added where it pops off. Well, I don't know if I can picture this in my head so moonlight sonata is a little bit. It's is like Bumba, boom, boom, boom. Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. You know that one now now based on using in it. Yeah. So it starts off like that. It starts off like all like chill and also and you're like moonlight sonata. This is like a sad dreary song to put me to sleep. But then the third movement is the part where it pops the fuck off. And it's like probably the first drop in music. I think if I was at a concert where like Beethoven was debut in the third movement. Like I'd be looking at everybody like you guys hearing this. It's the part here. And let me see this just in this. Well, yeah. Fucking lit this part rules. Plan AARP, Ian. Oh right now. I was sorry that probably didn't sound very good coming over my microphone. But I remember I like downloaded God. This was like early days of like computer, like learning software for instruments, and I was trying to learn, you know, the usual shit like been fold songs, and there's some sort of like app you download from tar cords dot com or some shit. So I downloaded this downloaded moonlight sonata. And it was just this part and coming through a Midi file was like the craziest shit. I've ever if this is what classical music sounds like this is amazing. And then I went and borrowed some classical music like from my high school library, and I borrowed moonlight sonata. I popped it in. And it was the first part was like this is pouring. Where's the and I couldn't find the like lip part? So I took it back. And I was like, no more classical music for me. But the third movement that song beats as so good every time I hear it. And watching somebody play is the wildest because it's. Real fast. How do you classify something a movement? I mean, it's like what he told classical terms, right? Like, it's basically we're talking about three songs, but I guess it's all in the same key with the same. You know, there's late Latif and shit like connecting them and everything. But I mean, it's all of the movements together are fifteen minutes long. So it's really a this is an EP that he put out one that was that was pretty good. God that song rules. Very good. What else you got that you brought that in the same week as you brought a bag of chips, small bag small pack of chips, which is more air you than a big bag of chips. Okay. Do you want here? Another thing. I do you saw was drinking from this big bottle of water. You knew I couldn't answer is prank on me. I'm gonna say the Moscow mule. I feel like the world was late to this party. I didn't really know about it until maybe like five years ago. This is an alcoholic beverage that I suppose you can also make a virgin version of that is largely ginger beer and limit or lime juice and then usually vodka substitute several different liqueurs in. Oh my gosh. It's so good in the little copper, copper mud that is the most fun part of it. Yes. Favorite summertime. Drink. I really want anything with ginger beer in it. I found when I I am not a big drinker at all. But when I discovered that you can imbibe alcohol as well as a liquid that makes you feel better. Like, it's it's sort of everything kind of seven and seven for a long time. Similar purpose. Seven up is what I drink when I have a tummy ache. And so it was really just. Me kind of getting ahead of the game kinda robbing Peter to pay Paul situation there. I've got those videos like social media's or YouTube videos, where somebody builds a house or like a pool out of natural stuff. Like, they'll just scoop a bunch of mud up a house, and then that hot tub one the other day. No, I'm even talking about like people like just like digging a hole in the wilderness, and then like coming up with like makeshift masonry to like, build a really luxurious looking pool out there and like building irrigation channel from like a nearby creek and filling it that way and just like swimming and chilling in the pool they just made even search for them on YouTube. I don't know how to search for stuff like that. But I I watched I interface with enough of them on Facebook that now Facebook serves them up hot and fresh thyme. Also, my next thing is I'll just do it. Because it's also a Facebook thing I get a lot of Facebook ads for hot sauce, and I'm never going to buy that hot sauce. But I ll. I love seeing it this is so fascinating to me. And and enjoy me over here in the I'm actually sober corner. But don't sound like I'm sober because I tell you everybody's experience with Facebook is different. You will think about that. You being I think your party high. Say about it. Right. But that's how it works. How that's how they get you everybody talks about how much Facebook. But like you make your Facebook. You know, it's interesting. That's an interesting concept. But it really shows the the the holes in the algorithm that they serve me gentleman with a lot of IBS sort of symptoms. A lot of sort of what I would call. But troubles. Yeah. And they're like, here's a very spicy hot sauce. Do you want? This. Do you want? This you want it. Do you want it? Here's a picture somebody's baby. You want this hot sauce? Let's come back to that. I don't I don't get that. I don't get the I get a lot of clothing ads. Yeah. I yeah. I get this hot sauce, and I don't wanna eat it. But it looks very like rich. It looks like a rich sort of more of a more of a buffalo sauce than like a hot sauce spread. It's thick thick thick when you'd like dump all over a pizza, and I see that. And I don't want to eat it because it made me so. Sick. But it makes my mouth water. I get a little pep in my step for a little bit. Okay. I've got another one. Okay. Humidifiers these things keep it wet Donut. I I really think we should have one like in every room of our house because I really believe in the curative powers humidifiers. Also, just moved to the rainforest or live inside a rainforest. Cafe I being in Texas, which usually is very dry. It has not been lately you wake up, and you're just totally dried out in and humidifiers keep that from happening. And they also keep you from getting sick as often which is something that we have have taken turns with with Henry, and it's made a big difference. Really? Does the humidifiers have very powerful tool in our war against the elements. Will you try it out? You're just like more susceptible to all sorts of like horrible things. Yeah. And he fires. They keep it keep it damp and on days where I haven't drank enough water. You just get a humidifier going, and you just sort of get it another way, you know, what I mean, you don't need to drink. I have actually got my life to a point where I don't need to drink any water. I just have to chill in my office with a humidifier on. And the news the day every time I make I make. Do you want to give our listeners just an update on where you're at in your day journey? Yeah. You know, I've turned on you. Oh, God, no kidding, baby. This is me now. I've I really fucked with the oscillating feature now it's not enough. I actually prefer it. I preferred over one direct sort of like hydro poem right up there. I like it. I like to sort of disperse it a little bit more. That works from home. I just like can't even imagine. How read I'm like? Yeah. Nonstop. And I don't miss what the dryer function as much I find it's not I would have to sit there for about a full like two minutes the same spout that the water. Does know babe. Okay. I don't know how it works. Not. There's there's a whole different thing. I have one here, and it's good headphones. Man. Good headphones. Make all the difference. They make all the difference in the world for like, you're recording purposes or anything, I okay for for recording purposes. Certainly I use these audio Technica headphones that I think came with the zoom microphone. They're like fifty dollars on Amazon. I swear by them. They're like, they're really good fifty dollar headphones. But the chords really long. So I don't like bring them with me on the go. And then we have a listener who works for Bose who sent us some headphones that are really really nice. And I don't know if we've ever thanked him for that. But they are exquisite and good headphones. And it just really it really does make all the difference. When you just got good headphones. You can hear you music with. And I'll now I have. These these wireless headphones, and I will just walk around. Just like slip them on in the airport when I'm by myself and just listen to some tunes while I'm walking, and it's just nice nice headphones. Big on listen to stuff in the grocery store or member. Yeah. Yeah. I got air pods. I only put my air pods in when I'm going to the grocery store because I feel like it is just a very lightweight thing to do. And listen to podcast while I'm grocery shopping one what was do one more each maybe more. So pick a good thing. My final thing is I don't know how to say it in Yiddish. But my grandma told me this yet ish expression. Okay. Always really liked and it was you can't put your behind into horses onto horses. Yeah. To said in I say, I don't think you can put one behind in one. And she never like she could never remember how to say it in Yiddish. But she used to give that example lot. And I didn't really understand what it meant. But I always liked it. And it's a way of saying that someone is indecisive that they can't choose one side at the other. Yeah. That's a very useful phrase. I feel like for like your thirties. And almost every decision you have to me you can't put your behind onto horses. I like you're saying behind I never hear you bus out so refreshing because of how much in curse. It's your last thing. My last thing I just realized we've kind of done before. And I'm trying to think of some I was going to talk about shorts, and you have talked about cutoff shorts. Do you think it as a stretch for me to reopen the subject and talk about sports specific more specific? I'm talking about shorts that were made to be shorts in the first place in order for me to shorts after drag cutoff shorts purist over here refuses to take my cut off shorts. Just. The first you wear shorts is such a special day of the year. I feel like because it's a time where you say I'm done with all this gloom. I'm done with all the the short evenings. I'm here for shorts to wear during the summertime this spring time to wear to a baseball game to picnic to a race to raise to the store. I'm gonna wear my shorts to the store I'm going to wear shorts. Because it's now, and it's me, and I'm here, and it's me. Pants now, you went through a few different outfits today. I notice I did I'm a real close horse, aren't I e kinda came a such a fucking Khairi. Kevin came out a pair of pants, then you change into pair of shorts. And then was there a second parachutes that surface? Here's a tragic thing. I don't have any jeans that fit me, I have no jeans himmy, you gotta have jeans, and it's not even like a it's been like a Awiti thing. It's all my jeans are too long. And I just now realizing are my bone, my lead bones just come in closer together. I don't know. I don't know. But it really bothered how you know. What can I tell you? What it maybe maybe since you have lost a little weight. And you're you're behind. Possible. And then I put on shorts, and then you pointed out that they had Cheetos dust on them from the small bag of cheetahs eight for lines. Right near the it was it was right near the Pinas. Yeah. So many jokes. Like, are you what do you feed in that thing? I didn't. She did. What are you feeding that Cheetos, and I was like our sun is right? They're definitely not a joke. I said cheat. Oh fiend that hog Cheetos. Good one mom. So that's his first like long sentence to his father. Thank you for that. Thank you that gift. And thank you all for listening and thank you to Boeing and Augusta theme song money won't pay. Do you want? Some some some submissions wonders from our friends at home, you can find a link when he won't pay in our episode description, by the way, it's a very good. Let's see CARA says, my wonderful thing is half days of school. My high school has half days on every other Friday, and we get out at ten forty five. Is that a half two more third day last Friday, I drove my friends to get ice cream at our local gas station, and we sat in my car chatting and eating. Almost two hours. This is the most high school memory ever. And it is taking me on a fucking journey had forgotten that half days exists until right now, I never got them. We didn't get them. You didn't get half days. We didn't get half day got half days. Let me snow days. Did you get? I mean it depended. We got a lot of snow days. I feel like consoling we never had like the anyway, we get plenty of free time and scream for lunch. Nothing beats it. It's so awesome. That is so cool God high school. There was some good stuff there. Yeah. We'll just a car. Just having a car was such a big thing. Like, it was like a like a a place to go. Stephen says there's nothing better than finally defeating a boss difficult game games like Cup head and dark souls are full of these bad baddies, and there's nothing sweeter than putting one of these fellows down after multiple temps. It shows. The hard grind is worth the good. Good reward. I feel that have -solutely my jam. Did you see Cup head this like the cartoon one that looks like an old cartoon? It was very cool, and is very very very difficult game. This is just about beating tough bosses. We should play sometime. I think you dig it is as charming as it sounds is charming until you lose to the same boss who looks like a big funny. Sun flower for like the fiftieth time Cup head Emma says something I find wonderful is when books have maps on the inside covers the fact that the author takes the time to lay out a fictional landscape for the reader makes me feel considered pulse. Me into the world. Here's the thing. I could swear we've had this exact thing sinned by somebody else before that we read on the show, and that makes me very happy audience. Yeah. Don't remember. But I do appreciate. It it. I do appreciate it. Hey, thank you seriously for putting up with us doing this. I this was more fun. I think it was fun. Yeah. We just we didn't have time to research. And so we kept it short. I mean, I know a lot about web belts. But we really need to stick with the format that you are such a web belt in this of just you can put the holes are everywhere. That's true. The holes are every is nice. And they're coming back. I know it's fashion faux pas. And in a lot of people are going to call me out on it. But did you fold it over the top? You know, how they were always real long and you'd have to like folded over the top not cut it with scissors. No webbing. It would last me about two wears after that because the web would sort of unschooled at that point. Thanks to maximum fun for having us on the maximum fun. Check out all the great shows their shows, like stop, high guessing yourself mission, zits and beef and dairy network, and and flop house LOP house and one that mother switchblade sisters all these shows up on maximum or you can check out other stuff. We do at macaroni family should be a new monster factory coming up soon putting up like Mike early on in the month. So I think I think around. A new episode of macaroni brothers will be in. Trolls to. Oh, yeah, we're really shot the candidate doors. If if if if I'm being honest, and I think that's it. Let's just close with one more microscopic under- each and we'll say at the same time, maybe the sound good. Yes. Three two one impression. Maximum fund dot org, comedy and culture, artists owned listener supported. Listen, we already know that you love John removes them craft female filmmakers. So if you love all those things then by transit of property, you love my podcast switchblade sisters. Hi, I'm film critic April wolf every week. I have a conversation with different female filmmaker about their favorite genre. Film. Each episode covers the filmmaking process working in the film industry, and just like general geeking out about awesome movies. I've had such great guests like the big sick writer. Emily, Gordon to me. Indie movies as of late have come to be a catch all term for movie that kind of defies Honora Billy Madison half-baked director tamra Davis when a comedian comes and enters onto my set. They're they're just there to be funny. And we're all ready and waiting for them to be funny or industry veteran and actor Barbara Crampton as we're real drama lies for me. What's what's between you? And I speaking right now, we're we're we meeting, and what's the energy that we create between us, and so many others so checkout switchblade sisters every Thursday on maximum dot org or wherever you get your. Podcasts.

Rachel McElroy Griffin McElroy Facebook apple DMV Mike Myers Chicago Justin YouTube Henry Us magazine Jack Johnson Pugh Missouri Gary REEs Georgia Chris grant
Will more follow Jacob Rees-Mogg to back May's deal?

Coffee House Shots

13:49 min | 1 year ago

Will more follow Jacob Rees-Mogg to back May's deal?

"Hello. And welcome to coffee has shots. Spectators. Daily politics podcast, I'm Katie balls and joined by phrasing. Alison and James. So after much speculation in recent months, finally 'em piece of seized control of the government's agenda, and there will be a vote on indicative options BreX options tomorrow night, this appears to have scattered some Brexit is amid the movie considered resumes deal the morning, Jacob smog has concluded that Theresa May's deal is now the least west option Fraser, what does this change of heart from a lead Brexit, Tim mean will quote loosely in Jacob Reese, Moke has been seen as the bellwether Briggs us here. The chairman of the European research group guy who is seen to be able to bring of other people with him for a long time. Now, the government has been working on him saying, what would it take? And he is always held out the possibility that he might change his mind. And he's not one of these Tories use as come hell or high water. Not going to trees amazed deal. He's always hinted that he was open to reason was I can't work out is why he would change his my now, if you change his mind before the second vote it might have passed now. Of course, we do what the big changes. The big change is Oliver army that let wins lots have managed to seize control from them the government and give the Parlamento visited votes making it manifestly clear to those who hadn't quite worked out before that all of unlikely alternatives resumes deal are worse than Tris amaze deal, certainly from a Brexit tier point of view. Now, I can't see why it took him so long. I was always holding out for something better. I think you're dealers awful. I really thought the EU might have been persuaded to compromise and do just a small change making its comply with international law norms and create an exit clause, but they were in China. Suggests they would rather perhaps understandably the humiliation of the British parliament. Instead, we're now seeing that humiliation and annoying. It's difficult to think things are any differently than they are. So I think what we're seeing. Now is Jacob rees-mogg losing Oliver's. Army winning d think that Jacob smog is going to bring enough numbers with him that Theresa May has a chance of passing had deer potentially this Thursday. Jacob REEs Manca has been ready to move for a while on the second meaningful. He was very careful to leave a lot of declined at Brexit was endanger Bobby reason to vote for her deal. He is now saying it is I don't think he will move on the people the big question does he mean for Johnson Jacob REEs mortgage, the unofficial campaign manager for Boris Johnson's leadership? And so now, there's always had the best relationship to the people who his capital from his land. We're hearing about them Burs gonna do update next week saying, actually, I think is I didn't. Didn't agree and reading between the lines C in Brussels called yesterday. He was essentially saying if a different prime minister was going to stage to he could bat the deal. So the question then becomes which is. Won't get need domino effect going. So you get Jacob rees-mogg. You ain't get Boris Johnson. If you can get Boris Johnson things begin to look a little bit lonely for dominant, rob. And then wants to be left with Mark Francois. And Steve Baker alone in the room. And so you end try move from that, and you hope for the DP looking that this. But you've now all of these people are not going to vote for this storm won't lock does that change that view of art does thing has a chance of pulsing change view of labor in the seats just won't storm and kinda get fifteen twenty of them. And scrape this thing over the line, I still think it is a halls because there any guarantees the DP definitely most difficult basis. Occasion. I also think the, you know, the John berko will make your home for the government to bring things back that phase it to resume needs to seventy five more votes for her in order for it to pass and even. She some has this fantastic. Jacob Reese fax that's gonna get her seventy five votes. He look at the conservative rate out of MP's against steal their block who are there for a second referendum. If anything they feel galvanized by recent events by eighteen down this deal. And also some suggestion that some of these Torri MP's he voted for Theresa May's deal twice. He actually prefer Norway model might have lost incentive to vote for that time. If they think then dicta votes onto over gonna get them that desired result. Of course. I mean, the only hoop threes me go now is to do that the parliaments demonstrates. There's new majority for anyone option taking it back to her dealer. New deal, though, the dreams now new world of nightmares for two reasons. This. You'll have already lost a whole bunch of MP's were always going for Norway or something different the goods go from pursue option right now, and saving Norway option does get majority. Then I'm not sure that seven Jacob Reese will be able to make a difference. I mean. I'm not sure whether even going to have another votes on on her deal. But if we are she might lose by about twenty or thirty votes is difficult to see without a significant number of labor defections, then rees-mogg being able to make a difference. And she will perhaps crack smile the idea of him coming over to her way of thinking but not much compensation because it weren't make difference. It comes as indicative rates, James. How do we expect them to to play at ready and even tabs the full Matt because it's been some talk about slips multi options on is that when you have lots of different options that usual, I lobby system doesn't quite work. So well, what can we expect to see tomorrow night? I mean, this is a passive question. Why this part of the problem with this whole arrangement, which is all of that wins really come to MP's? Explain how much is going to work and take questions, but because he's not the government both no mechanism for him doing that. I'm not the problem. She's question Brexit. We have almost two governments. Now's comments. Now. Not not always a rather difficult situation to resolve as I understand it. The current thinking is this is you have schools deferred division. So MP's will give them ballot papers, and they'll be allowed to vote for as many options as they like so fear radically you could vote for treason still trees may still plus a customs union, and no, plus if you find all of those options accessible, the idea is to give the greatest chance or something can get a majority of votes. And then if this doesn't result in anything winning the first time round, they do the prices again on Monday, possibly removing the least popular auction from blest d think phase benign going to see some options just dismissed forget. Because at the moment, it doesn't seem as there are the numbers in parliament, for example, a second referendum but second referendum. Campaigners claim that they shouldn't be treated the same as other Brexit option. Because they're up shit should be the last resort. I don't think anybody's going to give up on their solution for this part of the problem there, so many people with so many different ideas. So you can see labour MP's lived MP's, Tori, MP's MP's from the Mersey attempts matai just thinking, right? We have got we're gonna keep pursuing it. Because we think our option we've last one standing so I think that not even the meaningful process will kill things off if you really present for a second referendum. You're not going to give up on that. I think it will try to his minds, but it might change again. I mean, this time last week looked as if the year we're going to grant a short extension that would focus my answer to resumes deal or whatever the ease got in mind. But then things changed. So anytime you try to predict breaks even four or five days ahead four or five hours ahead. You can quickly be eating your words heads. We have multiple podcasts. Sometimes now just to end this podcast. We did touch on John Becker Adia, we know the government hoping. To try and bring back amenable on Thursday, if they can and last night, we were given a taste of how bad relations between the conservative party and drug. Buck had become and you can listen to that here. The effect today require open the right on general, the member of Chelsea foot of the fogy est idea where to start he was one to whip. He wasn't a very good with. With. Rangers. James what was going on behind that moment so off to let with amendment pause David TC Davis, Tori, Brexit tear got up to basically say, well, how does the hangs hold all of that win to account? I mean, he's a job in prime minister. What's going on berko? Then started chastising some peeve. I'm a bit rude. And then Greg hands Jonathan wanted. Let win question time equivalent to prime minister's questions point on berko shot back, but I'm Greg hands. And not me. Very good whip. Which won the Tory benches went into up rule shouting withdraw resign swings on. I think berko for one's berko realized he gone too far. Because the wall of noise orlands who resigned was huge, and it was angrier. I think even the when that was at whole rabbi, Jeremy Corbyn handle had not coutries mastery treated woman, you actually heard berko for the first time rattles in those notifier, and his voice that he was losing the absolute lose control of a chamber actually ended up. Apologizing Greg hands. It was one of his classic apologies. It started off as I apologize. If he was offended Nolan pulmonary that actually did become slightly more generous as gonna barking went on Melissa Joan Burke was go to Paula Jones for his loan and eating we can expect another backer government rats week over well, not they can bring back to raise maize deal for third vote. I mean, there is potential for it. I mean this thing which is ultimately if I'm gonna majority forward deal, then it will be quite it will be called home for berko to book. It I will we knew James if we're going to George. I mean, what war is the government is vacant probably by the government all probably the best case or the government are, but the storms debate Josh shorter majority. And as the debate goes on on a few, Tori, MP's don't want to be the people who stopped the whole thing happening and some more labor impedes begin to obviously might happen. So the I am prepared to do it. Just just. To move on to get this phase. But we're still thinking rump of probably fifteen to twenty twenty and pizza wouldn't do whatever therefore fifteen to twenty labor MP's needed. Yes. Depending on the wherever DP DP comb board the government don't need quite not many. I wasn't. There is an interesting thing, which is using a second referendum tour. MP's group of annoying NBC didn't fight against it for non Brexit here reasons. I mean, the bulk of that group vote for the deal if she was going, and I think also quite a few in that group that wants to be the last person standing people, you know, this is not prevails and covered stuff. People want to be the Tory. MP thing loses by two votes. You don't want to be the one MP who made the difference between worldly, Brexit and potentially chaos. I mean, this is one of the things which is always interacts with what happens in the indicative votes because case out if some if something gets very close on the indicative votes for not will become an option knit bowls is tasked his can something get more. Votes in her deal. Last time round was if nothing gets close, then I mean to my husband much, better Jones Ables deal. I simply Fijian's to ask what you think of his indicative who's gonna be giving. Verve Daming got majority. First time round of the you can't quite know quite whether the government is going to whip on ought, however, labor than with were not let that will have a big affect the government's surely it's within the government's interest for none of these options to succeed. So we should. Yeah. And there is an option that you could say that the tour amount stay was against a wall, kind of customs unions gonna wipe against it. But if you did that you roll a beget more resignations from the government, you have free dollars night. But we wait and see. Thank you, James. Thank you Fraser. And just in case, you haven't got the manner. We have an offer involving that chip twelve to twelve pounds along the twenty pan John Lewis fascist which can also be used in. Petros. Just go to WWW dot spectator dot co dot U, K Ford, sash facture.

MP James Brexit Theresa May Jacob rees-mogg Jacob Reese Brexit Boris Johnson Tori prime minister Torri MP Fraser Jacob REEs Manca Oliver parliaments Jacob Jacob smog Paula Jones Jacob REEs
From Chicago To Oaxaca

