30 Burst results for "Reema"

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

"Name is chung show carney associated professor and the southwest johnson university in trump province in china. And can you tell me a little bit about your specific research areas. What do you study my research areas. Congress daytime my machine learning and data analytics gender most specifically focused on forecasting demand focusing in retail and time series focused sich of sees. So the main pay for. I asked you on to discuss. Today is wire arena and serena or s arema not sufficient. You'd mentioned you have a good background in machine learning. I don't necessarily think of a reema as a machine learning technique. How do these two areas fit together in your mind. Actually because the site focused teams all problems and can be served by machinery and when the approached this focusing problem with fines and attorney time service models are very important solutions to forecast team problems. Other side focused is very important in today's areas because you're low many many data so always Focused in problem. We find penser is very important and we also find iron man. Sarah map and armagh. Those are very classic. Run divided news time service motives and when we do couldn't this i remind saruman model. We're fans than actually the classical extre nation or classical. Modern for iran. serena is northern sufficient sarichichekli. Either way actually approach. I remember sarim from elisa angle which is spectral lenzi's digital delivery and in your system theory so we use elisa angle to do countries a romance. I remember motive defines onto loads dench a sufficient from the rich porno view. So this is the whole ground

Southwest Johnson University Carney Chung Penser Sarah Map Congress China Saruman Sarim Elisa Angle Lenzi Serena Iran Elisa
"reema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"reema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is marketplace. I'm Reema raise. Okay, so we're going to take a look at one sign of a recovering economy last year when the pandemic hit a lot of college students took a step back from school. An enrollment plummeted. But some early reports from administrators and experts suggest that things may be turning around this fall. In Maine, lots of new students are coming from out of state folks craving stability. After an unstable year. Maine Public Radio's Robbie Feinberg has that story. Our next stop is going to be the gym and I know we have a hockey player on the tour. So that is our ice arena is Olympic size Ice arena On a sunny afternoon, University of Southern Maine senior Fantasia Perez leads a small group of interested high schoolers on a tour of the colleges, tree lined campus. Classes ended in May, but she's been busy ever since. Showing off the school to prospective students. Perez talks up her favorite spots from dorms and dining halls to the steep hill that's used for sledding in the winter. With that being said. I will like, say, I will warn you. There are trees, you know, just don't fled into the trees in recent years close to 90% of the students here have come from within main. But over the past few months, early deposits from out of state students are up by nearly a third across the States University system. Perez has seen that two. We've had people from Alabama, California. I think I've sent letters to students all over the country, really. The school says all that interest now has the college on track to boast the largest freshman class in its history this fall. It's a somewhat surprising trend, especially after a year in which college enrollment fell by nearly 4% nationwide. And David Hawkins, with the National Association for College Admission Counseling says expectations for this fall weren't much better. The bar was set so low that there was so much pessimism. But Hawkins says this year early deposit numbers nationwide suggest that enrollment may bounce back. There does seem to be some optimism at the college level that students are returning that the yield numbers the numbers of students who accepted offers of admission. Are fairly healthy this year, which which is surprising a lot of institutions and, frankly surprising us as well. In Maine University officials say they ramped up outreach efforts last year to reach new students. And University Chancellor Dana Malloy says the state was also boosted by generally low covid 19 numbers, which enabled universities to remain open last year while colleges and many other states state remote that worked in our favor, and it told the story that you know that main in general was doing a good job and that we were ready to be responsive Administrators note that the numbers aren't final and could change before the first day of classes. But in Maine officials say that if the trend continues, it could bring more young working age people into a state with the oldest median age in the country. Eva Martino from New York will be an incoming freshman at the University of Southern Maine. She says she could definitely see herself staying in the quieter confines of the state after college. But for now, she's just happy to know that she'll be seeing her teachers and classmates in person next fall. Did pretty much my entire senior year online. With the exception of, I think like five weeks we had in person, and Martin O says after a year and a half of remote high school classes. The last thing she wants is another here online in Gorham, Maine. I'm Robbie Feinberg for Marketplace. So we are going to stick with the young people beat for a little longer, but now we're going halfway across the world to Thailand. Young people in Thailand have already faced three economic crises. Two military coups. And a number of natural disasters, and now they are facing the fallout from a pandemic that's put their economy on life support in one area that's really taking a hit is tourism and makes up 1/5 of Thailand's income. Thai authorities are hoping to open borders to vaccinated tourists. But right now the country is dealing with its worst wave of the pandemic. So what now for millions of young people who depend on this industry to survive? The BBC's Laura Becker reports from the island of Phuket. Warm Azura waves still rumble over the golden sands of Paquette. The only living souls on the beach are straight dogs searching for washed up scraps. Normally in this bitch is Don't be is very popular. But look at this now. There's no people 25 year old. He was just wanna.

David Hawkins Eva Martino Robbie Feinberg Laura Becker Maine Hawkins Perez Thailand New York National Association for Colle Martin O University of Southern Maine Paquette May Phuket last year 19 numbers BBC 1/5 90%
"reema" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 2 months ago

"reema" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Marketplace. I'm Reema raise. Okay, so we're going to take a look at one sign of a recovering economy last year when the pandemic hit. A lot of college students took a step back from school and enrollment plummeted. But some early reports from administrators and experts suggest that things may be turning around this fall. In Maine, lots of new students are coming from out of state folks craving stability. After an unstable year. Maine Public Radio's Robbie Feinberg has that story. Our next stop is going to be the gym and I know we have a hockey player on the tour. So that is our ice arena is Olympic size Ice arena On a sunny afternoon, University of Southern Maine senior Fantasia Perez leads a small group of interested high schoolers on a tour of the colleges, tree lined campus. Classes ended in May, but she's been busy ever since. Showing off the school to prospective students. Perez talks up her favorite spots from dorms and dining halls to the steep hill that's used for sledding in the winter. What that being said. I will like, say, I will warn you. There are trees, so you know, just don't fled into the trees in recent years close to 90% of the students here have come from within Maine. But over the past few months early deposits from out of state students are up by nearly a third across the States University system. Perez has seen that two We've had people from Alabama, California. I think I've sent letters to students all over the country. Really, the school says all that interest now has the college on track to boast the largest freshman class in its history this fall. It's a somewhat surprising trend, especially after a year in which college enrollment fell by nearly 4% nationwide. And David Hawkins, with the National Association for College Admission Counseling, says expectations for this fall weren't much better. The bar would set so low, but there was so much pessimism. But Hawkins says this year early deposit numbers nationwide suggest that enrollment may bounce back. There does seem to be some optimism at the college level that students are returning that the yield numbers the numbers of students who accepted offers of admission, um, are fairly healthy this year, which which is surprising a lot of institutions and, frankly surprising us as well. In Maine University officials say they ramped up outreach efforts last year to reach new students and university Chancellor Dannel Malloy says the state was also boosted by generally low covid 19 numbers, which enabled universities to remain open last year while colleges and many other states stayed remote that worked in our favor, and it told the story that you know that main in general was doing a good job and that we were ready to be responsive Administrators note that the numbers aren't final and could change before the first day of classes. But in Maine officials say that if the trend continues, it could bring more young working age people into a state with the oldest median age in the country. Eva Martino from New York will be an incoming freshman at the University of Southern Maine. She says she could definitely see herself staying in the quieter confines of the state after college. But for now, she's just happy to know that she'll be seeing her teachers and classmates in person next fall. I did pretty much my entire senior year online. With the exception of I think like five weeks.

David Hawkins Eva Martino Robbie Feinberg Maine Perez Hawkins National Association for Colle New York five weeks May Dannel Malloy University of Southern Maine last year 90% Alabama, California Reema two next fall this year Maine University
Clubhouse Promises to Fill in Security Gaps Following Breach

Techmeme Ride Home

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Clubhouse Promises to Fill in Security Gaps Following Breach

"Clubhouse has announced that it has added security safeguards and banned a user after some clubhouse audio and meta data from clubhouse rooms was found on a third party website quoting bloomberg an unidentified user was able to stream clubhouse audio feed this weekend from multiple rooms into their own third party. Website said reema. Bonna say a spokesman for clubhouse while the company says it's permanently banned at that particular user and installed new safeguards to prevent a repeat researchers contend. The platform may not be in a position to make such

Reema Bonna Bloomberg
"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

"Child's daily life. Your child is completely learning and going to school fine. And you know it's minor. It's it's not something to say. Oh my god my child. is you know itching. Because they have a sweater on something. I need to be concerned with. I know i'm super aware. And hyper aware of anywhere under the armpit address. I'd like sequence under the all itchy and it gives you a whole rat. Just know that as long as it's not impacting daily life. As long as it's not impacting their daily lives. They can still function. they're okay. You know then right fine. Don't all the fled remiss. page nine. i put him in. Wool has to be something the child from well. If you're gonna flood reimeas page move. We can find her page for this amazing book. Worst of i love that. The cover is super colorful diverse characters. Wasilla look and see someone who potentially looks like damn boy or girl. Oh my goodness. I love that. This is to your son to three boys to so tell everybody. Oh my do moment that is thought about it because i remember well about used to real quick We we're in a temporary situation and putting it out there. This is in the interim as much as we need grace. We need to give our children grace. Give them a space to feel as if they can be themselves and in being. I think that really brings us down to the core of then assessing what potentially may be a deficit or behavioral issue or a sensory issue. Whatever the case may be but just really trying to clock in as a parent and see. Okay what exactly maybe triggering this is this. Just something temporary. Like the time that we're in because of the situation that we're in we're children aren't home is something that will likely go back to normal once we have our normal back so just give our children greece as much as we would expect that as adults because i feel like sometimes as parents or as adults. We tend to be like bullet. Still do that but you know giving our kids orders all the time where if we just kind of take that back and just say you know what honey. I understand that this is like really strange situation that we're in. I would love for you to be in school with your friends. I would love for you to have this particular you know playroom or classroom setting Just letting them yeah and then moving from there as it is a huge change for them and realizing as much as it's affecting you really really them that is where i'm just trying to keep it together. Okay all right rima. So dr raymond naive. Tell everyone where they can find you. They can find your book the This is the first book in a series and it's called the adventures of senzo kids and it's basically the kids who are four sensory characters that represent the sensory systems. We work with and they're like mini. Ot's so the we basically educate parents on the senses and then we have the story. This one is focused. On the tactile sense of a child who's having a hard time adequately processing tactile information and how she calls on the sense of kids they magically appear and they pretty much do activities. We would do in the clinic but home based activities. Oh this doesn't doesn't. She looked just so they call dr reema to that sober. She calls sense okay. she's pretty much the narrator and she starts off basically explaining what the census are then. We go into introducing the sense. Oh kids so you know who the sense are and then we go into the story. This is very in depth. I love it so already. And at the end there's a two parent teacher education page which explains in a little more complicated language What the character in the story was dealing with and how the sense of kids helped her and why those activities were helpful for her. The first the first is the touch sense. And then we're going to come out with more on the stabler and the pope and the other sense it's a little bit more education. A census found out about today today years old social media at ot studios la fabulous out. You got all the tea right there. All right now and be sure to find us on social media. Y'all that ask the podcast on instagram. And could eat. I am i am devout. And if you're listening on apple podcast be sure to rate review and subscribe.

