35 Burst results for "Red Line"

GOP Leaders Push Back as Biden Seeks Big Infrastructure Deal

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

GOP Leaders Push Back as Biden Seeks Big Infrastructure Deal

"President Biden has held his first oval office meeting with Congress's top four leaders hoping to reach a compromise on an infrastructure package the president's pushing his four trillion dollar jobs and families proposals with the bottom line here is we're going to see whether we can reach some consensus on a compromise on the floor but minutes after the nearly two hour meeting ended Senate GOP chief Mitch McConnell and house Republican leader Kevin McCarthy said the president's plan to pay for it by hiking corporate taxes is a non starter that's our red line though both men characterized the meeting as productive while the president's long showcased his ability to work with Republicans McConnell recently said his entire focus is on stopping the administration's agenda Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Congress Kevin Mccarthy Mitch Mcconnell GOP Senate Mcconnell Ani Washington
Republicans Draw ‘Red Line’ for Biden in Oval Office Showdown

Here and Now

00:15 sec | 4 d ago

Republicans Draw ‘Red Line’ for Biden in Oval Office Showdown

"Met at the White House with President Biden and Vice President Harris after the session, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said GOP leaders made clear that raising taxes to pay for the president's proposed infrastructure plan is a red line. The State

President Biden Vice President Harris Minority Leader Mitch Mcconnel White House Senate GOP
Biden Visits Philly to Celebrate Amtrak, Promote Infrastructure

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden Visits Philly to Celebrate Amtrak, Promote Infrastructure

"President Biden wasting no time after this week's address before a joint session of Congress traveling to Philadelphia today to try and sell his spending proposals to the American people from jobs, the infrastructure, education and child care, the president's proposals will cost trillions. I spoke with Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace about how the president will convince the public and Republican skeptics that it's all worth the hefty price tag. President the White House they've made a calculation. That because of all the money, and there were trillion dollar packages passed under President Trump in with the Republican Senate that that isn't a red line as much as it used to be in the past. And that there are would be greater acceptance for it. And, you know, look, you're talking about things that directly affect you're not bailing out Wall Street here. You're talking about money for community colleges money for four childcare. Having said that there's a lot of resistance from Republicans, especially to the tax increases and even some from more moderate. Democrats just that the enormous price tag So do I think they're going to pass something? Yes. Do I think they're going to pass the full $4? Trillion? No, probably not on those lines Criss. You had some high praise for the president's speech this week before a joint session of Congress, he said. It's going to be a popular speech with the American people. What did you think that and which people do you believe I could be happy with it? People who are getting something You know, I wasn't really saying that it would. The speech was good or bad. I just think as a political assessment, it's going to be popular, because basically what he's saying is, I'm going to give you a lot of stuff. $4 trillion with worth of stuff, whether, as I say it's child care or new bridges or You know, better airports or expanding broadband. And guess what? You're not gonna have to pay for it because big corporations and people making over $400,000 a year are are gonna have to

President Biden President Trump Republican Senate Chris Wallace Congress Fox News Philadelphia White House Criss
Putin Warns of Russian "Red Line" Amid Standoff

BBC Newshour

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Putin Warns of Russian "Red Line" Amid Standoff

"President Putin has warned Russia will deal swiftly and harshly with any country that crosses what he called it's red lines. But he gave no indication what those lines were in his state of the nation address. He accused other countries of picking on Russia, but said Moscow only wanted good international relations on domestic issues. He placed stress on improving citizens living standards and reviving the economy. Affected in recent years by international sanctions and the pandemic. Andrea Walker looks at the challenges facing Mr Putin. Russia has felt the economic impact of the global health crisis. Another decline last year was a relatively modest 3.6%. But for much of the last decade, Russia's economic performance has been sluggish. Economic output per person on approximate indicator of average living standards has been stark is around 45% of the level in the United States. The International Monetary Fund has said that to restart the process of catching up with the rich countries Russia needs far reaching reforms to improve the climate for business and reduced the economic footprint of the

President Putin Russia Andrea Walker Mr Putin Moscow International Monetary Fund United States
Biden open to compromise on infrastructure, but not inaction

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:33 min | Last month

Biden open to compromise on infrastructure, but not inaction

"I'm anthony davis president. Joe biden drew a red line on his two point three trillion dollar infrastructure. Plan on wednesday. Saying he's open to compromise on how to pay for the package but in action is unacceptable. The president ten fiery in an afternoon speech saying the united states is failing to build invest and research for the future adding that failure to do so amounts to giving up on leading the world. Compromise is inevitable biden. Said will be open to good ideas in good faith negotiations. But here's what we won't be able to do. We will not be open to doing nothing. Inaction simply is not an option biden. Challenge the idea that low tax rates would do more for growth investing in care workers roads bridges clean water broadband school buildings the power grid electric vehicles and veteran's hospitals the president has taken heat from republican lawmakers and business groups for proposing corporate tax increases should finance and infrastructure

Anthony Davis Joe Biden Biden United States
Feds investigating controversial shooting by Chicago police

Bob Sirott

00:29 sec | Last month

Feds investigating controversial shooting by Chicago police

"Authorities are now investigating a controversial police shooting in a red line station last year. Aerial Roman was shot twice during a struggle with officers at the grand some boy station in February of 2020. He survived his injuries, both the sometimes in Tribune reporting he was subpoenaed to testify. In front of a federal grand jury earlier this year. There are also ongoing investigations by the city in Cook County state's attorney. The two officers directly involved in the shooting were stripped of their police powers.

