7 Burst results for "Redevelop Properties"

"redevelop properties" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

08:16 min | 6 months ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on Planet Money

"Support for this. Npr podcast and the following message come from npr sponsor td ameritrade. Everything's customizable these days. Your trading platform can be too with thinker. Swim you can customize screeners charting and stock forecasts get started at td ameritrade dot com slash. Thanks swim support for npr and the following message come from usps. Your business is changing. Usps is changing with it. They're bringing small business. Solutions like fast reliable shipping nationwide more at usps dot com slash new routes the united states. Postal service priority. You anniversaries are a mixed bag. On one hand everybody pays attention. It's like we simply cannot resist twenty five and its multiples that last lawsuit the one that included chiefs grandfather began at the seventy fifth commemoration but once that lawsuit petered out most people outside of tulsa moved on. There was no new legal action until now the one hundredth anniversary last year chief signed onto a new lawsuit seeking restitution. It's got an unusual origin story. We have this new lawsuit that is being represented as a nuisance order a nuisance right because we we witnessed oklahoma sue pharmaceutical companies because of the nuisance that the opioid addiction crisis caused in twenty nineteen. The state of oklahoma sued a bunch of pharmaceutical companies and their case against and johnson went to trial. The state. Basically said johnson. And johnson. you guys make opioids. You knew they were addictive. You lied to us and now we have all these problems from addiction to homelessness to you name it. You are the reason we are paying for everything from drug courts to shelters you johnson and johnson. You created a public nuisance. Now sure public nuisance. Sounds more like somebody littered rather than wrecking entire communities but legally in oklahoma. This term means something specific. A public nuisance is one that affects at the same time an entire community or neighborhood. It was a rather unconventional thing for oklahoma to try but it worked scott. The judge here in oklahoma has found four. The state and against johnson and johnson declaring j. j. caused a public nuisance and has ordered johnson johnson to pay five hundred and seventy two million dollars to. There are thousands of these cases against drug manufacturers. This was the first to win at trial will when we looked at that that lawsuit and its definition as we said. Wait a minute. This sounds like the destruction of greenwood like literally in every form and fashion the consequences. The house affects the families. How it affects your future. Wealth inability to get a job or or be functional in society. All of those things directly impacted us so last fall team of lawyers representing the survivors and their descendants found that new lawsuit against the city of tulsa and its agencies the tulsa race massacre of nineteen twenty. One was presented legally as a public nuisance. Isn't that what reparations lawsuit in tooth and ninety seven to two thousand three was about restitution repair and respect. That's what this lawsuit is about restitution repair and respect everyone. We spoke with agreed that this is a creative approach but the official stance of the city is paying survivors and their descendants would be an unfair tax on today's citizens people who had nothing to do with what happened and the mayor said on the local news that reparations are divisive instead he's focusing on redeveloping property in and around greenwood. The mayor says it's a plan to build wealth that was lost and to bring all of tulsa together getting in trying to make cash payments to people. It divides the community on something that we really need to be united around so the city is trying to have the lawsuit dismissed in hair. Something i learned while working on this story by talking with historians lawyers and researchers historically reparation lawsuits for racial violence against black. Americans haven't worked when reparations have been paid for intern. Japanese americans for victims of the rosewood massacre in florida. They happened through legislation. I welcome everyone to today's hearing. On continuing injustice the centennial of the tulsa greenwood race massacre. That is why it's so meaningful that there was a hearing. Two weeks ago organized by a house subcommittee our next. Witnesses chief moose. Not quite how chiefs name is pronounced but still more than thirty years. After he first learned about what happened to his grandfather there he was giving his testimony of massacre descendants. Chief you're recognized for five minutes. Thank you mr chair in the steam. Buddy my name's chief wiley. I'm mushan. i'm the grandson of raymond. Beards senior and the grandnephew of matthew and mary beard chief made his case that is family fled tulsa after the massacre that they were dispersed across the country and lost contact with one another that they didn't know who was alive or dead and that he does not want to wait until the two hundred anniversary for some form of justice. When i look my oldest son in the is i wonder if the name i wonder if the chart baton of justice will burn in the palm of his hands or will it be cleansed in cold in the river of restitution. Thank you sir. We appreciate your testimony and your work a couple of days. After the hearing the tulsa greenwood massacre claims accountability act was introduced it needs to pass the house and senate so who knows what will happen. There have been so many similar. Bill's to acknowledge lynchings massacres slavery. That have stalled out before some for decades. This fight has gone on for so long that the easiest thing the government could have done. Give some money to the survivors. No longer means what it used to. As far as we know there are only three survivors left so we can stop here that That monument. That's place right there. So that's on the tour. Chief says he feels like there's this thing this hope for restitution and it's really close but when he goes to grab it it moves again just out of reach. 'cause you almost feel like somebody dropped a million dollars in a pond and gold coins and you feel like you gotta go dive into and scour it until you can find it because it belongs to you like. I can't stop looking for this thing. I can't stop looking for justice because it belongs to me. So for now he continues to offer his real black wall street tour taken groups of torres locals college kids through the streets. Where greenwood once was you any questions. All right we're done. Yeah yeah welcome. Thanks if you wanna know more about the tulsa race massacre you can listen. To the six part series i host blindspot tulsa burning. It's produced by the history channel and wnyc studios and collaboration with ko issue and focus black. Oklahoma you can email us at planet money at mpr dot org or an instagram twitter. Facebook tiktok today's show was produced by dan. Girma and mastered by julia. Moon planet. Money supervising producer is gold mark. This episode was edited by aaron edwards. Special thanks to rachel hubbard at keio issue. Treason heath at human rights watch and carlos hill at the university of oklahoma. I'm amanda and i'm kelaniya. This.