Wasilla dr raymond dr reema greece stabler la instagram apple
"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

07:23 min | 9 months ago

"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

"I we back. I went and paid my bills. I went and stripped too. So i can hold it no cover whatever. The lack is names. meet me right cleveland. You did something strange for a little change to spend money back now. We gotta listen. Let his like. I said before we have remained with a dr mike. Bennett school for maggie. Anybody can go to school for nine years. He deserves to be called. Did it felt like all right. So we are back with dr ni Rename we're going to answer these listener letters. We have one today. I'm going to start reading out loud. I am a married mom. I mean she is with two sons and a daughter ages seven through twelve. Even when school was operating normally advocating for our children could be very difficult now with virtual learning. What tips would you have for parents on. How to best advocate for your child and ensure that their needs are being met rima. Rima loves to advocate for x and x is only eight months especially advocate especially when they are a creative active child. That loan best do creative and in person. How do we advocate for these children during this high. I mean i would suggest contacting reaching out to the schools. I know that it's difficult. I know it's hard but reaching out to them and just advocating for you know any kind of aid or any kind of help that you can get within the home system. I do know of some parents who have been able to get help. Is this locally. Is this from calif. She doesn't say exactly but if if they are in california then yeah. I believe that there are ways to go around it. I know it's difficult. I know the school district and everything is really hard process. I can totally sympathize with that. But i would suggest continuing to advocate as much as you can and trying to reach out and trying to get you know as much You know as many resources as you can to get an aide to get some kind of help within the home system to go. You know what i would do. I renew it cable. Do because she'd be on it. But kay is not afraid of moving our children especially with remote learning. You can learning with any school any curriculum. So of that curriculum does not fit with your child. Hey you know what. I may have to remove my child from the situation and try to find a remote learning curriculum. That works out with helps them moving forward. Do you know as much as i don't like to be has a negative connotation helicopter parent word like being over your child for me is not about being a helicopter mom. It's about being involved like there's a difference. You know what i mean. And knowing what i'm looking for with my child us moms dads. We know our children best. So if you see that there's a deficit or you know that something may impede their progress. I'm i'm the queen of pivoting and just pulling them from whatever it needs to and in finding the resources. So one thing i know is what i don't know if i don't know something i'm the first to try to resources or asking You know friends asking and ask expert asking a friend who may know somebody who knows somebody getting for all that money right. I mean there's levels to needs that children have that need to be met For us the simplest thing so far just to even get that in person interaction for the children together. It's just creating a safe space of families who we know have been quarantining. Have been laying low right. Your kids haven't been in school. My kids haven't been in school so definitely have some community where we feel safe because we definitely don't take covid lightly so there's a certain community where say okay. Y'all have been at home. We've been at home for the most part. We can benefit our children together and create small playgroup environments where the kids can get together and play safely very necessary. Jackson says he misses the interaction that he used to have with his classmates. And i get it. I mean we've not been through this before so we don't know what the long term situation everything is up in the air. And so you know so. It is important to make sure that you're giving them similar activities or similar things that they were doing beforehand but in a safe space in a safe controlled space for this too. I'm gonna look at the camera directly when i say this. All the parents who are now advocating for their kids and without advocating. You said something that i would. I would challenge. You said that we know are his bus. I challenged that because these kids spend six to eight hours with these teachers every day. And i hear a lot of my friends and other people saying on social media all that stuff i was saying about my son when he was acting crazy was telling the teacher child. I do not know this person. Because i've been in the house with them for four months now stuck at home. I was advocating for before. And they're behaving the way. The teachers said they were behaving in class. And of course your children are completely different around you act around their classmates and the teacher. So i would say. The parents give grace to educators when we're going through this as well because etiquette educators also learning how to maneuver through covert so even though you wanna add advocate as much as possible. Give grace and allow it to work out a little bit before you jump the gun. That's because i'm definitely gone jumper the much to be like i know. I know that my son is not capable of this. Do these kids just us every day. But you know when. I did say that you know what. I'm glad that you like to play devil's advocate but it's just like we maternal instinct to know when something is wrong or not so i would say now and i think as parents now especially when you're watching your children in these home settings realizing and learning and understanding that if you're seeing things that are out of the norm for you if you think this is something that's different if they're you know behaving You know Where they can't focus attention. They're super super. You know all over the place and you never knew this about your child before because you weren't in this position with them. That is what i think is important to take that and realize okay. Maybe this isn't behave. I don't need to yell at him or you know. Maybe there is something else happening here and just to keep that in mind And not to be so quick to jump and be like all my kid is. She took my moment of truth that we do a moment of true but that was perfect. No that's a nice way to moment of truth pretty much what we've taken away from this show because we love for people to have takeaways. What can we gather from the conversation. So usually we sum up the end of the show with a moment of truth. So we might as well say wayne. It's and i know you've done my moment of truth. Even last night created a post before you came here and say that Just because your child wants it still doesn't mean they have a behavioral issue. We need to investigate. What other options we have before we just throw medication and labels at them. Go see someone and see if there's something else going on that was it like the they. He may still have a behavioral issue. But he or she may not. Yeah so before. We just run there. Let's try to exhaust. All options and this to me is a viable option. Because i've seen sensory issues. We kids for over the past decade. Solve a lot of problems on kids who were both medicated unmedicated. So i don't advocate for also just to find just to say this if you do see these sensory issues sensory concerns and they're not impeding your.

dr mike Bennett school rima Rima maggie calif cleveland kay california Jackson wayne
"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

08:11 min | 9 months ago

"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

"He needs medication he has. Add or adhd and their parents will bring them to us prototype and be like well before we do this. Can you guys work with. See what it is so we give them a workout regimen for them to do at home and for them to do with us and we've noticed that their behavior calm down work out right. So can you talk a little bit. About how movement just helps. Yeah absolutely appropriate. Option is like remain modulator of everything right like we always consider it like when everything fails us probe and it's basically muscle activity. Which is what you're saying muscle activity whether it's pushing something heavy whether it's You know doing any climbing activities things that really incorporate muscle strength and muscle activity is a modulator. So if a person is super higher rows and unable to intention or low arousal and needs a little push. It's always a good idea to incorporate pope. And that is something you see as well from an athletics perspective. I devel- is like the poster child for that because this guy is not pushing away soon lifting you know he literally has to be moving and be calm. I'm at your house. Every day which is may have to lift weights. don't lift weights and the thing about it. Think about how productive since i started lifting weights. Everyday going this sleep house. I don't think about how much my lifting weights for me has been the cause. Even before we started going to lift weights was running. Have anything heavy miles. I felt restless. Once i'm lifting weights in the morning. Lift me yes. You don't don't over a little bit too much weight on like give quarantine wait complaining dragon to get some squads and so we can see that So remote for new parents because we have many people who follow that are around them. A millennial age range either. Children thinking of having children for new parents. At what age should they start to look for the signs during this developmental process. That may or may not be an issue for their children and second part. It's a two part question. Should parents look for different signs between boys and girls. I mean that for that. I would say there are studies that say boys develop gross motor skills. Faster and girls develop fine motor skills faster. Boys our communication gross motor and fine motor so Fine motor like writing or doing anything. Yeah yeah so. Studies have shown this. I feel like all children develop on their own trajectory. And i do believe that there is. You know some some truth to that but at the same time I wouldn't say that would be the the thing to think about. I think it would be really looking at milestones when it comes to Autism specifically which people with with children with sensory processing issue a lot of times. Have they do go kind of hand. There are sensory processing disorders on their own. But then there's also autism linked sensory processing disorders and then to just look for the communication like. Do they pay tent. Do they look at you in the is do. Expect a focus and attention Giggles laughs are they socially kind of communicating with other waiting by by are the clapping when they do something show months eight months. I believe so. Yeah ron eight nine. Eight months and above nine months and above even tracing like the baby looking back and forth. That's something that happened a couple months pointing to things. It's they're non verbal social communication skills. You should definitely be looking for that. But i know that the pediatricians do the m. chat. I believe which is a series of questions around eighteen months. I wanna think i'm not a pediatrician. So i don't know but around that time They'll do the chat. And that's that's also a big a big one in terms of assessment. But yeah if you see any concerns you see anything that you find. It's a little bit stranger odd. I would always go to the pediatrician and ask for You know for advice on how to proceed. And if it is a sensory issue i would always say you know approach not so if a child is suspected to have autism for example It would be an assessment from an. Ot at first happened. it would be from the pediatrician. First editor would screen it. okay And then they would go on to refer you whether it's to a developmental pediatrician. Or whoever else that they would. We would get the referral after that so the job mental pictures. The pediatrician would referred. I know that it's been heavily. Debated where autism or any of the also issues or problems may arise. And i know that there's probably certain risk factors that may be start as early as a woman is pregnant or not going to ask about the vaccines because now well that's part of it. That's big bucks scuttle you're not bam bam amar vaccine there's no there's no real justification i mean i know people feel strongly about vaccines but yeah. That's what i'm saying. Some people are really either on board about it or not. There are i. Don't i don't believe that. There's a strong link based on research. I don't believe that there's a strong link to the memoir Gotcha but i do understand. The concerns and parents concerned is warranted. Everybody's concern for the covid vaccine now because we're like we don't want to be the first to try it and if you have young kids have to go back to school. I'm not gonna let you stick my kid. Neil and we don't know what the right There's no like bulletproof clear. Cut like reason or explanation as to how autism appears. Which is you know concerning early. Yeah i feel that you feel like if there a way that we can combat. Yeah and we'd be doing it as early as maybe when you're pregnant because you can relate to this now as a mom i'm sure reema in that you try to do everything perfect while you're pregnant like you follow all the rules. Don't eat this. do that. prenatal do that. And then you just ultimately pray for a healthy baby that will grow to be an amazing person and you just never know some of the factors that may impede the progress or slow things down. So we'll do. You think that autism has was something that always existed but now we have wasted diagnose it so it's become a little bit more of a hot button topic now. I believe that we've definitely improved the ability to diagnose it yeah ability to to find out that you okay this. This child definitely is showing symptoms. We didn't have that before you know. So yes i definitely think it contributes for sure. But that's a good thing because then now we'll have an earlier chance of finding what we need to work on how weekend. Yeah and now we can get in there from a young age. I feel like we may know some people who adult life was just like. Oh such and such was just kind of socially awkward growing up but then as an adult. You mean like wait. Maybe he might have been autistic and we just didn't know there is a spectrum so there's so high functioning i guess some high functioning people now who i think may have been autistic but some people just crazy on the look at my wife. My wife and i'm to be honest. Banking says she made. You really needed to buy all them. Shoes you leaders. The sense is that remote monitoring like a v eight cents. And i don't know the had c. n. t. s. b. spending soon so the american association of school administrators conducted a survey of more than five hundred superintendents across the country in june. When asked what they struggled to provide as school switch.

autism athletics bam amar reema ron Neil american association of school
"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