Latino USA

29:06 min | 2 months ago

From Chicago To Oaxaca

"Hey. This is lily. I'm talking often northwest suburbs of Illinois, one hour per Chicago. I live here with my family and here's where I've been spending the pandemic so far. I'm out to the House Right now, my dad's gardening ripping up the grass while his youtube music is playing from the phone in his pocket. He has his favorite baseball hat on it has an image of a horse in the front and the hair of the horses yarn. So it blows when the wind hits it. He actually just got off the phone with GRANDPA, who's quarantined with my grandma and Chicago. He's quiet and he signed a lot. It's a way that I can tell that he's kind of worried. I've never really known him to express his worry. My Dad emigrated in the seventies from Oaxaca Mexico, which is where all my family's from. There from fifty by US up Deka indigenous, community of five thousand residents we call it Pueblo. My GRANDPA I came to the US in the forties as I said on. The Oh program was a lieber that brought millions of Mexican workers to your arms. He made multiple trips between Mexico and California so he could send money to his family. The second family member to head North was my uncle was in the sixties. Your tunnel as we call him made several trips to California where a young Francisco my dad followed him to work. Once they realized how far the dollar went in Oaxaca they returned to Pueblo and convinced the rest of my family including my very stubborn grandma to make the journey across the border. Down had heard there are a lot more jobs in Chicago, and so my dad deals and grandparent's headed to the windy city in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four, and on a cold day they set a. Nobody. Had Jackets and it was below freezing. My Dad he actually still has Jean Jacket that he wore that day is skinny thin and is also worn out elbows. And it was a pretty horrible experience. They were all like, why are we here? Kennel died suddenly at the age of thirty five because of health complications after a lifetime of drinking. It was an event that devastated my family for almost forty years. We didn't lose anyone else. I mean look. GRANDMA GRANDPA a pair of the ninety three and ninety five year olds. The pandemic brought with a heaviness, a threat that I recognize like everyone else. I just never thought it would impact my family the way that it did. From who through media, it's Latino USA I'm ready aim to. Today another side of the pandemic. We go deep into an indigenous Mexican community as a separate family from Chicago and Oaxaca Battles cove it. To Me Lily Rees is an incredibly special human being. I've known her for several years I. Met her first when she was my student at Depaul then she became my teachers assist and and then earlier this year she moved to New York City to come and work if full Doodo. Media. But then the pandemic happen and lily picked up in the middle of it and drove back to Chicago to be close to her family. Lilley was escaping the then epicenter of the pandemic but little did she know that the pandemic would follow her and her family all the way to Chicago and then Oaxaca? With the help of recorded check INS and phone and video calls lily is going to take us through her family's fight to survive this pandemic, and also how they found hope in the wake of irreparable loss. Lily is going to pick up. The. Story. From. Here. It's the middle of May and we're in my house in Chicago. My Mom Maria is in the kitchen cutting a pieces of fruit to make our morning are smoothies. My Dad is pacing around in one of the bedrooms. He's practicing a dickel in language spoken by about four thousand people in me he go. He's going to record an explainer video about covid nineteen in supplemental a Summer Morales have speak it along with Spanish. And English it's like sex Bangladesh. Chanda Schoneman. Nah Francisco lease started becoming Greece negating on interested in these stay as you don deny chicano noise. That's my dad in the video saying hi and introducing himself as the son of Ben Coming. My GRANDPA's nickname Pueblo. My Dad was there in early March at the beginning of the pandemic in the US unsal that most people either didn't know about the virus or had just heard rumors about it. So he decided to try and help fill that gap. He's never done an explainer video. Loves talking and he loves youtube. Sunda. Sent. For starting the Day Cool when I asked him why he decided to do it ends up with a goal and that Spanish he said, well, there's a lot of older people Pueblo who don't speak Spanish. and is true while you're generations are learning, Spanish and English sabatical many other indigenous languages is often only spoken by our elders and assist appearing was. My Dad post explainer video and instantly. Views and they're climbing every single hour is pretty cool to see that people might be getting the message. My family on both sides of the border has been able to stay safe during the pandemic. Then June arrives. My Amalia. My Dad's older sister and her husband the Assam. Would both in their late sixties have been admitted into the hospital in new lenox about forty miles southwest of downtown Chicago. My parents in cooped up in my bedroom looking at a laptop screen, which is quickly filling with almost a dozen family members faces talk about my deals condition. Okay. Five. Okay everyone's on the call except for my grandparents, they still don't know about the hospitalizations. Were afraid if we call them, the news will affect them negatively and we'll be making a bad situation worse. A fellow at work. Yes. That's my dad Julie. Talking my dad's siblings. Gamble on sons he I'm leaving Rhode Island obedient and they'll be young. You they not Swiss yesterday on is van. Majuli is saying deals. The hospital will be okay. She believes in the power of prayer and has an altar with saints where she has been asking for the recovery. My Mom's been receiving what's up messages from a sister about more and more? That's an acquittal. My deal encourages us to get some perspective. In Cleveland. I'm Beatles. He says, if my deals were back in a liquid. They'd probably be dead by now. Fathers as here, and so we caught the amount in the hospital. He's been stable for the last couple of days. After. Zena. Bothering. Every time we speak to mill he checks on us. He insists on knowing how we're doing even though he's the one who's fighting the virus. At some point, our entire family lived in a brownstone in Chicago and when we heard my uncle sharp whistle, we knew he was home. He used to be a boxer exceeds all rolled up. But over time he became softer. His gentleness is still there. We also call my GRANDPA to congratulate him gay village terminals, Calvin did impoverish. Dust. Amazon so much. That Papa means. The Mustang. Sally. GonNa Star. We've been thinking and planning on how to tell them about my deals is hospitalization but today is just not the day. They've been asking about them over and over again they know something's up. Leah, is undoubtedly my grandma's favorite daughter they talk almost every day am ideal tells her that she's from women. But my grandma's wondering why she hasn't called. I'm so close to my family. And let me Chicago, for New York for a job opportunity back in January was not an easy decision. My grandparents made it easier by giving me their blessing before I left. They were surprised for we're like, are you gonNa make more money when you're over there and I was like, yeah. So they were like all right then. Then they gave me the sign of the Cross and kissed me. On the same day Fathers Day, we calm down me. For Fogel. For further. You. GotTa. You the. The. Suspension. Amalia this Monday the. Might. They shut down my dad's sister and my deal wheel are imploring her to wake up. My Man, she's in rough shape. Cousins are the only ones a lot of the hospital. So we're faced timing them. Or taking turns. Talent Himalaya that we love her and we're waiting for her return. Is Strange to see anyone in this condition but especially, the Amalia. She has this quiet commanding presence that will make you feel loved while she points at your flaws the same time. She's the Best Cook. To my parents and I stopped by our house, she would turn scraps into a feast. When do we to my grandparents? That was the main question looming over us every single day. CHAPA tells us my grandparents aren't doing so good. MY GRANDMA CAN'T SLEEP She has these weird chest pains like she can't breathe. Sometimes. She would wake up in the middle of the night. My. GRANDPA. To. He started having dreams he jumped of Matteo's on several occasions. It's like they already kind of new. We only pray the. At Church we, petitions. Before, and after mass. Breakfast lunch dinner. The prayers are for her. Not for deal. He's healthy. Strong. His favorite nurse. See some everyday. She's helping him with exercises. Moving from the bed to the chair. Chair to the bed. He's getting out soon. Meeting with might be masters afternoon. But. Then my dad cosby Vienna my oldest cousin Komo moment is Papa. Pretty Guy. I did the. Model in many. Get. My uncle has had to cardiac arrests. And all of a sudden the rules have changed. We were blindsided. And impre for him. Kickoff. Classic Out Okay What are we going to do? That USA. Lilies, family receives news about the condition of deal mail and DEA Amalia, her uncle and aunt. Stay with us not. Hey. We're back. Before the break the condition of lease uncle took a sudden turn for the worse. Meanwhile, her Dea Amalia remains unconscious and Lily's grandparents have grown uneasy. Soon, the family is going to be forced to tell them. Just what's been going on? Lily is going to take it from here. Over the next three days since his to cardiac arrests, mighty milk condition continues to deteriorate. On that third day, my cousins there together, they decide to have dinner at one of their houses. They let the kids go to the park. A phone call comes in to one of my cousins. Is Not the answer. It's an unknown number. But the name for number 'cause my other cousins phone began. When she picks up, she realizes that it's my uncle's favorite nurse. She says, they must go to the hospital. Things aren't looking good. They drive to the hospital the pass through the Cova checks and are able to enter the room with just enough time to talk to my uncle. Everyone's crying. Everyone is saying their goodbyes. He's gone. Go by. And feeling creeps inside. A feeling of helplessness. What's going to happen my wakes up? What's she going to say when she realizes amount uncle passed away? Can She handle it? Find the answers to those questions. Eleven by. An APP. Away. Peacefully To complications. With the criminal virus. We can keep postponing telling my grandparents. My Dad. My mom and I drove to the house at the center of Chicago to tell them in person. By the time I got to the neighborhood. My GRANDPA had just gotten off the phone with my cousins they had broken in new SAM. And he had already told my grandma. They received the news calmly. But other than any one of US expected. My GRANDPA cried. But grandma just sat there STOIC. Like one of those native American statues and indigenous woman were her three thousand around her head. Just STOIC. Silent Not Yours. I was like man, of course. They've lost four toddlers. And one, thirty, five year old son. down. There in the pandemic. DIV injured many losses from people who they knew and family members from will. They know what losses? Much better than any of us holding news of my Theo's hospitalizations. Before she passed. My Grandma told my prima. She didn't want cremation. My grandparents echoed her choice. They are adamant. No Cremation? For. Catholics. Out of respect to our indigenous roots and the traditions of Pueblo, we were against cremation. We know we have a new goal to get my deals back toward Pueblo just as my day Malia wanted. And just as my grandparents wanted. The biggest problem repatriating the bodies. It's we've never done before. Are. We actually going to make this happen. Especially after reading. So many things in the news articles about other Mexican, families not being able to bring home their loved ones we wanted basically do the impossible. The first place we went to was the funeral home. And when we told the funeral director look. This is what we want to do. And the thing that comes out of her mouth is. It's impossible can do it. At that point, we feel like we fail my grandparents were nagging us and they were asking what are they going back? When are you going to buy your tickets yet? When is this going to happen? So we end up doing is calling the Mexican consulate. We obtained the name of an official who was in the position to help us right away. And we asked him is this possible? Can we do this? Both of them he said. We were guess both my aunt, my uncle passed away. We want to take them back to the web which is possible. He's like, yeah, it's possible. Wow. Okay. Let's start the process. and. We have to get a lot of people. Work permits from the US permits from Mexico this so much time this suck about. Two Months And we barely barely got the approval from Oaxaca. Our home state by the way. We were able to cover a lot of the costs thankfully, but the process itself and the waiting itself was grueling taxing emotionally thinking about the US. Just there. Waiting. Waiting together. Took a look at any seven fourteen. Please remain seated. We're just deposited Super Science Phenomenon Could Act over It's a Sunday night in September and my dad and I have just landed Wocka after three hour flight from Dallas. We're going to stay with an old family friend Lesson Yala. Do millions and millions body should be arriving on Tuesday. We make it took the decline the by which is in the southeast of what? Is Very. Small. The same taxi driver that took my dad to the airport back when he was visiting in March, is picking us up right now. into the. My Dad and the taxi driver are talking about how things have been slowly stabilising Pueblo. When we get to listen your Lola's place, she's at her business next door it's a cybercafe. It feels surreal to be here. The finally arrives we head to the house at the million Malia had an quibble. We'll see them. Their caskets arrived last night. Some show. Shan. It means hello. Every house and has acquired Los Angeles a room of the scenes. My Dad and I walk into the room. The wasser green the ceiling is the darker green. It's my favorite color to. My Dad and I woke up to the altar as tradition. We kiss it. We see a prayer and we turned around to face all four of my cousins Estella. bbn. Not The and Rosie Of Caused Place to my dad shot the WHO connects and has my grandpa and grandma by her side. They're looking into the screen. squinting to see my heels. They console my premise. Who Take Time, holding the phone and they all say the same thing we did it. Slowly cruiser to say their last words. and. GRANDPA WENT I. He was calm. He was collected. But when my grandma came. On the phone. She was crying. and. I've never seen her like that. She had a Napkin. She was wiping away her tears. And I felt a piece on the inside that I've only ever felt after we told them what had really happened when might the? They finally had their closure and they finally said goodbye. We started gathering together to walk to the theon Pueblo the cemetery. We walk over to the grave sites. One for my feel and the other for my thea. They were maybe a role part. Because there was no more space in the cemetery in the theon. To have them side by side, there's too many people who have been dying up to that point. Every person WHO's buried? In. The cemetery in Pueblo. Are Buried with their ancestors. In, this case. My dear male was buried with his father. The bones of his father were placed right above his coffin. Thea it the bones of my uncle. Dana. As we're preparing to lower might into the ground. I hear somebody say any hey lilly I, look up. And it's my cousin Bella. She's mouthing at me tunnel to tunnel and pointing. And I turn on my full. When I see there's a wheelbarrow with a bunch of bones on top and a skull by told my dad. Dad Commu look and I tell him that's still gener-. The bones in. Teddy does. No broken once. He walks away from it. And comes back with a little bowl of holy. Water. He takes a flower. As is tradition to bless. Gibson in the holy water and blesses the bones of my dinner. You can still see his goal tooth. Young. The return. Means A lot. The fact that me and my entire family went through this across to countries. When it finally ended who ha? It's a feeling of lightness almost like happiness same with us. I can even tell the difference right now. Blasting my Theo's favorite music from last humanity. Yes. Tools bookies. Right here next to their graves. We're celebrating their lives and our unexpected return to the beauty and tradition of a weblog. Unity seems to happen this changes of places. The death of my Diaz showed us that. I all my cousins will miss him terribly. But as John Simply Juntas. We love you. Los Alamos. Kiss, consonant. Bus. Mill Eat Damani. Our thanks to millie res and her family for sharing his personal story with us. says. The. This episode was produced by leave race and Atlanta with help from John Mocha. It was edited by Andrea Lopez. The Latino USA team includes Neil Massias. Raise will yet at? Genie Montalvo. Elisa's got say an Henderson I said with help from. Our engineers are stuffy lebow, Julia, Caruso, and Leah Shop. Our director of programming operations is Matthias Fever votes are digital editor is Louise's Luna, Our New York Women's foundation ignite fellow is Trump our interns are human on several AMMIEL CICADAS our theme music was composed by Xanadu evils. If you like the music you heard on this episode stop by let new USA. Dot. Org and check out our weekly spotify playlist I'm your host and executive producer my gang of pasta join us on our next episode and in the meantime look for us on all of your social media I'll see you there Estella proxy lamp. Funding for Latino, USA, is coverage of a culture of health is made possible in part by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson. Foundation let's Hino USA is made possible in part by the Annie E.. Casey. Foundation creates a brighter future for the nations children by strengthening families, building greater economic opportunity and transforming communities. And New York Women's Foundation The New York Women's foundation funding women, leaders that build solutions in their communities and celebrating thirty years of radical generosity. Hey, this is nearly I'm talking to you all from the northwest suburbs of Illinois. Lily. Next time on Latino USA. The new school year is getting started and with that comes parents anxiety over what comes next the trials and tribulations of being a parent in the Times of global pandemic I kind of have days where I feel like I am failing at everything. Failing at work and failing parenting. That's next time on the USA.

Chicago US Pueblo Lily Rees New York City Oaxaca Illinois DEA Amalia Mexico baseball California Oaxaca Mexico Leah Shop director lieber Malia Jean Jacket Oaxaca Battles
Lord Martin Rees: The Future of Humanity

What It Takes

50:13 min | 2 years ago

Lord Martin Rees: The Future of Humanity

"I need to admit one thing before I dive into today's episode. I can't really tell you in. My own words, what our very accomplished guest has achieved in his career, not in any detail. And that's because I am not conversant surprise surprise in astrophysics and cosmetology and no amount of Google. Lynn can save me. What I can tell you broadly is that Martin Reese has contributed a good deal to our current understanding of the universe. I think when the history of sciences Ruth, one of the highlights is going to be understanding the place of earth in the broader calls boss setting the whole earth in the host of the system in the grand scheme tracing right back to the time where the whole universe was only. A second old. It's amazing that we can talk with straight face about this. But I think become Martin race since the nineteen sixties has worked to understand quasars black hole. The big bang and the mysterious period between the big bang and the emergence of stars. He is a strana Mer Royal of England top dog in other words and has been since nineteen ninety five he's the former president of the Royal Society, the UK's National Science academy. He's a former master of Trinity College Cambridge. And hey, he's also been knighted and elevated to the house of lords. He's even gotten asteroid named after him the list of prizes and publications could take up the whole podcast, but I'll leave it at this Lord. Martin Reese is a big think kind of guy who ponders the history of the universe. Going back billions of years and the future of our planet, and the humans who live here saw deep sense of mystery and wonder about the world around us. But also it allows us to change. The world around us, and we've got to make sure we change it in. But I in ways and minimize the downsides. So that's being something. I've been concerned about certainly in the last decade or two. So here we go to Infinity and beyond and back down to her on this episode. What it takes a podcast about passion vision, and perseverance from the academy of chief -ment, I'm Alice Winkler at a main this child is gifted and I heard that enough that I started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity. I knew don't take it. You may never have another chill. It always so clear. It was just like the pick your started to form itself. They was new. We reach alive could prevail over the truth darkness over light there over life. Every day. I wake up and decide today, I'm going to love my life decide. If they're going break, your leg when going play stay out of there, and then a long companies differential experiences, but you look for you don't plan for the boy, you better not miss him. I once met a famous Indian tycoon he heard I was a strong the Royal. And he said do the queen's horoscopes, and I said, but the straight face if she wants one, I'm the person she'd ask. Took it seriously. Asked me my predictions. I said troubling Lee stock market for fluctuate and things like that. He doesn't solemnly. But then I came clean. I said I'm just dishonest lost all interest in my predictions. And rightly so because scientists are rotten focuses almost as bad as communists. To make a few full cost about the coming decades. They tentatively one thing. I didn't mention my intro is that Martin Reese is the founder of the center for the study of eggs essential risk at Cambridge University. The website says they are scientists and experts from all different disciplines dedicated quote to the study and mitigation of risks that could lead to human extinction or civilizational collapse and rhesus latest book just out as I record. This is called on the future prospects for humanity. So he's got a lot on his mind. Besides milky ways and rings of Saturn. But let's start with the science and wind our way to the existence angst. Martin REEs wasn't destined for science his parents both schoolteachers warrant scientists. And as he told Gail I Can Tho who interviewed him for the academy of chief -ment in one thousand nine hundred nine and again in two thousand seventeen he was just as likely to become an economist when he was choosing his path in the early nineteen sixties but science allowed him to avoid studying Latin and German, and that he thinks was half of what drove him into the loving arms of physics that an inspiring professor at Cambridge. And after your I realize have a good decision not because I had a wonderful mental. But also because this was a time in the mid nineteen sixties when a storm is opening up for the first time you had evidence for black holes that there was a big bang in universe. And that we could understand how the universe evolved. And it's always good in a subject to be in at the beginning. Because then the old guys have no big advantage over the young guys. And so you can make them out funded quickly. And I was quite lucky in that sense. I might be happy doing can all makes. But I've been very fortunate to have had a ringside seat for many of the exciting developments in astronomy over most of my career. But actually, what's made me feel even look over my career is that the rate of discovery has not declined tall within the last few years. We've had discovering planets around all the stars entirely. New field of makes the night sky. Former interesting and also gravitational waves from space and all kinds of things we can now address questions couldn't even posed for years ago. Martin Reese doesn't like taking credit he describes his own contributions as entirely collaborative. He's not the guy out there with the telescope. He said theoretician who sent? The sizes the disparate data gathered by others. And he says over these many decades, he's never had one of those big cliche. A ha moments. I think if you analyze scientists every two types of scientists those who do one big thing, and those who contribute a lot of ideas along the way. Greek say, the FOX knows many things in the hedgehog knows one big thing. And then that sense, I'm FOX raum, the hedgehog in that I haven't had any one single great idea. Most of my career in doing physics involved trying to interpret lots of mysterious observations of trying to put them together to try and make sense of though. And that's my preferred style of it's very much a call for ethnic. I would highlight my own contributions too much. It's very it's very much a corporate of effort, and using insci- and also in my particular subject, I think the real heroes of the observance because people devised instrument and make an observation of some incredibly distant objects, billions of light years away. They're the ones who I think deserve for more credits than those tried to make sense of it all over the past fifty years Gail, I Can Tho wanted to know what have been the major setbacks. Well, many of my ideas of being proved wrong, of course. But that's normal for most. Scientists I think because I've tends to book on many things wealth and one thing I've never had to Mendes emotional investment investment of time than single idea. So I've been sped the trauma, which some scientists have if they sometimes find the ten years of work is wasted. I've never spent ten years in any single things. I've never had such a big investment in anything. And so for that reason I've tended to sort of heads my bets. And in fact, sometimes I've done something which many scientists think is unusual which is to work simple tiny onto contradictory theories. This is to me a reasonable because if you're trying to explain some new phenomenon, and we don't know which theory is right. Then what we should do is explore the consequences of a and b and perhaps they called because we alias to some contradiction beat doesn't all more about them. And so I want to know the answer and often the to do that is to. Explore two different ideas and see which works best. Let's back up here for a moment. And remember where the field of astrophysics was in the nineteen sixties when Martin Reese entered it Einstein had offered up a new way of looking at gravity and space and time in nineteen fifteen, but it was a theory. It would take decades for technology to advance enough to allow scientists to look for proof more powerful telescopes better ways of registering faint, light and space probes. Those provided the first evidence that Stein was right about well pretty much everything including black holes, and that's the ferment Martin re stepped into as a young scientist. So I would say over the last fifty years Einstein's theory has been vindicated fifty years ago. There were only a few tests of it, which weren't very precise. And they. Applied when week. But now, I think we've got very strong reasons for believing that it is the right inside into space and time and black holes governed by the equations of Eisenstein and also that the early big bang, which said our universe. Expanding was governed by those same equations. So we do have a very good theory, which explains gravity and the north coast to the universe. My spies. Tell me that you have books of Einstein in your study. Talk about your own relationship to Einstein, and perhaps your your estimation. Yes. Well, of course, I I I never met him. He died in nineteen fifty five. And I think he he is really rather special in the history of science because there's an interesting contrast between creativity in the arts and the sciences. I mean in the arts, whether your outstanding all just average your work has individuality, but it might not last if you're a scientist, in most cases, your work may last you've added one brick to the defense of public knowledge, but it doesn't have individuality if you hadn't done it. Someone else would have done it. And that's true of almost all of science, and Einstein is almost an exception to that in if Einstein hadn't existed, the ideas that we now associate with him would have gradually emerged. But it would have taken much longer. So he made a distinctive imprint in he was motivated not by some kind of ABS vacations. The ideas weren't already in the air as they normally all when sounds advances. But it was pure thought that led him to this and how did not being for Arnstein. It would have been maybe decades before we had an equivalent theory of gravity. So in most cases, doesn't really matter. Because if ages and do something be soon will and one of my favorites authors. Peter meta wa and he had a lovely saving his books where he expressed his contrast by by saying that when Wagner took ten years off in the middle of the ring cycle to compose Meister singers and Tristan he didn't think that someone was going to scoop him. And so that's the big difference between creativity in the arts and sciences. I think we can all stipulate that I kn- Stein was in some special art science category all his own, but that doesn't take anything away from Martin reese's immense contributions to the field humble as he is about them. One of the things rhesus best known for is his insight into quasars, which were first thought to be some very extreme kind of star. They're not in fact, they put out more light than an entire galaxy of stars. But are much much more. Compact Reese was one of the first people to ask how could that be? Now, this is where I bow out. And let Lord re stew the talking where we know that the basic loud scale constituents universe galaxies like Mckee wage containing about one hundred billion stars. But we also know that these entities, which are basically. Apparently stars orbiting around the central hub. Centered around a black hole in the center of the city. And that black hole is often crescent is one in our Milky Way, which weighs about four million times of much of the sun. But other galaxies have these in them, and if they are just questioned we don't see them, but if gas falls into them, then the gas world in and gets magnetized on very halt and that gas in fully into the black hole releases far more energy than the hundred billion stars in the galaxy. So the brightest objects recede when we look with our telescope and universe de so quasars where the light of all the stars is out shown by the central concentrated light associated with a black hole. And this is important in itself. Because it allows us to study extreme conditions where gravity is very strong. But also is allows us to probe further out. In the universe. And there for further back in the past the further out you look in the universe long the lights taken to get to us therefore third you'll looking back in the past. And so the fact that these quizzes bright has made it possible for us to actually understand what universe was like not merely now, but one billion two billion three billion and up to twelve billion years ago by looking at these quasars, and this therefore means that if we want to understand how our universes of and how from some big bang eventually turned into the complex most we apart of we can do better than geologist. We can look not just at fossils, the powers, but we can actually observe the pas because when we look far away we are looking back. So we can actually see what galaxies were like a different stages in their development. I remember growing up as a child hearing talk about the sun and the moon and here are the planets. And of story. Well, it's a lot lot bigger. Obviously, we know the sun is one of a hundred billion stars in our Milky Way. Galaxy omic away galaxies wonderful about one hundred billion galaxies. If we can see out to limits of our telescope, and incidentally, those more speculative, I personally think that physical reality is vastly more extensive still than the region, we can observe so there's been a huge expansion scale. But I think what's more important is the ability to observe in different way bands. And with great sensitivity. That's how we've come to map out the universe in more detail and understand more about the physics of the stars and planets and galaxies within it. Before we leave astronomy. What do you think is the next frontier? And are we working on? I think there are two basic frontiers. One is to push back to the very very early universe. We understand with a great deal of confidence. What happened in the big bang after the first Niagara second over because after the first micro-second the conditions in universe were no more extreme that we can similize in the lab. So we have fairly good evidence for what happened from. Millisecond after the big bang microseconds of the big bang to the present. But if we try to try further to the first tiny tiny fraction of a second, then conditions in terms of density, and temperature energy will more extreme than we can simulates. And therefore, we lose our foothold in imperial physics, and therefore things are more uncertain, and we would like to have a theory, which allows us to be more confident about those early stages is that there is a special challenge will involve achieving one of the summits of twenty first century science hasn't yet been reached which is to unify Einstein's theory of gravity with the quantum principle. Einstein's gravity applies to things on the cosmic scale stars and planets cetera. And the quantum theory applied micro world of atoms. And we have no theory that combines those two that doesn't matter in most of signs because if you're a chemist you don't have to worry about the gravitational effect between different atoms in a molecule. It's very weak on the other hand, if an astronomer you don't need to worry about the quantum fuzziness in the over to the planet because it's so big that's negative. But if we want to understand the very beginning of the universe when the entire observable universe could have been squeezed microscopic Cise. Thank clearly we need a seri- which going to incorporate gravity and also in corporate principal, and that's what we don't yet have. And so one of the challenges, obviously is to take more steps towards reaching that summit of unified theory because only then will we be able to have a firm of you for what happened in the very beginning. So that's one frontier. Another quite different area of astronomy. Which is fast is looking. Planet. Toronto the stars the night skies. Become hugely more interesting in the last ten or twenty years with renowned know that most of the stars you see in the sky, not just points of light that surrounded by revenues planets, just as the sun is rounded by the earth and the other familia planets and until twenty years ago, we had no evidence for this. But now, we know that most all's planets around them and that in our galaxy. They're probably a billion planet rather like the earth in the sense of having all bits where water code exist and being about the size of the earth. And this is fascinating study. And of course, motivates the thought of whether life could have. Emerged devolved on these two subjects exobiology trying to understand these planets to see if there's evidence for life on them is I think going to be really exciting at the moment. The planets are. Only really inferred indirectly by looking at the star there orbiting around and seeing their effect on the star make it a bit dimmer if they trust in front of eight or causing a bubble due to their gravity, but with the next generation of tennis copes, we'd be able to actually analyze the light from the planets of selves, and that'll tell us whether they have a biosphere whether's evidence oxygen water, vapor and things like that. And that's gonna be very exciting. And of course, we want to understand the origin of life. Because even though we understand how winning selection allowed over four billion years simple life in the younger through evolve into the complex biosphere, which we're apart. We don't yet understand how life began here on earth in the sense of what triggered the transition from complex chemistry to the first replicating metabolising systems recall alive. Serious people working on that. And I hope that might progress, and if they make progress until to other things, it'll tell us was this such a rare fluke would have happened. Elsewhere. Would we expect it happened on these other earth like planets, and Secondly, it'll tell us whether the DNA are a basis of life on earth is unique specialists. It were or whether the could be life based on quite different chemistry may be without water. We don't know those questions. So that's a fascinating frontier of stormy and science, and so I would say three frontiers of does the very small the quantum world, the very large the cosmic world, and you want to unify those to understand the big bang, but the third frontier of science, which is a very complicated world, and that's the everyday world, especially biological things. And and that's quite different because challenge there is to understand complexity while. Why aren't held up by not understanding sub nuclear physics, or by north understanding is lines theory. They're held up because even the smallest organism is far more complicated than the atom or star, scientists believe life. I emerged on earth nearly forty five million centuries ago about half a billion years after the earth itself formed, but Martin Reese is worried as a scientist and decision that it could all go awry in just one hundred years time. Well, this is the first century in those forty five million where one species one dominant species, namely us can't control the planet's future. And that's important because the storm was no, although the been forty five million centuries in the past the sun is less than half way through his life. So there another sixty million centuries to come before the sun dies and indeed the expanding universe may go on forever. So we are less than halfway through the life of our solar system. But even in this, huge, perspective extending. Hundreds of millions of years in the past and the future this century is indeed special because it's the first when one species the human species can determine the future because we are dominant on this planet, and we have huge numbers of people with powerful technology, and I do worry about whether we will get through the century without severe setbacks. And I think there are two different classes of risk. We need to worry about the first is the category, which we are imposing collectively. Because there are more of us on this planet growing population. And each of us is more demanding of energy and resources to a now nearly seventy two half billion people on the planet. The be nine billion by mid century. When shortly after that, it could go up even more. But also, we'll all mortem on in terms of energy. And was also is and of course, we hope that the developing world close the gap with more fortunate countries like ours, and that will of course, increase the the pressure on energy and resources. So does a risk that this is going to lead to despoil of the environment. Climate change could have severe long-term effects and to disruption of colleges DD to mass extinctions. And of course, those will be irreversible degradations of environment. So we will not be leaving an environment for future generations as good as be inherited. So that's a serious concern collective effects, but as a different kind of concern, which also me, which is that because of powerful technologies in particular biotech and cyberattack. I individuals much more empowered than they were in the past. And that therefore means that an individual or small group can buy ERO by design. Have a consequence damaging consequence that could cuss gay globally. I like to say that the global village will have its village idiots, but they will now have a global range, and this is something very much the new technologies of exciting. And of course, we depend on new technology to feed nine billion people and to find a good life in the mall. So we don't want to slow down technology, but we do want to redirect it and controllers if we can so as to minimize these serious risks because we are in the interconnected world where a disaster in one region will cascade around the world. No positive world is isolated from what happens elsewhere now. And so we need to very concerned. And that is why I do worry about how we will get through the century without severe setbacks. Why do you think climate change is so politicized and therefore diff- more difficult to address I think climate change raises special problems because first of all the signs is still rather uncertain? Everyone agrees that the temperature on average is going up and more importantly that rise in temperature is going to trigger big logo change in weather patterns, the regions where you're the monsoons where you have drought cetera will change, and this will be a disruptive effect on the climate for more rapid than any natural changes in climate that have happened in the past. But of course, these time-scales will low very short that's Nova context. Long in a political context, we're talking about what will happen in the next few decades, and what might make the lives of of people now just bored who. Who'd be alive in twenty second century worse now, and it's very hard to persuade politicians to do something now which will not benefit to here now between now and the next election, but will have an effect on the lives of children now board who will be alive at the end of the century. And also on the lives of people in remote parts of the world. We more -ffected than we are in Europe or North America. So that was difficult to deal with because obviously the focus of most action is the the Geant and the parochial rather than the long term. And for that reason, I think it's very hard to keep. Dilemma climate change high on their gender. I personally think we should be prepared to pay an insurance premium now is it were to remove potentially serious risk. From the lives of future generations. But it's hard to to make that point because think of ways in which we can keep that on new gender elected say two things about one is one policy, which I think we can realistically adopt and get countries to accept is to pursue acceleration. Research developments into all forms of carbon free energy because those involving citing new technology and give a boost to the nation of I and the faster development. Proceeds to sooner will the cost come down. So it's instant India, which clearly needs to have new sources of power to replacer stoves burning wooden dog which is hugely damaging mentally they'll be able to afford clean energy and not build co founded how stations so we've got. Accelerate the hour so clean energy is cheapest co five power stations then without any further incentive. India and other countries will go directly clean energy leapfrogging the face when they have huge fossil fuel pass stations. So. Developing clean energy is quickly as possible is win win situation for the world. So that should be a priority. And the amount of our d in those areas is very small compared to defense our defense, medical, Andy. And why shouldn't be it become purple? Indeed, I would say that one of the most inspirational goals for young engineers should be to provide clean and affordable energy for the developing as well as develop world, we're very exciting development. That's one thing. But the other thing we can do is really to persuade polticians that they should think about long-term questions. So let's oppose the Stormers had found evidence that there was an asteroid heading for the earth, and that we calculate it might hit the earth in the twenty one hundred that's eighty three years from now, and suppose we could say that we ten percent confidence. No Pesenti mope of the reaction to the public be. Well, would we say well? L in fifty time have better technology to deal with it. It may miss us anyways. So let's do nothing. I don't think we I think if that the case we would damnedest starting now to see what we could do to make sure that we could somehow deflected all minimize it's impact and here in algebra climate change because climate change is on certain before we can say is that there is indeed a credible. Fred that by the twenty one hundred climate change will have triggered irreversible two points. While the like, the melting of greens is we eventually racy level by about seven or eight meters. And also cause huge global change climate. We copy sure because likely, and my view is that we should already be prepared to pay insurance premium to reduce that risk now, we shouldn't say, well, fifty people richer, and they have best technology that leaves them. We should start. Now. And I think the analogue of the asteroid indicates that it is worth pagan insurance premium now to eliminate risk even if it's an uncertain we shouldn't just say, it may not happen. We shouldn't say that they can deal with veteran fifty to become now we should already start to see what we can do about it. I keep thinking of a little a line and poem, which is the way the world, and it's not with a bang his. As Reese likes to say, there's no planet b that's why he got a collection of top thinkers in science philosophy and law to join him in starting the center for the study of existential risk to examine not only climate change. But also is recess mentioned the dangers lurking in artificial intelligence and bio and cyber technology. Yes. Well, of course, cyberattacks becoming very very serious. And then example of how just one person can produce a really major disruption by disrupting electric power grids. And and things like that. And this is a new kind of wolf air if nations engage in it, but even individual goes pretty serious damage and similarly with the bio threats, the new techniques, for instance to make. The friends of ours. Movable transmissible these have been developed with few years a few years ago and in twenty fourteen the American Federal government stopped funding research into these because it was thought to be dangerous knowledge and risk of the vases escaping it cetera. So that's an example where there's a new technique. And of course, we've got the wonderful new, gene editing techniques crisper has nine which has huge benefits, but also could have unintended consequences. If so could gene drive is used to make species extinct, and that has consequences. So does the big risk of these things. Now, quite rightly there are lots of discussions within scientific Adams and elsewhere about how to regulate these new technologies particularly bio modeled on nearly days of becoming a DNA when the researchers agreed to moratorium into. A follow certain guidelines, and in that spirit the being last two or three years similar gatherings of of academy Sion's experts, but things are different this time the different because far more nations involved as relied spread and also does much stronger commercial pressure. Which the wasn't forty years ago. It was no biotech industry. And for that reason. I think whatever guidelines we have an field to be adopted on prudential or ethical grounds. Enforcing them. It's going to be very hard. I would say it's going to be hopeless to enforce them locally as it is to enforce drug laws or the tax laws and we've had precious success in forcing either of those and this I find very scary. And the point is that the equipment that needed. Is they modest? I mean cyber-attacks just need access to the internet and the techniques needed for some of these, gene. Modification techniques is available in university labs and industry, etc. It's not like nuclear where you can't build a nuclear weapon in your garage got conspicuous, and f is feasible to have inspection and monitoring of nuclear developments. Okay. We can't do that in these cases. And so my worry is whatever can be done in the bible side area will be done somewhere by someone. And I didn't know what we can do to eliminate that risk. We can certainly time juice it. And I think we should focus very hard on ways to reduce it to have surveillance etcetera. Although there again, there's going to be a tension between them security freedom and privacy. If we want to try and guard against individual lone wolves as it were misusing this technology. But I think it's only do need to worry about. And it has stopped me. Some of my colleagues that does not enough attention given to these threat. We want to use technology optimally and minimize its downsides. The stakes get higher as these techniques. Get more more powerful. And that that's why I think is very important to ensure the experts focus on how to assess which of these scenarios communist business on fiction on which are sufficiently real that. We ought to think about them and address how we can minimize their impact and not enough people doing this this far less attention, given to these sort of potentially existential risks than very small wrist, a huge numbers of people thinking about the days of Costner gingy in food. No radiation doses. Making plane safer of oil train crashes and things of that kind. But the amount of attention given to these high consequence Lopo -bility events whose probabilities rising all the time as technology gets higher is low. Was there a time in your career when you realized that? Your responsibility as a scientist should lead you to speak out more about these issues, then to stay in the lab and look at it microscopes telescopes and when I think back in the nineteen eighties. I was quite involved in the Pugwash movement for nuclear disarmament. And I. Member of campaigns for new into things like that. So I spoke in rose quite a bit about the nuclear threat back then, and I had the privilege through those activism getting to know, some most impressive people have met who are some of the physicists who worked at Los Alamos during World War Two on the balm. But then they return to civilian an academic life afterwards and federal brigade to do all they could to control the posited helped unleash and people like Joseph Roth Blat hands beta Vicky, vice culpa people out that really great men and the longer with us. And I think they set an example for Santis in any. Area of science at has societal ramifications. Which is that. Even if your primary and academic scientist, you should be concerned about the application of your work. You may not yourself do expectations of work, but you should be concerned to ensure this if you work has beneficial applications someone exports them, and if it has Dade with locations efforts made to reduce their risk, and that is now responsibilities. I think falls not just on the nucleus on as it did seventy years ago on but on the scientists involved in these other new techniques, particularly microbiology genetics artificial intelligence and cyber techniques. And so I think it's very important that they should be engaged. Of course, scientists should realize that they are only experts in technology when we get to the issues. Which involved then political economic death. Ical concerns come in and scientists just citizens in those areas so Santus shouldn't be decision makers shoes, but they have a special responsibility to ensure the public is informed. As well. The like in the house, which by calling Michael gives. It's like if you've got teenage kids you conduct you control what they do. But you'll pull parent if you don't care what they do. What happens to them? Likewise. If you're a scientist. The ideas you come up with your creations as were. And she ought to care about what uses made of them in the same way, even called control it. And so in the same way, I think scientists alter or to care. And should try and inform the public and inform politicians, and incidentally, if the public is to be an informed citizenry, everyone needs to have some feel for science because so many of these shoes which confront us today. Whether it's health energy environment transport. They have a scientific dimension. So if the public debate to rise above the level of slogans ever needs to understand a bit about the science and scientism selves should take a lead in insuring that that happens for the past several decades. Martin Reese may have applied his significant brainpower to worrying about the future and trying to save us from ourselves. But his picture is not all gluten do as a cosmetologist. He still got a sense of wonder at his core and takes the long view. I mean, the really long view. And that lets him consider some better scenarios for the future too. So we'll end this episode by listening to part of the talk he gave in two thousand seventeen at the academy of achievement international summit in the English countryside. But there are some real optimists around. Future. All just Ray kurzweil who know works Google, he argues, it was machines get up to human capabilities. They'll Len design even better bones themselves. We have an intensity spills unless he goes a singularity. But he's learned minutes half him in his lifetime. He's into sixties. So he takes a hundred pills a day, and he wants his body frozen Zona when he dies, and then when an offer he wants to be resurrected we'll have his brain downloaded. Well, there are people who believe this. I was interviewed by salting. -sulting colorful in the air cooled, the abolition of involuntary death. And they support all this an upset too. Because I said I'd rather end my days in English churchyard down that American refrigerator. And I was surprised when I go home the three of my economic colleagues paid for this to it paid the full whack won the Cup price. Just have his head frozen. I'm glad they from Oxford or not my university of table. But of course, more seriously domestic life extension may happen. And that will be crucially important full population. Trends if nothing else, but my expertise is in space and just beyond the earth that cyborg ni- technologies we'll have their low spectacular scope. So what about that? Just those months we heard of the Cassini spacecraft which plunged into satin Clinico opium of information about that planet and its rings on its moves. It's twenty years since Cassini Julie. And maybe realize how spectacularly smartphones and logos for. Unst in twenty years. We read is that we could do better now than the amazing things Cassini did with nineteen nineties technology, and I think doing the century. The host solar system will be explored by fillers of miniaturized probes for mode Cassini and John robotic fabricators may assemble lightweight structures in space, huge within radio flexes solar energy collectors and such like, maybe using rule materials mined from the moon asteroids. We're both about human spaceflight languished for decades since the great highpoint of the moon things. Robotic advances. Eroding the practice. This any people into space nonetheless. I hope people will follow the rowboats though. They would do this adventures not for practical goes, and we should specially claim the private enterprise efforts in space. And on Musk's SpaceX Jeff blue origin on the wrist because they could tolerate higher risks than the western government could impose on public funded civilian, astronauts and thereby cut costs compared to NASA ISA. And I think that later the century courageous thrill seekers people in the mold of say Felix Baumgartner, Phil SuperSonics house to balloon and crazy people like that they may well establish bases. Independence earth on malls. Malls. Or maybe asteroids most himself who's not forty six years old says he wants to die on house, but not on impact. And make it. But don't ever expect mass immigration from ours? I think the dangerous delusion to think that space office in the scape from earth's problems because them here. Cope with climate change is a dull compared to tear forming. Mas a no way and also the system office environment, even as Clement as the antibiotic was the top of Everest. There's no planet b for Audrey risk averse people. But I think I'll send it to you. Another should cheer on these space adventures people like Baumgartner because they will have a pivotal role. I think in spearheading the post human future space, even MAs is they hostile environment for humans. So these pun is far more incentive than us to redesign themselves that harness the superpower full genetic and cyber technology. We'd have in the coming decades. East techniques would be heavily regulated I hope on earth, but these people far beyond the clutches of the regulations. So it's these adventures space, not those of this come to be adapted to life on earth who spearhead a post human era within a few centuries into a new species. Ganic beings like us. And gravity post. Humans make the transition to fully inorganic intelligence. They may prefer zero g especially the construct your mouse artifacts shows in deep space that non-biological Braves may develop. How's the tombs conned even imagine? So even if intelligence will now unique to. Needn't caustic side ship voted in generations of self improving machines, advancing as it were Intel's design that we knew selection it could in future spread far beyond the soda system. Voyages hold no terrors if your nearly immortal and I should mention an astronomer. I'm aware that we have billions of years in the past have led to humans most of that. But fuel oh where does the time? Lying ahead is at least as long we ended not even halfway stage. We've Lucien should be six billion years before the sun flares often dies and expanding universe may go on forever declared. Woody Allen turn ity is very long, especially towards the end. That's Lord Martin Breese astrophysicist cosmologists and ask her of the really big questions. He's also England's astronomer Royal and the founder of the center for the study of existential risk. He's author of many books, including most recently on the future prospects for humanity. You can find more about him at a chief -ment dot org. I'm Alice Winkler, and this is what it takes from the academy of chief -ment. What it takes his funded by the Catherine b Reynolds foundation. Thanks to them. And thanks to you for listening.