aaron edwards five hundred amanda rachel hubbard julia johnson kelaniya twitter five minutes last year Facebook instagram carlos hill wiley first twenty five tulsa two thousand channel florida
"redevelop properties" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Franchise history. Stay informed during hurricane season with W F l A news dot coms OPERATION STORM WIVES brought to you by Morgan Exteriors Potato six at news radio fella, Your doctor and other health care providers taken a lot more money If you pay with private insurance than if you're on Medicare, and the difference may be a lot bigger than you may have thought. A study published by the Rand Corporation finds a large sample of employers and private insurers pay on average. 247%. Moreover, what Medicare pays for the same hospital services in one week from today, the city of ST Petersburg will launch the application process for its Commercial revitalization program. The program provides up to $100,000 in grants to projects located outside of the downtown core that redevelop properties, decrease vacancy rates, create jobs, seek private sector investment and add to the tax base. And how are you feeling? Well, like the rest of us, you are a consumer. Later this morning, the University of Michigan will release its made September survey of consumer sentiment. Bloomberg surveyed economists are looking for a small improvement from Bloomberg. I'm Steve POTUS for news radio w F L A It's happening in just days. Publishers Clearing House will be ready to award $1000 a day for life. Enter now at PCH dot com and you and your family could soon be celebrating the win of a lifetime. Don't miss your last chance to win $1000 a day for life, go to PCH dot com before it's too late. That's PCH dot com. Better Hurry. If you want the next big winner to be you into red PCH dot com Now entries do 10 28 no purchase necessary void where prohibited Guys who needs an untucked shirt right now, How about anyone who's considering putting on a really close for the first time in months at on socket, we designed shirts to be worn on top. So comfort is our thing. Our shirts of the perfect blend of comfort in polish, so the next time you have to roll out of bed and straight to assume call, reach for an untucked shirt. Instead, use code September. And saved 20% off your order it on. Talk it dot com or your nearest on talk It store on socket shirts designed to be worn untucked. Never wait for weather. The storm teammate forecast of the top 30 past each hour on news radio w F L A.