Tribune Cook County
The Bakery AI Being Used For Cancer Research

Kottke Ride Home

07:25 min | Last month

The Bakery AI Being Used For Cancer Research

"There's a bakery chain in japan that offers dozens of different kinds of pastries danishes. Donuts croissants sandwiches you go down a cafeteria style line. Pick what you want. Put it on a tray and when you get to the register to pain you put your tray on top of a backlit rectangle screen shows an injury of your train with bright green lines around each item it recognizes each item from among the dozens of pastries on offer at the bakery and then correctly charges. You how does it do that. You'd imagine some kind of relatively recent developments in deep learning neural networks. But in fact it's a more grown technology that got its start. In two thousand seven led by a man named hisashi kombi the new yorker recently profiled combine work with the bakery and how the technology he developed is now being deployed in many other sectors including cancer research. So let's start with the bread problem. Japanese consumers like lots of options and bread is no exception market. Research in japan showed that a bakery that offered a hundred different options sold twice as much as a bakery that offered only thirty and that unwrapped baked goods sold better because people perceived them as fresh but without the wrapping. You don't have labels or barcodes on the pastries so then you've got employees who have to memorize hundred different pastries and this slowdown lines. Because workers would often mix things up or have to take time remembering which peachtree was which not to mention. They handled each unwrapped pastry individually. So it wasn't exactly the most sanitary so this chain wanted to automate the process somehow and they turned to comedies company. Brain to help them out. Rain had already been working for twenty years on finding ways for computers to see something that was long one of the biggest challenges of artificial intelligence. The new yorker explains it really. Well quote as i write. This can look up at my shelves. They contain books and skin of yarn and a tangled cable. All inside a cabinet whose glass enclosure is reflecting leaves in the trees outside my window. I can't help. But parse the scene about a third of the neurons and my cerebral cortex are implicated in processing visual information but to a computer. It's a mess of color and brightness in shadow. A computer has never untangled. A cable doesn't get that glasses. Reflective doesn't know that trees sway in the wind. Ai researchers used to think that without some kind of model of how the world works in that was in it. A computer might never be able to distinguish the parts of complex scenes. The field of computer vision was zoo of algorithms that may do in the meantime and quotes over the last decade this has changed as deep learning and neural networks have been applied and tweaked in real world scenarios. Siri google translate and alpha. Go all rely on deep learning with layers of simulated neurons and their honed by things like tagging people in photos on social media and picking out street lights in those prove. You're not a robot tests on website forms but especially without that kind of passively crowd sourced assistance quoting again. The drawback of deep learning is that it requires large amounts of specialized data the deep learning system for recognizing faces might have to be trained on tens of thousands of portraits. And it won't recognize address unless it's also been shown. Thousands of dresses deep learning researchers therefore have learned to collect labeled data on an industrial scale and quotes and for brain the bakery chain not only with the frequency with which the bakery chain changed their offerings. Make such data required for learning. The new pastries be untenable. They were also several years too early to even consider using deep learning so they built their own system using lots and lots of algorithms by two thousand ten. They built a system with ninety nine percent. Accuracy across fifty types of bread tackling problems like different pastries that look remarkably similar and the same pastries that look different when one is baked. More or one got squished. As developing the back light the pastries have to be placed on to keep the lighting consistent even though they did have to also build a mathematical model to account for inconsistencies in color when it comes to bake times rather than showing assistant thousands of photos of each pastry as one would with a deep learning system they manually tweaked and honed the algorithms on each doughnut and danish until they got it right but their system learns to win. The system isn't sure instead of those green lines around each item. It shows yellow or red lines and prompts the user to select from some suggestions or manually input the product quoting again show bakery scan a pastry never seen on earth and it'll recognize the next one of its kind about forty percent of the time according to brain after just five examples it is ninety percent accurate and after twenty. It's nearly perfect. Moreover whereas deep learning systems are relatively inscrutable. You can't look at a neural network and say exactly why a decision emerged from it bakery scans judgments based as they are on hand engineered system or more particularly if the system. Miss identifies something. You can figure out why these days. It's unusual to develop in the way that brain developed bakery scan. The approach requires a mastery of fine details. It is in spirit artisanal. It takes years during which parameters must be tuned. Special cases accounted for deep learning relieves. You from having to understand how the seasons affect shadows in a donut hole you merely plug enough examples and the network figures it out and with deep learning. The same brain can accomplish different tasks when you feel different. Data deep mind. The alphabet subsidiary used data sets to train a single neural network to beat humans at chess shoghi and go systems that depend on domain specific knowledge as bakery scandal need not just new data but new filters new features in new algorithms before they can be used elsewhere and quotes nonetheless. The technology behind bakery scan now housed under the umbrella. Name of ai scan has gone on to be used in applications as far flung as distinguishing pills in hospitals to counting the number of people in eighteenth century woodblock prints and even spotting incorrectly wired bolts in jet engine parts but the most impressive application came in two thousand seventeen when quoting again. Dr louis pasteur's center for medical research in kyoto saw a television segment about bakery scan. He realized that cancer cells under a microscope looked kind of like bread and quotes. I love that observation but he was right. Ai scan has now been working for a few years on fine tuning their cancer cell detector. Saito a scan now. Being tested at two hospitals is able to look at an entire microscope slide and identify potentially cancerous cells with ninety nine percent accuracy based on features like the color tone size and texture of the nucleus and all round -ness of the cell as they continue to grow and build on their original system. Brain has had to bring in deep learning once recently when covid nineteen pushed bakery owners to start wrapping their pastries and individual packaging. Brain used a deep learning to help their bakery scan system still be able to identify the pastries behind the reflective plastic