Martin Reese scientist Einstein England Google Alice Winkler Lord Martin Martin REEs founder Trinity College Cambridge Lynn Ruth UK
Lilian Bland Born - Sept. 28, 1878

This Day in History Class

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Lilian Bland Born - Sept. 28, 1878

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs and I'm Laurin vocal bomb and our show foodstuff all about these islands, history and culture. Food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, Dylan Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. Neil episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy v Wilson and it's September twenty eighth Lilian bland. Who was one of the women pioneers in the world of aviation was born on this day in eighteen seventy eight. She was born in Kent, although her family was Irish and she went to live with an aunt in Ireland when she was twenty. Two after her mother became seriously ill and moved to the Mediterranean area for the sake of her health bland was a disappointment to her aunt that she moved in with though she didn't act like a lady. She wore trousers and she smoked and hunted and fished. She was an excellent shot and one of the first women in Ireland to apply to be a jockey as far as her profession, she was a journalist and photographer, and in one thousand nine, she got a postcard from her uncle that depicted French pilot Louis Blair ios flight over the English channel. And she was in trance too bland decided that she wanted to fly. And not only did she want to fly, but she wanted to build her own plane. So she did in October of nineteen thousand nine. She went to Blackpool to attend the first British aviation meeting, and she came home with all kinds of notes and ideas for aircraft. She started out making small gliders as a proof of concept and what she decided to move onto a full sized model. She chose bamboo ash spruce and elm. That's her materials because she was a journalist, and if otographer she documented the entire process and published articles about it, Lillian bland named her aircraft, the may fly as in may fly or it may not fly. She took it up to Carmody Hild, see if it would. This wasn't a powered flight yet she was operating her design as glider to see if it could stay, aloft, which it did, albeit with some bumps Chamade adjustments. And once she was satisfied, she ordered an engine and then went to England to pick it up herself because she got tired of waiting for it. She finally made her first attempt at powered flight in August of nineteen ten at the deer park randallstown. This was short and bumpy, and she had to get off the ground quickly because a cantankerous bull lived in the same field that she was using as an airstrip. She kept tinkering with this plane and finally was able to lift to an altitude of thirty feet and fly for about a quarter of a mile. She was so happy with her successful flights in the may fly that she decided to start her own aircraft company. She sold gliders and by planes in standard and racing models. Her family though was really worried about her safety with his whole flying fixation. They bribed her to quit by offering her a new model TV if she did, and she took them up on that offer. This was not a matter of her just giving up a lifelong dream of having her own airplane company, though she recognized the may fly hopped more than it really flu. And she also realized that flying was an increase. Expensive hobby. Plus when she drove that model t. c. realized that driving offered a lot of the same satisfaction to her that flying did. In fact, she became so enamored of driving that. She decided she would sell cars. Her family didn't like this either. They thought it was unladylike. So they arranged marriage for her to her cousin, Charles Loftus bland. They did get married. They seem to have been pretty happily married. Although their marriage deteriorated after their daughter died of tetanus at the age of sixteen Lilian bland died on may eleventh nineteen seventy one at the age of ninety. Two. You can learn more about Lillian bland on the July thirteenth, twenty episode of stuff you missed in history class. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts, and wherever else you get your podcasts. So Mario, you can tune in for a household name and a mysterious death. Baratin bay Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast, which three and meet will we explore how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. We've got the why cleft John. We have so much more in common than you could even imagine you put two kids together. Big on one play. They're going to want to have the time. They gonna wanna fall in love, have opinions this every kid listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me in the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Lilian bland Lillian bland apple Ireland Dylan Fagin Asheville North Carolina spit iheartradio Anna REEs producer Neil Carmody Hild Blackpool Kent Baratin bay Thurston Laurin England deer park Mario
SS Princess Sophia Sank - Oct. 25, 1918

This Day in History Class

06:28 min | 2 years ago

SS Princess Sophia Sank - Oct. 25, 1918

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs, and I'm Laurin vocal bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these islands history and culture food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer Dylan Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year, economic depression with beer and food. Neil episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast, I'm Tracy v Wilson, and it's October twenty fifth. The SS Princess Safai sank on this day in one thousand nine hundred eighteen after running aground on the twenty fourth. The SS Princess Safai had been providing passenger cargo and mail service around British Columbia, Canada and Alaska territory this ship had a route that went from Vancouver British Columbia to Skagway Alaska. It had eight stops for in British Columbia and four Alaska and this was a seasonal boat. It was a seasonal trip. It only ran for made October in the rest of the year it acted as a fairy in British Columbia on October twenty third of nine hundred eighteen the SS Princess Sify departed Skagway Alaska on its last run of the season with captain Leonard luck at the helm the but was really crowded that day. It was a sold out crowd. And there was sort of a see you in the spring party going on at the dock. This was. As I said the last trip of the season. There were a lot of people who are just waiting to hunker down as everything froze over because of all this chaos. The boat left about three hours late Skagway is connected to other waterways on the coast of Alaska via the Lynn canal. This is an extremely windy waterway with squalls called willows blowing in off the surrounding glaciers, and it's made even more treacherous because there's a stretch of rock in the middle of the canal called the Vanderbilt reef not long after leaving Sagui s Princess afire ran into a storm and probably because it was running late. It kept up its normal speed of eleven knots rather than reducing to seven knots, which was what was supposed to happen in bad weather during this storm. The Princess Safai was blown off course into the center of the canal, and it hit the Vanderbilt reef at top speed in the very early hours of the morning on October twenty fourth what followed was an almost forty hour waits. Stuck on the? Iraq, several fishing vessels and a US. Lighthouse service tender came to try to assist, but the weather was so bad and the sea was so rough that they couldn't get close. The captain also thought it would be safer to stay put and to wait for the weather to clear before trying to put anybody into a lifeboat to get them off the boat. This other rescue ships eventually had to take shelter. A lighthouse service tender called the cedar tried to make a britches buoy on the afternoon of the twenty fifth of October. The plan was to drop an anchor run a line over to the Princess of Phya. And then people would use this lime like zip-line the name for this being the breeches buoy comes from using canvas britches to hold onto the water was so rough though the cedar just couldn't get the anchor to hold and the afternoon of the twenty fifth all the ships had to once again take shelter leaving the Princess Sify there on the rocks. The power went out on the Princess Safai. And the passengers were in total darkness late that afternoon. The batteries were also running out on their radio and other ships lost contact with them briefly in the afternoon of the twenty fifth when they reached them again at about four forty five by radio things had taken a really dire. Turn at four fifty. The captain of the Princess defy sentence. SOS with the message, quote, taking water and foundering for God's sake. Come and save us at five twenty. He said when talking to one of the other ships for God's sake. Hurry water coming in room in the morning when the weather had cleared a lighthouse superintendent from nearby sentinel island went to the scene and found only the Princess Safai is four mast visible above the water sometime between five thirty and six thirty the evening before the wind had spun the ship completely around on top of the rocks. So that was pointing north instead of south torn the bottom completely out of the ship and the ship had slid into the water. There were no survivors aside from one English setter. He was found covered in oil about twenty miles to the south two days later, the dog had gotten very far away from the record had clearly been wrecked with the rest of the passengers the exact death toll of the Princess Safai is unknown. But it was more than three. Hundred people, including a lot of people from Yukon more than one hundred of the approximately eight hundred people who lived in the city of Dawson died in this one wreck no-fault was ultimately placed on captain lock or the steamship company. There were people who questioned his decisions, but a lot of other captains agreed that they would have done the same thing in his place. Very little money was ever paid to any of the families of the victims. Although the shipping company was able to get an insurance settlement. You can learn a lot more about this on the Tober fifteenth. Twenty eighteen episode of stuff you missed in history class. Thanks to Terry Harrison for her audio work on this show. You can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcast, and wherever else you get your podcast, and you can tune in some loro for a story from tombstone. This is our Yana having gun, and I'm here to tell you about the thrive. Global podcast what I see down some of my favorite people to find out. How the thrive in all parts of their lives. I've had great cover sations with everyone from Jennifer Aniston, and Malcolm, God, dwell to Katy Perry and end grass Dyson and have learned an amazing number of the Niks to be our best in modern. Well, search and follow the thrive. Global podcast on iheart radio are subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.

Princess Safai Princess Safai Alaska British Columbia apple Vanderbilt reef Asheville North Carolina Anna REEs Dylan Fagin Skagway Neil Laurin captain Leonard Lynn canal Iraq producer Jennifer Aniston Katy Perry
Lyudmila Pavlichenko Died - Oct. 10, 1974

This Day in History Class

05:26 min | 2 years ago

Lyudmila Pavlichenko Died - Oct. 10, 1974

"Hello. I'm Anna REEs and I'm Laurin vocal bomb and our show foodstuff all about these islands, history and culture. Food and drink is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, Dylan Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like and how we can find more of those things. On our first trip, we went to Asheville North Carolina, a city that pulled itself out of a seventy year economic depression with beer and food. Neil episodes will be coming out Wednesday and Friday on apple podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b. Wilson, October tenth lead. Mila public Sankoh died on a stay in nineteen seventy four. She was one of the most famous snipers and the Soviet Red Army. The pebble chanko was born not far from Kiev in nineteen sixteen and in her youth, she joined the volunteer society for the assistance of army aircraft and fleet. This is a paramilitary youth organization. It also involved a lot of patriotism and athletics. It wasn't so much a really volunteer organization though. Even though the word volunteers in the name attendance was expected and that's where she first learned to shoot. She got a certificate in marksmanship with the volunteer society for the assistance of army aircraft and fleet. She went onto snipers school while studying at Kiev university when Germany invaded the Soviet Union on June twenty. Second of nineteen forty one public Sankoh decided to put her training to use and. He tried to join the army. She was turned down though because she was a woman kept trying. They kept encouraging her to be a nurse, but she didn't want to be a nurse. She wanted to be a soldier. Not only did she want to be a soldier. She had the skills required of being a soldier. Finally, after all this persistence on her part, someone decided to give her a test. She was with a unit that was defending a hill, and someone pointed out to remains were working with the Germans and told her to shoot them which she did. She was then accepted into the Red Army's twenty. Fifth Shapiyev rifle division in her. I seventy five days of service. She had one hundred eighty seven confirmed kills and by the end of that service, that number had risen to three hundred nine thirty. Six of these were German snipers, some of which were effectively Indu -als with the enemy from her point of view, especially when it came to the snipers, the work that she was doing was ultimately saving many other lives. She was also wounded four times. In the line of duty while working as a sniper, her reputation as a sniper really spread and the Red Army started using her in recruitment materials and in propaganda in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. She went to the United States to try to get some support from the United States for Russia's military efforts on the European continent. While she was in the US she became very close friends with Eleanor Roosevelt. Although the press coverage in this tour which there was a lot of was really focused on questions about her appearance and what she was wearing rather than her military service or the Russian efforts that she had come to the United States trying to get support for after she returned home. She was promoted to major. She was named hero of the Soviet Union and eventually she was depicted on a postage stamp. After the end of World War Two, she went back to school and she became historian and then in nineteen fifty, seven while Eleanor Roosevelt was on a tour of Moscow, the two women were reunited. This was something. That Roosevelt had asked for again. And again, while she was planning the trip when she got to Moscow, she kept asking her hosts, please could she see public chango after asking over and over. They finally agreed to let her, although at first they would not allow the two women to be alone together. It was according to all accounts, very joyful reunion among the two of them. Once they actually got to talk to each other lead mill chango died of a stroke at the age of fifty eight. We talk about her along with five other women on the front lines in the may fifteenth 2017 episode of stuff. You missed in history class called six, impossible episodes soldiers, snipers, and spies. Thanks very much to tar Hereson for all of her audio work on his cod cast. And you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast, Google podcast. And wherever else you get your podcasts tomorrow, we will have the opening of a massive change to a major church. It's Barrington date, Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast. Twenty-three in me where we explore how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. We've got the why cleft John. We have so much more in common than you could even imagine you put two kids together. They're going to want to play. They're going to want to have the time. They gonna wanna fall in love, have opinions business. Every kid listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me in the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Soviet Red Army Eleanor Roosevelt United States Moscow apple Mila public Sankoh Kiev Asheville Soviet Union Dylan Fagin North Carolina producer Anna REEs Neil Kiev university Soviet Union Tracy b Laurin Wilson
NPR News: 06-17-2019 12AM ET

NPR News Now

04:55 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 06-17-2019 12AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Nora raum. Hong Kong's political crisis is entering its second week, according to protest organizers. Nearly two million people turned out Sunday to demonstrate against an extradition Bill that would allow some Hong Kong residents to be tried in mainland China, Hong Kong's chief, executive Carrie Lam says she's holding off in the Bill for now but protesters want the measure abandoned completely and for lamb to resign. The calling for residents to boycott work classes, Monday a widespread power outage, hit Argentina and several neighboring nations, causing severe disruption for tens of millions of people NPR's Philip REEs reports Argentine officials are saying electricity now restored for most of the country, many Argentines we're looking forward to a relaxing Sunday. Celebrating Father's Day with the family. Instead, they woke to find themselves in the midst of one of South America's biggest ever power outages. At around seven AM local time, the electricity supply crashed across Argentina and in parts of neighboring Uruguay Paraguay train. Stop running shops, and restaurants. Shut hospitals and airports relied on generators, it happened while some areas were holding local elections voters cast ballots using cell phones, as torches Argentina's, president Mauricio Macri is calling the outage unprecedented and his Auden investigation. His energy secretary says it's not fought to be sabotage flip. Reads NPR news. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo says the US had lots of data lots of evidence that Iran was responsible for attacks onto oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman last week, but Pompeo told Fox News Sunday, the US does not want to go to war with Iran. He says the US will use diplomatic means among other actions to guarantee unhindered shipping throughout the strata for Moos. He said, the Iranians should understand the US will take actions to deter Iran, from that kind of behavior, Iran denies any involvement. The US women beat Chile three to nothing Sunday in their second game of the World Cup. The wind follows a record setting victory over Thailand. Last week. NPR's Laura Walmsley reports from Paris US coach Jill. L S made seven lineup changes to the starting eleven from Tuesday's game against Thailand. But even though the US was playing at second-string against Sheila the American scored three times in the first half, including two goals by veteran Carli, Lloyd, there was one scare for the US a tricky to land free kick that dribbled into the net before the referendum off side. And in the second half the US had lots of chances, but we're unable to score against Chilean, goalkeeper, Christiane Engler, who stopped an array of shots, the stands were full of US fans and it felt like a home game for the Americans but she brought a spirited contingent to who chanted their support after the match the US plays its last and toughest game of the group stage on Thursday against Sweden. Laura Wamsley NPR news parked plans, Paris. This is NPR news from Washington. Fighting between rebels and pro government forces in northern Syria continues. NPR's Lum our reports activists and inlet province near the Turkish border are saying that air strikes, and shelling by regime forces intensified on Saturday, the white helmet. Civil defense group says seven civilians were killed. This includes three children, and their father after an era talk Hitan center fifteen people were also wounded, according to the rescue group who posted photos on Twitter, digging people out from under the rubble. It live, which is the last opposition, how the area has a population of three million people many internally displaced last September Turkey and Russia signed an agreement to turn the province into a de escalation zone, which means a stop to any fighting lemon NPR news. Fatal city officials in Phoenix, Arizona are apologizing to a family after video surfaced that police had pointed a gun at them and shouted profanities over allegations that are four year old. Child had shopped at the doll. This happened after family had left a dollar store and may twenty seventh relatives say they didn't realize their daughter, had taken anything video showed the police curse the parents and threatened to shoot them. If they didn't cooperate the maker of Ragu pasta sauce is recalling some of its products saying they may contain fragments of plastic the recall applies to chunky tomato, garlic and onion old world style traditional in old role style meat sauces. The company says there have not been any reports of consumer injuries or complaints about the recall is being issued out of an abundance of caution. I'm Nora raum, NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly dollars dot com slash fast.