"redevelop properties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Should be the best see you in for ten Sena Vega who still on maternity leave it's good to have you here with us on the take away the covert nineteen pandemic has four cities all across the US to try and address homelessness in a more comprehensive way some major cities including Philadelphia New Orleans and San Francisco are putting unsheltered people into hotels to keep them safe from the spread we recently spoke to San Francisco mayor London breed about the challenges involved as a this is the age of social distancing and I think that it's a lot more challenging not just for San Francisco but for anyone with a large homeless population so to expect us to all of a sudden open up every hotel room and have the ability to take care of houses this group of people and things will get better is is not necessarily realistic but the fixes that cities are implementing including moving people who are experiencing homelessness into hotels are largely temporary so what happens when the covert nineteen pandemic has passed many advocates are hoping the scale of this crisis will force officials to put new policies in place that will make lasting change to keep unsheltered people safe and to reduce homelessness overall nan Roman joins us to talk about this she's the president and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness and Jared Brady is with us also he is a freelance reporter in Philadelphia and housing correspondent for the nonprofit news organization next city Hey man he Jared hello thanks for having me Hey Derek can you start by giving us an overview of the scope of covert nineteenth effect on people who are experiencing homelessness nationwide and where we've seen the most significant impact well these folks are among the most vulnerable in in any event and so with a public health emergency like the one we're facing now and the possibility of a disease that so communicable folks who don't have homes are at some of the greatest risk the main public directive to avoid spreading this disease the stay at home it's okay we don't have homes that's clearly impossible and you know things like new York experienced the greatest outbreaks so I think that the folks who are on the house there are are seeing the some of the worst tuba city all over are trying to figure out how to deal with housing people who have been house for a long time and are now at a at a much greater risk of harm now and there has been some federal relief action to support states and cities who are having efforts to try and offer assistance to people who are currently experiencing homelessness what kinds of federal action have we seen so far well there's been considerable investment in helping our communities to address homelessness during them at the pandemic so Congress provided four billion dollars in emergency solutions grant funding which is a flexible kind of fat formula funding that goes to everyone in the country and that is going to provide a lot of assistance what needs to be done really is two fold to get people into spaces that can form with the CDC guidance so that they have enough distance between each other and their quarantine or isolate if they need to be and then also to address or what's going to happen during the economic recovery and those ESG resources will help with that there's also other federal money that relief find and other programs that could provide assistance to homeless people during the pandemic and when you say four billion dollars I mean give us a sense of whether that's that's a large amount of money for this or is that a drop in the bucket well we did an estimate or we actually ask university of Pennsylvania researcher and some colleagues to do an estimate of what it would cost just to reconfigure the shelter system to conform to CDC guidance around these issues and they estimated it would cost eleven point five billion dollars to do so that we got four billion of that we still are going to need additional resources and that isn't really even moving people along into housing that's really just to reconfigure the current system Jerod we've been speaking on the show about how many cities have been moving people who are street homeless to hotels or community centers can you give us a sense of how this is working in a few different cities yeah you know most cities are at like you mentioned trying to leave most of these that I've that I've heard about trying to find hotel rooms to individually house homeless people who either have been infected or at least expose to the to the virus to a certain degree there's also sort of questions around how to shelter people in an emergency ways that don't involve you know sort of concrete shelters I think that well a lot of the typical home shelters we think of people are pretty close together and don't have a lot of personal space and that's really become a problem during the pandemic in Sims is going a lot of other cities in California local governments county governments and state government to a certain degree was trying to lease hotel rooms for this purpose and a couple have talked about so currently acquiring hotels I know Missoula Montana recently just purchased a motel downtown that it's gonna use for emergency housing for people who've been exposed or infected and then once the emergency is lifted hopefully what if they were to do that realist it lifted that they're going to plan to rid of redeveloping properties permanent affordable housing so they try to keep to kill two birds with one stone we just did some work in the house in question and a longer term affordable housing shortage which is which contributes to the homelessness problem in the first place we have been talking to a lot of jurisdictions that are trying to use the hotel and motel strategy one concern we have is that very few unsheltered people are being brought into a shelter most of the people that are moving into the hotels and motels seem to be coming out of shelters they're trying to get in out to some degree we also know that jurisdictions are saying telling us that they're having a difficult time staffing those hotels and motels a lot of organizations sheltering organizations have lost staff people either because they become ill or because they're concerned about catching the virus or they have their children home because they're not in school various different reasons and this is a challenging population that needs support and it's hard to staff up basically on a dime but it's a very important strategy and I think places are starting to get better at and injured what about rental assistance have any cities made efforts to formalise rental relief especially for people who are experiencing homelessness right now yeah quite a few I know that in Orange County Florida that but at the very sort of at the beginning of the pandemic they had opened up a local rental assistance program and it was so quickly overwhelmed with applicants that they had to shut down this and you know it's just a few a few hours basically last week in Dallas the same thing happened they they opened up a rental assistance program locally that people who had lost income because of the pandemic could apply for rental assistance and more in mortgage assistance and I think that lasted about thirty hours and they had about ten times more applicants and they were able to actually serve I live in Philadelphia and they're opening their own T. H. O. rental assistance program this next week just a couple days here so we're going to have this gonna happen with that but a lot of cities are using some of the cares act money to create rental assistance programs and then just seeing the the demand to be much greater than they are ready to to meet and then what our city is doing to keep people who are living without permanent shelter safe in this moment besides finding physical shelter for them are they doing anything to provide hygiene or or anything else that's helpful to them in a moment like this some jurisdictions are really working with people who are unsheltered largely those encampments and not everyone who's unsheltered lives in an encampment a lot of people really live individually you know either in a tent or they move around but where they are groups of people living outside there are jurisdictions in California DC and elsewhere where they're providing hygiene materials Porta potties doing clean ups and so forth but really we need to get these unsheltered people into shelter at a minimum and eventually into to housing in order to protect their health people who are unsheltered halves are very vulnerable in terms of their health care much more disabled and ill than people who are sheltered much less people who are in homes so it's really imperative that we deal with unsheltered homeless people and get them in and I don't think we've made a lot of progress on that to be honest Jared can you speak briefly to the crisis of food insecurity in this moment and what efforts have been made to connect people with access to food yeah I mean I think that one of the consequences of having come get shelters be sort of more dangerous places to be now that there's a public health crisis is that people haven't known what to do in terms of communal cooking a lot of things like that that that used to happen and and and those kind of shelters I know in Cambridge Massachusetts the mayor there instituted a program where the city is basically paying restaurants that have had to shut down because of the state homeowners to create to make to make meals for some local homeless shelters and if you know and they had a range restaurant has been that and are sort of pretty meals that can then be passed out and in a safe manner to to to folks who are using the shelters some of the cities of done similar things that are their projections for how many more Americans could become homeless as a result of this pandemic I have not seen any projections on how many people are likely to become homeless I would say first that because of the additional resources federal resources at least we do have a chance I think if we're still for strategic to move a lot of people who are currently homeless into housing but I have a lot of fears about what's going to happen as the country opens up again many people now are living under rent forbearance programs they don't have to pay the rent at the moment but when all of this ends they're gonna still those a rear reaches these are many of the same people who haven't been able to work or only work sporadically they're not going to have three months worth of backgrounds they don't have assets or they would have been paying the rent already we also have a lot of the eviction moratoriums around the country and in certain kinds of housing that prevents people who can't pay their rent from being evicted but those will also go away and so I think we're gonna have a lot of people who rent and are able to be evicted and are affected and I'm concerned that we need to plan better about what's gonna happen to them we the alliance and many other groups have come together to request a hundred billion dollars in the next ten miles's bill for rental assistance in great part to prevent replacing the existing group of homeless people with a just a new group that comes out of this pandemic in and as we're seeing different cities reacting to the needs of unsheltered people during this pandemic do you believe that any of these temporary solutions give way to long term solutions yes I do think so and I think we have resources to move in that.