09:42 min | 9 months ago

"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

"Would have been recruited me off husband. I was super into like a filmmaking and music. And and just the ability to express myself creatively but in my culture and my background my family was all you have to be a doctor or lawyer. That industry maneuver through and i went into therapy. Got my doctorate. And then i the create a bug did not wanna leave me the creative. It's going to come out some way and it came out in my profession which is Something i'm so excited about and proud of that's amazing. I'm excited about it. you know. Read the sensory kids and one thing that kind of interest me was learning about two nuisances. My whole life girl. I was taught about there. Being five cents was today years old. When i found out that we had seven cents is a not. Yeah and i feel like now. I'm doing my children a disservice. The other two can you. Can you pretty much breakdown the senses or the two additional own. Just the five that we all know right. We all know the five senses but there are two additional senses and they are the vestibular system and appropriate septic system the vestibular system being the movement and balance system. so basically. Let's say if you close your eyes and you move your head right left back forward. You know the direction you're moving raised upon your vestibular sense which is located in inner ear. Or if you're on roller coaster and you close your eyes. You know which direction you're going. That's your vestibular. Since then you have the pre-acceptance which is basically muscle activity. So your if i do jumping jacks the joint receptors are sending connections to my brain. That this is what your body is doing in this action right. Understanding the importance of those two will help when it comes to child development. Because if you think about the playground and children trying to navigate new The jungle gym or new activities within the playground setting some children who are having a hard time processing these sensory this sensory input or having an issue with praxis which is basically the neurological connection or neurological display of a connection between the cognition. And the action. So your cognition and your action. Kind of connective lead through the through the brain so them having an issue with that is a sensory concerned but a lot of times it will look like the kid is antisocial. Don't wanna play on the playground surfaces as a behavioral issue. Exactly so. oh she's sitting on the corner because she doesn't wanna play with anyone. She doesn't like to engage. No she may have an issue with practice. You may have a motor planning issue. Her senses may be affected. So let's get a sensory evaluation done by occupational therapist before labelling a behavior or you know an issue. That may not be that. i mean. i'm not saying it isn't a behavior issue. But i'm saying there's something else that you should consider it being right so it's not just automatically labeling child it's like okay. What do we do our due diligence as a parent to say you know what. Let's have our chelsea occupational therapist so for someone who may not know. What exactly an occupational therapist does you let them know what you do. Absolutely so as not. I'm in pediatrics. ot's are in many different facets in areas but I am in pediatrics. And what we do. Is we basically work with children who have autism developmental delay sensory processing disorder Children who are not meeting certain milestones. And we do evaluations on them. We see exactly what areas are limiting gross motor fine motor social emotional where it is and then we create treatment plans and goals around those areas. And that's what we do. We work with them on achieving those goals in the long run this was crazy right. 'cause i saw an occupational therapist after my surgery and most people do when you're a professional athlete. These motor skills. Proprio -ception vestavia. I've heard these terms before. After you come back from an injury you have to retrain your body to be able to do these things so for example. I remember when i came off my surgery. And i broke my finger in the very beginning. I had an issue catching the ball. Not because i didn't know how to catch a ball but it was working on the motorcycle from my finger being ready to catch a we had a bunch of therapy things for me to get that back so it makes it. It makes me think how many kids probably struggle with those things from young. We just passed that off as this kid is. Just something's wrong with them without working on it. We're only ready to work on it as adults when we see it fits for something like athletics but this is important for every day every day interaction. Absolutely i feel like pediatric. Ot in just ot in general and under i feel like an understanding of sensory integration and an understanding of how it can impact or be affect. Your child's development is important for all parents and teachers and anyone who's really interacting with a child on a day to day basis because understanding. That information will help. You pinpoint certain things you may have not thought of and probably not label things as this is definitely behavioral. Oh this got this. Got to be this or that. No maybe this is sensory related because a lot of things can be sensory related. There's a there's a thin line with the behavior and the sensory part of what. What an occupational therapist does is investigative. So it's finding out what it is and then you're corrective because if you can correct certain things on an earlier phase for the child then it will not impede the progress of their growth and hitting those later on us if a child comes to us with tactile defensiveness when there may three or four. It's easier for us to work with that or younger verbally. But if it's later on in developments lot harder talent into this is what defensiveness so basically if you are wearing something that is itchy. Are bothersome for you and me. It might be okay. This is just bothersome. I can handle it though can still live my daily life but for someone who has tactile defensiveness be a real bothering problem problem and it will actually impact their daily lives. They can articulate that to their parents. They may be come across as a behavioral issue in school. If they're wearing turtleneck that's does bothering them and you know how many times we've seen this. You can't even seen this in jackson. I think most fleeces absolutely up here. And he's like i hate zipper on my neck and i'm like dude. Just the zipper on the same as an adult but no but as long as it's not impacting his daily life. As long as he's. I mean i hate certain textures to but i can still function now if you can't function then there's a there's a a level that needs you need to see someone who can actually work with you and in otas not when we work with these things. We work basically with the neurological system in the clinic. All under the guise of play. So the child doesn't realize that what we're doing has a neurological basis. The child is thinking. I'm playing right. I haven't played today. Dr ray but what i'm doing really is navigating these neurological sensory Concern and also why that's important especially from a young age. We got a lot of parents in prototype whose children whether it was a boy or girl who brought the their children's abroad digiorno prototype because they felt like they were antisocial and they need to work out because they're so antisocial they don't wanna go outside and since they don't wanna side in the antisocial their parents are worried that they won't be good people they just his part of a team with people own and bringing them the prototype we worked on these drills just taught them how to be sports and as they became more confident doing these drills because they did it over and over again when they got back to their block of their community. They felt more comfortable going outside to play basketball because their balance was better. They were little bit strong. They were faster and then they started to develop friends because we all develop our society as society. We all develop our friends to play totally so when you make a kid feel more comfortable with their body. They'll feel more comfortable speaking to another child. And i've seen it first hand we prototype seen it just for firsthand in playground settings and i've just been a great specimen playground. Yeah you can see all kinds of things in the playground but yeah it makes you think and then a lot of the teachers will will identify. Oh this kid doesn't want or for example on the circle time if a child is sitting at circle time and he's rolling around on the carpet and not paying attention. The teachers will. Sometimes i think he's got a behavior problem. No maybe it says the stimulus system his balance and movement sense that may need you know babies having a hard time processing that info that feedback sensory information. So if he's inadequately processing it then unfair to be labeling him as being a behavior issue so get them an ot referral. Let's figure out what this is too soon. Not knowing about these other two senses. You don't know about four and you worry worry. So are there any tools that parents can use prior to getting to in ot doctor. Are there any tools that parents can use to help. Identify a child with some sort of sensory issue or deficit. Particularly the two that we are referring to that many people don't know about right so in terms of that i would think a lot of.

autism Dr ray athletics jackson basketball
"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

07:55 min | 9 months ago

"reema" Discussed on Dead Ass with Khadeen and Devale Ellis

"A lot to me. Of course because yano davao load of kids are ludden kids anthem prototype. We talking shout out so it's a new york anguish out the artist yet so we after i was very fitting i wore my new york. See no matter where. I'm at where a man. It's all right bill. I love it. I know. I can be what i wanna be. If i worked hard at it. Well maybe i can be what i want to be if i work hard it. I'll be loaded. Abbas yeah let me tell you this season you'll be hitting all sorts of notes and active. I think somebody's been practicing for karaoke. Wasn't meet out in quarantine you've been practicing in quarantine practice making sure. Sure as right benz mardieh bismarck. The shadow patrol trouble. Can't get your name right any who yes story. Time all right so this story times me back story. Two thousand and fourteen. Okay i know get say the young man's name because y'all probably go find them more facebook as people crazy but his mom and my brother and i were doing prototyping brooklyn. Mom brought us him to us because he wanted to be on the football team. That narrows it down to four hundred kids. Yes looking them up. And i'm not gonna say the school but She brought him to us and she said his issue is. He has behavioral issues. So he's been medicated. he has about sixty three average shot wanting to graduate high school. That's what she's doing. Her name was saying he's off the rails just need him to graduate high school and My brother and i have been used to dealing with children like this. Because he was fourteen at the time. And we will like Let's try something different. You know we're not gonna do the whole screaming thing and get upset at him. So let's Let's try to give him accountability. I and tell them. Listen if you average is not come up to a seventy five after this first semester with us you can no longer participate in prototype so a lot of times we notice if you give accountability to kids and they're around other kids who exist in that same accountability rome. They'll normally just step up without you having the right. They don't wanna be dumb kid joke about the jokes. They pretty much we since you had to have at least an eighty five. No one wanted to be. The dumb kid had prototype so he worked to get his grades up right and then We asked him seriously like west about east of men. When i take this medication. I just don't feel good. When school tired i feel sluggish. So me and my brothers like told me to moms can stop taking the medication for a semester missy. Hongo's his grades up to eighty eight eighty after taking off the medication and he started a workout program with us. We gave him words of affirmation to say whenever he fell nervous so member. We used to say i'm big. I'm strong i'm fast. I'm elite prototype. That started with this young man because he didn't have confidence. So like if you get nervous before tests meditate gaudio. I'm big. I'm strong on me in that. We spoke words positively. You can do this like you've already done us. They man ended up graduating from high school with native average attending college. And now has his bachelor's degree medication free and medication. Free and his mom just wanted him to graduate. You want him to pass and here. This young man was able to go on and do well in excel and go to school. She said never in a million years she thinks oh will go to college and he went on his own merit earned academic scholarship. So that's my my story in prague. I'm not gonna say his name. The people who know me probably know discussing man 'cause they know talking about what. I'm not going to blast him about what his grades were before prototype but now you start. That's true that's true is how you find. And he's not the only one all right so the new normal though. I really do not want to accept this as like the new normal update is the new temporary. How about that. The interim okay if you will but whatever. This is has really changed the way. Our children are experiencing education. But today we're talking about how virtual learning affects children with learning disabilities. And we're here to gain some insight on how to best support our kids through this transition because like i said now t parents have assumed the role of teachers and everywhere else in between when it comes to the educational staff and being a normally in those environments school environments teachers can then pick up on a learning disability that a child may have sort of behavioral issue so now that parents are home with their children. How do you really hone in on realizing what those things are. How do we differentiate what just may be frustration from the parent and Maybe frustration from the child who just may not even understand or the the parent me not understand how to navigate such a deficit so we decided to bring in an expert today. Because we don't know nothing about that side of things. We know our own three kids and we're still learning still learning them on a day to day basis so allow me to introduce our special guest today. Dr reema naim. Reema attended the university of southern california where she completed her bachelor's master's and doctorate was there a long time in psychology and therapy her love for animation and creative nature gave birth to the sense. Oh kids four lovable sensory characters whose role is to educate clients and families about occupational therapy and the sensory systems we work with dr name received her s. Ipt integration and a practice tests certification shortly after opening ot studios inc and becoming a c a s. Which is a certified autism specialist to expand her knowledge and passion for working with century integration. She currently oversees the business and is working on expanding the sense. Oh kids brand. She is also a fairly new mama. Clap it up. Beautiful little boy exterior. Thank you for joining us today. Happy to have you here. Thank you and it's amazing that we have you here on the day that your book launched. I now it's crazy. It actually happened. I've been working on this for five years now. So it's pretty amazing. Since i opened the clinic which is five years ago so this huge accomplishment on my end and now for sure when i love. Is that in speaking with you. Remind just having past conversations you talked about how much you were able to are desiring to somehow find a way to use your creativity when it came to your practical profession and i'm super happy for you. I'm super excited. That you're able to navigate this and find a way to integrate your creativity and your love for that into your field of work. Absolutely i mean i. Initially as a child wanted to be a music video director you would have been recruited me off.