NPR US NPR Iran Washington Nora raum Mike Pompeo Argentina Hong Kong Hong Kong Thailand Paris Philip REEs Carrie Lam South America Dulles International Airport Mauricio Macri Gulf of Oman secretary Syria
86 | Martin Rees on Threats to Humanity, Prospects for Posthumanity, and Life in the Universe

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

1:40:02 hr | 9 months ago

86 | Martin Rees on Threats to Humanity, Prospects for Posthumanity, and Life in the Universe

"Hello everyone welcome to the mindscape podcast. I'm your host Sean Carroll. And today we're going to have a thought provoking if perhaps slightly depressing episode or at least slightly putting us in the mode of worrying about really profound things that is the concept of existential risks or even lesser than that catastrophic or extreme risks that we face as a species so we all know that something happened in the Twentieth Century. We gained a technological ability to really do enormous harm to ourselves. As a species there was always times back in history when human beings could harm each other but these days we can imagine human beings truly wreaking havoc on the whole planet or the whole species. That's what we mean by extreme or catastrophic or existential risks. So today's guest is Martin Reese that's Lord Rees Baron of Ludlow. He is officially award in the British hierarchy there he actually sits in the House of Lords and votes and so forth but Martin is also one of the leading theoretical astrophysicists of our age. She's done enormously good work in high energy astrophysics understanding black holes and galaxies. And things like that but over the last decade or two. He's gained an interest in these big questions of human life and where humanity is going toward the future so he's one of the CO founders of the Center for the study of existential risks at Cambridge University. And that's mostly what we talk about. Today there's a lot of risks out there. Of course the first really come on the scene was nuclear war. And that's still out there and we talk about that one but now there's all sorts of bio threats as well as cyber threats as well as artificial intelligence not to mention sort of natural disasters of asteroids and solar flares and earthquakes that could cause enormous. Harm it's a really interesting science problem but also a philosophical problem because you're asking how to judge an extremely unlikely event versus. If that event happens it will be catastrophic for everybody. So the classic example of this is one of the large Hadron collider created a black hole destroyed all the earth unlikely to happen but you really want to risk it. This is a really really good questions we get into this. We get into how to deal with all these questions but then being we are talking about life on earth eventually turns into life on other planets and in actually in the last half of the discussion. We're talking about life elsewhere in the universe again. Something that Martin is a world experts in and talk about why we haven't seen it yet. What forms a good take what we can learn about life on earth by thinking about life on other planets so we start off with some you know down to earth kind of depressing topics but it's very optimistic and Action packed there by the end. So tune in to like this one. Let's go K. Martin Rees mindscape podcast. Good to be with you. So you've done a lot of work obviously on cosmology high energy astrophysics and so forth but a relatively recent interest of yours has been the future of humanity the risks that we face and I thought we could. We could start just with a worked example and we can think about how to think about this so as someone who's done particle physics and quantum field theory. My favorite example is what if the large Hadron collider created either a black hole or some exotic particle that an eight up the earth but and I was surprised to learn by reading your books that you had actually thought about this one of the first people to really wonder about this when I got the idea from someone else but I thought it was a good work example because obviously it's very very unlikely but the confidence catastrophic. I think it's not stupid to query this and there were some people who of course did query this and they were sort of pooh-poohed bit by the people that Sir all brocade although we think it's very unlikely I think it does razor non trivial issue Because There was a committee set up at certain to address this and they said with great confidence That on the basis of all theories. This wouldn't happen But obviously the level of confidence you want is something like a billion truly into one that's given the consequences and the reason. I think it's not trivial to worry. Is that Supposing you up before an American Christian Committee to address this issue and you said well the challenges are a billion to one and then they say to you to Cairo. You really saying that is less than a one in a billion charged. You're wrong you say yes. Yes and so obviously. The main risk is that theories are completely wrong or something entirely Unin visioned. A system could happen. When you explore parter parameter space? There's never been explored by nature itself. I mean maybe for the benefit of the audience. Could you explain a little bit about what it would be? That could go wrong at the L H C. That would cause us all to be killed whether I think I'm just quoting the other experts. One idea with many black hole The other idea is I'm turning Material into US called strange. Let's which would gradually sort of gobble up the earth and turn it into some complex structure and these have been speculated about by particle physics. No one likely and I'm bit in hip talking about this because when I have talked about in rapacity newspaper headlines Osama things that the acceleration will destroy the world but I do think that it's something which is quite right. That one should address and I tried to think what I would do if I was before. The Congressional Committee I think I would. I would say that the challenge is very very small but I would then say Would you like to ask me? What's the chance that's something we keep discovers his accelerator will solve the world's energy problems forever and I would say that's very very small? But supposing did you thought that was a thousand times less more than the chance of destroying everything then my tilt the balance. That's right under so that that's the way I would explain why I actually despite uncertainty but my theory feel we shouldn't be inhibited in going ahead with these. Well okay. I mean that's a very good point. What if that were not true so I think this this is a good thing because I want to get on the table you know. What is the theory of thinking about these terrible terrible things for the chance very small? The consequences are disastrous. So you're suggesting that one of the things to think about is other really really small probabilities. That might be good. That's right and of course we're never possible to quantify that of course the risk in doing anything which may have potential upsides and so used to that in the testing of new drugs at everything like that and so when we get to these colossal risk then again the same argument applies that we might be forgetting benefits as humanized and puts it in one of his articles. The hidden cost of saying no That's right the example used in my book The particle the end of the universe was every time you open a jar of pasta sauce. There's a chance that a terrible mutation has happened inside and you're going to release a pathogen. Destroys millions of people very very small chance but it never stops us from opening the jaw. No no no but of course one does have to be cautious. And if you think of something which could be globally catastrophic then you get into philosophical questions about just. How much worse? Existential catastrophe is then very bad one and to express this. If you consider the two scenarios one is the death of ninety percent of the people in the world scenario to is death of one hundred percent of the people in the world and you ask the question how much worse is scenario to scenario one. You could say ten percent worse. The body counts ten percent higher but some people would say it's much much much worse because they're you destroy your potentialities of all future developments and future knives. And I think it's fortunate if we think of all listen ours living discussed apart in Israel. The crazy ones from particle physics. It's very hard to imagine anything to wipe out all human beings. That's right but so you. You are very careful in your formulation. They're saying some people would say that one hundred percent is much much worse than ninety percent. What your feeling personally. What I I do think that's the case because one thing which we learn this astronomers is that we humans not the combination of evolution. It's taken four billion years for us to emerge from the primordial slime as it were but The time ahead even for the earth is six billion years. Yeah and the universe as much longer future and I like to quote Woody Allen as it turned his long especially towards the end So there's no reason to think that we're even the halfway stage in complexity and of course If intelligence is rare and some people think we are the only Intel's galaxy then Feta's humans is of galactic importance. It's not just imports. If we want our selves out that would destroy these potentialities so I think it is much worse to visit wiping out. Everyone than having a catastrophe which is back to civilization. Yeah there are definitely implications of these ideas for questions about life elsewhere. I do want to talk about that. But let's let's stay down here on earth for just a minute so I think what you're getting at and something that I thought of as I was reading your book is that we talk about existential risks or these terrible disasters but there really is a hierarchy of them right. There's one in which a million people die which is kind of incredibly terribly bad. One of which most human beings die one of which all human beings die one in which all life dies. You're on the right and I think it's safe to say we can contemplate. All of these are there. There's there's scenarios for any one of these actually happen exceedingly rare but there are scenarios. Yeah that's and I think incidentally in in my book which is called on the future. I do discuss some of these scenarios and one point I make is that if we think of the intermediate level scenarios then they will all cascade globally in a way. That didn't happen previously. I mean you may know the book by Jar Daban call collapse where he talks about the way I think. Five different ships vision collapsed but In none of those cases did the collapse spread globally whereas now I think any really severe setback in any part of the world will have consequences because we also interconnected by telecommunications supply chains had travelled and everything else so things woods spread globally. And that's something new and another thing which worries me very much is that I think society is much more fragile than in the past to give an example if you think back to the Middle Ages when the black death bubonic plague killed off the population of many towns. The rest went on fatalistically whereas now if we had some pandemic wants the number of cases overwhelmed hospitals the be a breakdown in social order. Yeah people clamor for treatment. It wasn't available and likewise were so dependent on electricity. That if there were a massive cyberattack on say the east coast of the of the United States then to be a complete anarchy within a few days is nothing but work and indeed. I think that is realized because I quote in my book a twenty twelve report from the American Department of Defense which talks about that scenario and says if it were instigated by a state it would merit a nuclear response. That will be helpful. I should I. It's clear to me that this going to be somewhat of a Downer of conversation. Let people know that you're by nature a very optimistic person? Actually right you have a lot of optimism about breaks. It does good okay. Yeah so you mentioned the interconnectedness and how that allows potentially would allow disasters to spread and propagate but at the same time. There's the related fact that technology has given us a kind of leverage over our future for good and for bad. We didn't have a hundred years ago right. The Twentieth Century introduced for the first time. I would say the possibility we could extinguish ourselves. Yes lobe you care. Initially of course that's right so it's a different kind of question that we really haven't been trained to think about. I mean so you use the the number billions to one. Let's say if the vulnerability of wiping out the earth and maybe you got that number by taking one over the population of the earth. But what is that the right calculus? I mean how should is there any quantitative way of thinking about what we how we should measure essential risk? And how we should respond to it. Well does he is. I mean when I'm in a storm people say do worry about asteroids etc and of course I very much because they are one rescue can quantify pretty accurate we never ended up day all what the impacts who'd be Cetera The point about asteroids is that the probability of impact is no higher now than historic times are and the concerns that we should have in four of a mind those which are emergent and probably increasing. I mean nuclear war was the first one of this kind But misuse of bio and cyberattack New Concerns and I do think that That is not enough Attention given to these. There's a complacency that if something has never happened you don't worry about it but if it's an event which is associated even one occurrences too often we ought to think about this and I've been involved in setting up a center here in Cambridge to address these extreme risks. The argument being that. There's a huge amount of effort going into a moderate risk like cost Gentian food making trains and planes safer and all that but these improbable events which are growing in probability as time goes on can lead us into complacency and we really ought to think about how we can minimize these risks. And what we do if they happened. And I think senator if we can reduce the probability of any of these things one politician one thousand and the stakes are so high we live more than keep. That's right I. I'm morbidly fascinated by solar flares which are certainly a natural phenomenon. That has happened many times but I met a lawyer who had worked on commission where they thought about this and he. He's very concerned about the idea. That once every thousand years there's a solar flare that would be big enough to wipe out the entire electrical grid here on earth and so it's kind of a combination of a naturally occurring thing and the vulnerability that we have invented for it but again the timescales are things that we are not adapted to dealing with. No that's why. But that's an example of something where so I can affect satellites for instance. They can be hard to minimize that impact tended worth doing. But you're right in saying that there are some natural phenomena whose consequences greater now because we depend on electricite more and of course. The consequence of earthquake in Tokyo is more non. Who would have been three hundred years ago because of the number of people involved in well end in Los Angeles where I live of? The buildings won't fall down because the buildings are now cleverly constructed but we will not have electricity or water for a long time. Earthquake hits in the right place. And that's the real worry. You're safe here in Cambridge right. No earthquakes reported one of magnitude point. Eight few times ago reported the budgetary perch but nothing worse than that happens. That would not even be reported where I'm from so but there's also a philosophy question Here that I thought you highlighted in the book even when you use phrases like a billion to one chance what does that mean right because it's not like you've done it a billion times absurdities and seeing what's Yep Yep so how do we interpret phrases like there's that kind of probability well of course the some context where it is meaningful. I mean if you if you have something where you know roulette wheel is being turned or something like that. Then you can quantify but of course as you say we can't quantify any events probability if it hasn't yet happened right and that's the reason why we may tend to underestimate so we can't quantify well. I tend to be subjective EST ABOUT PROBABILITY. I don't know if you have strong feelings about the philosophy of probability but as a good basin I think that all probabilities are more or less on the same footing. They're they're related to our credence that something's going to happen but it's just harder to accurately that's true of coin tossing things like that. There are some estimates. Do make sense well races. See if you're an eternal list if you think the past present and future equally real than the outcome of a coin toss has just your ignorance about the future. You can relate it you can. Obviously you know Give a sensible justification for having a certain credence but I don't think it's philosophically different but but it does raise the question. The famous question in science is what is the error. What are the error bars on your era bars right? So you say what building to One? Could it be just a million to one something like that is it. Is this the kind of thing that you're center worries bells? And I think it could be. Because the prohibition theories are wrong is of course not at small right right now. It's hard to. That's why other surprises copy ruled out. And of course they can't be quantified. Yep and and that is I think the reason why we can't compete dismissed the concerns about doing something for the first time. He's never happened in nature. Of course when we talk about these experiments in many cases in the writing papers about this you can say that nature has done experiment already cosmic rays of high energy of collided and nothing has happened. And the fact that we can see. Stars White Dwarfs are not turned into Strange let's tells us something But if the is a potential affected we can create artificially which we don't think ever happened in nature then we perhaps should be open minded. Yeah but we shouldn't take too far I don't think there's anything in nature which is temperature over Military Kelvin. But we didn't have huge worries when we I couldn't something down to very low temperature that I suppose because we had very great confidence in the physics then yeah there is a does have to do with a theoretical not. I don't want to bias but we have to proceed on the basis of thinking that are theories capture some truth right catcher some element to reality when we make these otherwise like you say you do anything because anything would bear. Some worries nonsense. But I like I like this example of the The large Hadron collider and how we can ask whether nature has done it already because it gives a little bit of a an insight to people who are not in this field that we're not flying completely blind. There is a process through which people do think about how you might rule out the likelihood of these exit title problems. And you make the very good point in your book that which not really thought of before that we have an obligation to make that reason public to inform people about why we think this right. I mean you you really you make it clear that we can't just say let's trust the scientists on this let. We need to spread our reasoning lightly. Well I think especially when the scientists wants to do the experiment. Yeah they're interested in it so I think in that case it's good to have some independent group of people who can sort of reassure themselves without have any self interest in experiment that say and although I mean I I don't make a big deal of the accelerates if I Bahri about it at all right honest either out there but I think indicates of bio experiments that then this is a real issue And take one example. There were two groups which in twenty eleven I think. It was one in Wisconsin. One in Holland showed was surprisingly easy to make the flu virus more virulent more transmissible and these so-called gain of function experiments were denied. Us federal funding for a number of years because they were thought risky. Because first of all this is dangerous knowledge which perhaps you don't want to publish. That's one question but also does the risk of error releasing. Some something under is now possible to say. This is a small pox hours and things like that and we do have to worry about. Are there some experiments Where the risk of something going wrong? It says that you should do the experiment. And these are context where of course there are regulations And you don't just allow experiments to do anything. They like because we are concerned by prudential constraints unethical constraints on biological experiments and it is a regime of regulation as you know for the use of modern ideas in genetics etc. But of course what worries me and this is really seem of my book. is that whatever regulations one establishes even if that internationally-agreed contest would be forced regulations on nuclear activities can be enforced because they require special purpose conspicuous facilities and so the IRA can monitor these things. But when we think about biological experiments they can be done in a lab with the facilities that exists in many industries and many universities and of course cyber-attacks of bridge damaging consequences can be done just by alone Weirdo etc. And we can't really stop. Experiments like that or unethical experiments on human embryos and things of that being done and my concern is that Whatever can be done. We'll be done somewhere by someone. Whatever the regulation say an enforcing knows. Regulations Globally would be hopeless as enforcing drug laws globally or the tax laws globally. And so. That's scares me and if you ask me. What are the concerns? I have in the next ten years. Not being too futuristic than it is the misuse by era or by design of biotech or cyberattack. Yeah I think that's exactly right and it does Erases a couple of questions. So like you say. We have regulatory standards in place on the other hand. They seem to be easy to circumvent By a bad actor so Is that an argument for actually leading controlled research. Go on so I mean you can't just keep knowledge in the box. Someone's going to get it. It must be might as well be ours as well as someone else's is very difficult to say that we shouldn't do research. I mean you can obviously controlling the rate by controlling the funding but you convert stop. Stop the research although obviously if the research is intrinsically dangerous intrinsically unethical then we should try and banish but as I say. It's very hard to enforce these bands globally and in the context of bio and cyber. I think there's going to be a growing tension between three things. We want to Preserve Liberty Privacy and security and of course this is an issue that comes up when regulating the Internet. And all that and I think if you want to grow regulations you run into the problem. That different parts of the world would adjust the parents differently. I think Chinese would Care less about privacy and more about security than the United States and we in Europe or somewhere in between but these a vase serious issues which need to be addressed. What is the state of international cooperation on issues? Like this well. Obviously in in health is will have stations after but does does nothing yet established in the internet domain. And the problem. There of course is that the companies are global and they're vested interests in. Yeah Yeah doing certain things that people might not want to be done. That's right so I think serious problems of governance of the internet which are being addressed but I think enforcing them is going to be pretty hard. Unless you have really firm control on the Internet quite countries to the initial spirits and hopes of Tim Burners Lee and the other pioneers where they wanted it to be free but is it even realistic. I mean could we do it? Could we really regulate the Internet that easily? I'm not an expert on this so either but I think One can have sort of censorship of content to some extent but as regards the hardware and minimizing the risk of hacking. I don't know what can be done as these are serious issues. And they're going to get more serious and I think one of the most depressing things I find about The way technology developing is that the diffraction of efforts that go into security and all the things that wouldn't be needed if we're all honest is getting larger and larger and it feeds back into this idea that the timescale sort of of time scales right. There's great promise in doing research in biology or medicine or building technological infrastructure and there's also great dangers but there's this worry that we raced toward the promise on the rewards first and then try to fix up security later right. Yeah is there. Is there some sort of Global Philosophical Shifts? We might try to work toward to be more secure in our in our technological advancements when I think we should all come pain for this but we know how hard it is to get international agreements on anything climate CONSTRUCITON. All that sort of thing. Yeah Yeah we're sitting here in the United Kingdom which is just decided to leave the rest of Europe. It's hard even a national organizations together and we're all sitting here just a few days after it was announced that Jeff Bezos phone was hacked by Saudi Arabia. So you the best con protected. People in the world could be very vulnerable. That's right so what about I mean maybe it'd be useful to get on the table a list of your favorite existential risks. Obviously we we've mentioned nuclear weapons. Biologists the I'll let you be a little bit more specific about your top ten days. I think I'd want to avoid the word existential because the idea of wiping ourselves out is something which is rather than owned these various science fiction like scenarios. Isn't the name of Your Center. The Center for financial risk extreme risks catastrophic risks would be more appropriate representation. What we actually do good. And as I say I think these are the downsides exciting new technologies bio and cyber being the most prominent and of course another class concerns are those which are emerging from our collective impact on the planet. You know the climate change is one and associated loss of biodiversity etc. These are a class of long-term threats which everyone is aware of which are because of our collective actions. Rawson a few bad actors as any other cases and again. It's very hard to get affected action because Politicians tend to focus naturally on the immediate and the parochial. They think up to next election and they think about their own constituency CETERA. And it's very very hard to get hurt is ation of the action which is needed to minimize these global risk where the community global community has to act collectively and we're seeing this in the context of climate change and attempts to reduce co two emission to say two things about this. What one one thing. I feel quite stone in the UK. Context is that We have set a target of cutting net emissions to zero by the A. Twenty fifty. This is a challenging target for need some new technology and I support the idea that we should have a very strong program to develop clean energy better batteries and all that sort of thing but he's not support. This is that if we succeed then we will reduce our zero with really one percent of the world's emission says neither here nor there but I think we in Britain can claim to produce more than ten percent of the world's clever ideas up a certainly a disproportionate number. And so if we do have a crash program that does lead to cheaper Angie still retention CETERA. So that India for instance can leapfrog directly to clean. Energy GRID ARE NOT BILL. Power stations we will thereby do far more than one percent to juicing world co two emissions and it really hard to imagine a more inspiring go for young engineers. Dan To provide clean energy for the developing world. And so that's why I think there's a strong case for enhancing R. and D. and I would say the same thing about Research into plant science and bio because feeding nine billion people by mid century is not the challenge and this requires intensive agriculture. If one is to do this without encroaching on natural forests etc etc And here again. I need new technology Which deep scientifically advanced countries of which one can make a disproportionate contribution to so. I would say that if we prioritize research into those areas things to do with clean energy and storage and into improved plants on etcetera Then we not only help ourselves but help the world. So that's one thing that that's a digression but I'm thinking about the politics then I know people who've been tiff advisers to government and they normally get frustrated because the politicians have their urgent agenda Etcetera. And it's hard to get them to prioritize something. We signed long-term yes okay. But that's why I think that Santus kind more effects if they go public and get a become small-time call Sagan's work because then they do have an influence And politicians will respond if they think voters are behind him and so I think what the scientists can do is to publicize the issues in a way that the public response to because then the pub- public will inference. Politicians on. The politicians will feel that they can take these actions without losing votes. Never give two examples. One example surprising is is the pope because in two thousand fourteen. There was a big scientific conference at the Vatican which had all world experts in climate and people Jeffey Saxon Joe Stiglitz Etcetera which discuss these environmental and climatic threats of the world and that was input into the Pope's in cyclical in twenty fifteen and that encyclical got him a standing ovation. The UN and of course had influence on his billion followers in Latin America Africa and East Asia and help to ease the pasta consensus at the Paris conference in December. Twenty fifteen because the people in those countries new lots of people would support this as more parochial person in this country. One of our lesson. Lighten politicians proposed legislation to limit the production of non-reusable plastics drinking straws and things of that kind and he only did that because we had the euro two ago The Blue Planet to programs fronted by David attenborough which showed the effect of plastics in the ocean and especially ironic picture of patrols change with nest and coughing up rich. Yama not the long for nourishment but some bits of plastic and that's become an it iconic image rather like the polar bear melting. Ice Floe was for the climate campaigns and because millions of people saw that then there was public support for the idea of cutting down USA plastics. And and that's certainly become Clinton effect campaign in this country So if the public cares about something Then politicians will respond even if it's long term and part of a global campaign And that's why we should encourage value the scientists who are able to get through to the Y. public because that's more effective than being a science advisor in House to governmental politicians. Yeah that's a very interesting point that if the scientists say if the scientists wants to have a real impact on public policy than the public should be as much of the target as the politician Yes yes because politicians respond to. What's the INBOX? And what's in the press and what they think. Voters won't obviously and so that can be influenced by charismatic public. That goes with the scientific background. Good very good and so I want to back up a little bit because maybe we can be a little bit more specific as as an example of good action here if you think that Britain wants to be a zero emissions by twenty fifty. What would that involve? What kind of technologies that? Obviously some renewable energies some storage. But can you be more specific? I think stories more cheaper more efficient batteries and what has to stole the energy from day to night and maybe even seasonally. I'm so we have. We have to do I personally think it would include nuclear okay and of course this is controversial But I think the problem of nuclear is has been no real. Rnd In twenty years. The designs being used really date back from the nineteen sixties. And I think therefore that in trying to develop clean energy that should include fourth-generation nuclear and things like small module reactors which could be put on the back of a truck and beyond megawatt each or something like that and something like that would be safer and hopefully if they can mass produce more economical so I think that nuclear is probably going to be part of the answer without that is going to be harder so do think they're relevant the related issues there with not emissions but there's still nuclear waste right. Do you think that those are solvable? I think they they are yes. I mean the problem but I think they can. They can cope with an incident. I think people worry too much about no radiation levels. That's another place where scientists may be can have a Bellere's impact somehow. Yes yes exiting. This is not so bad yes well. There was a dread factor in a radiation isn't a yes. Well to digress a bit. I think it's very important to have clear guidelines about the dangers because Supposed dirty were let off in a street in New York or something like that here. Then people might look at some tape of risks and say we've got evacuate district the next thirty years which maybe isn't over the top but after event like that is not the time to have the debate. You have to have the debate beforehand. And of course an example. This which is that. We have started At our center is the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster in Japan which was serious but the evacuation was over the top and probably close far more distress than the radiation itself would have done. I didn't know I'm dumb over evacuated. They were regulated. Yes and I think what ought to happen is it should be sort of guidelines which may develop for every city about what the extra risk is from vertical level because if. I was an old villager in in Japan. Ib prepared to accept the significantly high risk of cancer in order to live my days in my home rather than being evacuated and people ought to be given that choice and of course people make a different choice from People young children but there ought to be some rational way in which people can make that choice. Otherwise it'd be an over reaction and this is something particularly the case in terms of radiation. This is just a human foible though right. We're very bad at talking. Rationally about what happens to us in extreme situations or when our lives are at risk once you say to an old villager radiation here. Don't worry about it you can stay here your old and you're GonNa die anyway. I guess not an easy conversation to have. Yeah well I think you'd have to actually ask them in advance. You could tell us you know. Well if what risk you tolerates if alternatives evacuating from your home. Yeah Yeah but Yeah I don't know what the answer is. I mean there. There certainly is a philosophy question here. A whole bunch of them. I mean are there are philosophers heavily involved in your center yet making decisions about these big big questions. Yes when in fact one senior people is is a philosopher and Is particularly concerned about the issue of a future generations because there is a question of what discount rate you apply and And how much we should think about future generations rather than this one hour live. This is real question and in fact we have set up a parliamentary committee to try and raise the amount of attention given it all legislation to the effect in the long term Lucas Many of the things we are having some effect. Obviously this is something we ought to try and emphasize and not discount. The future as much as a commercial transaction does have you found politicians more or less responsive to this or they are responsive. I mean as long as sacrifice for the present. Generations isn't too much but it is important obviously to think longer term and to realize that even though if you make a commercial decision on office building or something if you don't get your money back in thirty or forty years you've got to do it whereas in making a decision that may affect the longer term future people do care about the knife experiences of babies born today who still be alive in the early part of the second century and so so we ought to think long term. I mean it's it's hard. It's hard to predict of course because things are changing so fast and one of the points I make in my book is is that it's a at first sight paradoxical that's in medieval times when people had vay limited horizons and when they thought the will might engine thousand years they still build cathedrals. That wouldn't be finished in their lifetime. that might impair doc- whereas now we not do something like that right but the reasons not paradoxical is that in medieval times even though they lost the whole world might end. They thought the lives of their children and their grandchildren would more or less like this so the grandchildren would appreciate the completed cathedral whereas now. I think we don't have very much confidence. In predicting everyday life will be like fifty years from now Given the changes of being the last fifty years and so for that reason. I think it's rational to not clam quite so far ahead in some contexts but on the other hand if there's a risk of doing something which is irreversible long-term damage sure surely to care about future generation does the sample of the environment and climate change It has some sort of depressing aspects in how resistant certain quarters have been to the obvious scientific evidence right. I mean how much do you worry about misinformation or just vested interests resisting the scientific findings whether Matzo of course and this is a parent in that context of climate change where the science is. Of course they difficult and is very uncertain. Got To accept it uncertain but I think we we do have to worry about the reluctance to accept scientific evidence not in that context alone but in the dangers of vaccines and things of that kind. That's another example. Where where of course? There's a lot of misinformation which is damaging being from Los Angeles. I'm well aware of this phenomenon. The epicenter of that particular phenomenon but climate change is also an interesting case because it's so different in character than something like a nuclear war or even a terrorist nuclear bomb right it's slowly creeping up on US versus a tiny fraction every year. That would have been right as is it a different strategy. Different mental space. You need to be into attack these different problems. I think it is an I think Of course in both cases heart because in the case of the The southern catastrophe then the point is we're complacent because he's never happened and you think it never will is like in the stock market where keeps on rising star. And you think gone. But then there's a sudden as an asymmetry between the speed of rises and the speed of falls similarly you think things up going to be okay and they're not and one of your predecessors dollar lecture vision and Mr Talib who made some good points about perito distributions where things are below average ninety eight percent of time long tail important right. Yeah and so let me. Let's fill in a little bit. I WANNA get The all these different kinds of extreme risks. I think it's a good way of putting it and I think most people know about climate change in fact we talked about it on this podcast. There's the nuclear threat which may be was larger in the past for a large scale nuclear war. These days are much more worried about one bomb being Taken into a port and blown-up. Yes that's right. I think we can say that Joined the Cold War. There was a risk of a real catastrophe because the about fifty thousand bombs on both sides and if they had gone off then I would have devastated much of the Northern Hemisphere certainly Europe and North America and there were at least a couple of moments when it was indeed and under and I think you know when we see what people said macnamara in his later years and Kennedy saying that the risk of between one in three and evens and all that and of course the other false alarms We've learned about I think we realize just how great the threat walls and for those of us. In in Europe I think the realistic estimate of the risk join. The coal was probably one in three. I'm not and it's hard to quantify obviously but I think good looking back was of substantial chance and I personally think that if people don't realize that they would have been a bit more questioning of the conventional policy for my part. I wouldn't have been prepared to risk a one in three or even one in six shots of a nuclear exchange of that kind even if the alternative was a Soviet takeover of the whole of Europe And I spent many people to take view but they didn't really feel of just real risk right and saying those words out loud is also. Gets YOU IN TROUBLE POLITICALLY? Maybe a little bit might be might have been for some people at that time but I think realistically I think that that will be the tradeoff for better to let the Soviets takeover than to have the destruction of the whole fabric of Europe. So that was the situation of the Cold War but as you say that particular scenario is at least in abeyance because the number of weapons on both sides has been caught up by the factor of ten but on the other hand the two things to worry about three things one is that there are more nuclear power so now ten nuclear powers and the risk of some nuclear weapons going off in a regional conflict. It the Middle East India and Pakistan is probably higher than ever and that would be a regional disaster unless such big forest fires. Did you have a nuclear winter? But it would probably just be a regional. Thanks so that's that's one concern but the other point is that the the the global threat may be just in abeyance because it could be that. There's a new standoff in the second half of the century between new superpowers. We just hand less well or less. Luckily than the Cold War's so that's concerned and third concern is again something we've been having meetings about here that the risk of cyber-attacks of the nuclear infrastructure is a new threat. You know because obviously there's very complicated. So what exactly is the threat? There that a cyber hacker could do what could trigger trigger false alarms or even even trigge bombs going off and this is a one hopes that is being addressed. Yes just being addressed but on the other hand all these cyber issues. There's an arms race between the cyber attackers who I indeed. Aided by and of course those trying to secure things and so. This is a new concern. A NEW CLASS OF RISKS Quite apart from old-fashioned types of false alarms and the lone actor who's not even a state is a new worry for nuclear weapons. Right yes I don't know to what extent alone acticle realistically do that. But I but I think smallest state certain and presumably it becomes not less