Sena Vega US New Orleans San Francisco Philadelphia
"redevelop properties" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The cove nineteen pandemic has four cities all across the US to try and address homelessness in a more comprehensive way. Some major cities including Philadelphia New Orleans and San Francisco are putting unsheltered people into hotels to keep them safe from the spread. We recently spoke to San Francisco. Mayor London breed about the challenges. Involved as this is the age of social distancing and I think that it's a lot more challenging not just for San Francisco but for anyone with a large homeless population so to expect us To all of a sudden opened up every hotel room and have the ability to take care of houses this group of people and things will get better is is not necessarily realistic. But the fixes cities are implementing including moving people are experiencing homelessness into hotels are largely temporary. So what happens when the Cova Nineteen pandemic has passed? Many advocates are hoping the scale of this crisis will force officials to put new policies in place that will make lasting change to keep unsheltered people safe and to reduce homelessness overall. Nan Roman joins us to talk about this. She's the president and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. And Jared Bray is with US also. He's a freelance reporter in Philadelphia and Housing Correspondent for the nonprofit news organization. Next City Hain. An he jared. Hello thanks for having me jared. Can you start by giving us an overview of the scope of Cova nineteen effect on people who are experiencing homelessness nationwide? And where are we seeing the most significant impact? Well these folks are among the most vulnerable in any event and so with a public health. Emergency like the one we're facing now and The possibility of a disease that so communicable folks who don't have homes are at some of the greatest risk the main public directive to avoid spreading this disease to stay at home and so for people who don't have homes that's clearly impossible and you know please like. New York have experienced with the greatest outbreak so I think that the folks who were on housed there are seeing some of the worst two cities all over are trying to figure out how to deal with housing. People who haven't been house for a long time are now at a much greater risk of harm Nan. There has been some federal relief action to support states and cities who are having efforts to try and offer assistance to people who are currently experiencing homelessness. What kind of federal action have we seen so far? Well there's been considerable investment in helping communities to address homelessness during the the pandemic so congress provided four billion dollars in emergency solutions grant funding which is a flexible kind of Formula Funding. That goes to everyone in the country and that is going to provide a lot of assistance. What needs to be done really is twofold to get people into spaces that can form with the CDC guidance so that they have enough distance between each other and they're quarantined or isolate if they need to be and then also to address. What's going to happen during the economic recovery and those? Espn resources will help with that. There's also other federal money. Relief Fund and other programs that could provide assistance to homeless people during the pandemic. And when you say four billion dollars I mean give us a sense of whether that's that's a large amount of money for this or is that a drop in the bucket. Well we didn't estimate or we actually ask. University of Pennsylvania researcher and some colleagues to do an estimate of what it would cost just to reconfigure the shelter to conform to CDC guidance around these issues and they estimated it would cost eleven point five billion dollars to do the we got four billion of that We still are going to need additional resources and that isn't really even moving people long into housing. That's really just to reconfigure the current system Jared Whitman. Speaking on this show about how many cities have been moving people who are street homeless to hotels or community centers. Can you give us a sense of how this is working in a few different cities? Yeah you know. Most cities are like you mentioned trying to Lee's most cities that I've heard about are trying to find hotel rooms to individually house homeless people who either have been infected or at least exposed to the virus certain degree. There's also sort of questions around how to shelter people in emergency ways. That don't involve know Congress shelters. I think a lot of the typical homeless shelters we think of people are pretty close together and don't a lot of personal space and that's clearly become a problem During the pandemic in San Francisco and a lot of other cities in California local governments county governments in state government to a certain degree was trying to lease hotel rooms for this purpose and a couple of have talked about currently acquiring hotels. I know Missoula Montana recently. Just purchased a motel downtown that it's going to use for emergency housing for people who've been exposed or infected and then once the emergency is lifted. Hopefully if the emergency that relisted lifted they're gonNA plan to Redevelop Properties permanent affordable housing. So they're trying to sort of birds with one stone which is Housing question and the longer term affordable housing shortage which is which contributes to the homelessness problem in the first place we have been talking to a lot of jurisdictions that are trying to use the hotel motel strategy When concern we have is at very few unsheltered. People are being brought into shelter. Most of the people that are moving into the hotels and motels seemed to be coming out of shelters. That are trying to thin out to some degree. We also know that jurisdictions are saying telling us that they're having a difficult time staffing those hotels and motels a lot of organizations. Sheltering organizations have lost staff people. Either because they've become ill or because They're concerned about catching the virus or they have their children at home because they're not in school various different reasons and this is a challenging population that needs support. And it's hard to staff up basically on a dime but it's a very important strategy and places are starting to get better at it. And and jared what about rental assistance have made efforts to formalize rental relief Especially for people who are experiencing homelessness right now. I know that in Orange County Florida at the very sort of at the beginning of the pandemic they had opened up a local rental assistance program. It was so quickly overwhelmed with applicants that they had to shut down within just a few hours basically last week in Dallas. The same thing happened they. They opened up rental assistance program locally that people who had lost income because of the pandemic could apply for rental assistance and more mortgage assistance. And I think that lasted about thirty hours. And they had about ten times more applicants than they were able to actually serve. I live in Philadelphia. And they're opening their own rental assistance program this next week just a couple of days or so. We're going to what's going to happen with that. But a lot of cities are using the money to create rental systems programs. And then just seeing the the demand be much greater than they're ready to to me and what are is doing to keep who are living without permanent shelter safe in this moment besides finding physical shelter for them are they doing anything to provide hygiene or anything else. That's helpful to them in a moment like this. Some jurisdictions are really working with people who are unsheltered. Largely those in encampments not everyone. He's unsheltered lives in an encampment. A lot of people really live individually. You know either inattentive. Or they move around their groups of people living outside There are jurisdictions in California decision elsewhere. Where they're providing hygiene materials porta-pottys doing cleanups and so forth. But really we need to get these unsheltered into shelter at a minimum and eventually into in order to protect their health. People who are unsheltered have are very vulnerable in terms of their health. They're much more disabled and ill than people who are sheltered much less people who are in home so it's really imperative that we deal with Unsheltered homeless people and get them in and I don't think we've made a lot of progress on that to be honest Jared can you speak briefly to the crisis of food insecurity in this moment? And what efforts have been made to connect people with food. Yeah I mean I think that one of the consequences of having congregate shelters be sort of more dangerous places to be now that there's a public health crisis is that people haven't known what to do in terms of communal cooking and a lot of things like that that used to happen in in in those kinds of shelters. I know in Cambridge Massachusetts. The mayor there Instituted a program where the city is basically paying restaurants that have had to shut down because.