Hisashi Kombi Japan The New Yorker Cancer Cabinet Google Dr Louis Pasteur Center For Medical Research Chess Kyoto Saito
City residents use maps to fight inequality in their neighborhoods

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

City residents use maps to fight inequality in their neighborhoods

"Some city neighborhoods are lush with parks and trees but others are dominated by stretches of concrete and pavement areas with fewer trees to provide shade less vegetation to soak up water. They tend to be hotter. They tend to be wetter. They tend to have worse air quality. Caitlyn goya's with groundwork usa a network of environmental justice organizations. She says these disparities result from decades of disinvestment and redlining racist mortgage lending policies that reinforce segregation and worsened inequality groundwork is helping residents in nine cities highlight the relationship between historical segregation and climate change vulnerability without a really clear understanding of the harms. That have happened in the past. You can't have a vision for the future and for how you're going to repair that harm. The group overlaid maps of historical redlining with data about heat tree cover an impermeable surfaces. Mongolia says the map. Show how the impacts of red lining persist and provide an important tool for local residents to sit down with their local government with elected officials with leaders in their community. And say you need to explain why this is still the case. And you need to explain what you're going to do to make things look a little bit different

Caitlyn Goya USA Mongolia
Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

Jewish History Matters

07:26 min | 2 months ago

Waste Siege: Infrastructure and the Environment in Israel/Palestine with Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins

"What is it about waste. That helps us to think through big questions about what's been happening in terms of israel and the palestinian territories. You know what is going on there. You know both in terms of you mentioned the history of infrastructure and also in terms of the history of the relationship between society. The government and the palestinians in between later also the jewish settlements in the west bank and the palestinians. Living there as well like what is waste. Give us as a lens to think through kind of what's going on on a bigger scale. One way to answer that is to say that it helps us look at multiple scales at the same time so one question that kind of answers and it may be a question that we don't realize we have or we should have but that question is who governs the west bank and you could get the answer by looking at this material and where it goes and how it's processed and when it's left there when capital gets invested to place in certain places or treated in certain ways i think from those very impractical tangible practices and sites we can see who is kind of managing this territory and that such an important thing for us to know politically above all because since the mid nineteen ninety s. Either you have people saying that. The palestinian authority now that it exists is the government. You have that coming from various political positions where there's an assumption that whether or not it is recognized fully as sovereign it can be held accountable for various things like it exists and it is the government and then you have other people who sort of its presence including at some point. I remember early in my project. I had faculty telling me you know really. You wanna talk about the pa. They're not really doing anything you know and i thought like you to find out what they are doing and if they are doing something from a project that looks waste but then you do have people who think that you know. Essentially the pa is to which the israeli administration has out sourced its occupation and so it's sort of treated as a neutral conduit. You know that does israel's bidding and that therefore sort of doesn't deserve its own analysis beyond what it does to facilitate essentially the occupation. And i think that waste enabled me to see the very dumps and thick and complicated network which includes donors which includes companies which includes people who are not sort of formed in something that's legible and coherent. Who might just be people in a neighborhood who are all managing the every day together. And i think that's important to understand that we know how we want to name the condition essentially that we are looking at when we look at contemporary occupied palestine. There's a lot going on. there's lots of think about. You're talking about like the ways in which the palestinian authority plays different kinds of roles in terms of occupation in terms of the day-to-day life of the palestinians themselves. And it's interesting. Because i think that when we think about basic infrastructure people don't think about it for the most part when it works properly right you know when you turn the tap in your apartment and clean. Water comes out. No one gives that any thought or really for the most part people. Don't any thought it's one there's failures infrastructure and thinking about like for instance you know questions clean water or when it comes to waste management or i know like nuclear power plants and people may not pay attention to what kind of plant is producing their power until it turns out that it was a nuclear plant that melted down. Or you know if they somehow see the direct outcome of a coal-based plant or something ultimately. It's a question of what is the role of infrastructure in society. I think that's part of what's really interesting. Here in general also speaks to the question of what's taking place in terms of the history of israel and palestine over the course of the past hundred years if not more which is the question of what does it mean to build up infrastructure so much of the zionist movement. The building of the shoe later the state of israel was an attempt to try to construct infrastructure to increase the absorptive capacity of the land. And then later on. Also you think about you know. What does this mean in terms of the palestinians. Well there's so much going on here as we think about the history of infrastructure and about how waste is a useful element that people tend not to think about in terms of their daily lives. Yeah i mean if i can respond to a couple of things there one just point on that. Last thing that you mentioned is that i was struck by the fact that my observations of the efforts the palestinian authority was making to build waste. Infrastructures was Those early zionist efforts. You know that kind of focus on independent infrastructure essentially no matter what and i say no matter what because they're all kinds of ways in which that presented challenges for construction so for example. Israel would often say we'll let you build a wastewater treatment plant as long as you connect it to a settlements wastewater treatment plant and the. Pa would say a red line. We won't because the point is to build the infrastructure of the state. I want to say that vision. And the insistence of the palestinian authority to build the infrastructures that it imagined to be the foundation of a future state took the oxygen out of the room. In terms of what other possibilities there could be for taking care of waste and of course the assumption was and this is going to get us a little bit toward are kind of capitalism climate change direction the assumption was definitely that we consume and we produce waste at the normal speed of any normal ideally normal society and then we build the infrastructures to house those wastes. But we don't try to limit what we produce because we're still in the process of becoming what everybody else's which i think something that you find. In general and the global south. I would say that people and infrastructure studies who study it in the global south. There have been making this point over and over again which is important which is in a lot of places like basically the postcolonial world. Let's say infrastructures are just failing. All the time one interesting question to ask is do people perceive it to be a problem. In those cases or is there a kind of a normality to infrastructural failure. Such that something else becomes the abnormal thing you notice. you know. I happen to do my research in this special moment when the pa was trying to build up infrastructures from scratch for waste like infrastructures that did not previously exist. It was disrupting essentially processes and practices of managing waste in the name of order a new order but in ways that were very disruptive to people who had become accustomed to for example dumpsites being at the edge of every municipality instead of being few and centralized know two or three across the whole west bank. So what could look like failure. Now from the perspective was successful management. At that time. So i think the question of perception and how populations experience infrastructural failures super interesting.

PA Israel West Bank Israeli Administration Palestine
How Black residents in America's first city to fund reparations proved they were owed

Nightline

05:16 min | 2 months ago

How Black residents in America's first city to fund reparations proved they were owed

"Early at my childhood. I was invited to have a play date. My white friends never had a play. That so i want to megan's house. The streets were wider. The homes were bigger and brighter. It was obvious that it was the barrier race that kept us from that because the segregation was race spaced even here evanston illinois or proudly liberal suburb of chicago. The barrier and burden of race have long weighed heavy. Like a winter storm. This is alderman for the fifth ward. Robin ru simmons was born and raised in the historically black neighborhood. She represents this community was red. Line historically and that has come along with Damages that continue today resources were stripped away from the black community along with wealth as well. The city's plan to change that reparations. In idea long-debated proposed over one hundred and fifty years ago. I forty acres of land later mule for formerly enslaved people to share the american dream built on their backs for free. Promise long broke until now. This is a historic vote. Evanston is set to become the first. Us city to pay out reparations. A total of ten million dollars starting with increments of up to twenty five thousand dollars per person for housing. I didn't start my electic. Career even discussing reparations rich. I was looking at data. I was looking at what we had done. And reparations was the only answer the only the only the only any more of the same was gonna only at best help us sustain the oppressed state and the disparity that we have only. That's a big word. The only legislative response for us to reconcile the damages in the black community as reparations why housing housing specifically and homeownership is a path to begin to build. Well when you have stable housing you have an opportunity just to breathe and think about what's next. It provides a sense of place in the community where we're largely renters now and we should be owning. We anticipate litigation with the premise that we cannot use tax money. That's from public to benefit. A particular group of people throughout history taxes were used to benefit a certain group of people while others were excluded from that dino robinson is a founder of shorefront an archive dedicated to chronically celebrating. Black life in evanston a richness long undervalued. His documentation going back to the late eighteen hundreds invaluable in measuring the cost of racism. And the need for reparations of members were moving throughout evanston informing. You know pockets in the city of evanston and it caused the white communities are panic. Like what do we do about this. The response to that panic redlining federally sanctioned project assigning market value to neighborhoods a grading system a to d. The d areas usually relegated to the black community. The area d. was always read. This deliberately pushed evanston black families into an area that became the fifth ward. Segregating them from white families sought after property and ultimately wealth. Things were not loan to black families. Real estate agencies would not show you other than fifth ward. That map still is. The map of are concentrated. Black community are disinvestment today. White residents of evidence have nearly double the income in home value of black residents. This racial wealth gap is prevalent nationally. Black-americans possessing less than fifteen percent of the wealth. That white americans have who i am. Nineteen years old. We moved to evanston in nineteen fifty nine black residents who lived through red line again. Their descendants are eligible for reparations. That includes ben gain senior and his son then junior then senior grew up in nineteen twenties dixon kentucky part of the old south the business end of an era most violent weapon against african americans. Jim crow. He landed in evanston here. Jim crow war smile but still inflicted harm on black homebuyers contractor said fan a lot and it. We're in evanston bill. Whatever you will well when he said that he men in black neighborhoods and we still have these same types of problems.