likely over time right. I mean as as technology leaks out of the information gets out as more and more plutonium and uranium replying around. What kind of risk is it possible to quantify that we we have to quantify but obviously there are there are far greater risks. This is just another instance of how a small group of people amplified in their impact by modern technology can have consequences casquets globally. This is what about in my book. The Global Village in His village idiots but they will have global range. Now right we say didn't in the past and is the biological worry bigger in your mind than the nuclear worry eat. I guess there's two categories right sort of poisons like anthrax can spread. And then there's these contagious agents that you can imagine yell sound terrible. Yes yes what am I? Think the The consequences of a natural pandemic could be worse of course Sol's wasn't a global effect because only spread to cope with it. I mean Singapore and Toronto. I think mainly but Had something that's spread to one of the mega cities of the developing world like Mumbai Casablanca. Or something then. It could have been very serious and that's true of any future. Of course we have planned for that kind of. How would you cope? Would you turn off the mobile phones because as we are panicking rumor or would you leave them on so you could spread information? That's the sort of sexual logical issue which needs to be addressed in planning these disasters. Which should you do now? You have me curious again. I don't know but that that's an example of a context where you need social scientists to explore what is right and so. I think we do need to worry about natural pandemics and of course engineered pandemics and also. We certainly have to worry about the ethical consequences of new technology. Already used as an issue with the The Chinese experiments on human embryos and all that the guy got arrested right the guy who claimed to have genetically engineered yes and in fact all the Chinese scientists equally opposed to what he had done. The balance of benefits and risks was not such as to justify it whereas one can justify perhaps gene editing. If you remove the gene for Huntington's disease or something like that. But what he was doing was deemed by almost everyone to be unethical But we do have to worry about The widespread understanding in availability of these techniques. And of course we have to worry about the social effects of These if they can be used the human enhancement for instance. I mean I think most people think that if you can remove some severe potential to disease then that's Okay. But if you can use genetic modification for enhancement. Then that's different but fortunately that's a long way in the future because most qualities that you might want to have in human beings looks and intelligence Cetera. There complicated combinations vary thousands of genes. So before you can do you've got to. I use a on some very large sample of genomes to decide which combination optimal and then be able to synthesize. That's not Gino. And be confident. It's not going to have unintended downsized. So that's four long way in the future but if that happened then that would be a new fundamental kind of inequality that we'd have to worry about and it would be a bad news because if you think of the effects of medical advances in the last century they've had a beneficial effect on promoting equality. I because the cutting down infectious disease in Africa for instance has a huge effect on infrared realize so. I think we can say looking back. The medical advances have been beneficial. Not just for those who have them but for promoting equality worldwide whereas the future ones may have reverse effect in a sense because we're now inventing medical procedures that are just financially out of the reach so many people. Yeah but it's a good point. Good point to sort of segue into something because there's the topic of extreme risks and then there's also the topic of extreme benefits and in some. Some of these technologies are ambiguous there transformative You know human gene editing. A more things were stumbling across right now. In the twenty first century. And there's certainly that's certainly an example where some people are going to want to just rush ahead without thinking about the consequences but again we become Stuff econ control just like we can't control the DRUG LAWS ON THE TAX LAWS. And perhaps you know in a way if some crazy people want to do this perhaps we should not be too upset because obviously every technology in medicine. Starr's office risk I mean how trump heart transplants and things like that and then become more routine and so perhaps we should not be too upset. If a few people try to modify themselves in ways to announce not to be as beneficial held and of course techniques like Enhancing brain by some cyborg implant implant in children and we be great if we could improve our members and all latins and so it's perhaps a good thing that some people are talking with a straight face about potentially doing this. I mean as you said it's hard but let's just imagine 'cause that's what we're doing here the future let's imagine someone develops diagnostic tests that lets you screen thousands of embryos and pick out the one that will be the most intelligent and let's prospective parents take advantage of technology. Would that be bad? Not Necessarily of course it ends. She's know whether they would see more intelligence because it was the famous case of Mr Shock. Lead you remember who des Schalke eventually the transistor and he set up a a sperm bank for the bell prizewinners knock. It was very difficult to man. I guess that's true. That's true but I I just wonder again philosophical level. You know there's a itchiness factor but I think maybe you know sort of engineering babies. It sounds weird Dr Strangelove eat but maybe there's just an inevitability about it also once people get over that it's going to be taken for granted. Well of course we should make babies as good as we can. I honestly personally don't have a strong understanding one way or the other. No maybe we should but there is you said. Yucky factor about some kind of genetic modification eve animals. I think the the reason why. Gm crops were opposed in in Europe. Was the people associated genetic modification with things like making a rabbit glow in the dark by putting jellyfish genes into something of that kind? Which did promote the factor. It's like circus. Animals being given silly clothes anytime I feel is not what you should do for animals and people felt the same about that and that really perhaps went against the support for the use of GM techniques in very good it. Certainly we can't we. It would be irresponsible not to mention everyone's favorite new extreme risk which is super intelligent artificial intelligence right Do you have an opinion on whether or not that's a real risk or a fake one. Well whether to risk opportunity. We don't know but I think obviously the question is where this general intelligence and we know what we've had for fifty years. Machines can do arithmetic better than any human being. And of course we've now got machines. Compla- chest better than any human being and do many other things but but of course the still many things they can't do as well as a human and and the question is will they be able to acquire commonsense as it were that their queen greater capabilities and and and is very valuable for coping with large data sets and optimizing complex systems like the electric grid of Country of traffic flow. And incidentally the Chinese will be able to have a plan to of the kind that marks could only have dreamt. Aw because they have today they have records of all transactions all stocks in the shops etc. So that they could do that. So a Does have tremendous PA to cope with complex systems but I as regards to sort of robots which we can treat as intelligent beings as in the movies you know. That's quite a long way away because robots are still rather bad at interacting with the real environments. They can't you move pieces on a chessboard as well as a kid can. They can't jump from tree to tree as well as square counts as long ago before robots have that sort of Interaction and before they have any feeling for the external world. Because someone told me that the the Watson computer which were the game of jeopardy was asked which is bigger shoebox or Mount Everest and couldn't answer. And that's obviously it doesn't it understanding but it has no concept of the external world etcetera and to give a machine that concept and indeed to get you understand. Human behavior is a big challenge. It's a big challenge. Because the computer's perspective. Everything we do is very very slow and computers learned by looking at millions examples of pages to translatable Pictures of cats and all Latin denies them but watching human beings is like us. Watching trees grow very slow. And they can't accumulate the The the amount of data in order to really understand that and so that's a big impediment so that's a long way of saying. I think it'd be a long time before we have human general intelligence in the sense of sunny which behaves like a human being. Although obviously we will have machines that can cope with huge data sets and clean up on the stock market. And all those things right. So of course. Yes the getting Artificial intelligence up to general human scales will will be hard right. But do you think it's possible in principle does no fundamental objection to it? I suppose because You could imagine in principle a machine which has sensors which allows it to interact with the the real world and maybe you can communicate with human beings so it's not impossible but whether it be a motive for it right now because I think once you've got to remember is that there's a gap between what could be done. And what a economical social motive for doing and that's why some things surge very very fast and level off. Just to digress for a bit they most rapid technology ever really is Smartphones which is developed and spread globally within a decade or. So but probably they will saturate now the iphone eleven. Probably as complicated as you want to smartphone to be and so probably twenty years from now we're abusing similar smartphones and so siegfried curve is what happens to most individual technologies and then something else will take over and. I think we've got to be mindful of the point made in the famous book by Robert Gordon about the important technological advances and he makes the point that what happened between eighteen seventy and nineteen fifty in electricity the railways television cars and all that was more important than anything has happened since and this other again that and let me give you another example aviation nine thousand nine hundred nineteen or Brown's transatlantic flight fifty years after that the first commercial of jumbo jet nine hundred sixty nine and now we're fifty off that still a jumbo jet and the concord came and went and so that's an example of how technology developed when a motive but then it levels off When things are fine when there's no economically feasible way of developing further and we got to realize that may happen to Some of these information technologies which have very fast so we can't assume that because they're developing so fast now that they will be equally rapid changes in the next ten or twenty years. But there'll be some obviously. Yeah indicates an a smartphone? I guess the obvious next big phase transition would be to get direct interface with the brain and the computer riding. That'd be very big jump. Of course yes. But we're not quite there yet but that's not the next five years okay but still if artificial intelligence could be even if it's not precisely human couldn't pass the turing test There is a worry in certain circles that it will nevertheless be powerful and it won't have the same values that we do right. You could imagine something. That is hyper intelligent along some axes and yet isn't all that interested in human flourishing Is that something you well? Of course you got to two things first of course if we had the Internet of things then of course that means that It's hard to avoid a scenario where an AI can interact with the real external world. You can't be kept in its box but the question is does it have which would have just don't know I think it's not it has motivated may do things which are contrary to human interest officer. That's a possibility but that's still vending machine and is there any way to. I mean we can sit in Fred about it is there. Is there any strategy for planning for that? I mean you know. Many big names have started warning about this. But I'm not quite sure. What the principal different from volume the misuse of any other technology. Really so Marie so much about not worried so much about that okay. Very good what are you? What is your more positive spin on what? Ai Can do for us or what? These kinds of technologies will help is clear. It can optimally cope with networks electricity grids and things of that kind And obviously it can help scientists. I think To take one example if you want to have a room temperature superconductor then as you know the best bets on the complicated compounds things. Interior and Rather than do lots of experiments Then maybe I can can explore the parameter space come up with that and Ditto with drug development so I I think it can help and perhaps moving closer to our own field of science. I think it may help us to understand some fundamental problems in cosmology because Supposing that some version of string theory is correct and that theory applies to the early universe. It could very well be that. It's just too difficult for any human being to work through one hundred dollars in ten dimensions. It's all about me. It may be difficult but on the other hand just as a computer learned to play will clause chess in three hours given just the rules Then it could very well be that's A machine could do the relevant manipulations and calculations it order to follow through the consequences of a specific string theory a string theories and of course if it turned out at the end it spewed out the right mass of the Proton like that. Then we'd noted on the right lines and this may be a kind of scientific discovery way it never gives and human an inside because it's just too complicated but nonetheless we would know that it was a development correct theory and so I think we have bear in mind to maybe some theories which are correct but we can never sort of have the insight into them which we hope to have into the theories of physics at the present time simply because they're too complicated but nonetheless We would have confidence in them. Because it would do calculation and come up with says richer compared with experiment for numbers of neutrinos massive CETERA. And if we had such a theory we would then believe. It's predictions about the only big bang right because hosting supposed to apply to the conditions. Leon and so we would have reasons to be able to decide whether many big bangs and knock one they like and all that so I think this is just an example of how in science the capability of a machine to do they. They complicated manipulations of ten dimensions. Geometry which I think is less remote gold and understanding human behavior. Just kind of think could be. It could be good at and that could be very important for for science. The extreme kind of physics as we are insted in ourselves but also developing temps high t superconductors and drugs. And all that so I think the power of Ai to do Not just routine computations but to explore parameter space and learn is going to be very powerful and beneficial. It's been a while now since the four color theorem was proven. I remember vividly. But that's an example of computer doing something and instead essentially de knew what I was doing it. I think in the case of of string theory. We may not understand what it's doing it just like in some of the very clever moves that the Africa zero may play go. The experts didn't understand how it shows that move and I think it may be more like that. I think the four color theorem. Everyone knew exactly what the program is doing etc where this might be qualitatively different from that in that we don't really understand what's going on and of course this is a problem with because you know if decisions about whether you should we let her to prison whether you deserve credit or whether you need an operation. If they're made by machine then you a bit worried about that even if you have evidence machine on the whole makes better moral judgments human you feel entitled to experts and you can't understand because that's not always the case when computers are now used and it may never be the case if they're used to solve the difficult scientific problems which which involve a huge amount of calculation. Yeah there's a whole regime in which we can imagine computers solving problems and then not being able to tell us why not the solution that they did scientifically that would seem to be not really satisfying in some way like we would think that there's further work to be done if that's all we had. Well that's right because obviously what has faction of science is the is having some idea and then you get the insight when you realize just got to be that way. And that's the most exciting thing happens to you if you're scientists but we would never have that but nonetheless if spews out the correct values for the fundamental constance and things like that and then you have to accept that. It's really got some insights. What are your feelings about uploading a human brain into a computer? Well I mean. Is it ever going to be feasible? I don't know but then of course the question is would it really be you? I'm because I think personality depends on bodies interacts. No sense organs. So would it be you so again? More Philosophy discusses them if you're told us has been done. Are you happy to say well? You could be destroyed with all of that. And what happens if several clones are made of you which is really use. Oh so I think. They're all kinds of fascinating philosophic conundrums which philosophy talked about for a long time. But of course maybe one day they will be practical ethics. If we can do things like that better. I think we do need to worry about whether it's possible. And of course if we think a few centuries ahead then even without that Humid Hall Smith May Have Changed Human beings and we're not evolving on the timescale doing selection well evolving much faster we could do but through through these techniques and One other point I make in my book is that when we read the literature left by the Greeks and Romans Then we can appreciate it because human nature was the same then so we have some affinity with the emotions of ancient artists and writers whereas a few hundred years from now and intelligence around may have no more than an algorithm understanding of us because they may be fifty different and that they don't have anything we would call human emotions and human nature. So that's going to be a real game changer. But that could happen over a few centuries because of human machine interfaces or interfaces or joystick genetic husband right. But you're talking about. I do think that also look is a frontier that might change things dramatically if that yes indeed yes and it could and of course people working on this as you know in. Some people think that aging disease can be cured. Some people just incremental improvement but of course if aging can be slowed down so that people live to be two hundred. This of course would be a huge Sociological Change and again. If this was available to only some subset of people this be huge and fundamental inequality and the question is what will go. Would you multigenerational families or would you donate a menopause? And all that you know it'd be christly different and so we'd have to be married above board happened if changes of that kind were possible but again. We can't exclude to my dancing. And of course we know the people I miss the Ray Kurzweil who think that they'll be immortal either by that by all by began to download them under the people who want to have their bodies frozen in order that they can be resurrected when this happens and giving all the existential risk that we have talked about. That doesn't seem like the best strategy to me. No but in fact amused that three people I from Oxford not for my university have pay good. Money signed to be frozen by this company in Arizona. I think he's eighty thousand dollars. A cut-price if your head being froze and they hope this company will keep going for centuries and then they can be revived and of course. They've got to have their loved replaced by liquid nitrogen etc. They go round carrying some medallion. So that people know that statute be done as soon as they drop dead. Yeah so I think because I also think actually selfish because supposing that this worked then they'd be revived into a inconceivable different world they'd be refugees nepal-maoist and they'd be a burden. We feel if we've got to look after refugees or some people Ma'am Amazonian tribes habit has been destroyed but if these people voluntarily as refugees in the past impose a burden on on you then maybe they can put you in a zoo or something like that. it's not clear that it's unethical to do. I think I'm on your side but for purposes of playing devil's advocate here. It's there's a similar calculation that we do with the existential risks. If you thought that there is a one hundredth of one percent chance that three hundred years from now we cure aging and you'd literally live forever. Yes then clearly the benefit to you of being frozen even if it doesn't worry is almost infinite right. There's there's definitely calculation that ends up with the conclusion. You should do everything you can try to preserve yourself. Yes yes and the challenges zero if you do this. That's right so what about them As another survival strategy going into space I know that Elon. Musk has said that. One of his motivations for SPACEX is to back up the biosphere by making sure. We have some of US on other planets. It's something goes dramatically wrong here on earth. Is that a a good survival strategy for human race. When I be skeptical about these arguments I mean of course I. I'm especially interested in space being an astronomer and I think A A and miniaturization is going to be crucially important for the signs of space expiration I think would be wonderful. Probe sent into Space Cassini orbiting around Saturn is movements and all that and New Horizons which took pictures of Pluto Nolan but all knows were nine hundred ninety s technology. Ten to bill and get the undefeated. Think of how things I small firms have changed since then we realize how much better we can do now and so. I really hope that they'll be swarms of miniaturized probes going throughout the solar system to explosion. Indeed Sir I think that's realistic and Also I'm wandering around on the surface of Mars Cetera. I'm but as regards people then with every advance in miniaturization robotics. The practical need for the people gets less. And that's one reason why of goals manned spaceflight has not been pertemps so much Of course there is a revival of interest and I personally think that if I was an American I would want any taxpayer money to go on. Nasr's man program because there's no practical need for the people but on the other hand I'd be glad that Mr Moscow and the others. I'm developing They effective rockets. Being a Silicon Valley Culture to Lebron's of industry was dominated by the big conglomerates like Lockheed doing great stuff there and I hope that they will be sending people into space. But that'd be adventurous prepared to accept a high risk because one reason why the NASA manned programs very expensive was it was very risk averse. The shuttle was launched. I think hundred thirty five times and with two failures less than two percent failure rate but each of those failures have been national trauma because we presented a safe and they sent up a woman schoolteacher. And all that so I personally think that Space should be left for adventures. The kind of people who hang gliding symmetry and things like that. I don't know prepared to accept a high risk. The risk is just caught doing business. And that's bill. Yeah Yeah there are. People obviously adventurous. You are prepared to take that risk and even a war ticket to go to Mars and but Moscow said he hopes to Dioramas but not an impact and good luck to him. You know and we should add mar these people and cheer them on But I think the idea of mass immigration is a rather dangerous delusion. Okay because we got to realize that debate climate change for instance is a challenge. But it's doddle compared to tear forming malls right And so I think we got to accept it There's no planet beef for ordinary risk of US people and so we should encourage people to go to my house but That's less comfortable and living at the South Pole. Not many people want to do that right. I'm sorry I think we should encourage it and I think actually looking further ahead. I think we should cheer on those who tried to establish a colony on Mars even though to be against the odds uncomfortable a and that's because those people will have every incentive to use all the techniques of genetic modification and cyborg techniques to adapt themselves. We're pretty well. Adapted live on earth. But they they'd be in an environment to which they badly adapted so have every incentive to use these techniques to adaptive gravity different atmosphere CETERA and And maybe if possible to download themselves into some either twenty four and if they do that then they may prefer zero. Gna made not need to be on the planet at all. So I think that these posts human developments which will happen on a technological timescale FAA faster than the Dominion Timescale. They will happen fastest among these crazy adventures. Who TRIES TO LIVE ON MARS? And so the post human era will start from them. It does seem almost inevitable that the first trip to Mars will be a one way trip. This it's so hard to come back and that is a good argument that it won't be done by. Nasa never send astronauts to Mars volunteers to go one way right but the government would be having a hard time and of course I think as human beings we should admire and cheer on these people because they may indeed hold the post human future in their hands. And I guess I hadn't thought of the idea that people who dwell in space whether it's on Mars or in between Would be natural candidates for genetic modification. But it makes perfect sense so and sometimes a different species. Al Dead become a different species. Yes and of course whether they would be entirely flesh and blood all-weather they will by then cyborgs or even right downloads into something. You like tonic We don't know but if they become purely tonic. Then of course they want to stay on the planet and of course if they're near immortal and into cell just no deterrent to them and so they spread. And this has relevance in my view to Seti projects because I think obviously search for extraterrestrial biospheres is a mainstream part of science now that we know go exoplanets out them any like the Earth and within ten or twenty years we know when have biospheres but of course what people really want to know is are there any Intelligent aliens out there. And that's why are these programs to look for expressed your artifacts or transmissions which are manifestly artificial and I'm an enthusiast for modest expenditures on all these possible searches because it's fascinating to all of us but if you're if what I predict I particularly if anything is detected it won't be any sort of flesh and blood civilization on the planet. It would be a some sort of maybe burping and malfunctioning artifacts probably roaming in space and the reason for that is Let's suppose that another planet where things have rather like on the earth and what happened here on earth is full billion years of dominion evolution. And we're now in a few millennia of technological civilization but within a few hundred years as we've discussed It may have been taken over by some sort of electron ICK entities. Not Flesh and blood and they in principle have a billionaire future maybe a mortal and they can create copies all development to themselves etc. And so if there was another planet where things have differently. It's unlikely to be synchronized to within a few millennia so that we would detect guys. It's not on the same stage of technical so if it's behind by a few tens of millions of years then of course we see no evidence of intensity a biosphere. If it's a head then of course we would not detect anything like what's now on earth but we might detect some technological artifacts or their their emissions. And so that's why if we do detect something is far more likely to be something like that. Detect some Ronnie artifact. Yeah I personally think that the drake equation because Drako has talked about the lifetime. Civilization thinking of something With lots of independent fresh blood entities whereas maybe one super brain and maybe something electric and and that could persist for billions of years even if a compass for more years. I've often thought that the idea of taking a big radio telescope and listening in on the sky for other advanced civilizations was a very very very long shot because why in the world would advanced civilization waste of bunch of energy radio signals in random directions. But I think you know sensible to do everything we can everything as a byproduct of built. Yes yes some as support their efforts to look for radio transmissions narrow frequencies and optical flashes and things like that And we should also look for for artifacts we should look for evidence of some star that orbited by something. That's manifestly artificial. We should even look for artifacts in our solar system some some of the asteroid belt especially Shiny Cetera on the moon. Two thousand one. Yes Oh yeah I mean. One argument is that if intelligent life formed frequently it would build self replicating robots and it should have filled the galaxy longtime ago right in the speeds to the fair me paradigm a well. Of course the federal is is one important relevant fact about this but I think the reason why. I don't think it's a watertight argument. Is that if these future? Entities are electric. It's not clear they would be expansionist because we have evolved by the weaned selection which favours intelligence but also favors aggression. And so. That's why people talk about Steve Interest Expanding and etc aliens. Come here if the intelligence is our electric then they may be entirely contemplative. They may not want to expand and so they could be out there without manifesting their presentation speakers way come here so. I don't think we can say that the galaxy doesn't contain anything like that we can say it can't contain many civilizations which have led to massive expansion right. Somebody's got here already. But I think if this narrow is that advanced intelligence is electric then that need not be associated with expansionism the flip side of that though is I've wondered about this out loud you know. Is it possible that we do sort of gradually or suddenly upload our consciousness into electronics and then exactly because we don't have all these sort of thermodynamics? Survival instincts anymore. We stopped caring. Even forget about expanding. Existing is less interesting to us in that environment. The survival instinct is no longer there. I think we as human beings probably want to stay human being and and I think we we'd like to feel that the Earth won't change very much. That's why I'm happy about all these things happening fast right away from the earth but preserving the earth as it is occupied by creatures who adapted to it competitive making now so in addition to human beings. There'd be artificial intelligent electronic being so we could spread throughout the galaxy. Yes we hope Davis alone but But I think we would. I think want to try and restrain the speed of these changes because maybe we can't because May maybe some group will get ahead and and we'll have a sort of very disturbed world web human beings survive in this one of the dystopia scenarios. Obviously but I think we should hope things. Don't change too fast. So you see your. Your perspective seems to indicate that the FERMI paradox might not be a very big paradox and in fact that the galaxy might be teeming with different kinds of life is that is that fair and so what does that say to people who are thinking about the origin of life for the the frequency of life. So I know that there's certainly an idea that we haven't seen lots of aliens yet. Therefore the very beginning of life was a really really really unlikely or the beginning of multicellular life was very hard. Yes well I mean it's of course if you take the fame hurric- seriously then you could still behalf with the idea that simple life and a biosphere lots of plants and things could be wide spread and within twenty years we will know that because we all have spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars we'd be sufficient to tell us if there's a Is Fear there but even if a biosphere of project. Simple organisms is common on earth like planets lot the galaxy. It could still be that they're up Other bottlenecks stop it getting to intelligence so I think we can still hope. Even if we don't think that's intelligent. Life is widespread that simple box. Bizarre watchman because we don't know what the odds were against the evolution getting as far as as it has. I mean it's the dinosaurs had been wiped out with there. Be An intelligence like us that him emerged by different drew. We just don't know we'll Europa Titan might have biospheres right what Titan might might and of course. The origin of life is a problem which everyone is known as an important problem but most people though serious scientists have put it in this too difficult box and have worked on it evidence of that. Is that the military experiment on ninety fifties where they put sparks through gas and got a minor accident. That experiment still talked about forty years later could no one thought of doing much better experiments whereas now the lot of serious top ranking who are thinking about the origin of life in the stages by which it could happen as motive by advances in microbiology but also of course motivated by realizing that there are places in in. God if you wait could exist and and so. I'm hopeful from probably talked to a number of these people that we will have a plausible scenario for the origin of life within ten or twenty years. And that'll tends to things. It'll tell us I wanted to ref luke but it also onto your question does it depend completely on special. Chemistry are does it even depend on water or solvent because Titan? Of course you'd have to have methane? Yeah not water and and I think if you understood the Arden Life. We would know whether whatever happened. A temp to the earth with water could have happened on Titan. No not so we will know how rep urgent life is and what the variety of chemistries is could lead to it. So we don't have that but I think in the next twenty years we know about that I'm also might have evidence for whether there is life and of course Telescopes now aren't really powerful enough to be able to detect a spectrum of a planet because Earth like planet is billions of stars orbiting and to isolate the spectrum. That is very hard So I think we the James Webb Telescope. Mike do something but after that. The best bet is going to be the Europeans of building which is called the extremely large telescope. We are not a good deal unimaginative now but this has thirty nine meter mirror which is a glass. But in eight hundred pieces of glass and This will collect enough such that with the right spectograph. It should be able to separate out the light reflected from the planet from the billions time. Brighter night from the the star and So we can really see it as a planet different phases there new chains. And so that would something about Chlorophyll on the planet and things of that kind. Yeah so that's something which will be done within ten of frontiers. Yeah that's a very and just so everyone knows the extremely large telescope is a ground-based tell it's just a James Webb is in space and obviously is involved in space. But you're GONNA have a much bigger on ground. But incidentally if you look further ahead Then Talking about robots Even if we don't send many people into space We can have robotic fabricators assembling big structures. I on the moon or maybe in space and and I think One exciting scenario is fabricating. One huge they lightweight mirror under zero Jeanette in space which might even be able to resolve the image of exoplanet. Okay not to take the library but see it has an accent object. Not just as a point I think part of my book that the target for this should be twenty sixty eight which is a centenary the famous picture take my unders authorized which was the cassie iconic picture. The Earth right and it'd be nice if one hundred years after that we had a picture you can push on our walls of earth like planets elsewhere and not be crazy to have by that time a successor of Web Telescope and of the L. C. Which could be a huge mirror up in space? How huge huge some big. How big do you need for the Mirror space to do this? I think several hundred meters several hundred meters. I'm K- that sounds feasible. What do I know zero? G would not be impossible? That's right okay You mentioned just sort of start winding things up. We can get back to the ethical concerns a little bit because you did mention tariff warming Mars if human beings when I go up there and start living there. There are people who will say that we shouldn't do that right into this is a whole part of nature and What do you think well? I think If there were evidence of of life there then I think most people feel you ought to sort of preserve that life like a national park as it were. If there's no life tall then I think we could be some more relaxed about it. Similarly what the Moon I mean I think you know people talk about mining. The Moon In fact A Harrison Schmitt has this idea of of really is doing a huge amount of opencast mining. The moon to find helium three. And you know I think economically. That doesn't make sense and probably never will but on the other hand The question is will be relaxed about it and I personally would be fatty relaxed about Getting materials from the boot and it all to build structures on the moon preserving a few historic sites like where the Apollo last nose-landed kind. But if the were a biosphere already then I think most people would feel once you try and preserve it a mas or indeed onto the ice of enceladus or Europa. Which of course are now thought. Most likely places for knife in our solar system is of course there are pro probes of already being planned to to fly through the spray. That's coming up through cracks in the ice there to be able to do some Dallas to see if there's complex chemistry chemistry there and of course looking further ahead to send some submarine to go down and see something swimming around. We're going to tape listeners. Should know we will be talking about exactly that. Yes yes but I think the reason that's important is not as Nice Beret. Shen but of course if we could find evidence that earth life had originated twice independently within our solar system. Dr Patenga straight away. The life of some kind was widespread billion places in our galaxy. You'll be one of the most important discoveries full-time it would. It wouldn't do it but it's got to be convinced independent and that's why some people would say life on. Mars would not be quite so convinced him because people have said. Maybe we're all MARTIANS. Maybe lifestyles Mars and meteorites ported to the earth or vice versa whereas if it was on Roper. I think you couldn't make that. Argument will be independent and of course if it was quite different chemistry chemistry then also joined benefits. And so that's why I think searches for evolved boring. Primitive life anywhere knows. There's some other important because it would have such huge implications for the prevalence of lifelock the entire galaxy. You've made bets before Vote we'll be your bets about Both the existence of life elsewhere and our likelihood of finding it what I think I would bet substantial odds on finding evidence somewhere of life whether whether it would be in Europe rule and sell it moons of Saturn Jupiter all whether it will be from observations of EXO planets like the Earth. And of course we shouldn't just look at things earth. We should look at a place So I think it's not a crazy expectation whereas the the idea of finding intelligent life or or artifacts which are evidence at the Mall. Some sort of intelligent life. Obviously I'm in favor of shoe research at a modest level because it's so fascinating to everyone people know I'm an astronomer. Then the first question they ask is already known. It's all question and they want to talk about. If you don't want to talk to your neighbor on the plane you say Oh math mathematician but a even though I favor and support modern searches for intelligent signals some kind or artifacts. I wouldn't bet very much on that right but it's so important is worth a surge. Yeah it's a good point. I'll close by mentioning. I don't know if I've ever told you this but sometime ago. Roughly twenty years ago you gave a public lecture in Chicago and I was in the audience and so I was already you know cosmologists physicists. Giving lectures myself but you were talking about cosmology in the state of cosmology and in the middle of the talk you started talking about the possibility of life on other planets in other solar systems and as a professional scientist of course. I was appalled by this. I'm like that's not cosmology but I realized of course like you just said that is what people care abound upon reflection. I gathered a important lesson from that. Which is that. It's okay to talk about what people care about. Not just what you as a professional are supposed to be talking. But I think it's more than that. I think some subjects which has so far from any kind of empirical test that. It's not worth discussing them. And that should be left to difficult box alone and that may have been true in the past of many of these issues but I think Exobiology is now a serious subject Until I think no one would regard it as a crazy flaky cranky subjects as they might have done in the past. That's right and the very the very practice of contemplating the future seems to be a very different thing now that it was fifty years ago. So it's interesting to see how our perspective is chain. It hasn't but I think that when I'm asked. Is there any special perspective that I bring to these issues at the future because I'm an astronomer calls malls is simply an awareness of the long term future because Most people and this Kentucky Awesome Muslim areas are happy with the idea where the outcome before billion years of pollution but nonetheless frame anything with top of the tree where the combination and. I think that's something which no astronomer could believe being aware of the huge ranges a future time and extended space. It's a very good perspective to keep in. Mind that Martin Rees. Thanks so much. For being on the PODCAST. Thank you very much.