Jared San Francisco Philadelphia Cova CDC president and CEO Jared Bray US California Jared Whitman Housing Correspondent Nan Roman Unsheltered Relief Fund Montana Espn Redevelop Properties Cambridge
"redevelop properties" Discussed on Playerz From The South

Playerz From The South

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on Playerz From The South

"You're talking about the differences in the south. I'm sure there had to be some type of catalyst for getting records on the radio down here. How did that happen? How did the masses of fans started begin? Will we'll build in other places okay now. This was the process. But let me let me see if you can follow me from the early ninety s up through the mid nineties. Black radio was started to transition from from a Geordie. R&B format to open doors to more traditional rap. Music hip hop was making a lot of money by this time but still just scratching the surface southern rap along the Gulf of course was largely independent and it was a freedom to speak about whatever you wanted so radio wasn't accepting to it. In my opinion it was. Dj Greg Street in Atlanta and opened the door begin again a bridge that divide that hot summer ninety six it opened the floodgates for several rappers to get consistent radio play by that time you had eight ball and j g masterpiece and his family. You G K will already underground kings. They were all doing collaborations with each other. I don't think I started to pop to like a couple years later. Like on the National Level Greg Grant Street was breaking all this shit on top. Eight was probably the first time ever. The whole eight will be filled with just southern artists. I'll cast spirited that new movie coming out. Atlanta would soulful Cadillac music and not a golf course was coming with that ghetto dope boy funk and Greg Street blended that different southern cultures perfectly. I remember Greg Street. Yeah so what about Jack. The rapper. What makes that time so influential for you and your crew it was the camaraderie rebuilt not only with each other but it was the beginning of a brotherhood we built with the best of the best? Not only from down here either. The East Coast has some dudes who accepted us in the West Coast has accepted us not all but some we took that business trip was able to make business connections and friendships for a lifetime. We have so many forces against us but we kept on working and had to grind for south first and foremost foremost at that particular convention. We had the chance to see everybody who was about to contribute to. What's known as the Golden Era and hip hop Wu? Tang was there mob deep. Big Big Part Busta Gour premier nine hundred. Ninety four may have been golden era as a whole but I think ours came in ninety six. We were so late into the party but arrived arrive right all the time that makes any sense it makes sense but with east coast artists already having gold and platinum status by the mid nineties. Southern rap was still in its formative years. How was your level of success measured at this time in comparison to the present? Well if I remember correctly the diary sorry what platinum in Nineteen ninety-four dope ass album by one of the hip hop most eloquent lyricists scarface with the exception of releases by affiliated ghetto. Board members miss the south still hadn't started to consistently put up those numbers yet but by ninety six we started that breakthrough regular radio rotation finally rap city top ten. We'll be seeing nationally now. Outcasts opened the door for the South being a successful act that could be marketed to the world. The Gulf coast was still on the independence shit though but but finally breaking through the limitations of Regional Distribution When you G K released Ryan dirty set a standard for southern rap masterpiece go with ice cream man as a small dusty label who released two albums in the second quarter of ninety. Six BB is debut album hit. The highway went on sale over three hundred thousand units with the grassroots fan base. We had to spend a little more money on marketing. A royal sees project his self titled Debut Sold About One hundred eighty thousand and was truly ahead of his time very groundbreaking groundbreaking. It was these two releases that landed us a distribution deal with the major and that's went down south Pibor productions became Magnolia Music Inc.. We signed a joint adventure early ninety seven and never looked back. It wasn't a seamless transition though the whole entertainment industry was about to get rocked to court and nobody got hurt more than hip hop culture. I've heard a clear line of separation is used when people compare these eras. What does it do? You think that affected hip hop as a whole during this time. Always say the greatest gift and curse to not just heal up but black culture in general was the Clinton Communications Act of one thousand nine hundred six. It made us sick and we're still able to get will. Bill was this some type of legislation by Bill Clinton and his goons. How did President Clinton effect what you were doing rap when people say this was the beginning of the end and do you think this was accurate? Yeah I think goons was the right word to use. But you know there's no other way to approach this but to say we were doing from the start. What what happened was bill? Clinton was in office as President of the United States at that time signed into law. Communications Act which was largely meant to deregulate the telecommunications the industry would it did consequently was loosened restrictions on mega corporations