Evanston Robin Ru Simmons Us City Dino Robinson Alderman Megan Illinois Chicago Jim Crow White Dixon BEN Kentucky
"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"I guess is because i was very taken by How all this stuff isn't how far back it goes and i might not have done a good job. Inexpensively tying it into things like the proud boys and biglou stuff which you do. Yeah exactly exactly but you do you do a through line of bringing all the way through trump and gavin mcginnis and one thing one thing that really drove me crazy and still drives me. Crazy happens all the time. I did a recent very long threat on on twitter about it whereas laying out the map. Of gavin mcginnis white nationalist roots. And he's had white nationalist tattoos since like the nineties screwdriver. You mentioned all that stuff like you did your homework. A big problem. I really have is how and similar to the jimmy. Dorothy where he said. Hey talked to a big lou boy and you won't believe this. They're they're anti this this this too just like us. And we used to his word at what he believes. You know Simply mcginnis a lot of people kind of mcguinness's had several. Wow this thing happened and made me realize that maybe political correctness is bad and that I'm being turned into Conservative or reactionary by discovering these new facts but then when you look into his history since canada is his ancestor nineties. When he was young. He's been in this world forever and yulia people a lot of the time and it drives me nuts. There was this Journalists i knew who writer who lived in brooklyn and You know modern person a few times. Who tweeted oh. It's so funny. That gavin mcginnis. No as a bit you know. Or whatever courted these white supremacists and you know. Ironically now he's kind of trapped. Do this and i'm like no. No no no no no and it drove me nuts and i think one reason is that i feel like vice and government. Guinness in aesthetic has done so much Like besides gawker. I think vice is probably the most influential thing on the voice of modern New york or slash alternative alternative media that camping to thousands lot of people to void saying that they were kind of taken in by this guy and so much of people's aesthetic beauty having a very different politics from again is You know came from mccain's vice that they've kind of made this cope where they tell themselves that he was ironic thing and and you know just just lost the plot or in the movies with cock was on the cover and then go student cover and stuff and i really wanted to compliment that part of the book that you do not even in new york times recently had articles like actual journalists that should do basic research. How do you You know right that this is a hipster wing guy who You know a recent hilter and it's not what it is. He's always been this guy. And i think i think that's a really Good part of the book with the proud boys is that you don't buy into that narrative which infuriates me. Yeah i try to be very careful to show that gavin in particular has been in this world for for a minute now. He's he's not a he's not. He's not a recent convert by any stretch yet provides. Yeah yeah yeah so It goes very into like today's current events and news so yeah definitely definitely read it not just for a history lesson but it all goes right into right into the present and yet thanks. Thanks for joining us. I hope we Got all the best parts of the book out there without Over explain the booking giving giving people you know enough that they want to go check it out. I think it's pretty good book. And and the resource section. I think is really great too..

brooklyn New york trump Dorothy new york twitter thousands gavin mcginnis one reason today mccain canada one thing one vice nineties jimmy gavin of people mcginnis
"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