yano davao Hongo gaudio new york Abbas benz brooklyn football rome facebook Dr reema naim Reema prague ot studios inc university of southern califor autism
ZZ Packer Reads Lesley Nneka Arimah

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:59 min | 1 year ago

ZZ Packer Reads Lesley Nneka Arimah

"Highs easy. Hi, Deborah. Welcome. Welcome back. Thank you. Thank you to be back. So. I come across the story who will greet you at home. Did you read it in the magazine when it came out? Yeah a did I read in the magazine I couldn't kind of believe the story I was just so impressed by it. I didn't know who this young new writer was and not that shortly after I believe it was maybe a year or so after I met her at McDowell and we kind of really hit it off and we would right three thousand words a day with each other and that kind of thing. But but yet if I met her just by way of the story itself. What impression did it make on you at the time? Well, I was just blown away. I'll be honest with you because I kept thinking. Here's the story that sort of starts off very quietly in creeps up on you and then you kind of only thinking in this very fairy tale way about it like not not quite a fairy tale well, because you know there's the real world, but then there's this other aspect of it and it's something. That Jerome Stern calls kind of Blue Moon where it's kind of like this, just one supernatural aspect of the world and the rest of the world seems to go kind of as is, and all of this is just making me hop along with the story as it's being told rather than analyzing the story. The way I normally kind of tend to do when I'm reading stories I just marveled at it and I still do to this day. Yeah, it's hard to classify isn't it? It's not quite speculative fiction. It's not satire. It's got a little folk tale in it. It's got a little horror story in it yeah. Yeah Well. We'll magical realism to exactly exactly and it makes me think of Maria Tatar. She's the. Harvard I guess folklorist fairytale expert. I don't know what you call, but she writes about fairy tales and there have psychological aspect and how each of them is sort of dealing with the traumas of childhood that every child has and I've always loved fairy tales I always have I will stop and read a fairy tale a couple times a month and I kind of realized why after reading some of her work. Because they're just so interested in this sort of very acute way in which they deal with what it's like to be a child, and then what it means to go from childhood to adulthood. So to read about this, which incorporated like those fairy tale aspect folk tale aspect, but also had these very real literary psychological kind of consequences. So I thought it was very masterful. Yeah Yeah and she was so young when she wrote it in an early in her in her writing career. Yeah. But already had this in a way. It's more of a fairy tale about the trauma of Motherhood the child. Yes exactly and that's the other thing that you don't really read about like one of the aspects of fairy tales that Maria Tatar hit upon is that you almost always here a read that they are orphaned in some way and this kind of like a reverse orphan story you know you've. Woman girl slash woman who is wanting to be the mother and what it means for her to suddenly get a child rather than suddenly be orphan and so that to me was just you know as a mother myself, I was just intrigued by it and how could capture so many aspects of motherhood that we don't even want to admit to like there's this way in which you know you're doing everything for this child no matter what the child is sort of doing to you and your personal life. You're just go ahead and you're like, okay I'll give you my all I. Don't know if I'm revealing my own mother Zeile there but. Yeah, it'll all come clear when people hear the story. So. Maybe we should dive in now. and. Now, here's easy packer reading who will greet you at home by Leslie Neck Reema. Who will greet you at home. The. Yarn baby lasted a good month. Emitting dry cotton, soft gurgles in pooping little balls of lint. Before again, she snagged its tie on a nail and it unraveled as she continued walking mistaking its little hoops for the beginnings of hunger not the cries of an infant being undone. By the time, she noticed it it was too late, the leg, a tangle of fiber, and she pulled the string the rest of the way to end it rather than have the infant grow up maimed. If. She was to mother a child to mute and subdue enfold foldaway parts of herself. The child had to be

Maria Tatar Deborah Jerome Stern Mcdowell Writer Leslie Neck Reema Blue Moon Zeile
"reema" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

10:41 min | 1 year ago

"reema" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"If we keep it up and we're determined to do that is going to to save lives and improve the quality of life for many women? Do you WanNa say something about that remote. Sure I think Secretary Clinton had I. Is that you know. What do you think about cook stoves and Dull G? Oh definitely because this is what women have to deal the in and they out book you know infantries like ours. Everybody has taken that. Cooking is taken for for granted that women have to cook. So what's the big deal in it And you know we wanted to bring the clean cook stoves. We wanted to bring unclean fuel to the houses of women. But we didn't want to distribute stalls. And so you know we designed a whole program where you know. Ceiling to National Finance Corporation gave a I lost guarantee and each woman bought clean stole so today today we have apple million women using those clean cook stoves in you know lunch but it was a challenge for us because you know the husbands and the mother in law thought that you know we have been cooking for generation and so why do you need to take a loan for a Kook stow and Then then the challenge of how do you upkeep and maintain those folks still and then from bookstores. Women now started using the L. P. G. so they are moving up into the social ladder and with that then we started bring in solar power. So you have you know solar powered cook stoves so she no longer has to depend on whether the fan in the stove. Joe is working or not or whether she's still needs to cut the fuel and chop it but she just has a solar power in she plugs at dinner thin and the stove is up and running and I think we are now scaling the sub to take it to all our two million members and that brought in a whole whole aspect of. How do you bring access to energy because if you really want to improve and strengthen the livelihood energy is still so? This is such a strong nexus between women energy. Feel you know food and nutrition and you've created a nexus with the private sector because a lot of what you've been able to do has been because businesses have partnered with say W-wa maybe you could mention your your new health venture and then we can move on quickly to your friend to your right and the exciting work. She's doing Jhangvi shouldn't be keeping keeping them all holding their impatiently listening for last two hours. But I think and just a few more minutes inlets and will stop here for your who have a lovely evening meals but I think as you as you rightly brought out there the to know my second big message on behalf of our millions of sisters Secretary Clinton is that what they need is partnerships and I think the kinds kind of partnerships you partner in Rhode but you also partner in you know the difficult times or in the losses as well and that will help the enterprises grow. How do you bring access to healthcare? How do you bring the like how we brought banking at the doorstep? How do you bring access to healthcare? I get at the doorstep and that's where I think we have been very fortunate to be able to partner with Abbott and again again as I said we don't want Sherry. We didn't want anything free. But how do you create a model. That is sustainable. And that women can have access still have get at their doorstep so we have young daughters of Ghauri Benza. The daughters in law who have hand devices who had those glucose meter so go from house to house and you know they keep track of his pattern meters of our members and you know how when the Para meter is crossing danger lines. How do you take her two referrals services? And that's the kind of a model that we are creating also to take it to policy level when we talk about universal health. Care what does it actually mean for the rural end the poor women or the women in the informal the sector. And that's the kind of the partnership that we are talking about so it's a win win. You Know Fordham in Brazil. So Technology Innovation airbnb illiterate. Women what are they doing on Airbnb do you know how do you. Then we have the issue of security and mobility of young daughters young daughters in law and who have studied. But you know who are not able to find and meaningful productive work and that's where you know I stumbled across AIRBNB. My son was studying at Christie and and there was the alumni of Christie's the founder of AIRBNB and I was getting introduced an ipod. Eli on Earth do with Airbnb the and then I thought anyway. I'm meeting. I should really annoyed something in there. I Lo and behold and I approached Airbnb back home in India and I say what you list. My sister's homes on AIRBNB and like rural homes on airbnb selects. Let's see the story from my own sister today. We have two thousand homes listed on AIRBNB. I'm already been and I've been a member of saver now for twenty five years and I want to say that you'd have seen and you would have come across several companies in this world but not a company like mine with the owners and managers. Managers are are all the men like me and we control the entire supply chain right from purchase of raw material to the sale of finished broadens. The owners of our company so I think you have a flavor we invite you to visit the Indian villages listed on Airbnb. Eh If you're companies to partner with with say Wa they're wonderful partnerships that can be developed. There're you're successful ones ongoing. I don't know if you want to add anything Secretary Clinton but it's been an experience it has and I'm so happy happy that we could share the stories. You've just heard with all of you and I would only underscore what Milan said. This is a a really good investment for partnership for the kind of visible progress that can be made in people's lives women's lives and say why has been plowing met ground now for decades. But they're really at a new level level of development and it's something that Reema and the leadership of say we are really focused on. You heard her briefly mentioned the health insurance program. I am that they're going to be rolling out. We need good models today don't we. We need to demonstrate that we we can we can get things to work and we can help people and we can all be the better for it and as you just heard I mean we really are all in this together whether we want to admit it or not and if we do admit it then there's a an opportunity for everybody to partner with say Wa in some way and so I would. I would urge you to follow up directly or through Milan and I think I'm supposed to get another presentation aren't i. You're supposed to get a presentation from gory. Yes so let's see what she has for you. I'm thirty show thirty official. I'm I'm nick. I hope you you enjoy that conversation about the incredible women of Saehwa visit. Say What Dot Org. For more information about the self employed women's Association our top takeaways I. Women's economic empowerment is critical when women can make and manage their own money. They're able to exercise better control over their own lives and help provide provide for their families. It also creates a double dividend women reinvest ninety percent of their earnings back into their communities and economies. Second those in need are looking for opportunity not charity. They need a hand up not a handout. Lastly AS Roma's shares partnerships can accelerate great progress for women beyond philanthropic gestures a well-designed partnership with the private sector can result in sustainable programs that create shared value. They're are both good for women and good for business. You're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose a podcast brought to you by the Seneca Women podcast network with support from founding partner P. and G.. If you like this podcast please subscribe. Tell your friends and rate us on Apple Apple podcasts. For more information on Seneca women follow us on social media. visit our website and check out the Seneca women APP free in the APP store. They have a great week..