owning huge slices of media empires radio stations. TV networks we bought and consolidating into a parent company with new major interest in keeping their culture alive. They got a board of directors who only saw bottom line. How do you think all this affected hip hop as a whole for one with this created was a situation where he has a publicly traded liquor lumber even candy company could acquire a major label and a network network of urban radio stations in major markets and please programmers limited knowledge of how to move a crowd in positions of power? Just keep the bullshitting rotation. Keep the abortion in rotation program masses. You see what you have. What was known as the big six? The major label families were Sony Columbia. MCA UNIVERSAL BMG. RCA EMI capital Warner and polygram it all but killed the phenomenon of indie label. What had become in the south? I see where he's going with this. So what you're saying is the Clinton Act brought about this slow certain death to the culture being grain music. We listen to what we're forcing. I get that the environment became too controlled mucked up and money. That's exactly what I mean. When I say shit went off the rails instead of owning our own culture and being creative innovators? We started to applaud the fiction. Accept Anything and anybody bt now had to push whatever agenda The parent company wanted them to push regardless. If the ideology edgy are images would be cool with the people you realize that eighty five percent of information we take in is controlled by three or four companies essentially that takeover was a monopoly for your your mind and your spirit as long as corporations had the money to promote the bullshit it was going to sail to a watered-down audience that real shit was becoming less visible but nine hundred ninety Lina. I knew I wanted to get out and had to plan an exit strategy. That took me four years to execute people like you you become well respected just by a lot of moves that you've made eight inside and outside the music business. I know you've always kept family old associates around you. who was the crew in? What role did they play in your plans to make something from? I'm essentially nothing early on all we had was a home phone beepers and Effects Machine at my Mama House Way it turned out Mama will watch the fax machine. It should usually book. The show's uncle was road manager. And he had a right hand man who would always watches Beck. His security detail became a one man security team. His name was Kareem Green and they met in the pin years earlier. Korean was about six foot. One in about two hundred and forty pounds built like a linebacker in the league. You know what I'm saying but he was a convicted felon. He couldn't own or even carry on person but nobody had to know that he was forceful with his words. In a calm way to let you know he wouldn't about no punks it then. Vinh Cortez was always around as Rhody Barber. He carried crates for the rule. Dj whose name was IRV. Scratch the you know my cousin J up of course produced all records. He was with us all the time too. There was a method of a white dude named Zach. I think you referred to him as White Zach. Oh Yeah Yeah. Yeah can't forget his crazy as me as I got Cooler Hula Catholic school I went to. He came from money and always wanted to be down with anything wrap related he could quote classic lines with the best of them. You know he was a real student at a game and just wanted to be down so I made him director street promotions for the label by then our first three Axworthy Rossi and a wild pair of twins named the hard heads they it became our first major label release by this time. Jamal was in zone. The first album south stories sold over four million and with tomato production. He started to get calls from all over the map. He started doing sessions with the biggest names in a game. That time man. We all grew up together. Feels like you've faced an insane amount of pressure as the young men of color starting a hardcore rap label in the South Ninety five. Now you're a multimillionaire and you've made a fortune real estate holdings capital investments. But some. Some people might rest their laurels and consider themselves success and just quit retire completely. And what ways are you still active in the music business. Also where are the Murals Bureau of you in your own city. It seems like you'd be more beloved in the city that helped put you on. The map was the deal earlier. When I was talking about the haves and have-nots well see we from the hood not expected to do much? I want perfect growing up but I do want to get out of here and help the ones who couldn't get out with me me. I bought land redevelop property and had beautification projects enacted our barber shop and a learning center on the same side of town. I grew up on every time we started the bill. Momentum we faced a setback or two Dilawar red tape from City Hall. You know. I've got friends on the city council. Who knew how to push through when it needs to be but man? We're in a time. Where black political leaders pandered to an ignorant voting base or to concern with catchy slogans rather than the system of checks and balances that regulate when shit get.

Bill Clinton Atlanta Greg Street South Ninety Gulf White Zach East Coast Lina Beck Jack Tang United States City Hall Pibor Murals Bureau West Coast Sony Columbia Magnolia Music Inc Kareem Green
"redevelop properties" Discussed on Daily Detroit

Daily Detroit

10:41 min | 2 years ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on Daily Detroit