02:35 min | 3 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"Of real estate between two thousand and six thousand seventeen so overlapping trump era addicted that saw unprecedented mobilization of migrant workers comprehensive immigration reform twice defeated in the us congress and the election of donald trump maze. Cocom foundation poured approximately one hundred and thirty eight million into the ten network that that same guy most of which would not have existed with her support in the first place so i help support the creation of all these things and after her death is a perfect example of like creating things that less they all this money Put into it. The bulk of that money went to fair. a. r. the center for immigration studies. Which i heard before. And i not know was tied to these people and so this book and numbers. Usa three of the biggest anti immigration tanks that tant either founded or nurtured in the trump administration political appointees almost every federal department that immigration as well as a stall assistant secretary of state nominee include tanta network post on their resumes. And i thought that was really a testament to how good this guy was at getting money out of these these people. Yeah so yeah. It's pretty remarkable. Yes so this guy was active from two thousand. This guy was active from like the seventy s. All the way to do now and most of us haven't even heard his name. Yeah keep it that way. They don't like him they're like roaches. Man they don't like exposure today light they may in the dark man. Yeah they don't They don't like attention. I feel like it's a big problem with the black movements though because because i'm black movements for example yet the black lives matter protest the first one second ones and we've had so many kind of names pop out of that. We've we had like the three black lives matter. Founders de ray all these people but if he has like who is a superstar came out of this fair thing man a lot of these names. Unless you're an avid researcher. The stuff you know rushton is not really a household name. is not really household. Name mc all these people like you know they're much better at Just getting the grass roots stuff done and and keeping their names kind of Hidden do you think it helps to have. It helps to have hundreds of millions of dollars to play with and serve experiment. What do you think that's deliberate or you know. Have there been people who have own wanted to be kind of superstars and make names themselves. Like yeah i think so I mean in a way cordelia escape maze older brother..

Cocom trump congress two thousand donald trump today three rushton ten network first place hundreds of millions of dollar twice approximately one hundred and first one six thousand seventeen tanta network s. second ones Usa seventy
"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"For example was a very good organizer everytime we went to a city and spoke and a lot of people don't notice about him and a big problem is A lot of people get this. Get their stuff from the autobiography by addicts haley and and the movie by spike. Lee didn't talk about a lot of the nuts and bolts of what malcolm x. but everywhere malcolm x. Left he left a mosque. He was very big into grassroots organizing and structural stuff so he created a lot of mosques whereas martin luther king didn't really after he left the city after protesting relieve anything behind and the internet nowadays. And all this stuff with variety is very very good at mobilizing. But it's not great at all is in organizing slow right and i think one problem that to add to what to add to what mario said another reason why i think the night attending doesn't work because people can't keep it together in my experience long enough to even make it to the point where They get what they want. Because because of the slow process though that ten percent ends up causing infighting vaunting apart before you cross the finish line you know with those alliances of convenience. You know like like ooh look like how in this this thing with danton. He couldn't stick around with zero population growth people because they weren't going on board with his hardline Immigration stuff like another reason that you just can't last very long in these Coalitions you might last long enough to mobilize but you're not gonna last long enough to actually organized and that's where you really cross the finish line. That's a great point. Yeah and you know in in a weird way you as you talking about max. Creating these lasting institutions that are then able to sustain struggle over time through the ebb and flow of Different mobilizations like tinton broke with other parts of the concentration is movement then created these institutions. That were able to endure. And then when the moment came they were ready in that moment took shape of trump trump trump campaign and trump administration. And i do agree for sure that we're on the left where in a moment of being able to mobilize people very quickly. But it's very reactive. It's very like own. Yeah it was always kind of in response to In response to one like immediate crisis or another and that's necessary like we have to. We have to be able to do that But it's always you know we're not being we're not able to to create like kind of crisis new able to create things on our own and create a crisis on our own terms because we haven't built up the kinds of institutions that that connects was was trying to and was ended Succeeded that to a certain. I'm going to tell you guys something It's hard to blame the left or or black radicals or immigration reform people or any of these people. It's hard to blame them for now. Organizing because i feel like one key part to organize things to make people feel like there's a real unifying Crisis you know That requires more than just just mobilizing. Because i think emotion and being reactive is not gonna be enough to keep you Active because you get tired you know. Even the george floyd thing like the outrage got kinda tiring kind of burnt itself out you to a degree And and really kind of woke me up to this..