Airbnb partner Secretary Clinton Seneca Women Secretary Wa Ghauri Benza Apple founding partner Seneca National Finance Corporation Jhangvi Christie Sherry Joe L. P. G. Roma Rhode Technology Innovation
"reema" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"reema" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"And we talked and I asked a few questions and one of the women told me why being a member of say was so important to her because she said she had had freedom and she could be free from not only her husband but her mother in law and when we finish talking and I got up thinking that it was time to leave all the women rose and they began to sing we shall overcome it. Come in Gujarati. What I saw that day was so inspiring to me because it was the power our of hope? It was by dint of hard work. It was the support that they were giving to one another other. It was the fact. They were organized and I stayed in touch. I would see remo or others from time time to time here in this country. When I was secretary of state I went back and made it absolutely a stop on my tour because I want it to continue the work we had done to lift up the lives of women and especially the it was when I was secretary of state? One point two million members. Now it's two million in India and another million and a half and Pakistan Afghanistan Bangladesh. Other places I just can't speak enough about how this has. Truly provided economic empowerment and through economic empowerment freedom and dignity and the full fulfillment of the lives of so many women and now onto the second and even third generation Shen of the daughters and granddaughters and they want different things that they want a different kind of say well. Although forty percent of members in India are women under thirty right so there's so much to be learned from what they have accomplished. But I also think it's such a good news story that it's really important that more people hear it and I'm thrill that remote can be here to tell us first hand about the progress that say what has has made so tell us about. I'm sure there are many in the Saudi and so are not acquainted with the work of Saehwa. Tell us how how you move. Women the great majority of of them start out as waste pickers and how they come to have worked with dignity Nettie that sustainable nominee thank you so much. It's such an honor to be again. You know with you secretary. The Clinton and Milan has been a true supporter. All through this two decades. You gave such a wonderful introduction introductions. I don't need to repeat that again but I think the message that I bring today on behalf of all our two million Sisters from India is and especially from the young members of Sega who are aspiring war looking looking for more hor poor looking for a peaceful world war looking for a world in which they have work which brings them dignity which also brings them self respect and I think the biggest message which I've been telling Milan again and again is that you know poor. Do not want chatty I think all they want is an enabling environment where they can come together and listening all through this evening thing. I've heard that you know solidarity sisterhood. And I think it's the power of work which is so magical uh when women's work gets Weiss and visibility. Hambali did when they come together. As far as women and as workers workers she's able to end vents. She gets word based on the skills and the knowledge that she has it gives her tremendous confidence and then she gains gains the collective strength from the Camaraderie of other sisters that she's together with and I think it's the organizing that gives her that strength and with organizing than the members of that saver are able to tap into to get small loans which otherwise they are not readily given access stowe. She's able to build her infrastructure. She's able to gain access to head gear. She's able to build her own. Enterprise raise get access to markets in short. She's able to lift herself out of poverty and she's able to then take on any challenges that life may bring to her and I'm saying this not just on behalf of for two million sisters in India but also we have seen that in enough Ghanistan or in buck is Stan in the water. Nydia of should Lunka or in men mar or input and and I think the other message that We would like to share on behalf of our millions of sisters. Is that you know. When new put technology into their hands they know how the best application of it could be? You know how can a waste collector. Also lookin' usable. You know and SORTA Baltics is nothing bad but you know she no longer has to. You know rummaged each through the garbage but she can use a robot to do all that aura manual scavenger who has to get down into the trains in our ark countries still to you know clean those strains if she has access to robotics how she can change her life you know or a a young daughter of a farmer who feels that you know. How can she done her family to an enterprise and that's where you know how how she can use into agriculture and farming? We learned it from User Secretary Clinton when you had invited one offers small small farmers to the State Department and how she was shedding that she took out a small loan to take a says Jeff on Tobias Cell Phone and now she runs her own agribusiness company with two hundred fifty thousand small women farmers like her which has a turnover of about ten million rupees. And I think it's the same woman when she this year in our are annual general meeting. She rose up and she said seventeen years ago. I had no identity of fire on. I was confined to the four walls of my house today. I no longer feel. I'm poor. I may be trade but I'm not poor and I think this is the kind of dignity this this is the kind of respect that I think brings women out of both so. Rima raised the issue of technology which you might think doesn't go together with literate women but what they're able to do through technologies extraordinary and one of the things that you did Secretary Clinton at the State Department is you were trying to close the gender gap in mobile technology now. Why did that matter well? That's exactly right as remote said and really I was inspired by what women and say Wa were able to do if they had access to technology particularly mobile. Phones We knew that there was a gap in mobile phone ownership and usage between men and women. And we knew do that if we could help to close that gap it would provide opportunities for women to utilize technology Collagen in their businesses and in their homes and families so we did have a big initiative to try to work with other foundations and other leaders. Cherie Blair was someone working on that. Through her foundation to help lower the price increase the access provide education. Although everybody was really fast learner once they got access to it. It's a wonderful to see and we found you could deliver messages. You can deliver health messages. You can deliver messages about weather which is really important. If you're a farmer armor you could deliver messages about education. If you are worried about your children's future there was just a an unlimited number borough of uses that could be imagined and then implemented for technology and I'm thrilled that say Wa has been a real leader in this yes. There are other women's groups micro enterprise groups organized groups in other parts of the world. But say why has been a leader adaptability mention one other area that we worked on when I was in the State Department was clean. Cook Stoves on Clean Cook. Stoves was a passion of mine because respiratory distress is the fourth leading cause of death for women and children worldwide. Because if if you're cooking over a fire made with wood or Dung and you breathe the smoke and especially if you're in a small space you acquire all kinds of respiratory ailments and often and they lied to decrease lung capacity and even death so one of our initiatives in the State Department was to promote clean cook stoves and and say what was a great partner because you had to get models that would work in different climates that would work with different different villages just different groups of women who were used to spending their time hunting for firewood and would need to learn a new way of cooking but say why has been an instrumental in spreading clean cook stoves in India. which over time.

State Department India. Secretary Clinton secretary Wa Cook Stoves Clean Cook respiratory distress Stoves Baltics Milan remo Saehwa Cherie Blair Nettie Pakistan Afghanistan Banglades India Hambali Sega
5 Podcasts For Those Who Love Awkward Conversations

Feedback with EarBuds

02:24 min | 1 year ago

5 Podcasts For Those Who Love Awkward Conversations

"This week's theme is Awkward Conversations. The curator is Courtney Cossack Co host the Private Parts Unknown podcast. Here's why Courtney chose this theme. She writes I love setups that are inherently uncomfortable. Haven't told your boyfriend about that. You're crippling debt. You think your data's a serial killer you want to confront your troll. I'm in here. Are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Courtney. Monday's episode comes from this is uncomfortable and is called when money makes it weird. It's thirty one minutes long. In this episode host. Reema Jerez tries to settle a debt. That she's been avoiding and what happens when one person in a relationship has way more money than the other Tuesday's episode comes to us from the clearing and is called hunting season. It's fifty two minutes long in this episode. We meet April. WHO finds out that her father might have been a serial killer? Wednesday's episode comes from this American Life and is called. If you don't have anything nice to say say it in all caps. It's fifty eight minutes long in this episode. What happens when the Internet turns on you? It's safe to say whatever you want on the Internet. Nobody will know it's you but that same anonymity makes it possible for people to say all the awful the things that make the Internet. Such an annoying sometimes frightening place Thursday's episode comes from Private Parts Unknown and is called men have abortions to part two. It's fifty four minutes long for the seventh episode of Private Parts. Unknown hosts coordinate Cossack and Sophia Alexandra are back with the second installment in their three part series featuring men talking about their personal experiences with abortion for this edition. Were joined by two guys. I former youth pastor slash current stand stand up comedian Derek Murray and then filmmaker slash writers slash VR extraordinary Christopher Morrison who exemplified. How subtle religious indoctrination can manifest in surprising prizing ways as the shame and stigma surrounding the issue are processed Friday's episode comes from heavyweight and it's called the marshes? It's fifty six minutes long in this episode. After a drunken slip of the tongue Steve Marsh and his siblings discover a secret their mother has been keeping from them for almost forty years now. Steve Steve wants to help his mom. Take action those. Are The podcast recommendations. Chosen by Courtney for this week's theme Awkward Conversations

Courtney Courtney Cossack Co Private Parts Unknown Steve Steve Steve Marsh Reema Jerez Private Parts Two Guys Sophia Alexandra Christopher Morrison Derek Murray
Woman leaves kids to save brother in Syria

Invisibilia

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Woman leaves kids to save brother in Syria

"Have a special present for you today. Courtesy of our friends at embedded it's this amazing story of young woman, whose mother of two small children, and who leaves them and risks her life to save her brother from Syria where he's fighting with ISIS. Now admit I have a soft spot for nontraditional efforts to fight terrorism. Some of you might remember that a few years ago, I did a story about a small Denmark town, where a couple of cops at an also Eleanor slave and link tore life-link kept getting calls from parents who sons had gone missing in the three. They were young men from Muslim neighborhoods. And then there were five on the newer seven who'd been radicalized. Seventy two was ten and snuck off to fight in Syria. I mean, what could we do these cops were trying to figure out what? Can we do about it? What Allen and tore life? Ultimately did was create one of the most unusual counter-terrorism approaches out there to hear their story. Just scroll to the season two called flip the script in urine visibility feed, but I listen to the stellar reporting for my colleagues Ruth Sherlock and Kelly mcevers. Here's Kelly in two thousand ten a guy set himself on fire into nesia in eventually died. People went out into the streets and demanded that the dictator of Tunisia had to go and soon millions of people across the Middle East. We're doing the same thing including in Syria. You might not remember this, but the war in Syria, actually started as a protest. Pretty soon, though, government forces started shooting protesters, and people started fighting back, that's when it became a civil war government versus anti-government. Then it became something else. I covered Syria back then, and to go there, we would have to sneak over the border from Turkey. At one point, we started to see these other guys crossing the border to. Guys with long beards and short pants carrying gun sized boxes guys who would say they were doctors. But looked like something else guys from the Gulf, the former Soviet Union Europe and Africa. And the Turks wanted to let these guys into Syria. So they could help fight against the Syrian government. What they didn't know what none of us knew was it, eventually some of these guys who came over the border would have other goals like fighting not just the Syrian government, but anyone who stood in the way of their Olten it goal to build an Islamic state. That was how it all started today's show is about how it ends. That's coming up. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with a dedicated in toll free airport. Access highway from the beltway. I a d means it's accessible to DC with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing and with nonstop flights to more than one hundred thirty five destinations. I a d means I'm already at my destination. More at fly Dellis dot com slash fast. Support also comes from gusto, providing payroll, benefits and HR built for the way small businesses work with gusto. Your federal, state, and local payroll taxes are all automatically calculated paid and filed on your behalf. You can even use gusto to offer your team health benefits and for a one case more than sixty thousand businesses nationwide us gusto for full service payroll. HR. Tools and health insurance. To learn more, go to gusto dot com slash NPR. If you've been following the news, you know that has now been driven out of its territory in Syria and Iraq, some hardcore fighters are dead. Some are in prison. Some are regrouping around the region. But what they left behind is a newer, and in some ways, even more complicated problem, tens of thousands of people who were living under the Islamic state now have nowhere to go the world literally does not know what to do with them. Some of them women and children who chose to follow their husbands, or boyfriends or fathers to ISIS territory. Others were forced to go or kidnapped. And there are others men who lived and worked under ISIS, but it's not clear if they actually fought or killed anyone. What's more complicated? A lot of these guys are from Europe and North America countries that aren't super eager to bring back anyone affiliated with ISIS. Ruth Sherlock covers Syria for NPR, and she's been reporting on the people who ISIS left behind for months. And she has the story of one woman who's looking for her brother to protect your privacy. We're calling this woman. Rima. And her story is all about what you do when someone you love gets caught up in a situation that is way bigger than you could have imagined. Here's worth. Even before he disappeared Remo worried about how old brother, she worried because he was in his thirties and struggling, he had trouble keeping jobs. She says he'd sometimes leave his home for months, even years at a time and cut off contact with his family in Canada. He seemed depressed and then one day, Reema hood that the police had come to her parents house, apparently hit brother had been stopped trying to cross from Canada into the US and the office of the US officer asking, why are coming here. My brother told him that I have a meeting with John McCain, as in Senator John McCain, Reema says the people at the board attend him back, and then the police came to let the family and when she talked to her brother about it. He told me the same story my border. He told me that he receive an Email from John McCain, and he was a guests. And he won't go to Washington to meet him when he told me this. I'm like, okay, God. He's just sick. He had I called my mama. I told her could do. Please call Dr and just win your son in the hospital. I should no, no. He's just doing it depression. Don't worry, I'm like, no mom. No, please.