"And Sven catches up with soccer correspondent Fletcher sharp to preview Fridays Detroit City F._c.. Soccer Midwest semi finals match and some drama in the National Premier Soccer League playoffs all that right after this daily Detroit is brought to you in part by repurpose. That's where you can get hired by Detroit's best startups and companies repurpose connects top ten unlike you with purpose driven companies based on values experience and culture fit join their talent community at Repurpose Dot C._O.. What's that website again Repurpose Dot C._O.? Another week another report about about property the illitch family owns and mostly is in developing the Detroit news reports the villages own of forty four empty lots and eight vacant buildings in the area surrounding Motor City Casino Hotel another property the family owns the villages now want to build a seven story seven hundred space parking structure next to the casino on Grand River that would be taller than the Casino building itself. All of this property is just west of the district Detroit the illitch families name for the fifty block area between downtown in midtown that promised to develop into vibrant mixed-use neighborhoods opponents of the new parking garage site the lack of progress in district Detroit and with other illegit on properties as evidence that the family doesn't follow up on its promised to redevelop property the Detroit News says that despite promises that the district would be transformed by two thousand seventeen quote more than a dozen of the fifty blocks are more vacant now than when the plan was launched in twenty fourteen in I'll add here. It's been reported by the Detroit news by cranes. H._B._O.'s got into the mix. We've talked about it for its part. The villages say the new parking garage would better serve casino patrons and employees and would mean the ability to hold more concerts and live events at motorcity soundboard art will link to the Detroit News Story Online spin one of the reasons. We're doing this. Is You got some thoughts yeah so I was just doing some thinking the other day about the district Detroit you know it really remains just probably the most bizarre kind of mystery in town like what the hell is going on here. I mean the short answer is nothing right so like it's a lot of district did not very much Detroit yeah and some of this you know some of these things I've sort of said before and pieces because we've certainly talked a lot about the district Detroit on this show before but I kinda put it together like a little bit holistically so let me back up a little bit I recently read the book death and life of Great American cities by the famed urban est Jacobs and it's really you know a an indispensable book. Look if you're interested in cities. You have to read it. It's really fascinating even though at times it's a little bit of a laborious read but anyway I digress. Jacobs makes some very insightful observations about cities. They're remarkably complex places when you really break them down and and peel behind him and look at what's happening. I mean we're talking about successful vibrant cities here <hes> vibrant city neighborhoods. She argues need twenty four hour neighborhoods where there are uses twenty-four hours residences. You know you know people who live in the neighborhoods people who work in the neighborhood people come to the neighborhoods for entertainment and recreation and things like that you need a diversity of buildings and structures and building heights and you need things like trees and short blocks and parks and you know like you need blocks interrupted so and cities of course need to grow organically. Although of course you know planning urban planners <hes> are important to play an important role all cities through things like Zoning Blaine important role in how neighborhoods take shape of course in any big city so all of which is to say that what the villages were talking about doing with district Detroit. I mean fifty blocks is that is really ambitious and frankly really hard right like and I said this before like could any is there any developer in America or much less. The world who's capable of like literally a single handedly building a vibrant urban neighborhood that stretches fifty blocks. I mean outside of say Saudi Arabia or some of those Arab countries where you've got those super towers you know those yeah but I mean even there those superpowers story buildings whatever they are but those superpowers are also separated by like eight lane freeways where people are driving. You know eighty miles an hour and stuff like that so yeah. It's it doesn't doesn't translate here. I mean it's just it's a really unprecedented thing so you know I'm personally doubtful at this point. I I'm growing more and more doubtful. This is maybe my new revelation. I don't think the district Detroit's ever going to materialize not in anything resembling what villages initially promised right that it was going to be I think four or five distinct neighborhoods hoods with retail and office space in a hotel like a huge you know they were talking about a world class hotel and and residential of course is another important component. You know this vibrant urban neighborhood and you know we talked about it when cranes came out with that big story that they were really micromanaging the process when they were you know undergoing it trying to dictate all the terms to developers of Outlook D. This is the standard look we want and when I thought about that I thought that sounds you know if they're going to dictate how the look and design standards of this whole neighborhood like. WE'RE GONNA end up with like something. That's going to be like a Carnival district in Detroit and you know if it ever if it ever became if it ever came to fruition wishing it would be a disaster like nobody it would be like the tally hall of urban redevelopment projects like people would think it was Kinda neat at first and then they'd be like wow this place is really weird. Let's stay away so all of which leads me to conclude that if. You know indeed the district. Detroit never materializes in the form that it was initially proposed. Maybe we've actually dodged a bullet here in Detroit because we would have been stuck with this giant fifty block neighborhood <hes> where everything has this weird you you know illitch approved design standard that isn't organic and is really out of character with the rest of the city and it would be a giant flop and it'd be a dead zone. I mean Dad's Oh now but it'd be a dead zone with brand new buildings and colossal waste of money. That's really interesting in the context of how they've been especially to residential tenants Kinda Slum Lords with those folks especially with those folks down the way over by Catholic high school just a couple of blocks from here and there's any here's the kicker here here's the kicker if it it fizzled and it just fizzled and they said Okay you know what we're GONNA go ahead and sell or spend some of this land and give it to an you know put into the market for other people to use it that would be okay. Well whatever right that's right business things still work but we put three hundred twenty four million dollars of taxpayer subsidies of one form or another and we'd hide that to this project right which complicates everything because without though subsidies would be like well while they sell some of the land and let's get it to other developers and see what can go because this neighborhood support successful things were sitting in one of them yeah absolutely and I agree and the point out that well the technically the three hundred twenty four million in taxpayer bonds were for the arena not the district attorney but the arena was sold as like the centerpiece her piece of district Detroit. I mean they don't think it was all push for the arena unless all that other stuff goes around right because the idea was it's not just an arena. It's the catalyst to do so much more. How People Kinda were sold into well? At least the public was sold. I think as far as the deal itself it's pretty clear that was done behind the scenes that was wrapped up with a bow and delivered yet and I mean you know look. I think the city was sort of duped into thinking like Oh my God we have the opportunity once in a lifetime opportunity to develop this huge swath. I would say not just the city I would say the emergency manager and the state because we didn't have control of our own city at this time point good point but they looked at it as this while once in a lifetime opportunity to redevelop one fell swoop. You know this never happened. We it would take otherwise take decades who knows how long it would take to redevelop all these blocks surrounding where we're recording this right now but I don't think it was ever realistic and frankly I mean if you know we talked about it before to. They have a long history of making promises like this. I mean look at the terrible illegit facebook page they dare do an excellent job chronicling that when they talked about you know the tiger town or whatever they called it when they were pitching Comerica Park back in the turn of the century tree so you know I don't know I I don't know how we could compel the villages to just give up some of this property and sell it to people who will actually do something with it but I'd certainly in favor that since the weekend is coming. It's time to talk food news. WHO's in fun I off sit? Gold request room is opening this Friday the piano and Karaoke bar. That's an echo of the New York location promises to be quite cool and you know I've chatted with the New York based owner before really cool guy all all of it <hes> the project is opening later than expected but man man's fan this might just be the new ticket downtown and it's over at the world's or billing like the scientists really cool some of the preview shots that I've seen like on instagram and things like that I mean it's going to be great and and it's done by a couple of interesting people so I mentioned Paul and he did the famous beauty bars and his other partner is the former psychedelic firs guitarist Joe McGinty notes interesting yeah really interesting and here's the thing about the beauty bar and there isn't one around here so maybe people don't know but I spent some time in New York and the beauty bar actually has six locations and it actually started as a conversion from a salon to a saloon like a beauty salon. Yeah who's literally I think actually they still had like some of the the hair stands or whatever I I don't get perms. I don't know what those are called dryers. Oh you mean the chairs with the like weird cap things that dry or do whatever your hair yeah exactly that's it. I used to actually own one of those. I bought it off. Somebody at a garage will look like you need one. No it's really not nowadays I had more hair done but I just let it looked cool. Yeah definitely next up the New York Times recently shouted out a pair of top notch chefs from Detroit in a recent piece highlighting the sixteen black chefs changing America America specifically they highlight Kiki Book Younger Luhya from the farmers hand and folk hope I got that names pronounce correctly as well as Max hardy from river Bistro and coop the Caribbean Fusion Asian Food Stall Right downstairs from here at the Detroit Shipping Company..