trump Lee mario martin luther george floyd ten percent danton one key part one problem tinton malcolm haley population lot of people spike
"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"I've gone through them already. And it's so what public is kind of like what the label is on and it's just all his correspondence documents regarding his relationship with the pioneer fund. We won't be able to see what's in those for for a long time but the nativist movement and the eugenicist movement are functionally one in the same and yeah so he you know he was trying to trying to sweet. Talk this guy into leaving all of his all of his money to Detention as as an inch To to build up his legacy like his ancestor in wild. We're on the team. Before i was going to talk to was actually go. Direct this at at you you have. I think along with me have always been looking at their racer nike stuff and that movement and stuff like that and i was gonna tell you. Mario that the pioneer fund. I don't know if you Know much about them. But i'm pretty sure that based on the stuff that i know we've read independently. I'm sure you've heard of some like the main studies that they've Funded but do not disgrace an iq. People always talk about the the twin studies. The twins raised apart. Yeah via raised. Yeah had approved how that proves You know that that. I q is genetic and race-based they. The the pioneer funds are the people who funded those studies. The minnesota twin family study in texas adoption project studies. They are very known for making supposedly innocuous studies that the racist always used. So that when you see racist come to you and say well this Twin study shows that you know. Iq is genetic look at these twins or whatever and they don't tell you that hey are people are white nationalist organization the pioneer fund kinda so-called think tank funded and create the study. They're all into Making these white nationalist studies. So i just wanted to give you background that you might be interested in about the pioneer fund. Gray in along those lines Just a bit of clarification because you know we always like to try to assume that we have an educated audience but also maybe someone who's just now coming into these terms so can you guys define what you mean by native ism short I i can. I can give my definition. Trevor do you want to go to the definition on on a please. Please give i so. That's a good question. It is important to define our terms. I think that the way that i think about native as as particularly racist form of anti immigrant. Sorry particularly militant form of racist anti-immigrant politics that is organized around the principle of a like racialized national identity. And so that any Any immigration or the you know the presence of people who are not already absorbed into that national identity it poses an existential threat and kind of There's this idea that like That identity is going to be deluded Or or sort of obscured and in the united states you know this has a particular salience and cuts to the the click of deep historical memories and and and sort of Trends insofar as you know. This is a a a settler colonial nation. This is a a a post. Slave nation where the creation of the formation of white supremacy and the maintenance of white supremacy is like integral to the very idea of nationhood national identity. Nationalism in is they add religion into that as well. This is a christian nation. That's bad that's that's definitely that's definitely Part of this history. It is interesting that canton santon and scape name. At least in my understanding were not particularly religious that that was not a major factor in their in their political Concerned about you know like western civilization time right..

Trevor nike texas Mario twins twin studies Gray twin family minnesota christian pioneer fund think united one canton santon
"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

Champagne Sharks

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Champagne Sharks

"Frustration with environmentalists queasy response to his ideas about immigration led him to start his own his own movement. And from there you kind of go into could dealey escape. May i was wondering if you could talk about that moment. Where he breaks from zero population growth in connects with critically escape main. Who could heal escaped. Me is yeah so credit escape. is She's a woman who was in an heiress to the Fortune gives are very wealthy family. That are sort of a branch of the even wealthier mellon family. There's sort of together. American capitalist aristocracy Tinton in cornelius may met through one or another of these conservationist organizations and shared and analysis shared a shared anxieties about the what they saw as the deficiency of the environmentalist and conservationist movements to take up the nativist. 'cause to be in their estimation be honest about the pressures that mass immigration was putting on on the environment and so it was that relationship that enabled canton to start his own organizations to start founding and cultivating these institutions. Which may she was. Not the only funder There were a variety of other folks that they knew that she connected him with that he courted courted Relationships that cultivated over the course of the eighties nineties and really up until and after her death. cornelius me was the was the primary funder of these organizations. All of which have sort of innocuous sounding names like federation for american immigration reform center for immigration studies but which have had a very insidious effect on our politics insofar as kind of formalize A latent white nationalist worldview And may his his correspondence with canton's correspondence with scape may was able to read through in quote at length in the book in show how he played on her fears about Basically like kind of racial displacement which was a concern that she shared a lot of kind of far right intellectuals of the time the time being the late seventies eighties and still today that are kind of given different.

late seventies eighties today eighties nineties Tinton American canton mellon cornelius zero population one american
Erdogan says Turkey wants better ties with Israel, talks continue

Forum

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

Erdogan says Turkey wants better ties with Israel, talks continue

"Of Turkey says ties with Israel could be improved, adding that bilateral talks have been ongoing at the intelligence level. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports president rigid type Erdogan says Israeli policies toward the Palestinians are unacceptable. President, rigid type. Erdogan spoke with reporters following Friday prayers in Istanbul, saying quote Our ties could have been very different were it not for what he described his issues with people at the top level. Underwear toe on Turkey's relations with Israel soured in spite of strong commercial trade between the countries. Turkey was long a quiet but key ally of Israel's, but the main sticking point for Ankara has been the Israeli occupation of the West Bank. Erdogan repeated that concern, saying Israel's treatment of the Palestinians remains a red line for Ankara. But he said Turkey hopes to see relations improve in the future.

Erdogan Peter Kenyon Turkey Israel NPR Istanbul Ankara West Bank
How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