Syria Syrian Government NPR Ruth Sherlock Senator John Mccain Kelly Mcevers Isis Dulles International Airport Middle East Denmark Tunisia Eleanor Gulf Allen Canada Turkey Soviet Union Africa Nesia
"reema" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"reema" Discussed on Embedded

"It said that remains brother was in prison in Syria to fully appreciate what happens next you need to know what the latter didn't say it didn't tell her witch Syrian prison. Her brother was in aware. It was a why he was there. And it definitely didn't say that someone in his family someone with two young children and a fulltime job should cross the Buddha of a country at war and try to find him. But Reema huddle ready decided the moment that received this information. I said I'm going to go over day. See my brother it was. It was logical for me. It was logical for Rima. Maybe it was not logical for the Red Cross or the Canadian government who Reema says both told her that going to Syria to find her brother was a bad idea. Cervi McKenna plans, quiet. She didn't even tell her parents. But there was one person that she had to tell on a night when he'd gotten home early and before he'd even sat down Remo told her husband. She wanted to go to Syria. It did not go. Well, when I told him that I have to go. He say, it's crazy. You cannot go there. We have babies to have two kids. And he was very upset. What if something happens to you? He said what about me and the kids and I told him, but. Have you? Everybody. But my brother, nobody. If you was in this case. You want that someone good look for you. He had her out. And he said, okay. So Reema mates in Kohl's. And eventually she got in touch with an Austrian woman who has a door to detained in Syria and makes trips that to see her book a flight to Iraq. The Austrian woman told Reema you can do this. When I meet up with remerged late January. It's fast I in Syria. She traveled here with the Austrian woman. The staying in a hostel in the only room that has heat does a funnest that spits out these terrible diesel fumes. A day ago. Reema wasn't even sure she'd make across the border. They lost a whole day. Scrambling to get ficials on the phone begging for permission, which might not sound like much until you consider that Reema has Ernie plan to be in Syria for four days, she has to go back to family..

Syria Reema Cervi McKenna Red Cross Rima Remo Iraq Kohl four days
Saudi Arabia appoints first female ambassador to US

America's Truckin' Network

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi Arabia appoints first female ambassador to US

"His plan. Saudi Arabia is appointing a Princess to become its next ambassador to the US. The first time a woman has ever been given an ambassador post their Princess Reema Bint Bandar. L sods new role was announced by a Royal decree on Saturday. She spent some of her childhood living in Washington DC. Her appointment comes as Saudi Arabia's public image has taken a hit after the murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal kashogi in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Islam bull

Saudi Arabia Princess Reema Bint Bandar Saudi Arabian Consulate Washington Post Washington Dc Jamal Kashogi United States Murder
Saudi Arabia, Princess Reema Bint Bandarban Zoltan And Prince Khalid discussed on BTV Simulcast

BTV Simulcast

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi Arabia, Princess Reema Bint Bandarban Zoltan And Prince Khalid discussed on BTV Simulcast

"Saudi Arabia has named Princess Reema Bint Bandarban Zoltan. To the United States that makes her the kingdom's first woman to head a diplomatic mission. Saudi Arabia has also named prince Khalid bin Salman as deputy defence minister with the rank of

Saudi Arabia Princess Reema Bint Bandarban Prince Khalid United States Salman
"reema" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"reema" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"For a border wall. I'm an Carrick, Fox News. President Trump is talking about declaring a national emergency to get money to fund his border wall. Fox's Chad pergram with how that works. There was a Bill passed in nineteen seventy six which gives the president, you know, pretty broad latitude to do things like this presence of always used executive power and try to push the envelope. Envelope a little bit you certainly saw this in the late nineteen fifties. With President Eisenhower sending in military troops to help desegregate the schools and literati or Rock, Arkansas. You saw it in nineteen Ninety-two and President George W Bush and troops to help with the riots after the Rodney King verdict in Los Angeles. So administrations often push the envelope. It's a question of how much, you know, agility, President Trump might have to be able to use unable gated funds. That's the term of art here and move that toward a wall. If he declares a national emergency two sets of meetings over the weekend produced little progress on ending the government shutdown. With order excuse me with the border wall funding and the government shutdown at an impasse. The Senate turns its attention to Syria. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell introduced a foreign policy legislation last week four bills focused on the US role in the Middle East while the planned withdrawal of US forces from Syria is not addressed debate is sure to include concern about that decision from Republican and democratic hawks legislation does include non military responses to human rights abuses in Syria, including sanctions on financial institutions vote is expected by the end of the week on Capitol Hill, Jared Halpern, Fox News. A Michigan family of five dies in a fiery crash after a suspected drunk driver hits their SUV traveling the wrong direction on interstate seventy five in Lexington. Kentucky Lethem and Reema Abbas and their children Ali Isabela and Gisela ages seven to fourteen were headed home..

President Trump Fox News President Eisenhower President George W Bush Syria president Senate US Carrick Mitch McConnell Fox Rodney King Jared Halpern Middle East government Los Angeles Michigan Bill Lexington Arkansas
Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

UN News

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

"This is Matt wells at U N, news Gaza hospitals, unable to feed their own patients elective surgeries perspective for years. Those are just a few examples of what the UN's deputy special coordinator for the Middle East. Jamie McGoldrick describes as a collapsing system in free fall on Monday, he issued an appeal as part of the humanitarian response plan for next year the three hundred and fifty million dollars to help one point four million people in the most need across the pied Palestinian. Territories chiefly the Gaza Strip are you a news Arabic chief Reema buzzer was in Gaza with Mr. McGoldrick several weeks ago, and after they visited the main hospital together she asked him to outline the extent of Gaza's plight. The health sector here has been under severe funding shortages for for years. The blockade for the last twelve years by Israel has prevented goods coming in movement. The lack of supply of key essential drugs has been one of the reasons why in the salad problem is one of the reasons as hospitals don't operate properly. L she has a special offer because it's a teaching hospital is one of the biggest hospitals here. And as a result of that when the greet. Macho return demonstration started the March. It was the police that absorb the biggest number of casualties people who are wounded as demonstrations those being twenty thousand people in jobs and five those of those with live bullets most of the injuries are below the knee. And so what we saw today in the hospital was hundreds of young men and women who have been short Belo's who need at least six seven very complicated vascular born reconstruction subsidies, which would take maybe two years seventy operations, and of course, millions of dollars and needs technical support a needs technical ability needs resources this hospital. This guy's doesn't have. Not even talking about the the stick. We're talking about only wounded emergency cases. But there's adults. Yeah. The delta said this morning, they've kgo eight thousand elective surgeries for heart surgery for cancer patients for people regarding tons plant Sodi operations, all of those have been left the being pushed the hospital that don't long do that in the hospital anymore. The only teach trauma Kazaks all the deal with all the other subjects have been postponed. Council delayed or send somewhere else, and that's up to it'll be years before they can clear that might log. Meanwhile, more and more people are getting sick. That exit of the hospital said that he was working he's working as a doctor for thirty years. And this is the first time ever that he sees a hospital unable to feed its patients, and he asked for more support. What can the U N do? Well, I mean, what we try to do when the guy the marches took place demonstrations, we a special people, which was a white paper, which was to try and bring donor specific funding for the health sector. We mighty stick over twenty million dollars. But that's twenty million less than we need. We need forty million. Plus, and that's just to deal with the case law would behalf today every Friday there are more patients who arrive with boom bullet wounds or requiring treatment, and it just answer the caseload. Meanwhile, the other subsidies are not team police because there's no key essential drugs. Can not enough essential drugs. We hear from the Central American see store, the drugstore that are some drugs that run on the running thet it is and forty days. And then when he he says he can't feed these people as indicative of the crisis that health system faces, but the health system is only power part of a broader issue. A broader issue of collage. Apps collapsing system in free fall. And if we said that the unemployment rate in Gaza is fifty percent, how Gessen's surviving always flagged this idea of resilience, which is something that are self reliance that the half here in Gaza. I mean, what is so willingness to survive under very terrible conditions of Nokia station. A blockade of an ability to move around freely unless you can p to go from there. Most people are stuck here for most of the lives. And it's not as you can buy everything you can have everything if you working seven and ten youth don't have jobs, and what we're trying to do is to create cash for what programs are we'll try to get people on what schemes that gives them a trade or skill that, they can go outside St. and say the to themselves, but this difficult to bring immaterial to actually, you know, build funded and self on a Sudafed to export matisyahu because of the restrictions are placed on Gaza. So it's a very very harsh environment for economic development. As a result of the economy is in freefall, the World Bank report in September said very very clear. The GDP gone to one person and to our declared this in poverty, as by the UN standards. So we're facing a crumbling collapsing situation here, and if you put on top of that all the stresses of the great March, Tom the demonstration, the health system, the psychosocial, and then you've got owner as the funding crisis for Indra as massive, you know, people are not George people are losing their jobs losing the support. And that's only adding further and further pressure on a very fragile precarious environment. And you mentioned before that two thousand eighteen was the worst humanitarian funding. What was the main reason for this? Well, I think there's a couple of reasons I think first of all this environment in the Middle East is a lot of other countries who may or higher profile than Palestine, and that would be the Yemen's of the series and the racks and then Libya's so you compete against those unfairly an also Palestine's been around for a long long time. People don't get the sense that there's a there's a political solution in any anything soon. And I think on top of that you've been doing fatigue. You know, then I think with the the fund. Cuts from the US towards Indra. I think that's basically been a catalyst other things to happen. I think is all of that. So we struggle as or humanitarian response plan for two thousand eighteen thirty five percent funded against the global average of fifty percent, which I fade how incredulous that has given the importance of Palestine to this Middle East region and the fighter this Palestinian question has been languishing for so many decades support you're getting from the Arab words from the region. Well, I mean, clearly not enough. I mean, I know the recently pledging event in the received some pledges of hundred twenty two million men much of that came from the Gulf countries, but it has to be a long term prospect has to be a regular prospect. It has to be something we can predictably expect from these donor countries and clued in the Gulf to make sure that we can plan properly because having a timing often ptunning on is not the base we plan for population who are vulnerable and Trump.