Your Center US Europe Twentieth Century Martin Reese Los Angeles Cambridge K. Martin Rees India Britain Cambridge University House of Lords Sean Carroll Unin visioned
Eva Marcille Gives Us A Masterclass On Confidence, Beauty, and Unapologetic BLACKness!

Yes, Girl!

42:58 min | 8 months ago

Eva Marcille Gives Us A Masterclass On Confidence, Beauty, and Unapologetic BLACKness!

"The very we're back at the podcast actually don't know the number because I am out in join corona walk but I'm excited that I know we are talking with even Marcel today that I know the show gas. This is yesterday a podcast of backing is. It's a whole new but we are not happening with the great interviews with amazing gas before all this happened. We talk to myself to in my head. Be America's next top model the most famous winner of all also star real housewives of Atlanta. We all know in Lovisa I went to college with her story. Atlanta University Center. As she was going we knew each other than even before reality show fame but she's just a really dope human being. We love her. She was on the show but before we get into that where he after like. We gotta talk about life. I know what would day does it feel like for you? I'm doing great in week. Four thousand of this Oh Way do you know There's this comedian. His name is Leslie Jordan. He's actually a character actor. I've seen him a lot. He's like this short very southern white man and he was on instagram. Saying like when it's march going to be over and it kind of made me laugh. 'cause he's like. What is April coming April? Come into the you know you kind of forget that March as thirty one days. He's showing better than me. I- legit thought. Wednesday was Saturday so I'll admit I've been pretty good about keeping up with the days but I really woke up Thursday morning and was like I need the weekend. Be Here I. I'm tired of watching the news. I'm tired of logging onto a work. I just need a need a break and this one is sit down. I really wanted in in is as much as it's weird to say. I want to enjoy Kerala. The little joy of Corona. It's like not doing anything. I need my moments in anything you know. It's real that you said that because I think we are still weakens for a lot of people who are working from home remotely Monday through Friday. I feel the same way I woke up this morning and I was like honey is Friday. We made it. He was looking at me like what we're that go. Did he wear and I was like. But we're going to the couch right or like we get to do being that aren't like you said about just work work work work and I'm grateful to have a job. Let me just say that and I know a lot of people are struggling right now But who are still working at juggling work by balance kids. Family Grocery Ryan's I think. Sometimes the weekend really is right now. The only time we ourselves knows true. I was you know. My daughter was watching a clip of a Disney show and the parent with workaholic and she never. He never had time for his daughter. And I made me pause and look and said you know. I've kind of fallen into a habit of like from eight thirty to five. I'm constantly telling her mommy's working Mommy's working and you know I realized I was like well actually. We're not going to get this time again. You know we're able to eat when we're able to be to go back to our normal quote unquote normal lives and I'm like are actually need to try to be more connected to her in not use the fact that I'm working from home as a way to avoid her if that makes sense No that makes sense. I think you're right about the connection you know. We had the essence virtual wellness house. No the first ever in so many of it which is amazing by the way like. I can't believe we pull that off two day conference online. We had that was amazing and it was also like a really great distraction. Speaking of that and I think people were connecting in like away that wasn't so heavy and negative and we were just kind of like learning crafts with our kids talking about how to beating variety in jail and like doing all these amazing things together online and I think people really appreciate it because as heavy as this time is. I'm glad like right. Now you're talking is still doing earl. We have to sign the light together. You're right I I did not don't forgive me. I did kind of get distracted. Missed Yalla's read I heard Read but catch your conversation with Charlotte made and the thing that really stuck out to me was when he said a lot of people are meeting themselves for the first time during Corona He. Just tell me what was it like? Having a conversation with him it was really really powerful and I appreciate it so much am I. This was like my first time in a long time. I was getting the read as I was interviewing someone because he was basically because I started it off and I was like what are you stressed. He was like I haven't thought belting by right because he's been doing all the emotional work bike with the therapy and everything all the things he's trying to get us to do in the community but for all the people who have meant he was like this might be the first time you're really looking in the mirror guest sitting with yourself a so much what he said that. I Love Corey is so many good things can come from. That can be such a positive refresh in all of our lives. It doesn't have to be scary but you might actually find out why you do what you do. And then you have the perfect time to work on that address that be reborn from that. And I'm with that. I really really loved that. It really really stuck with me because it's even made me even physically look at myself and you know. I know a lot of people joking about like going to the hair salon or cutting things and I'd like for me personally is made me look at my grace because I'm usually when they come out so much. I run to the barber shop and get my sides cut down but I'll say oh snap I really gotta look at these graves right now and then another the next level questioning it is. I'm getting older and I need to find the beauty and getting older So that's just me personally would something I've been thinking about. And when he said that it really touched me because if something like you you realize you may be running away from things but this is the time to earn towards at an embrace it so I love that. I'm glad he added that his main I know he really. Everybody really appreciate the conversation. I know you mentioned generally and I have been doing that. And it's been really cool because it's not like I'm like dear diary. It's not like it's not like that but it's just like whatever I'm into that day like right about what I watched. I may write about something I learned about myself. You know like we were talking about last week. I may write about something that made me happy or something that made me sad. It's just a bunch of just feelings and I think it's going to be like my guidebook for like mine new me and my new normal after this now totally Pam when you talked about what you've been watching. I don't know about you but I have been using this time to been some shows. Well two types of shows. I've been binging. I've been binging things that came out recently that I just haven't had time to get around to like I've recently fell in love. With High Fidelity Zoe Kravitz and first of all divine joy randolph. Like let me just tell you about this girl like I love her on the show but one of the through lines on high fidelity is the fact Zoe. Kravitz characters. Name is rob. She's never watched the Sopranos and I realized during these corona streets. I need to go back to do some deep dive of showed. I've never watched and the earliest there that breaking bad. I've never seen it's funny. You say that because a lot of people have been calling me because they know. I Love Chris Series. And they've been like Charlie. What should we watch and ask Corey? That has the Mike I that advice. Like if you've already watched hygiene and like me you watch the new season of way to pass and you're like where do we go from here? I think you go back to the classics. I started blacklists which I had nowhere near was so good. And there's a million zillion episode. Oh Wow Dang that is a good one right. There are a lot of shows that I was start watching but the way TV was back. Then that whole like you'd have to wait a week or you'd have to wait seizing and you know you just for me. Personally I would get away from because life got underway but now life is making me sit still and I can't enjoy this stuff now. Oh Yeah and then like. There's always something you meant to get to write. But you didn't like we. League used to love and watch all of breaking bad but we never watched at a call now. My husband's like we're GONNA get into that. I'm like we should be doing nothing saying holding fate. We're doing nothing but would you okay not to be like a whole mare which I know. I'm the lifestyle girl in essence. I have really been enjoying like China like Russia had not my space too and I think because this is spraying and this is the time to do that and I think that you know. I think we anyone who's like stuck at home deserves to just have that refresh. Whether it's you know bagging up things in your closet for goodwill rearranging your decor. Doing finally unpacking. That box from whatever you know are like repainting as crazy as it sounds. A lot of people are going to like places like Home Depot and target to get supplies. Anyway in these places do sell things for your home and you're GonNa be there you know so like grabbing a can of paint or grabbing from new curtains. While you're getting essentials you don't need to feel guilty about that you know you're there you can still save and it'll allow you to have something to do at home and I don't think we should be feeling badly about that. I do want to say that we have to keep our hands and minds and hearts busy and also for those of us who are doing a lot of meetings from home or facetime or skyping. It's nice to have that cute backdrop so you can take the time to be like I look crazy but look at these wall paintings with these Bo- friends. We were on the live summit. It's kind of like I was scoping out everybody's home situation. Joe Joe Rees back that gray wall I was like. Oh man I mean. I'm unfortunately staying with family friends right now. But when I get back to Brooklyn I am definitely going to paint a nice cute wall for Mizen me. Oh I was let get online. Order me a painting while I wait for others toilet paper inspire greasing. But we won't talk about that. We're going to let you know what else you know what Eva and I talked about for this interview. Corey. That's right 'cause I was I where would I go? I know this was a okay. Yes he's horry was out. She was booked. Dizzy was like Hollywood season. So Corey was working right for you. Were busy it was. Eva came through so she and I had a talk but one of the things we talked about was like stepping into your full cells as she about like really when she grew herself and really became unapologetic and embrace the woman that she was. And I love those kind of compensation some always talking about like grown woman wait grown woman thoughts grown woman attitude grown woman rela realization. So what does it mean to be like? You know you're grown ass full south. I love it but I cannot wait to get into. I need hear some of that right now. Oh It's good either. I think was a light in that way and my other favorite thing that you talked about and you guys gotta tune in for is I. It's funny because I had never thought about this. Even as an essence director but even talked about her essence cover. Now y'all know the essence cover club is elite. There are a lot of women who have them and they're women to this day we know in love. Who Haven't it's just one of those things so it's a special club as we come up on our fiftieth anniversary. I was talking to her about that. It was like I had a cover and not just any kind of court. She had estimate cover. She was on July issue and she was like that really. Put My career on the map because that cover was everywhere you know I remember booking at cover? I do remember because this is. When you know America's not Tom Outta was everywhere but when she won because she really was a favorite she really really really was a favourite and I remember a believed dying. Weathers was editor in chief than she was. Just like you know what we need. Even Marcel. We need we need Yvonne Cover and we made it happen and it was gorgeous and that was yes like that was that year was black girl. Majett NAIRA EBA Jaja like and it was early on in the you because I feel like they were literally like forty seasons of America's next top model and I don't to this day I think is the most famous winner. She's a I'll be honest with you. She's the only one I think about energy. Appoint in the cost of who she didn't win. But those are the two people that stand out for me Fain same and I definitely watch at least the first like seven season. You know what I mean but I mean she's also one of my favorite housewives. Because you know I love. She's got she's giving you how. How lifelike mom. Why model life you know? And she's you know she. She wrote she from fireball. I love her so as we all continue to stay positive and feel good. Let's get into this great conversation that I had with our boo even myself. Let's get into it. They saw everyone my even. My son was here. I'm ecstatic because we talk about this all the time we go back like Atari. Yes trolley full Atari like Thomas Guy all the way back seriously like pacman all the way back to our college days where we first met. I Adore you. I love since we watched her win. Seasons the cycle three young America's next and just changed the game. We saw you and watch what happens. Live with Tyra so good. Oh my God that was amazing images. It was so good that happen. It doesn't happen often enough so I started out. Tyra put meat on like the definition of put on was a person it would be tire top model for me. She literally put me on and then gave me what I need it to maneuver through this business. Like the entrepreneur managed me. She taught me about my word about diligence about when someone sends you a gift right a thank you card and mail it to the. Hello. It's easy to send an email to easy to send a text. They will remember getting that. Thank you card in the mail from you like little things that I think have really sustained me in this business and create longevity because beauty and sas alone is not going to create a paycheck. No and you are really constantly reinventing doing new things new business and we're GONNA talk about busy but Tyra hell plant. That's not tyrod. Help plant all of that just in. It wasn't just what she said. It was more so what she did her actions you know she would get in early in the morning and set up something that for a challenge. We had that day and then mind you. She has our show going judging that night. Leave their Victoria's secret like he finished that and started managing me and then talk show. There's always some day now. She has model and coming out. And it's for the everyday girl is fine their inner fabulous and just what she's done. Not just for me in the hundreds of people that have been on top model but just for the culture. I posted on instagram about her and basically talked about how amazing she is just for. Our idea of beauty is and what we know is beautiful. Because our MOM's taught us we were a beautiful in in our grandparents told us but we went out into the world. They didn't say anything and nothing around me looked like me that said. I was beautiful and things. That were considered beautiful. Look nothing like me and my family especially in the mud. Tara change that so my daughter can look up in all her life she will no beauty. That looks like horror at that walks like her. You know what I'm league. What she's done is so amazing. I mean for Look Barbie dolls with Vitiligo. Like are you kidding me? You can't tell me tyra banks did not have something to pay those way you look at beauty. She really did. And speaking of beauty icon. You know when you with you coming today. I was so excited I think about all the things that I could ask you about and also were morning beasts men model Multi Hyphen it entrepreneur. Lifestyle time I of her time. You are also in essence coverage. Thank you as Hello Sailor Susan Taylor absolutely and I see you making your way there that trail by your own brand. You've had a lot of brand natural progression. Y'All been times where you're like okay. What's next you're going to do but you know as I got older. I fell in love and I had a child and I became a mom and so I can kind of fight against what's naturally happening or I can embrace it and try to figure it out along with the rest of US women out here and so that's what I've decided to do embrace it. It is what it is you love. Our lives can be the brand so you can just be yourself. Yes that's timeline. You know there was. I remember when I first started out modeling there. Were all these things inside of a box that I was supposed to be. But for some reason the largeness that is me never fit in. That box. Entira decided that the box don't work. Let's not do the box? Throw it out. Let her just be and I have been allowed to be me and then other women that realize I'm just me to in who I am as fabulous and then that resonates and so I think you create a culture especially our culture where we have been so beaten down and belittled in even taught to hate ourselves within ourselves. You know to see and you wonder you know. How do we change it? This is how we changed the unraveling and those old teachings of you know what is beautiful and what is not. I mean we are all of that now. I love it. I want to know either. I knew you in college. We enter into the super well but we were adjacent. You saw me. What was the moment that you knew that you can never live in a box? That who you are today is who you had to be because you are definitely one of the most authentic real people. I know you have you guys. She's been this way since the beginning. When did you know like I'm just a little bit extra and it's okay and I'm going to own it? You know what? I had a nice pick of schools that I could have went to and I did a college tour with my mom. Shut out some of the most amazing mommy ever. She decided to like planets war and spin her own money and just take all these different colleges New York New Orleans Atlanta just. Why can look at them and see where I wanted to go and I ended up? I remember when to spell man went to emory and we went to Clark and I remember when I went to Clark I felt for the first time at home not because it was a black college because spellman black to the motto of the school. His name was Mr Reed. He was the emissions. Remember the Guy. Never forget he came and he said welcome to Clark Atlanta where we find a way or make one that and it's the school model so simple but it is literally the lyrics of my life. Engine mind a way or make one or make away it. That's really all that we have in. So I knew that Clark was for me and I knew that I was okay to be me when I went to an institution with amazing African American surround. Wbz Boys when here and they said find a way or make one which meant that. If the the what's out there doesn't fit me then find something to make something that duck when a new door and so I just allowed me to to never be stagnant and never be complacent in one space but also be okay to dream dreams bigger than you could even believe like. It's okay absolutely and to be bold outrageous and dare I say fast. I feel like in that cycle top model and then watching the evolution to like what we have now with housewives or sure it was the beginning of being like you're GonNa get this fierceness whether you look at drag race yes off from top motto but just we are who we are. We're here and I think the unapologetic -ness of our blackness for me definitely came in College. I it was invited me. I mean. I woke up to lift every voice and sing all my wall as a kid we blackout. But when I went to college like not apologizing for that being unapologetically me and then going out and so I'm me and then I don't have to apologize. My ideas my thoughts in my desires which might not be conventional are okay to because they're me. I love it. I just live that. And what about your confidence as a beautiful woman too because I think sometimes we always feel like? Oh you're beautiful. You have it easy. But I've heard so many models say you know it can be difficult. You know walking into Beijing. Yes you know I'm here. I slay but now I love where we are. As black women will absolutely. We're like Yep you're GonNa get this lay all day here I know. I don't think so. Much like cosmetic optic beauty. I think that's what we think it is right. It's more the essence of our confidence. That has nothing to do with if we have on lipstick right now or what our hair is doing or not doing. I was taught to walk up with my back straight head. Hi Hello Dick. Pooled shoulders down so you know what I mean so. It's knowing walk in like I'm beautiful because I am and so are you absolutely the fact that I'm okay with me. I know who I am in the confidence in. That often breaks any silence. Neurone ends when that person walks in. You're like okay and you think it's the jacket or you think no it is fierceness. There it is the knowing of self they walked in this room with. That makes you check like okay. Well I know myself right added do I? Yeah so that's where it is and we confuse it with beauty beauty. I've said it since day one. It really is within. It radiates from the inside out and so some of the cosmetically prettiest people in the world when you get this. Thank goodness on them. For some reason they're just not that pretty and then some people that you thought Kinda basic then you hear him speak again rely on them and their soul in the beauty of that. The cheeks did a bit. Higher is length a little more in the lips got fuller like it just becomes more beautiful absolutely and I love you back and that energy to housewives of Atlanta I mean I love the most watch housewives franchise receipts. It's the most watched. We're all addicted. Do you think that helped you be able to let basically the world follow your whole life. Oh absolutely no. That's not easy. I'll make it look easy but it can't be it's not easy to show the world everything especially the bad parts of your life. You know. It's always good when it's good when it's not good that's kind of when you want to run for the hills but I think when it's not good is where people resonate with because all we are all people in this world trying to figure it out going through it trying to get over it that's all. We are loath in. Our clothes are smiles and relook all fancy but we're morning we're sad we're depressed you know. We're a little bit of everything a little bit of all of that. And so this show. I think you see US neglecting glamorous Kinda why you watch it via the houses and stuff but then you realize like she having problems with her man just like me or you know her relationship with her. Mom is a strain like minor with all this stuff she has all she wants is to be loved exactly and I think it's the bonus of these women to put their lives out there. Love it or hate it but the boldness of that allows other women to heal like highly. Tell me about my daughter's name change which is just it was real in my life and so but if rates or trans great if not whatever but she was just like you don't understand seeing your family and seeing that dynamic it meant so much to me because my kids are not biologically mine and I often fought with. 'em I really their mom in. What does this mean in their life and so do you know to see the way you respect the way your husband loves your daughter and your family unit? It's just it's amazing I've been telling people in so many ways blended family really. Is The new American family. Get Real. It's the truth a lot of times when we talk about right. That's my daddy other child. I know that's your brother. Exactly what's probably half or the fan? I well one of my brothers. It's weird to say. It is my half brother but I don't know what have just means. There's a different donor for DNA. Bates we have the same family household and my dad his dad you know my mom is says mom and he's the first half brother and we never said have ever. I'm like I've been saying my brothers since the beginning of ever happen. Yes so thanks so why. Sometimes it might be scared especially like with my donor situation with Marley. That was very difficult to share last season. And I had girl come up to me at my favorite little chickens pot in Atlanta. And tell me she's been going through domestic violence for eighteen years. She wants to leave. Her son is just seven college and so now she can go and hearing me talk about it. Meant so much because she's scared to even talk about it but someone that she looks up to to know has went through the same thing and survive and she sees me. I'm pregnant now about to get married in her show as difficult and as embarrassing as it was to tell my story it helped that lady who no longer works at the chicken spot anymore because she got out of the situation she's not dare and so if if if she's the only one that helped on and did my job. I love the way you relate to your fans and I see you instagram. Blanking really never sell sauce on here that I saw a year ago. We had the same outfit on. You never know when you're gonNA see so I mean I know where people were all just souls. Try TO FIGURE IT OUT. But how do you keep your energy so high? How does easy we were better get to that you bugged brand so seaweed? So that's how you get it so I D C coming. It's out it's out. It launched the day after. I had my son Maverick. Congratulations thank you most times. Thank you. He went through the Launch Party and spoke on my behalf. Because I was in the hospital still but I have an amazing CD line in it is it was your you got into. Cbd I got into CB. Because I try to figure out how to take care of my family without horrible medicine medicine and we live in a world where their germs and bacteria and we get sick and it's just is what it is and allergies headaches and I knew that there had student doctor savvy so I knew that there had to be away. There's the old saying your grandparents grandparents told them the body is meant to heal itself. Absolutely there was no excedrin in ancient Egypt in Cairo. There is no might off your cramps. Ma'am but they was having babies. At Ninety so sodden that we are doing is wrong and a lot of his are the western pharmaceuticals just mask. They're masking agents for elements and issues. That usually have a dif- deeper root issue in. Cbd is one of the one hundred and thirteen Canada. Noise that has the most amazing medicinal properties. It is a natural anti inflammatory. You did your research so girl check it Tom. Let me tell you your skin cream. Never knew in a million years if visit anti inflammatory and you put in skin cream. What is it do makes your bags? Go down makes your puffy. Go Down your swelling. It's magic it literally pretty much. Do anything made in the ground out of the Earth Earth biggest misnomer. Let me just dispel it down please. It does not get you high. It is not we for the discipline is not now there is CBD that might be infused with hd that's a whole nother thing but CBD itself does not have the psychotropic effects which is what gets you high when you hit but it says it has everything else does it keeps you sleep. Well rested for my relaxed focused anxiety. If you're one of those people I work with somebody WHO's amazing? What she is has so much anxiety she wears me out. Oh I gave her a CD. She's been on at four months and she superdome her life is. Our life has changed. She's just chill like she is the things that would razzle you. If you think about it they are joy. Stiller's they are moment killers enjoy stiller's because your anxiety your frustration. Your fear in takeaways thought is not even real feels real. It feels real so if you can quiet that thing in the back of your head that has you on your way to your meeting to take these kids are getting this dinner prepared and your husband and all. Just drop you a little. Cbd It's good for you and it comes all of that Dow but see Buddy C. D. me fears you. Listen yes I love it. I listen it is. It's me if you could put me in a bottle. I will be here to help you. Chill you out in about an answer. What are your favorite products from the line so favorite products skin cream radiance absolutely everything day night live by Levy. We'll ask him about my skin. I live off a three to four hours of sleep literally. It's my skin cream. Kelsey why we all like that? I don't have time but the three or four hours of sleep by now get is uninterrupted peaceful sleep so you ever had one of those real catnaps and it was just like forty five minutes while not wake up feeling like he's left forever. That is what my CBD DOES HAVE. One called harmony and one called bliss and it just takes you right now Melania while it doesn't drop you to sleep the harmony will job that has THC. The Bliss has no THC that will help you have a com- sleep so a pin drop one. Wake you up like it normally does and you can stay asleep but not wake up every two hours like your body because your body naturally led. Yeah it's everything. It is absolutely everything. I have a friend of mine who sleeps to three hours a night. She slept two days in a row. Six hours she was like what is in this stuff. And it doesn't keep you asleep like if someone came in your room and said hiding. Wake up but your shoe at a peaceful sleep like that rem sleep that deep sleep you. WanNa get one. You need but instagram. Alerts won't let you. Yes that part that because your own is plugged in right by your nightstand. Twenty-six notifications later. You're awake so I'm so impressed that you yet again are just coming out with something for women for people just about healthy lifestyle better lifestyle. Is that what you want your legacy to be gone like what is ever see you do is create a lifestyle brand that shifted and changed the culture for us eleven? Now it's GonNa sprinkle a help a little bit of everybody but if I can affect change from my people how we eat. What we put in our body are medicine. What we think is beautiful. Our hair all that stuff. Then I've done my job done your and that's my space and it's easy because it's me it's me it's true. It's what I know. I'm raising a beautiful black girl. I have two beautiful black boys. And so that's all I know in life trying to figure out how to create the best world for this this Princess Princes that I'm raising your family five I I stand. Y'All are so cue. Thank you while you standing. Look Look I love the kids okay. But no seriously. I babysit gummy. Yeah when I'm mainland hit your. I'm serious because they're so cute. They're adorable but I know motherhood and being busy being booked and also being a whole hit reality show. It's a lot it is so juggling balance would is even now learning about that. Maybe even her twenties wouldn't have understood Om Now I'm alerting a lot of things one to live in the moment because a moment is fleeting. So you know when you think about it like look what happened to Kobe. Bryant and his beautiful daughter in all of the other victims we just saw his home going not too long ago though and it just reminds you that life is fleeting not. Today's not even promise using tomorrow with the rest of today is in promise and so live in the moment. Live in the now Mother had has taught me balance. It's taught me Pailin and patients with myself and with others because I had to learn on my kids little stuff like put the shoe on you know now. Now it's not that deep and it's like no give her a second and then I learned to give her a second then. I learned to give people in the world second. Oh I like that so it teaches you patience and not to require that everyone. I talked about it earlier not to require that everyone and everything works at your level of thinking in grasping because you move through life and you try to learn as much as you can so now you're smarter so everything around. You should be easier like everybody chest. Everyone has to adjust. And you need to adjust to the fact that everyone's not like you year you there them. Find your metal and wood. Having three kids that are completely different with having a husband who works all the time. I have a radio show. We're smelly morning show that I'm on and listening to these callers call in every day and listen to their lives like everyone's life in situations differently so you just gotTa take it one day at a time and go with the flow go with the flow but give these kids a chance because we talk at these kids and we don't love on them the way we should. We love our kids and we provide. I know what you were not there. We also give them a lot of devices. Yeah strikes dinner down there but do we really ask that? Just how will school? But what's your best friend's name again? What did you guys do at recess more than just the regular and because I travel so much I find myself having to force that time in with my kids and so I try to get to those beyond surface moments. I love your intention on there. You have to be because it's so easy. The best parents in the world are just literally doing what they can do. It doesn't come in the manual. It doesn't come with the main doesn't and speaking of intentionally. You're also intentional about being a great wife and released showcasing your love story and your marriage and I think that's really important. I'm a marriage and through the is now happily married as well and I think we need to see every version of back love that we have a and I love how happily in love you are and your fairy tale wedding forever will be free. Someone asked me if I would do. You know how you renew your vows. Never I would never have another wedding. What for what I had the most. I WANNA. I WanNa Jackie Christie wet and. She has a win every every year and be like my wedding was so perfect. I couldn't even. It was absolutely fairytale. It was beautiful and the most perfect part is I left there with my forever you too. I had my son my daughter and my husband like my everything everything and I love that. You're like okay. I have everything but as we all know a moment. That's why is literally this morning. I tripped over my husband's parents and I was like I'm serious. If these Vance one more time okay seriously it's happening but I love that transparency and I want you to keep doing it. You know. I'm no you do it through TV but you also do it through social media. Yeah I think it's one of the most important things how to fly in a relief. How did shown in how to fight? Yup because you have to fight in order to sustain who you are to keep your boundaries and to get what you want you have to be able to be vocal. In the other person will not always agree. There will be accolades but to learn how to compromise. Learn each other's love language that is so important peaks and valleys. Don't Tuck it under the couch like it's still under the Gal. How can you address it if you don't talk about it? You didn't address it okay. You just exactly exactly. So yeah when it comes to my husband and I The argue like any couple. We don't always agree in some areas and I definitely get on his but if there was one person I live in a one room shack with it would be him that one right there at lose it off for him now before we wrap 'cause like I could hold you ave and be selfish. I know you've been booked in busy. Essence honey please please literally right. Listen nothing mattered. It's still fighting candy and I are talking about it but nothing matter being shot by some of the most amazing people ever until I walked in and that photo shoot at essence. And I'll remember Mickey Taylor was saying I want it to be fluid. Tonic Mickey is an icon and I did not know how to make you hit your fluid. I was like tired and teach that one got a lot. How do we do that one? Then I learned the magic that is Mickey and Susan. Taylor Oh my God no essences turning fifty this year. Shut the front door in May as has got the AARP car you better like. Where did that time though? Listen Anti I can't believe it either. But essence as long as this earth every single month we got our coveted essence magazine. And you better not touch it. Don't crease it for Mama take to get her hair done all Saturday after she gets. I hear done on Saturday. You might be able to look at it on Monday and my grandma used to kill us. If like you know how you were too rough with it and the cover off absolutely absolutely shouldn't play about this. I think we can just go to the corner. We get another look at it like we were not even allowed to open up the magazine until Mommy had solid. Mommy finished watch looking at it. Grandma might come over on Sunday and wanted to see it so you got to leave. It doesn't just in case encased essence history now and then on Monday Tuesday you like. Where's Alicia key? I mean what is it? Yeah have not yet. But I'm ready. Eleven yes like getting my mortgage but then here we are but just for me. It was just the pictures. It was the beauty pictures. Every day was my favorite and just knowing I will get here. I will be a bad bitch but like I like Cynthia. Like bridges like clavicle up. Oh my God bald head Whitney Houston like icon. Everything where's your cover? I know you've done something with framed as Mama hasn't. My Momma has it and then. I have one of my books because times have changed. I'm thirty five. Fifteen years ago. We still had polaroid's Tares Karu blockbuster blockbuster thing today we have smartphones. You don't eat any of that. We don't have any of that stuff anymore. Oh my God you don't even need it when they send you your cover they send you your caliber digital your. Send me a a for at least three solid. Okay good cause I was literally going to find you know. Go Find Me Sam. I'm GonNa try you know what was my essence covers. I mean everything was that it was the July issue. What does that mean? Everyone essence festival so it was It everywhere it was my board essence. Oh my God assured me Tara driving to the door and tyrod drove me to the door in essence. Walk me down the red carpet like literally. I love it was everything I love. And what was your favorite essence cover other than your own. I just since we're on my favorite essence cover ever than my own would be. Oh there's so many icon Anne. There's one that Mary J. Marriage as done a lot unless she's nine. There's one that Mary J. did that's like epic. I remember took my life. I loved. Listen Okay I'm GonNa wrap your promise. Promise I know. He's a black man issue honey child of Nazareth the Black Men's issue of essence box. Can we just take a moment for the box of We take a moment for as was memorial wars and bores all the wars and that was fine it relates to a black man. I get back. But then they'll find black man issues. Oh no you have more recently with Michael. Be The black man we do. Vince covers well. I appreciate the glory genetic and they had a really good cover to cover everything the first one the first a beauty with the close up via door you. I love you March I come back I appreciate juices. That can be various quarrier. I missed well. Sorry listen if not a real black girl hiding unless Ja who come out. Thanks for this week's guest. Even more South be sure to listen to subscribe to other great episodes up. Girls are conversations with Raphael City. Kelly Rowland Regina King and you can check out our podcast on apple podcasts. Spotify our heart radio and Google play. And while you're there be sure to ever be.