Detroit Detroit News Motor City Casino Hotel soccer Detroit Shipping Company developer America Sven National Premier Soccer League Fletcher sharp New York Grand River Jacobs motorcity soundboard Saudi Arabia New York Times midtown H._B._O.
"redevelop properties" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"redevelop properties" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"We have a growing concern for the safety and security of our members are airlines, the traveling public due to the government shutdown this already long as government shutdown in the history of the United States. And there is no end in sight in our risk averse industry. We cannot even calculate the level of risk currently at play nor predict the point at which the entire system will break. It is unprecedented air traffic controllers people who prevent air. Craft from crashing into each other in the sky. Cannot predict the point at which the entire system will break. Donald Trump said he was proud to do this. He said he is proud to shut down the government proud to be pushing air traffic controllers to the spot where they cannot predict when the entire system when will break, and when that system breaks people died. Here's another horrible. Mark of the Trump shutdown. Two. So if you not. Program. Come in here. Institute. Margaret. Backup. About fifty six. Through the second chance round out. We'll visit. Leading off our discussion now joy Reid an NBC national correspondent and the host of AM joy weekends here. And I miss Barbara arrest. The former executive vice president of the Trump organization and the author of all alone on the sixty floor. How one woman changed the face of construction and Jack O Donald the former president and chief operating officer of Trump plaza hotel and casino and co author of trumped the inside story of the real Donald Trump, Jack O Donnell being of course, the most successful American with the name O'Donnell and not related to me. Of course, joy, I wanna start with the woman. We just heard face myth. That is the real face of this shutdown right now today people who are on the verge of losing their homes. She is going to be a victim in Washington DC. Donald Trump has done a lot of his life as father done a lot of visions. They know from their end of it how that works and Mitch McConnell is the person who now will be as responsible as Donald Trump for face myth getting victims. She does not only doing vixen. But if you follow history as Tony Schwartz and others have laid out using tactics. Like, not fixing the heat making the apartment so unlivable that people essentially selfie Vic and leave in order to redevelop properties into luxury condominiums he's used to inflicting suffering on people that he thinks are disposable in order to get his way. This is the way he operates, and unfortunately, the country is getting a couple of lessons at once. We're getting a forced lesson in the constitution. One on one on the powers of the article one branch, which Nancy Pelosi is putting on a clinic as you say. Said she's wielding her power. So thoroughly so viciously. And so and so publicly in a way that we don't normally see women do she's not doing it with sort of demure way that we expect women to do. She just wield power period. And we're so used to week speakers or we're just not used to it. So Donald Trump is getting less than along with the rest of the country clear. He knows nothing about the constitution. But for the first time his infliction of misery on people. His lack of empathy for people is coming up against another power trying to stop him..

Donald Trump Trump plaza Trump Nancy Pelosi Jack O Donald Tony Schwartz president and chief operating United States Mitch McConnell joy Reid executive vice president Washington DC NBC Barbara O'Donnell Jack O Donnell