Gaza Middle East UN Gaza Strip Jamie Mcgoldrick Palestine Israel Matt Wells Nokia Gulf Coordinator United States Belo World Bank Delta Technical Support
Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

UN News

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Massive funding crisis for Palestine relief, compounds collapsing system: UN coordinator

"This is Matt wells at U N, news Gaza hospitals, unable to feed their own patients elective surgeries perspective for years. Those are just a few examples of what the UN's deputy special coordinator for the Middle East. Jamie McGoldrick describes as a collapsing system in free fall on Monday, he issued an appeal as part of the humanitarian response plan for next year the three hundred and fifty million dollars to help one point four million people in the most need across the pied Palestinian. Territories chiefly the Gaza Strip are you a news Arabic chief Reema buzzer was in Gaza with Mr. McGoldrick several weeks ago, and after they visited the main hospital together she asked him to outline the extent of Gaza's plight. The health sector here has been under severe funding shortages for for years. The blockade for the last twelve years by Israel has prevented goods coming in movement. The lack of supply of key essential drugs has been one of the reasons why in the salad problem is one of the reasons as hospitals don't operate properly. L she has a special offer because it's a teaching hospital is one of the biggest hospitals here. And as a result of that when the greet. Macho return demonstration started the March. It was the police that absorb the biggest number of casualties people who are wounded as demonstrations those being twenty thousand people in jobs and five those of those with live bullets most of the injuries are below the knee. And so what we saw today in the hospital was hundreds of young men and women who have been short Belo's who need at least six seven very complicated vascular born reconstruction subsidies, which would take maybe two years seventy operations, and of course, millions of dollars and needs technical support a needs technical ability needs resources this hospital. This guy's doesn't have. Not even talking about the the stick. We're talking about only wounded emergency cases. But there's adults. Yeah. The delta said this morning, they've kgo eight thousand elective surgeries for heart surgery for cancer patients for people regarding tons plant Sodi operations, all of those have been left the being pushed the hospital that don't long do that in the hospital anymore. The only teach trauma Kazaks all the deal with all the other subjects have been postponed. Council delayed or send somewhere else, and that's up to it'll be years before they can clear that might log. Meanwhile, more and more people are getting sick. That exit of the hospital said that he was working he's working as a doctor for thirty years. And this is the first time ever that he sees a hospital unable to feed its patients, and he asked for more support. What can the U N do? Well, I mean, what we try to do when the guy the marches took place demonstrations, we a special people, which was a white paper, which was to try and bring donor specific funding for the health sector. We mighty stick over twenty million dollars. But that's twenty million less than we need. We need forty million. Plus, and that's just to deal with the case law would behalf today every Friday there are more patients who arrive with boom bullet wounds or requiring treatment, and it just answer the caseload. Meanwhile, the other subsidies are not team police because there's no key essential drugs. Can not enough essential drugs. We hear from the Central American see store, the drugstore that are some drugs that run on the running thet it is and forty days. And then when he he says he can't feed these people as indicative of the crisis that health system faces, but the health system is only power part of a broader issue. A broader issue of collage. Apps collapsing system in free fall. And if we said that the unemployment rate in Gaza is fifty percent, how Gessen's surviving always flagged this idea of resilience, which is something that are self reliance that the half here in Gaza. I mean, what is so willingness to survive under very terrible conditions of Nokia station. A blockade of an ability to move around freely unless you can p to go from there. Most people are stuck here for most of the lives. And it's not as you can buy everything you can have everything if you working seven and ten youth don't have jobs, and what we're trying to do is to create cash for what programs are we'll try to get people on what schemes that gives them a trade or skill that, they can go outside St. and say the to themselves, but this difficult to bring immaterial to actually, you know, build funded and self on a Sudafed to export matisyahu because of the restrictions are placed on Gaza. So it's a very very harsh environment for economic development. As a result of the economy is in freefall, the World Bank report in September said very very clear. The GDP gone to one person and to our declared this in poverty, as by the UN standards. So we're facing a crumbling collapsing situation here, and if you put on top of that all the stresses of the great March, Tom the demonstration, the health system, the psychosocial, and then you've got owner as the funding crisis for Indra as massive, you know, people are not George people are losing their jobs losing the support. And that's only adding further and further pressure on a very fragile precarious environment. And you mentioned before that two thousand eighteen was the worst humanitarian funding. What was the main reason for this? Well, I think there's a couple of reasons I think first of all this environment in the Middle East is a lot of other countries who may or higher profile than Palestine, and that would be the Yemen's of the series and the racks and then Libya's so you compete against those unfairly an also Palestine's been around for a long long time. People don't get the sense that there's a there's a political solution in any anything soon. And I think on top of that you've been doing fatigue. You know, then I think with the the fund. Cuts from the US towards Indra. I think that's basically been a catalyst other things to happen. I think is all of that. So we struggle as or humanitarian response plan for two thousand eighteen thirty five percent funded against the global average of fifty percent, which I fade how incredulous that has given the importance of Palestine to this Middle East region and the fighter this Palestinian question has been languishing for so many decades support you're getting from the Arab words from the region. Well, I mean, clearly not enough. I mean, I know the recently pledging event in the received some pledges of hundred twenty two million men much of that came from the Gulf countries, but it has to be a long term prospect has to be a regular prospect. It has to be something we can predictably expect from these donor countries and clued in the Gulf to make sure that we can plan properly because having a timing often ptunning on is not the base we plan for population who are vulnerable and Trump.

Gaza Middle East UN Gaza Strip Jamie Mcgoldrick Palestine Israel Matt Wells Nokia Gulf Coordinator United States Belo World Bank Delta Technical Support
Palestinians trapped in coercive environment, says UN rights official

UN News

06:26 min | 3 years ago

Palestinians trapped in coercive environment, says UN rights official

"This is loose. Graffiti of UN news, many Palestinians, living under his rarely occupation suffer from a course of environment were settlements expansion has made people's lives. So unbearable that they feel pressured to move according to a top u n official there James Heenan, head of the UN human rights office in the occupied Palestinian territory said that permits for building in the West Bank were almost non-existent now for Palestinians, speaking to Reema Bauza of UN news in Jerusalem. Mr. Heenan explains the challenges Palestinians routinely face today in the West Bank and east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip was buying and then he's truce Lamon Gaza will have their own different types of human rights challenges. But some of the challenges of calling across the whole area. One is use of force another is freedom of movement. Another is the way in which space society and human rights defenders dramatically, and if we talked specifically about Gaza, what are the issues that were you the most widely the buzz is really hope for the population Gazans feel and are under pressure from old photos at the moment, they are suffering from an eleven year blockade and closures imposed by Israel. They suffering essentially also under the split between the West Bank and Gaza, the political split and the the factor thirties in Gaza, Mike loss, very hard for a number of people, including human rights defenders for us. The concern for Gaza is all about. Allowing people to have an adequate standard of living, which is a human rod under the ICCPR international could covenant uncivil political rights and towards that end. The UN is working tool to humanitarian response to what's going on in Gaza. Ultimately, of course, it's a political problem humanitarian, what are the other human rights challenges specific to the West Bank and east Jerusalem at the moment, the biggest human rods challenges are generated by settlements the expansion of settlements. And we produced two reports a year on this. In and of itself creates a number of human rights violations. So for example, severance themselves are violations of international, we know that. But when you establish a settlement in areas c in the West Bank, he generally brings populations into proximity brings a settlers into proximity with the local Palestinians, and we know that that proximity generates things like settle of items the take over of land blocking the freedom of movement. The Palestinians nearby things like the blocking of access to services for Palestinians nearby. So the settlement enterprises people call it doesn't just have a problem with the Silverton themselves, but the impact on human rights. The biggest thing that's happening. Most recently is what we call the environment where you have a desire to move, Tulsa and communities for the purposes of settlement expansion or creation. What's happened at the long pass? I communities would have just been forcibly moved. Now. What's happening is those communities are put on the enormous pressure. So feel I have no choice but to move, and that's what we call. The course environment. This comes from the jury's prudence of you hate Trump troubles on the former Yugoslavia this idea that you can make lifestyle bearable for people through combination factors. They feel they have to. So for example, if you have a community near settlement sky to expand they can be subject to settle labontes. They can be subject to demolitions. So they cannot build in the West Bank term ability in the West Bank. But I'll sit ins are almost nonexistent. So any expansion they come undertake the young people get married. They can't start the village because there's no it to live. They can't expect access to services are blocked a firing zone can be declared by military nearby, which will mean that they can't access they land. And it can also mean that there is actual live far near the village which is dangerous last year. We had a sixteen year old boy killed by unexploded ordinance of this in the field. A combination of all of these factors all of which are human rights violations as well. Jen at their base makes life extremely difficult for people, and you see that people are leaving because of this. We know type in the West Bank of people on the huge amount of pressure to leave, and we know cases in Hebron where families of decided to move. Now each case has to be looked at all it's merits businesses, very serious mental. And the thing is Palestinians have a very very strong resilience. So they don't move easily. But it doesn't mean that the pressure is not there for them to move. And we're concerned I'm concerned that saw these communities will feel they have to move at some point. We'll talk about the courts environment. What does your office do on that issue? We have not see role an illegal role. Yeah. I think the office has been instrumental in bringing together this idea and making sure that there's a common understanding about what environments based on the jurisprudence of into. National tribunals, we track the quiz environment that patents to see what's happening through the violence. Not just the instances of settler violence. But also, the trends, and we analyze trends, and we publish them. We are mandated by the UN to be public about these things. What is the final message would like to express? I think the involvement globally. Is not supportive of human rights to seem to be. Since some places ideology, the pasta or system in the past. And you hear a lot said about that these days, but as Kofi man once said, it's not it's not people who so human rights is relevant. It's usually governments he said even real and for us. It's more relevant than ever that not just our office. But everyone stands up for human rights because the car is very very worrying.

West Bank UN Gaza Jerusalem Gaza Strip James Heenan Israel Reema Bauza Official Tulsa Silverton Kofi Yugoslavia Hebron JEN Mike Loss Sixteen Year Eleven Year
U.S. government to pay $4.7 billion in tariff-related aid to farmers

Marketplace All-in-One

01:16 min | 3 years ago

U.S. government to pay $4.7 billion in tariff-related aid to farmers

"US farmers caught up in the wider US China, Mexico trade dispute or expected to get details today on a twelve billion dollar aid package to help offset the effects of retaliatory tariffs. Farmers have been watching prices drop for milk, soybeans, wheat, and more marketplace's Reema Chris reports, farmers like Kevin skewness, say sheriff. They welcomed the aid, but if they had a choice, we keep going. The station that we, you know, we want trade not aid schooners who's also the head of the national corn Growers Association says, trade disruptions have led to billions of dollars in Las value for the corn industry. The government's compensation of twelve billion dollars sounds like a lot, but is it joke Lauber is at the international food policy research institute. I think if you total up what producer groups say they are owed, you will be well over twelve billion dollars, and there's another variable says Jonathan compass at professor at the university of Illinois, we are talking about making payments for market losses that we don't actually know the full extent of yet. But he says, if one thing is certain, it's that the impact of the tariffs will go beyond short-term pain. It's likely to have damage reputational damage in particular, and that's another cost to relationships with trade partners that may be hard to win back.