Atlanta America Corey Tyra Cbd Corona Marcel Zoe Kravitz Susan Taylor Clark Atlanta University Center Mickey Taylor Leslie Jordan Disney Mommy Eva Kerala Home Depot Joe Joe Rees Mama
Good Mustaches & Love Squares

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

40:43 min | 1 year ago

Good Mustaches & Love Squares

"This is how many think my name is brooke like. I'm gavin girl man. We got a lot to say. I didn't have a line after we're trying to be honest is with you as we possibly can without well without killing our own career this is this is unscripted unfiltered raw these five. I use the phrase loosely gentlemen sitting around discussing everything you guys wanna know so in ten seconds last how many think what is education of all men glenn different ages man code decoded abu. I don't know if i could say damn. I can't even follow that up the tagline man yeah. Let's go with that. What helmet is available now everywhere. You listen to podcasts. This is the ben and ashley. I almost famous podcasts with iheartradio. Today i mean i'm feeling real spry so much better than the day after ashley jared's wedding big news this. We've got daniel on eastern studio. They're gonna be joining me. <hes> we're also going to be talking to chicken man about jordan's attitude paradise and <hes> if he thinks he was in the right or wrong by fighting christian but before we do that big news ambassador nation ashley canetti has now changed her name to ashley the icon <unk> nettie haven vegas official. We wondered we didn't know and it has happened. <hes> you know we <hes> we love those two. We can't wait to actually more about her amazing time in newport but <hes> today is about the second episode of bachelor in paradise this week it was i would not say it was wild and crazy really towards the very end. I want to get danielle eason's opinions danielle if you could explain this episode but in in one or two words what would it be four. If you need i i would describe this episode as upsetting yeah well fair you said doesn't make it makes me sad and it makes me frustrated. <hes> there are parts that made me happy but mostly i felt sad to describe it as love square because it's a square between it jordan nicole clay and christian the take a love square. We kind of went away. I felt like this episode of from the blake. Hanaa dylan drama to now nicole is kind of the bachelor in paradise. Here's the rundown of last night's episode just to remind everybody that was watching. Dean is the new member he comes in with a moustache. It was trending on twitter. Daniel must ask it or bad. I loved it. I am i feel like he his personality personality really shows the mustache funny yeah it is and we know dean well. He comes in. He talks down about himself. He you know he makes it sound like he has nothing going on in life. If he lives in a van he doesn't have a job. No ambition dina's is has wunderlist and i think that's probably the best way to explain the guy just loves adventure and i think all of that is his ambition is to adventure now to say i love to travel. I don't think is a fair synopsis of what he's doing. That's like everybody loves loves to travel at some level. It's he likes to adventure. He likes to journey and he's soaking that into the mustache can adds to here's something. I'm a little envious about you. Both will know about this grew a mustache. I'll month two months ago. No good reaction zero positive reaction from it on. Everybody loves it. I loved your moustache. I think we need to bring it back. It's not true. I it was a joke. It was a classy mustache. I've had similar reactions actions when i've grown mustaches though dean has a really full one. That's i think one of the differences not the years isn't full years clark gable or something classic movie movie star. Johnny dean looks like magnum p._i. We've had amazing response from our listeners. When it comes to twitter and e mails here recently on some of the questions you've asked which makes us so much more fun so listeners do me a favor. What makes a good moustache. I get that it's going to say fitting for the face and fitting for the person but what really separates that mustache on different men i mean we've had some really famous mustaches in our time as humans and it feels like deans was widely accepted and not widely rejected and i wanna know why and what separates good mustache a bad mustache on a good look inhuman so what does no emails had been an ashley. I heart media dot com or please a hash tag on twitter almost famous podcast we read we listen. We like and alan joy. This conversation big storyline of the episode that i think will continue to be a big storyline. Tanner tolbert actually came out last night on twitter and asked what the difference was between this story in jed story ori. The story is this demi tells derek she was dating a girl back home coming into the episode and still has feelings for this girl she explains herself as being sexually fluid lou id and as a result dare cast it aside if he's going to stay and pursue this relationship or not obviously derek is conflicted. It's not easy form warm but tanner comes out publicly and asked the question what is the difference twitter reacted and said that the difference was that jed was never truthful truthful or securely honest with hannah about his relationship back home that he hit it even up until the time that they got engaged and demi came out and talked about it in front it of a long term commitment to derrick eastern deal. Do you both agree. Is that the difference. I agree with you. I think it's a little bit different at this point. Demi me and derek have known each other for maybe a week and she's just starting to realize that this relationships going a little somewhere that she's starting to develop real feelings. Thanks for the guy so she she came. Clean versus jed hit his whole story line until he got outed. You know there's a difference when he had to come clean because somebody did at four him. Versus de means like you know what this is. My situation and i'm gonna tell you and also i don't know i don't know if this is accurate or or not but i think demi had she was seeing somebody like she didn't have like a girlfriend and jed was like fully in a relationship like i was like i am jets girlfriend and now he's going on this show for his music. Versus demis like casually seeing somebody and then she's going on. This show too casually see other people yeah. You're right i mean i think you're spot on and that's really they're really going to get down to it. That is the difference in this. There's also something disagree with me on but before i tell you about at that let's take a break and talk about one of our sponsors wondered. How do the smartest marketers cut through the noise sir. I'm bob pittman chairman and c._e._o. Of iheartmedia and on my new show math and magic. I'm sitting down with today's most gifted disrupters but when i did this people thought i was crazy. There are really no other rules aside from you know full frontal nudity. Go out there and do it. I don't like to follow the trend of iheartradio is number one for podcast ask but don't take my word for it by math and magic on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast with a community of six hundred and thirty thirty million professionals linked ends powerful targeting tools help you zero in on reaching the right audience down to their job title company name in the stream more better targeting are getting eagles a message your customers care about it's almost like a wishlist redeem a free one hundred dollars lincoln credit to launch your purse campaign go to linked linked dot com slash imagine terms and conditions apply. This is how many think my name is brooks like gavin to groff aw man. We got a lot to say. I didn't have a line after we're we're trying to be as honest with you as we possibly can without well without <music> out killing our own career this is this is unscripted unfiltered raw five use the phrase loosely gentlemen. <hes> tom sitting around discussing everything guys wanna know so in ten seconds or last. How many thing what is the education of all men different ages man code decoded. Oh all boom i. I don't know if i could say damn. I can't even follow that up the tagline man yeah. Let's go with that. How many think is available now everywhere. You listen to podcasts. There's a lot of open ended storylines right now. In paradise. We have demi also talking about how she has a partner a girlfriend back home. It's something that we don't know a ton about yet. She has mentioned it and it's going to be interesting interesting to to see how this plays out in the show. She obviously has a very <hes> interesting relationship with derek something. We've all been excited about one of the interesting parts about this season or the bachelorette or bachelor in paradise. Is that none of the relationships are that serious yet now. We're just a few weeks in but derek and demi are serious enough to sniff each other's armpits pits leading me to this question this week's almost famous question. Please write us. Would you or win. Do you get to the place in relationship where you're comfortable enough to smell smell somebody's armpits and if it smells horrid. Is that a turn off to you. Is it something that you dislike or if smells great. Are you into it. Like what point do you sniff. Somebody's farts to say that was a good one or a bad one like. Is this a thing now that we sniff each other ladies ladies in the room and eastern included. Do you sniff your your partner's armpits and if so why is it any moment is is it hard to do. I love doing it straight up. I love it. You're for fun. Yes i do because it's because it's a part of her that i love. I got to smell l. Dina armpits fairly recently to see if i could detect which one had iota rent in which we did the difference was clear but <hes>. I think it's really fun. I'm okay with the fighting. I am not so it's a hard. No you're good if somebody has massive b. o. v. sticking senate they're a smell that you revolt. My husband doesn't really have bad be oh so or is it that you like his b o mainly you like it added like his ramone's are something you're into yeah i wouldn't be wondering what do you think would you would you sniff armpits giggle geico. Thank you so creepy. Not the get go. We need when i ask you what you sniff. Somebody's armpits new. I feel like you would come on until the truth. I'm really trying to i just i haven't even thought to be. I don't as a girl perspective being demi. I would never ask a guy if i smell because i do like please think of me as a flower and i smell delicious as a guy if he does it. I probably be like sure i it depends on what date were on dating. I can't do it if it's like the first few i was going to say once you pass like the like the year mark like you yeah yeah i mean i don't mind like when just go on long walks or runs like we obviously bo smell. I don't mind that but but i i don't know if i prefer but again i just. I don't mind her fairmont's. I don't mind how she smells as a human. She smells good and you know you you enjoy. You're attracted to similar since it's about something to talk about so the question of the day is almost famous. Listeners is it weird is odd. Is it okay. What do you feel. What do you think what do you want to express about smelling. Your partner's armpits that any point in their relationship. I don't even want to put a timetable on any appointed relationship. Do you have anything against that or is that just something that partners do for partners so here's what's going on. Demi admits to derrick that she's dating back home that she she is sexually fluid. I am upset with me about this for one reason and one where he's an only demi explains the katie that she's doing all this cause because she's tired of being tough demi however i would argue that by her admitting this publicly she's actually becoming tougher more confident confident more vulnerable honest than anybody we've ever seen on the show this is this is groundbreaking for bachelor u._s._a. Massive in so i think demi in this feels weak because this is an admission of something that we are not familiar with on the show she's will probably a little nervous and fearful and scared by by her being completely honest and vulnerable with the world demi as tough as ever yeah. I think that's what she that's what she meant instead of saying like she's is not being tough demi. I think she's saying she's being vulnerable. We're seeing a whole different side of her. We saw this feisty <hes> rambunctious girl when she was on on <hes> the bachelor and our seeing her in a completely different light totally bringing us into her inner circle and being so vulnerable rob all these moments for you guys i mean you've been in these before your friends all of a sudden. I mean how many times in life it doesn't happen often. But how many times have your friends admitted something to you when you've known them for a while. We've known for a long time. We've loved them you for a long time. We've laughed with demi. We've been annoyed by we've lived with demi demi for a long time in the show but all of a sudden a friend in any one of our circles admit something. That's unexpected that we don't see coming. How much more does that bond us as humans so so much. I mean i've that's happened to me before and then when they finally tell you you're you just you get a sense of relief for them but you're also like ah finally like you're being you're being you you know and that's like such a good awesome feeling as a friend to see your one of your best. Friends runs really come into themselves. He said i want to ask you as a non eligible husband at this point <hes> but a man who was a very eligible bachelor in his day if you're dating a girl and she admits something like this to you. Would you have a similar reaction to what derek erakat or would you be more. Throw it off and kind of <hes> would really should be over. I i i i have been in the situation and i reacted exactly like derek. Did i know because i the thing that that i was the that comes to my mind and i think was president. In derek's mind is is this person is special and this person is choosing to spend time with me and that's something to be treasured and whoever this person is someone that that i really like and and someone that i support in whatever they do and i just want to be there for them and if they choose to spend time with me and that's that's something that should be held very very special. It's not easy. I mean they're really did handle this. Well and i thought for everything going on around him. I didn't think he was doing it for television. I felt like in that moment he was is he was in a situation where we really like the girl she was admitting this to him. It was definitely hard to probably process initially. He's going to be for anybody but then when he finally finally did start the process he said hey. I'm not going to give up on this yet. I still wanna see where this goes because demeer willing to see where this goes but let's not underestimate how big of a moment but this is in bachelor history. This is huge and we are excited. He almost here podcast to see how this plays out and see what kind of conversation this sparks <hes> <hes>. It's one of the first time it'd be confronted with with this type of topic and i want to hear your thoughts again. Emails please at the been nationally. I almost famous podcast. The the email address is nationally at iheartradio dot com right next topic kevin steps in this episode more. We've seen him yet. He has a lot of comments about blake especially revolve around the hand of jesus which we don't hear much from dylan. This episode stays quiet. The blake hannah drama with dylan does stay quiet for the episode. I hate that. I actually kind of enjoyed it for. Everybody involved literally. You always seem seem like every season you get the random guy in the corner of the random girl in the corner adding in their opinion on topics. They don't know much about and i felt like kevin was doing here he doesn't he doesn't really know these people. He hasn't been around a lot but yeah. He feels like it's his right to express what he's feeling rolling. I don't know at this point when it comes to blake. Maybe i'm alone in this but it's became such a massive topic here in the the u._s. and then also here in paradise that i wish people from the outside looking in we kinda stop sharing their opinion <hes> when it comes to being on the beach. It feels like something dylan. Hannah and blake need to figure out on their own at this point if not it just we're going to become a cluster. We saw that for example and i think i'm saying that because we see see this when too many people get involved in one thing we see issues arise and i think that's what happened with the christian klay nicole in in jordan snare but before we get there. Let's talk about this. Let's take a break and talk about one of our sponsors and we're back at the ron. Burgundy podcast season two baby carolina. Here is a pathological liar okay. So what does her brain like. I normally would disagree with this but i made a pact with iran earlier so y'all. Let's go with wendy. Brush your teeth but when whenever what else does on holidays and sometimes i forget i'm not perfect smell of your breath the smell of rare steak and aged whiskey. You know carolina. That doesn't bother me. You're bleeding a little bit for the back of your shirt that means it was a good waxing. They got the entire hair follicle. If you say i know so ron is how long has it been bleeding. It's been bleeding all night. Long should go cheap on waxing. I had to throw my sheets out. This is ron burgundy until next time. Don't use public restrooms. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio you up or wherever you find your podcasts in the montgomery county maryland courthouse there are thousands of pages of documents detailing the horrific murders orders of three innocent people to things from the early days of the investigation are clear. No one knew for sure who committed the murders but somehow. Tom had a theory about who engineered them soon as i heard the details i knew my dad was involved right away. We know it was lawrence horn. I mean i knew who else everybody knew. That lawrence horn was responsible but at the time of the murders lawrence horn was clear across the country watching tv in his los angeles home and he could prove prove it beyond a reasonable doubt. I'm jasmine morris from iheartradio and hit home media. This is hitman a new true crime podcast coming august fifteenth listen and subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts the second we're gonna bring on david rees who was was chicken man on his time during the bachelorette and then we also saw him fight with jordan in paradise and that's why we have on the podcast. He's a frequent guest but really think he's he's gonna relate to what kind of triggers people when it comes to jordan however before bring david on. I want to sit in this for a little bit. I wanna talk about a topic <hes> <hes> that happens here at paradise all the time. We saw it with our buddy deane <hes> two years ago. We're seeing it with dylan. This year you falling in love with a girl. You're falling in love with the guy and then you have to watch these. These people kiss others on the beach in front of you. It's it's it's hard to watch. I guarantee you. It's harder to live <unk> out. I mean anybody here in studio. Please add on but have you. There's a moment highschool for me. I'm gonna tell you story. There's a moment high school for me. I was dating a girl. I was a senior in high school. She he was a sophomore and we were dating for a long time. We had broken up at this point but we are only broken up about four days. It was very fresh and we just ended up at the same party and i walk into the party and she's on the couch kissing <hes> one of my buddies little brothers who was also a sophomore now and it it tore my a heart out like destroyed me and we were already broken up. I had no right to still be upset but it was still so hard to see and then your mind starts playing these games with you. My my question now is for anybody out there listening to the people in studio. How does dylan recover no matter how much hannah may be leans into him at this point says i made a mistake. I really care about you. You're the one for me how how in the world is he recovering after seeing his partner kissing somebody else so many times with multiple people in front of it. Oh no all i know is like it's obviously happened before you know jo and kendall and i just have faith that dylan can get over it but i if i was in dillon shoes i. I have no idea how i could get over it. I think oh just be like all right. I'm out. I'm heading outta here. Do not go just numb from that kind of thing in that situation you're right. Numbs probably the best word to use there. Isn't it just completely numb and probably sad completely crushed. We've all been there. I mean we've all felt that kind of crushing blow if you've been in a dating that's what love does right. That's what i love is so beautiful we can celebrate the good times but in the bad times make the good time she'll have much better but you just go numb you go cold and i don't know how dylan recovers a dylan dylan recovers from this. Let me you say this right now. If dylan recovers from this there's two things i'll take out of it one. He's a better man than i would ever be into. He cares about hannah like legitimately loves hannah but he sees his future with anna. If they come out of this together my bet will be that. They'll be together for a long time. Okay the question for you. You what's up so you're on the bachelorette. You saw caitlyn kiss other guys. How did you navigate that yes yeah so one of the famous stories is right. I was in san antonio and caitlyn stuck into the room that sean booth and i were sleeping in and she kissed sean in front of me in this room and ah was laying in the bed next to him and we laughed and it was numbing to me more confusing than anything else because we were just a few weeks in at this point and i didn't have the strong feelings for caitlyn. That dylan has for hand. I don't think i knew i like caitlin. I knew i was interested in kaylin. I wanted to be around there for multiple reasons for caitlyn but because the whole experience was still kind of <hes> you know i was infatuated with the idea of still being around there and building friendships and so this happened and i remember leaving the room the next morning and feeling kind of just weird and off in what happened that changed it is ready to go home and i told kaelin that hey this isn't for me anymore. I just feel like it's not right for me to be here. I don't know how this whole thing plays out but it just doesn't feel right from here and she said here's the thing yes. I'm into sean sean but i still am very interested in usa. Will you just stick stick around and give it a chance. I'm sorry for doing this in front of you and i said well that makes sense like let's give it a shot but it still hurt and the difference though is really. I think the feelings going into it. If i was in love with caitlin and this was happening next to me it would have destroyed me but because caitlyn i this point. We're still kind of exploring what was going to be happening and we're more friends ends in anything else that i didn't feel that rejected. Do you think that's why they kind of the last few weeks of the bachelor bachelorette. They kind of keep keep the contestants away from each other. Yeah yeah i i definitely do. I mean you have to because this happens in paradise is weird in the fact in the sense. We see this all the time every season. We see scenarios like this. There's not a lot of places to hide. It doesn't feel like i've never been down there but it doesn't seem like there's many places to hide i just can't i can't imagine it's got to be one of the hardest parts is watching. These people do this in front of you so i mean maybe the most interesting storyline to to me. <hes> i think demis up there <hes>. I also think that not the blake dillon hannah drama. It's more of how dylan hannah respond on now and how we're this relationship goes between them coming off of scenarios like this. I'm really interesting that moving on here. We have have to get in now to christian. Nicole jordan in clay never expected this to be something that we're watching on television. It feels like going to be one of the most dramatic storylines that we've ever seen somebody that can relate with these storylines is our next guest david rees. He's chicken man on his season of the bachelor. He comes on often and we're bringing them on the day just strictly to talk about what it's like to be in a feud with jordan because he's been there. He's done that and he's felt it it before david famous podcast once again buddy how you doing ma'am back always good to be here in cherokee ben. How're you doing so good man. David thanks for coming on. You are now dislike. Chris bukowski is the the guests at his came on bachelor in paradise bachelor bachelorette here at the most you have now been on almost famous podcast the most and we appreciate you every time for david. We're here for one reason that okay. I need you to go back to the less mature less good looking <hes> david a year ago okay and and let's why they dated law and less wise because dana david. You are one wise man now. You're studying still you're. You're such a smart dude. Let's talk a little bit about what it's like to be in a feud with jordan. I want you to you know if you saw this week. On the episode christian <hes> the newest member to bachelor in paradise <hes> <hes> comes in i would explain let me just break this down. The christian insurance i with david but christian comes in he's got swagger. He's good looking. I i'd say he definitely comes off as arrogant. <hes> definitely comes off that he <hes> he belongs there more than anybody else. I think right away we could tell that was going to get some of the trouble like a i think right away. We knew that there was something about christian. That was rubbing everybody the wrong way. If they would have seen things he was saying in doing but one thing he does does do is he spots nicole. I and he says the date nicole is really enjoying the attention. We don't blame her right. It's her time on paradise. You we know cleaner has a great thing going on <hes> but nicole is definitely enjoying the attention. That's coming on from the outside and christian though so is the one guy it's it's kind of sad for clay. I think in a sense because you have jordan kimball who you're familiar with david and then krishan to very polarizing figures coming onto the beach and taking the corner date. Neither of those figures are going to stay quiet for long but there's a certain christian jordan relationship they fought on mental christian was around sound like one night and he decided to kinda step out and have his moment during the tell all jordan and appreciate it anyways as you're watching this david. Whose side are you on. Come on clay side more than anyone you know. It's hard to take side in in jordan christian thing that they have going on but jordan takes place dot. I feel like jordan standing up for a friend there does he take it too far. Yeah it definitely <hes> you know. There's no reason to get physical there from what it looks like <hes> like you know he was really standing after clay after clay tried to best foot forward after nicole had said hey. I want you to be more aggressive. I want you to put yourself out. There and clay could literally just crush crush didn't and i feel like i literally just you know he gets picked the guy up in crush. 'em tom but that's not quite as a soft spoken guy. You know really really really super respectful. Michael jordan is just looking out for his friend there <hes> so i guess there's a cyber tickets definitely jordan and clay side <hes> i. I feel like christmas definitely arrogant. You know definitely stubborn comes in paradise thinking he's the king there and you know clearly nicole definitely had you know in <hes> charismatic moments with him and they definitely have chemistry. I think he just kind of the whole schick a little too far. And what do you think yeah. I mean i think so too. I think you make a great point. We've got to be on the clay side. I wanna know from you. David in anybody else wanted to chime in here. Am i off off or wrong. That christian really really started kind of irk me like right away. I just felt like there was something i'm thinking about him. I don't know him personally but he came in and right away. I was like my red flag was up. Look people that list the listeners out there. Please email us in and tweet us if that was the same same reaction you had but that was my reaction yeah. I was getting bad vibes immediately you know he he came in with a i feel like it was like really rehearse. Do you feel that like you came in with all these lines one liner like egypt like had a game plan coming in there and really just you know stuck to script that's like he had a script going into paradise inside all right. I'm going to say i'm going to say hey this and that's really what he did. He tried to execute his plan and <hes> it was almost like you're playing football or soccer player. It's almost like playing soccer. Danielle l. and eastern were either of you impressed with christian <unk> swagger vibe when he first came to the beach he definitely had slag not going to deny ah i was like this guy is cute but as soon as he started talking i was like oh no this guy's going to cause trouble <hes> and then the thing that really threw romy off is when he <hes> was when nicole and clay confronted them to try to take nicole away and there's this whole exchange between clay unchristian and things got heated and then christian was like nicole you pick and choose like okay well. I'm just gonna spend some time with clay and he was like oh okay. That's all i needed into here and like walked away and i'm like what is happening right now like this guy was just literally crushing klay with his words and then like nicole said oh no. I'm gonna spend some time with clay and he was like oh yeah koo koo koo bro. That's all i needed to know and gave like klay a handshake might this is so weird through that entire conversation rindge very odd decent racing. What do you think was christian at all impressive to. I mean he had swagger. He's a good looking guy but how quickly did that change in your mind when when christopher showed up. I didn't like that jordan was roasting singing for his shoes because they were cool. They were neck apor max's. Those are cool shoes. Somebody i feel bad for this guy but then two and a half minutes later the i wrote down this note saying christian shins sucks. I want to watch clay destroy him. I wanna see clay bickham over his head thrown into the ocean. I wanna see that i don't like her. She sucks yeah. I i agree. The shoes are great so back off. I actually had to google what kind of shoes jordan told me need to buy. Google them last night. There like toms shoes bright s._p. Drills which is like <hes> it's hard to explain but they're very like more female than than male a male aspel yeah but i mean no christian the one thing i will defend you on keep those vapor max's on their comfortable shoes like maybe not beach appropriate but they're cool. Hey and also i mean jordan has the thing about tennis shoes because earlier on i mean i remember him on the episode. He was kind of hitting on clay's white shoes on the beach. I think jordan is a question his fashioned one thing really quick pleased never thought david would say that he was team jordan and clay so yeah i mean jordan points a friend of mine and we put the whole thing behind us and obviously a good buddy of mine too so we're no water under the bridge point that i'd love to hear that you've spent some time david with clay in blake in denver here recently recently but besides that there's some pictures out there going around about that what is it about jordan that is so polarizing but also just makes hugh angry when you're on the beach with him for too long. I mean go back to that time. You're friends with him now but go back to the time when you wanted to take his pinata and throw it across the beach. What is it about. Jordan just irks you. I think he's just a very polarizing figure. <hes> you know i think he you know very a strong with his words and you know that could rub people the wrong way <hes> for good and for bad no i. I think once you get to know the guy you know you appreciate a <hes>. You know the quick wit and his funny and his sense of humor <hes> initially you know definitely rub people the wrong way and you know for me definitely rubbed me the wrong way. <hes> kinda came off as a little arrogant <hes> and just kind of like a know it all <hes> boy you know i feel like people don't know him. That's really how he comes off so <hes>. What did you know the guy you know. He's a teddy bear. He's he's great. He's just a funny guy overall so yeah i feel like that's going on with him and chris soda and <hes> obviously the physical altercation there about the the jordan will continue to be a polarizing figure on paradise. Here's my last question for you. David will we ever see back on that beach and then the second follow up to that. Would we ever gonna see jordan back on that beach if he doesn't make it past this week for me. Never say never but <hes> you know. I feel like i'm on to great things and the getting my m._b._a. Okay and <hes> you know make my way through business. Never say never i'm. I don't i'm single and you know when we give a shot anyway. I can't <hes> when i was first. Jordan goes i. I think he has a i think you'll end up seeing him back there at some point whether it's <hes> the beach and other show who knows i feel like this is. I feel like this is right up the dalai yeah. Hey sorry i lied to you. <hes> what would happen on the beach. Do you think if we've obviously seen it that it's an actual fight going on between them. Is there security around the like break those up. Do you think they'll be fighting for a while they will they have to go home. Do you know what happens when people actually like physically fight on that beach ya yeah so i mean if you remember last year <hes> leo and the leo altercation that <hes> at the cocktail party right before the roaster turn nonni leo and joe got into it and you know there is security there there producers around their security and you know you can't predict what's going to happen and you can't predict the fight but you can't be free judge if something's about to blow up their people around ready to jump in but <hes> if they can't get there quick enough to you know people are ready to go <hes> so we'll see obviously i would imagine you know any physical location no results in a van from the beach <hes> but i guess we'll have to see what happens. We'll see what happens. Hey dave thanks for coming on man. We appreciate it best of luck and they continued studies. You're the man that's degrees. Chicken man joined the podcast things. What an episode what a time to be alive. Paradise is moving and grooving. There's fights on the beach asia. There's relationships blossoming also relationships ending. If you have a quick recap of some of the things that we did not talk about this happen this week jordan and demi our friends am larry moment on the beach making fun of people. I don't know if that's ever as funny as what it feels like. It is at the time but those two we're going to cause havoc and that's what we love nicole and christian dating as we talked about clay's off to the side the rose ceremony has a cocktail party. I guess has started <hes> it was a to be continued episode because of the fight between jordan and christian j._p. Jay is reciting poems. Patia seems the work. I i mean it was a little smooth j. p._j. Has something that the rest of us do not have chris in katie are definitely i would say the most consistent couple right now impaired it is or the one that i think will make it the longest that's my bet and and as far as everything else goes blake hannah until trying to figure it all out there in demi are going to make things work even as jimmy admits that she is sexually fluid christina finally it has been said to be talking behind kaelin's back why kaelin pursues a relationship with dean calin feels slut shamed by christina and admits it in tears during this week's episode. Hey felt like a transition condition episode other than the fight. It felt like a lot of things that will continue to build <hes> next week. As we continue to watch. Finally we have a reader or listener email email every single time <hes> that we want to highlight its from eleusis analysts. What are your thoughts on setting up analyst and cam they both expressed a strong desire for marriage and children and i think there would be a great match. Let me know what you think. I think it's a great idea. I think it's a terrific idea. We've never been successful in almost famous podcast at setting up people. We've tried it with ashley before jared. We've tried it with a couple of our listeners. We've never done it successfully but this feels like something we can make happen danielle danielle eastern. Can we try to make this happen yeah. I'm here for leaf. I think they both can't catch a break him elise yeah. That is something eastern. That is something a eastern dale joining me today. Thanks for filling in for the ashley who is on her honeymoon. Hopefully not thinking about almost famous podcast. I appreciate guys thank you david. Thank you for coming on as well chicken can man join us to talk about everything bachelor in paradise and also his time studying right now to get his m._b._a. Hey eastern daniel in your phone my lead here with that. We'll talk to you next week. I've been i've been east in in this almost famous podcast later follow the nationally i almost famous podcasts on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts boom and we're back at the ron burgundy podcasts season two baby pressure team what we do. I brush not when everyone else does on holidays and sometimes i forget. I'm not perfect. This smell your breath bother you. I mean the smell of rare steak steak and aged whiskey no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio apps or wherever you find your podcasts.