United States Nafta Nancy David Brancaccio Mexico Michigan Congress National Corn Growers Associat New York Reema Chris Rena Chris Jonathan Compass Canada Kevin Skewness Washington Germany UK Britain
"reema" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"reema" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Since the Syrian civil war started seven and a half years ago, more than three million Syrians of crossed the border north into Turkey, they've had to restart their lives, find new jobs and build new homes, and in a lot of cases that falls on women, often young women who've had to take on more responsibility than they ever intimidated because their husbands were killed in the war marketplace's Reema case reports now from Gaziantep Turkey, not far from the Syrian border on a young woman who's become her family's breadwinner. I'm half as we'll never forget her first day at her first real job. She was thirty four and really nervous, so nervous that she asked her mom to come with her the day, didn't get off to a great start hand on event. We got lost on the way there. She tells me an Arabic. That's because they didn't understand the bus system and walked instead huff is was an hour late and her boss also Syrian refugee was not sympathetic. What do you What know. do you know? He said, don't be late again or to me that you got lost and I said, no, no, no, of course not. So the next day I got all my strength. And when I got to work on time, I felt sorta leafed her job cleaning. The offices of a small nonprofit was easy enough. The hard part was being an office how fit says she was so shy at took her weeks to look people in the eye back in Syria office had stayed at home with her two girls while her husband went to work. But when the government started bombing Aleppo, she fled and her husband's state to fight. She found out later on TV, he'd been killed, leaving his young widow and a foreign country where she didn't speak the language. That's a good pet in your so that never in my life that I think I'd work, but I didn't want my daughters to have to lie on anyone else to feel like something was missing without the father around. It's been two years since that's scary for stay. She tells me as she washes the dishes and sweeps the floor in the office kitchen. Amanda? Yeah. Pistola mom. So have you tour in the Muslim part of thing for me is that I'm not dependent on anyone's help. I can take care of myself. That's how his cell phone. Her eleven year old daughter met him again. I know I know I asked her in Arabic, does she call you a lot at work? They move. It's going to make the Sean. He's always calling me. She always says, when are you coming home? You're late. I'm bored, it's summer schools out huff. It says she feels guilty. She's not at home more, but she also knows she's one of the lucky ones. There are thousands of searing woman like Hoffa's in Turkey. Their husbands are gone and they're carrying the weight of their families. Many have little education if few skills and can only get menial jobs with long hours and low pay. Huff has got her job with the help of a local NGO and makes five hundred dollars a month that first paycheck she says felt on real halo. That was the first time I ever got paid five hundred dollars. I didn't even know what five hundred dollars minutes right away. I took my daughter to the mall. I bought them foods and he pushed the car. It was the first time ever pushing a car and they were so excited. After work Hoffa's takes me to her party in Gazyeta were about a quarter of residents are Syrian refugees. She lives on the second floor of an old building in a three bedroom that she shares with her daughter, her mom or dad, her three brothers and two of their wives. Black cushions are spread out on the living room floor tonight. They'll be pulled together as beds. Her father sits quietly eating, sunflower seeds. Her mother greets me warmly. We exchange hellos and Arabic. I let them slam kathak. She tells me that back in Syria, they didn't live like this. Everyone had their own apartment. I'm the highest mega there was no better life than before. She says, we wish we can return to that life, but it won't come back. Things have gotten better here when they first came to Turkey after spending almost all their money on smuggling fees. Huff would spend her days outside a mosque, begging for bread..

huff Turkey Hoffa Syria Gaziantep Turkey Huff Aleppo Reema Sean Amanda Gazyeta five hundred dollars eleven year two years
Republican Senator Graham Warns Against Troop Withdrawal from Syria

01:09 min | 3 years ago

Republican Senator Graham Warns Against Troop Withdrawal from Syria

"Upended serving short short i'm not sure one can have a culture shock within their own country but that's what i'm experiencing right now this twenty six year old saudi man comes from a large and conservative family so conservative he's asked his name not be used so as not to anger his family for talking to the foreign press he looks at his own family members and worries they'll be alienated and left behind because they're not fully on board with all the changes so on a personal level i see them just shrinking and excising themselves from the public sphere that's upsetting that they believe that the future doesn't include them saudi arabia should be big enough for all people princess reema bint bandar heads up the saudi sports authority which is allowing more women to take part in athletics she's making the rounds to promote the changes but acknowledges the government and the religious establishment needs to do a better job explaining them when you live in a community where overnight what was a no is yes it's very hard to rationalize if there's no.

Saudi Arabia Bint Bandar Saudi Sports Authority Twenty Six Year
Russ Solomon, founder of Tower Records, dies at 92

The Dana Show

02:20 min | 3 years ago

Russ Solomon, founder of Tower Records, dies at 92

"Listen live o rama world had dinner radiocom at the iphone footer pushing into the fold hulu and go and find me on instagram as well this is a long way away and i i dare disagrees them it's you can hear it on podcast everything here and hoping upon as kept anyway let's speaking to listen it's time for data's quick five well ces women okay this is literally a study in its from new york post so this is news women are getting that you're at work exit from university of arizona they found significant incidences of women on women reema's at what this is like everywhere in life by away as an assistant professor management her co authors ask for one thousand four hundred forty fulltime employment women whether they felt demeaned if such were they said women were mr reader to each other demand and warmer weather and that's completely true that's true women there from the earth six thousand dogs apparently quote pope work at amazon says the company because they joyner owners at work every day that's pretty cool they like bring their dogs to work and the dod they said it's been dogged friendly since day one that is pretty cool and they need a name the dogs they have like a thing on their they if they on the thirty thousand amazon campus there's dog relief areas and everything as a corgi name conolly i just want to point that out that's adorable the court above it uh consumer going on down the line who humans are getting mad and at robot cars according to la times in slapping and shouting at them on the in in fact in two of the sixty m b crashes involving robot cars human slap and shouted and freak out at all of them according to those are actually like police reports so yeah founder of tower records dies at 92 while drinking whiskey and watching the oscars russ solomon died with a drink at his hand in a smart alec remark on his lips the swashbuckling entrepreneur who founded tower records died of an apparent heart attack there's watching the academy awards when he was stricken said his son former chief executive of tower records he said ironically he was given his opinion of what someone was wearing that he thought was ugly and.

Hulu Amazon Founder Academy Awards Chief Executive New York University Of Arizona Assistant Professor Pope Joyner Russ Solomon Alec Sixty M
"reema" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"reema" Discussed on The Good Fight

"The then is this ever we of reading this past election as a story of continuity near a one just because he was at the top republican ticket that yes have papi's number never cups of white house but actually does harking back to a set of nineteen century economic populism must be quite influentual it's been a strain of malcolm frugal ford for a long time so you don't excellent book i feel like sometimes torn between these two readings and i wanted to get you a sends off you know is this an extraordinary moment with copious of ton inclined in american history it was the sort of actually you know full he may be suspicious designs a plus not that 'extraordinary a moment in pursuit of going to return to normal operations veteran protected really good book what we argue is that these are not mutually use that trump is the reema manifestation of occur in the war in more public and in conservative politics in the united states hope with a laugh kony you could say even poorer two years and when you push brings to an extreme as trump has you create a crisis that uh you weapon visible before we view trump is kind of good big joe that the system probably needed to confirm friend that were slowly coding system but only became obvious to everyone when somebody of extremist trump came along the are a couple things about that one in the republican party and the conservative movement.

united states republican party malcolm nineteen century two years
"reema" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"reema" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"Commemoration and if you do it in the next week will uh read a couple of them are play a couple of them on the next episode podcast at over thinking in dot com or the phone number two of three two eight five six four zero one i haven't said the phone number in a long time is that right two three two eight five six four zero one while you either hear my voice on the voicemail machine a voicemail thing that records and mp three or else you know or else you can't just just tell some random person who you who answers the phone which you think of the overthinking or podcast so yeah i do that or email us reema's the voice memos something something like that we'd love to hear any thoughts that you might have on this auspicious occasion all right speaking of things that lake this podcast our american made now we we all watched tom cruise's latest film recently and and i was sort of pleasantly i was pleasantly surprised by this movie and i thought that that there would be that there would be a lot to talk about um actually speaking of speaking of this weekend there were three are rated comedies in the one not comedies will it's kind of a comedy three are rated movies in a in in the the one two and three spots at the box office which is which is unusual and as i was talking as you do here in la as i was talking to the bartender at the reserved seating movie theater about the film i was going to see the the bartender also named mass coincidentally said to me you know i have friends who say that are rated tom cruise.

reema tom cruise la
"reema" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"reema" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Hold on to those afterburners fire nation jld here and while come to episode seventeenhundred in fifty eight of eofire where i chat with entrepreneurs are fire seven days a week are you ready to turn a your funnels on fire i have a free step by step course awaiting you at funnel on fire dot com now show today's featured guest reema deemed yell jomaa reema are you prepared to ignite are dj is an entrepreneur from la she currently lives in santa teresa costa rica where she manages a yoga retreats center in vegan restaurant and she serves all day so obviously she's got her systems and processes in place really take a minute filling the gaps from that intro and give us a little glimpse of your personal life all right well first of all hello partner shanghai tell tape that you're grabbing grateful to be here so my personal life by trade i marriage obama therapist i also teach yoga i'm an expert on all things again i don't iran restaurant i travelled a world do a little bit of everything bang mberi outdoors there and i within a coal part about my story and my pap as an entrepreneur is i actually khrais all of my opportunities to what kind of seemed like out of thin air so i've never really had many resources but i believe that whatever you need it's it's always within reach so whether it's something tangible are up stocks you know i got an idea or a solution that comes to me in third just get working towards creating it into a form so.

santa teresa costa rica partner obama iran seven days
"reema" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"reema" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

"What about you casper my blessing this week is for reema's loop him we mentioned the moment web as the sudden understanding between him and series without needing to say a word and you know i just think back of friendships that i haven't spoken to friends in years and you know i might see them at a party or even a family gathering right may be a relatively you haven't seen in so long and i i guess i just wanna bless that connection that still transcends time and space and the love that is felt between these two characters on the page in between us even after many as a pot so if was a a friend who's may become into your life recently in your thoughts or if just be reminded of them in some way may be for me this is a blessing to reach out to them and just rekindle that relationship i'm right here honey after all this time hallways again you've been listening to harry potter and the sacred tax check out our new video release last friday and support us on patron patrons you can have more videos like that in all of our lives and please show them on social media who can follow us on twitter instagram tumbler and facebook and leave us little review by chechens next week will reach up to eighteen mooney worms held pat prongs through the theme of isolation this episode of harry potter and the sacred texts produced by arianna nettle men vanessa sultan unmee kasperczak on music is by ivan plays out and nick boll and we are part of the panoply network you can find oz and other great shows on panoply fm thanks this week to emily baba for our voice mail rebecca and charlie ledley stephanie herself and fabulous kathy to from the nancy podcast for coming in sharing hostile policy you will next week by.

social media harry potter nick boll rebecca kathy twitter facebook emily baba voice mail charlie
"reema" Discussed on LadyGang

LadyGang

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"reema" Discussed on LadyGang

"It twenty percent off your first two orders over thirty five dollars ladies visit jet dot com and enter promo code lg at checkout have you heard august one is a whole bunch of awesome new show for names that are waiting for you on a brand new amazing afrikaner game changers norman lear talking to any bowler julia louis drivers and charles barkley given blair house unscripted ryan grigson josh gad soon meal patrick harris nadi so see real house white ever rose world against reema of on gas would lioma shell nelly furtado l king and more on me out of african regina and if you like what happens in the ring we'd go steve often christiana hotel son and and a whole bunch more or download our one of a kind waxy for yourself go to be asked door googleplay or downloaded now in august one cow okay what's going on in now accused the lady day to day play your favorite second favorite chair deliver italy britain she can take the titles he gave us classic episodes like brittany brittany and the one where if we found out cheetah's zero point zero gpa and then graduate she started dancing at the age of nine years old and went through a lot of shit in her life to become the star that she is she got cut before the top twenty on so you think he can dance which is a travesty she also lost her nadda young age and then she had the do the terrible thing that's called touring with beyond say just getting she's the ojeh single lady but she's not single she's married and a amama of two and recently she was a part of the biggest upset ever on dancing with the stars when people were jealous that she was perfect and they voted or off way too early when actually she should have won lease about them the one already had omarosa snow that was the worst sean drowsiness were starting with that of what happ.

josh gad brittany brittany happ norman lear julia louis charles barkley blair patrick harris steve italy thirty five dollars twenty percent nine years