Michael jordan nicole clay demi Nicole jordan dana david blake hannah david rees iheartradio derek erakat nicole partner dylan twitter jordan kimball Johnny dean ron burgundy ashley dina caitlyn dylan dylan
Christian Atheists?

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:20 min | 10 months ago

Christian Atheists?

"Remember all those Popular Atheists Dismiss Christianity. Because it was so bad for the world will a new crop seemed very close to saying it's been so good for the world it might actually be true for the Colson Center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point. Last week actor John Rees Davies best known for playing the Dwarf Gimli and the Lord of the Rings Films gave a strong defense for Christianity speaking to the Christian post from the red carpet at the movie guide awards Rees Davies said. We seem to forget that Christian civilization has made the world a better place. We Owe Christianity the greatest data. Thanks that generation can ever have. He went on crediting it. For the ideas of religious liberty free speech and Individual Rights Rees Davies who recently started in an animated adaptation of Pilgrim's progress and is the lead in an upcoming biopic of Saint. Patrick said that he often finds himself sticking up for Jesus and his line of work. The strange part of this whole story is that rees. Davies is a self professed rationalist and skeptic not a Christian yet. He's still able to see how the faith of Christ church is author. Alvin J SMITH PUT. It changed the world for the. Better Rees. Davies. Is just one of many skeptics atheists and secularists of late? Who reject the rhetoric of Richard Dawkins Sam Harris and recognize the immense? Good that the Gospel has done for the world whereas the so called. New Atheists slandered Christianity for being backward and poisonous a new crop of unbelievers. See it as beneficial beautiful. Maybe even in some limited sense true take. Douglas Murray British journalist political commentator and author of the new book the madness of crowds though a self professed non-believer and gay Man Murray admits to admiring Christianity in the positive role it played and building Western civilization. He has even labeled himself somewhat tongue in cheek. A Christian atheist and a recent dialogue with Christian writer Esta Riley on the unbelievable podcast Murray praise Christianity's revolutionary moral insights such as the command to love and forgive your enemies the more atheist on these things. He confessed the more. We might have to accept the sanctity of human life as a Judeo Christian notion which might very easily not survived the demise of Judeo Christian civilization but even more than recognizing Christianity's usefulness Murray sees the faith as meaningful describing a trip. He took last year to the Sea of Galilee. Admitted that he couldn't stop thinking that as he put it. Something happened here. Murray was one of several Christ haunted unbelievers that were discussed on a recent break point. Podcast conversation between Shane. Morris and Esther early and addition to a recent interaction with Murray O'Reilly also contributed to an upcoming book about clinical psychologist Jordan. Peterson another who has articulated a strong respect for Christianity from the perspective of non belief and according to a Riley skeptics admitting to the Christian faith positive influence on history. Well that's only the headline of the story. Although we'd also be remiss if we didn't include the recent Book Dominion by Tom Holland as yet another example a rally thinks that under the surface spiritual truth is being found too much like the skeptics. Cs Lewis described in his essay entitled. Myth became fact Lewis Himself a convert from atheism. Wrote a man who disbelieved the Christian story is fact but continually Fed on it as myth would perhaps be more spiritually alive than the one who ascended to it as fact but did not think much about it with a Riley. We hope that the flame of myth and meaning fans into full blown belief for these guys that they'll come to see Christianity as the place. Where the hearts deepest longings and deepest intuitions about what is good connect with the minds deepest understanding of what is true after all no one belief could survive that moment just as CS Lewis. Ketchikan Morris's conversation with Esther O'Reilly on the break point. Podcast you can find it at breakpoint dot org or by subscribing to the breakpoint podcasts. For breakpoint I'm John Stonestreet.

John Rees Davies Murray O'Reilly John Stonestreet Esta Riley Cs Lewis Douglas Murray Ketchikan Morris Esther O'Reilly Colson Center Man Murray Richard Dawkins Sam Harris Rings Films Alvin J SMITH Sea of Galilee Patrick writer Pilgrim Shane Tom Holland Peterson
NPR News: 03-29-2020 7AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 8 months ago

NPR News: 03-29-2020 7AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Joel Snyder. President trump is backing off a threat to block travel out of New York New Jersey and Connecticut. Npr's Scott detro- has more on Saturday. President Trump announced he was considering issuing a quarantine order for the northeast states. Hit hardest by the corona virus that was news to the governors of New York New Jersey. Who said despite recent conversations with the president his public statement was the first they had heard of the possible move. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo questioned whether trump had the legal power to even do so hours later the president tweeted that he was asking the CDC to quote issue. A strong travel advisory for the states and that a quarantine wasn't necessary. Several other states are requiring people arriving from New York to self quarantine for fourteen days Scott. Npr News Washington in northeast. Arkansas officials say the situation would be much different if not for the restrictions in place because of the corona virus a powerful tornado ripped through the town of Jonesboro this weekend officials say several businesses including a mall and hundreds of homes were damaged. Six people suffered minor injuries. Jonathan Rees is with member station K. Asu On a typical Saturday afternoon. The mall at Turtle Creek would have thousands of shoppers but the mall has been closed over the past several days due to concerns of Kovic nineteen. The mall took a direct hit of strong tornadoes. Saturday hundreds of homes were either damaged or totally destroyed. Half of the city's electric infrastructure was severely damaged with some expected to be out of power. This week the Arkansas National Guard is helping with security and enforcing citywide curfews. That are in effect through at least Monday night. Jonesboro Herald Parent says. Few injuries have been reported and no deaths. He attributes such low casualty rate to people staying home due to covert nineteen concerns for NPR news. I'm Jonathan Reeves in Jonesboro compared to other countries hit by the corona virus. Germany has a low mortality rate among patients who test positive but the head of the German Federal Agency responsible for Disease Control Warns. The country's health system could still face strain similar to those in Italy. Bbc's Damien McGuinness has more on. What Germany's numbers reveal about? The spread of the disease although Germany has one of the highest rates infections in the world. The death toll is still relatively low now. That's mainly because Germany carries out a lot of testing for the virus. So that means that people who don't have any symptoms or have few symptoms are also tested. Now what that indicates is not necessarily that. Germans are recovering better or in any way Batra dealing with the virus at all. It means is elsewhere in other countries where there is less testing. The actual infection rate is much higher than we know the BBC's Damien McGuinness reporting you're listening to NPR news to Spain. Now where the cabinet of Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez is meeting today. To approve. Stricter lockdown measures because of the corona virus. Pedro announced the moves yesterday and also urge the European Union to come up with a united economic and social strategies Spain. The second worst affected country in Europe after Italy the government reported more than eight hundred thirty new corona virus deaths overnight in Australia. The rate of daily confirmed Krono. Virus infections has been cut in half in recent days but the government today asked Australians to isolate themselves. Further officials are limiting public gatherings to just two people and urging Australians to remain inside New Zealand meanwhile saw its first death today. Canada's top soldiers put the country's military on a war footing as it prepares to fight the corona virus pandemic Dan Carpet Chuck reports a directive. A five page letter to the troops Canada's chief of defence staff general. Jonathan Vance ordered his troops to stay healthy and be ready to respond if and when they are called into action due to the pandemic van said military commanders of Repairing Kovic Nineteen Response Forces. That will be deployed as required. He also acknowledged that units could be called upon to deal with natural disasters such as floods at the same time as the pandemic Vance added that overseas missions will be scaled back. The two hundred Canadian military trainers due to return from Ukraine. Next month will be replaced by only sixty. He also ordered members returning from overseas to be quarantined at home for fourteen days. Vans added that the primary mission for all personnel in Canada is to stay healthy and be ready for NPR news. I'm Dan Carpenter Chuck in Toronto. And I'm Joel Snyder in Washington.

Germany President Trump NPR New York New Jersey Npr Jonesboro Joel Snyder Canada Jonathan Vance Damien McGuinness Scott detro New York NPR Npr Italy Bbc Jonathan Rees president Australia Washington
20 Minute Movie Review: " A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood."

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

19:51 min | 1 year ago

20 Minute Movie Review: " A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood."

"In Mr Rogers I'm here to interview is so nice to me. They found Mr Rogers Challenge. This piece will be furnished. Furnish about heroes. Do you consider yourself a hero for we are truly to get the borough delays blaze dealing with feelings. My things you can do. He can play all the lowest keys on a piano at the same time he loved. Broken people like me intangibly to ask some I. The best thing we can do is to let each one of them is precious. Welcome to the Monday morning critic. podcast today is the very first installment of a segment. I am calling the twenty minute movie review where no review will exceed twenty minutes. Some it might be ten semi p fifteen so might be twenty on the nose but I promise you this not one will exceed twenty minutes. So it'll give you a great idea of what to see every weekend Dan because I'm at the theaters every weekend or I see you know I'll double up on one weekend but I usually average about one movie weekend and hopefully my insight it would give you the information you need to either see a movie not see it but either way give you a general sense of what the movie's about you know without giving you spoilers or without without giving you you know stars or thumbs up or down or with their movies fresher. It's raw in or giving you graves or letter grades aides or percentages or numbers out of ten. Whatever the same stuff that's been beat to death by movie critics for over sixty seventy years? You know enough offers enough. I'm just going to give you an idea of what I think of. What the movie's about the basic plotline? And you can make a decision yourself whether or not and I won't insult your intelligence eligible for the score. I'll lay out for you. You decided this movie you WanNa see. You're not and I'm going to tell you the very first one is very appropriate because this is a movie that exceeds numbers and ratings and Stars and in the movie is a Beautiful Day in the neighborhood directed by Marielle Heller starring. Tom Hanks Matthew Rees and Chris Cooper you know the plot or the summary of the story is. It's the movies based on the friendship between Fred Rogers and journalists in in the movie that journalists. His name is Lloyd Vogel in Real Life. The man's name is Tom June. It after Judy was asked or Loyd Vogel was asked to write A. You know a profile profile on Fred Rogers the whole movies about you know his his profile on Fred Rogers. A lot of it is and I'll use the characters name even the movie. You know the the man's real name in real life. Is Tom June in the movie. His name is Lloyd Vogel. So loyd is asked to write this piece on Mr Rogers basically because has no one else can stand Lloyd Vogel because he's very negative. He's very cynical. He's very glass half empty. He's asked to write this piece about Fred Rogers and we starts meeting Fred Rogers for the first few times. He can't get over like this has to be an act. Nobody can possibly be this kind. No one can possibly be this. Good Royd no no one can possibly have a heart of gold like this cannot exist and he has to get over that skepticism. While and I think this is where the movie is a a little different than what people think. I think most people believe you know. It's a movie from start to finish about Fred Rogers life. That's a little true but it's really not that type type of movie. It's a movie that centers around the relationship between low Lloyd Vogel in his family. But it's also a movie that centers around Fred Rogers in his his importance in what he lived by. So it's a combination of two. I think some people are GonNa go into this thinking. Oh this is Tom. Hanks and Fred Rogers which it is. But not as much as you would think and and I think that works for this movie and I read a couple of you know critics over the weekend that said or or during the week that said you know The movie could use more Fred. Rogers Gers and more Tom Hanks in it. I don't know I think when you see Fred Rogers in the movie. You know obviously played by Tom. Hanks I think that makes it more special. Because it's not diluted did with okay nonstop Fred Rogers. When he makes an appearance it really is symbolic? It really is powerful. And you'll see that when you see the movie and I think they Marielle Heller did a really legally job of that of of really just kind of looking at the movie and saying you know and I love the little things about this movie. You know when you Wash Beautiful Day in the neighborhood the the Mr Mr Rogers had his show. Everything was these like toy. I WANNA say Lego but like these models that were build up to scale these little scale houses cars. The whole movie is like that in between scenes. If Louis Vogel is flying somewhere they use a toy plane in the air. The runway is made of everything is toys and and I love how she did that I love. She did a great job of really putting this together. And I mentioned just like I said that the combination of how she decided to portray Fred Rogers. I I really think it. It made it more powerful. I think it was a really unique blend and way of of looking at Fred's life. It's a really powerful because Lloyd is not going to say too much because I don't WanNa ruin a free. BELOIT is really upset with his father and it's his it's the conversations the rapport with Fred. Rogers that really set this movie apart. you know And I've I've had two guests from Mister Rogers neighborhood one of which is David Newell who plays as Mister mcfeely and then Francois Clements who played the police officer. And that's a whole other little surprised movie than touch on that. because Mr Mr Rogers had a bit he did a lot of monumental things one of which was we had an African American police officer on the show in the two who of them share this wonderful rapport and there's a scene with with a little kiddy pool awake a little kids pool And they both kind of just dip their feet in there and this is real life like this is not the movie and I wish they had included that I really felt like but but the way she directed the movie. I don't I don't see how that would have where she would have done that. Just based on the tempo and tone one of the movie but in real life. If you guys get a chance Google that it's a really phenomenal and I think there's clips on Youtube. It's pretty impressive moment. So I've had Francoist francoist clemens on the show. I've had David Newell guys want to see that this interview all interviews and the reviews are available at M. C. podcast dot com. It's Monday morning critic podcast. But it's M. C. PODCAST DOT COM for any interview I've ever done. I think you'll enjoy. What have up there but yeah I really love this movie? A Don't get right into it too like I said I read reviews that people were disappointed because they felt that there wasn't enough mister Rogers. I think there's just enough and I don't know when I'm watching thing this movie. I'm like I don't know how much of it is. Because it's Tom. Hanks playing Mr Rogers so you have to legends. That are kind of like a lot of ways so I don't think any other actor would have done the justice that Tom Hanks. Because you're an off. How Great Tom Hanks's but you're also an all that there's this guy? They lived his life trying to make children's lives better. So you're kind of in like this. It's like a I don't know what you would call it. Positive this the two wonderful souls goals that are good human beings and one is portraying the other. It's for me that's all. I kept thinking you because Hank's is amazing. I always feel like Tom. Hanks channels calls the people. He's portraying he doesn't just portrayed them like other actors I feel like he channels them he is them and the kindness and there's so many scenes. There's a scene in a restaurant that you're gonNA love. There's a scene where it's just it's one captivate and they're just seeing that the end of the movie just will absolutely take your breath away whatever's left anyway because I do believe this. It's pretty hard to make a movie mister Rogers and fail. Let's be honest but I'm GonNa tell you right now. This movie hits on all cylinders and and I really hope people see Hellers vision and how she directed this movie. That's the big thing in the movie touch. It does touch even though it didn't have France while clemens on does touch Japan some of the big moments in Fred Rogers life when he appears front of Congress. Great if you've seen the documentary or that's another thing that you can watch on Youtube when he appears on the Arsenio Hall show another awesome appearance you just. You never think that there's going to be another man like this because nowadays if you have somebody like Fred Rogers people be like what's he really want. Why is he really spending time with these kids? What is wrong with him is there? I wonder what is true. Motivations nations are. That's the way society is today. That's how skeptical it is. That's how a that people would never accept the Fred Rogers today because they wonder what his true intentions things are. I have to be very honest. You know I'm watching this movie is I'm blown away by hanks and I'm blown away by Fred Rogers. I'm going to tell you this. The one thing that he reminds me of is to be an altar when I was younger believe it or not. Yes but it tells me that. They don't believe but I used to be an ultra boy right and these horrible priests priests have ruined this wonderful genuine. Re Poor that altar boys used to have with Prese right. He's awful appreciated about the news that abuse their privileged religiously abused their position. Much like other professions. Right you read about priests and the connections that they've had with with children and they've abused abused it but I'm GonNa tell you on the other side of that. There's so many priests that didn't abuse. It spent their lives trying to get through to kids much like Mr Rogers I. I have a priest that I used to go. Go to church. I don't go much anymore. I I'm hopefully still looking for faith right. I'M NOT GONNA say that I'm Agnostic I'm not gonNA say that an atheist but I'm still looking for faith and I think I'm currently watching the crown on Netflix. which is I think? Now my favorite show and I'm and I usually have about ten to fifteen if not twenty shows in my Rolodex. The decks of shows that I watch on on a loop and I've been watching the crown absolutely love season three. And that's that's A. That's a conversation for another time. But one of the episodes Philip. Philip is talking to his mother Queen. Alice talk about a special person. Youtube or Google Queen. Alice when you get the chance. She's absolutely amazing. Talk about a wonderful life. Live very similar and a Fred Rogers and a lot of ways but they talk about the concept of faith like I said I'm not religious but she makes a point to her son. It's important that you have faith in something. It's important that you develop faith if for nothing else for your head for your heart. It's just such a moving thing. Thank right and I have to say that in this movie Fred. Rogers does a lot of that. Same thing he doesn't he I believe he does mention God on a few occasions and he talks about praying and he clearly fred Rogers spiritual and religious but I think what I took away from that. I think it's important. I think that the wonderful things that religion bring to the table kindness for others. Forgive this and believe me. There's some people my life I will never forget. There's snakes in my life that I cannot forgive. But that's my flaw. The correct way would be to live by the way Fred Rogers did live by the way Queen Alliston with with kindness in your heart forgiveness in your heart and there's a scene where Fred Rogers talks about forgiveness and he says you know that's letting somebody go of the anger you have tourism it just captures a nells it. And then there's another scene where where he talks about being a hero where where Loyd Voegel asked him about being a hero and I'll play that little clip for you now and then we'll finish the review on the other side. I consider yourself a hero. I don't think of myself as a hero. No not at all what Mr Rogers is he. Here I don't understand the question. Well there's you and there's the character you play Mr Rogers and I have to say that's the only time in the whole movie where I feel like if there's anger at all and there's none but if there's any type of anger boiling I feel it. was there in that scene with Fred Rogers because Lloyd was basically calling him out and saying you know this thing you do fred Rogers. That's an act that somebody you bring to the table when it's time to fill in the show. Then you go back to being Fred Rodgers and I think what makes Mr Rogers. One of the most special people in the history of humanity is that he is Mr Rogers Twenty twenty four seven. That's who he is Fred. Rogers is Fred Rogers. He's a beacon of kindness. He's this wonderful soul that will never ever be duplicated. And you can say the same about Tom Tom Hanks. But that's what makes it really special and that seems awesome and it's just the skepticism that Louisville brings. I think a lot the people had about Mister Rogers and I think we look at it at two thousand nineteen. We look back in our rear view mirrors and it's it's he's there he was the real deal and it's great to because the there used to be rumors when I was a kid growing up that you know Mr Rogers was the navy seal and he was in the Marines and they bring that up in the movie a little bit and it's he kind of laughs it off a dismisses it and it's obviously not true but it's just it's awesome. How this movie was put together? I cannot reiterate that enough it just so really really well done. And and that's the whole thing with Fred. Rogers is what you see is what you get. It's it's how he delivers. And there's so many scenes of when he just sits there and he cares for children and he just talks to children spend time talking to adults. You know and there's a scene where you know talks about you know you you help heal broken people like me and every answer the one thing that one of the things. I took away one of the many things. That's what he's every reply. Every answer that Tom. Hanks gives us Fred. Rogers Rogers is the perfect reply. And it's the reply that you know you would have gotten out of out of Fred Rogers. And that's what makes it so very special. But anyway he's going on a tangent a little bit back about priests and altar boys and when I was an altar boy eight a priest named Father Ray and he's still alive today and he did all those kind things that Fred Rogers visit people talk to people sit with people show up at their house the other just these kind acts for no no other reason but because he's kind because he's a good soul because it's it's the moral and right thing to do you talk about oftentimes watch watch animal planet or these other shows. We talk about endangered species. It's the Fred Rogers of the world. The endangered species. It's the father. Raised the world of the endangered species. That's what we're missing in the world. That's what we need you know. Forget these politicians of both sides. I think they're helping us. Just go out and do it Koala and help people. Aw that's the thing and I'm definitely trying to. He my own advice and he'd be what you know the way you know Fred Rogers lived and the way in my personal life father live to. It's just a good soul to people reminds me dead on of Mister Rogers and we all have that person in our lives. That reminds you Mr Rogers. Maybe not one hundred percent but certainly only the kindness going above and beyond. Because it's just simply the right thing to to without personal gain. That's what makes it so special. That's what I bring up. When I was an altar boy and I and I was an ultra under fathering? He reminded me so much of red. Rogers just being kind for the sake of being kind and I was thinking when I was watching this movie I had a lot of thoughts to get through my head one of which is you know. I'm I'm psyched about. Star Wars coming up the rise of Skywalker and those are the podcast and regular basis. You Know How much I love star wars kindness in goodness in morality remind me of the force for those familiar with Star Wars. Some people in Star Wars are blessed with a lot of the force. Start Vader Yoda. They're very powerful force. But it's how they choose to use it. Some people have a little bit of the force. Some people have a lot of it and and I feel the forest can be translated or transfer into kindness. It'd be the same thing a Lotta people. Haven't they choose to use it and all the right ways people choose to be kind people choose to go ahead and be the opposite. Just be horrible. People people make that choice and I think the struggle with life is trying to figure out ought to be kind on a more frequent basis and believe me. This is advice. I'm trying to adhere to so yeah I just think that's what makes this so special. And that's all I keep thinking about about. Was We choose to be who we are and Fred. Rogers chose to dedicate a whole life to others to being kind to choosing the road. Less traveled traveled. This movie is a love letter to Fred. Rogers I mean there's no question that Marielle Heller and all the cast the people involved I mean this is this movie is a love letter to Mister Rogers. And that's what's GonNa hit with audiences that's why people are GonNa love it so much. It's it's thank you. It's a love letter. It's like a time. I machine back to your childhood for so many reasons. You'RE GONNA love this movie not GonNa Break Down with plot points or writing or get technical with it just go see it. You'll love it. I'm telling you I mean. The movie speaks for itself the trailer which you hear a lot about you heard a little of the intro. You're GonNa Absolutely love this movie and I gotTa tell you what made it more special for me and this is always my dream scenario because average about one or two movies a week. As I mentioned the beginning. When I walked into the theater I went on? I think he was late late Thursday night and there are. Everyone thinks. This movie's coming on Friday. So I walk in the theater and WANNA buy my ticket. The woman says you're the only person that theater I'm like what I was. ESTATICALLY my dream scenario. Every time I go see a movie I mean once in a while somebody will send me a screener when I had a guest on on a show but walking into a theater and having the whole theater yourself. It's like finding a Unicorn I'm going to tell you I was in there and And I'm looking to my left link to my right and I'm like is this really happening. And there's Times where this happens and in the last second the worst the person in the world shows a break that we all we all see those movie hours right. I WanNa Talk Non stop throughout the movie to wants to bring a crying baby in the movie but the movie starting to roll whole and nothing. I'm like I have the whole theater to myself. This is my dream scenario. I have the theater myself which is always my dream. I'm watching Tom in Hank's portray Fred Rogers. I've got my tall diet coke in my small popcorn. I mean this life get any better. It is so hard not to be romantic about the movies ace. The movie is called a Beautiful Day in the neighborhood starring. Tom Hanks Matthew Rees and Chris Cooper this concludes the first episode of the Twenty Minute Movie Review. Thank you for listening.

Rogers Rogers Fred Rodgers Tom Tom Hanks Mr Rogers Twenty Lloyd Vogel Rogers Gers Mister Rogers Marielle Heller Tom June WANNA Youtube Loyd Voegel Francoist francoist clemens Google Dan Hank Louis Vogel Chris Cooper David Newell Matthew Rees