Morning Edition

05:36 min | 5 months ago

How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

"David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Noel King in Washington, D C. Good morning. How should the U. S government respond to a computer hack that breached both government networks and private companies? Most cyber security experts think Russia is responsible for the Hack and NPR's national security correspondent Craig Marie has been talking to some of them. Good morning, Greg. Good morning. No. Well, perhaps most importantly, is the half over. Absolutely not. It's still ongoing and we're continuing to learn details. We've heard now that the Treasury Department hack occurred in July, and like other government departments, this was just uncovered in recent days. Email of top officials was hacked, though apparently not. The account of Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, also no evidence that classified systems were breached. This information has come from Democratic Senator Ron Wyden, who was briefed on the matter and we can expect this kind of information to sort of dribble out in the weeks and months ahead. As government agencies and private companies go through their computer networks. But clearly much of this is going to fall on the Biden administration to make sure the hack inside government computer networks is over that there's clear attribution on who did it and then to decide how to respond. These major breaches have happened before. Does the government have a strategy to deal with them? No, absolutely not. Again. There are no rules or red lines are clear consequences for adversaries who get caught Now, today what we end up seeing is lots of hand wringing and ultimately some sort of limited responses. Right now, With this current hack. We're seeing wrestling over the definition. Some members of Congress called this an act of war. Now, cyber experts and the intelligence community do see it is a big deal but more along the lines of traditional espionage, albeit on a massive scale. I spoke about this with P. W singer cyber expert at the New America think tank. This was not an act of war. This is more cold War style back and forth espionage stealing of secrets. That's why you've seen the reaction from the intelligence community to be a mix of Oh, my God. What just happened? And Gosh, we got a tip the hat to them. What a coup for them. So if there is no clear way to respond, Greg what of the range of options here? Traditional spying might generate public criticism, kicking out suspected spies, perhaps, um, sanctions, But when this has happened, it really hasn't changed the behavior of Russia. Any other adversaries they still seek. Hacking is a low cost high return proposition. Singer says the U. S can and needs to do much more and should create deterrence in two ways gave a boxing analogy, saying US needs to punch back harder and also develop more resiliency to absorb the growing number of cyber blows. Make the parallel to Mike Tyson. You don't hit him because he'll punch you back in the face vs Mohammad Ali rope a dope right through resilience where you don't hit me because it just won't work out for you. What else do we know? So we know that the government and private companies were both hacked. What do we know about the private companies? We haven't heard that much from them. Have we? No, that's right. But we are hearing more of the hackers clearly targeted. Many tech companies in this makes a lot of sense. They hackers Coley want these cutting edge cyber tools that these companies have, so presumably the hackers can use them themselves. And the first organization to detect this hack two weeks ago was fire I, a prominent cyber security firm, Fireeye CEO Kevin Mandia spoke with NPR's all things considered yesterday. And he said, these hackers were extremely sophisticated, and once they got into the system, they carried out an operation that was specifically designed to attack fire. I he realized very early on as they launch their own investigation that this was a level of tradecraft he'd never seen before. And he said the scale of this hack really drives home the need for a strong national cyber policy. It's time this nation comes up with some doctrine on what we expect Nations rules of engagement to be And what will our policy or proportional response beat of folks who violate that doctrine Because Right now. There's absolutely in escalation in cyberspace. It just seems astonishing that we don't yet have the doctrine in the year. 2020. The US, however, does have a lot of cybersecurity might what is preventing us from using it more effectively? No. Well, you're still seeing a lot of things that are in the works. Homeland Security Cyber Agency was just launched in 2018 and focused on the elections this year. And and by all accounts, did I did I did a good job. Right now, There's the military authorization bill on the president's desk waiting to be signed. It has money for additional cyber upgrades, and by all accounts, you're seeing a lot more cooperation between the government and private tech companies. But this country is losing huge sums of money due to the cyber attacks. And a couple years ago, the N S a director Paul Marcus, Sony was at his confirmation hearing. And he was asked if adversaries fear the U. S and cyberspace, he said the answer is absolutely not. MPR's Greg Marie, Thanks so much, Greg. My pleasure. America's hospitals are really

Noel King U. S Government Craig Marie Steve Mnuchin Senator Ron Wyden Biden Administration David Greene NPR Greg Russia Treasury Department Mohammad Ali Rope New America Treasury Los Angeles Fireeye Kevin Mandia D Washington Wrestling
Experts Weigh In On How U.S. Should Respond To Massive Computer Hack

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 5 months ago

Experts Weigh In On How U.S. Should Respond To Massive Computer Hack

"Should the us government respond to a computer hack that breached both government networks and private companies mo- cybersecurity experts think. Russia is responsible for the hack and npr's national security correspondent. Greg myra has been talking to some of them. Good morning greg. good morning noel. Perhaps most importantly is the over absolutely not it's still ongoing and we're continuing to learn details. We've heard now that the treasury department hack occurred in july and like other government departments. This was just uncovered in recent days. The email of top officials was hacked. Apparently not the account of treasury secretary. Steve mnuchin Also no evidence that classified systems were breached This information has come from democratic. Senator ron wyden who was briefed on the matter and we can expect this kind of information to sort of dribble out in the weeks and months ahead as government agencies and private companies go through their computer networks But clearly much of this is going to fall on the biden administration to make sure the hack Inside government computer networks is over that there's clear attribution on who did it and then to decide how to respond these major breaches have happened. Before does the government have a strategy to deal with them. No absolutely not again. There are no rules or red lines or clear consequences for adversaries who get caught now today. What we ended up seeing is lots of hand-wringing and ultimately some sort of limited responses right now with this current hack. We're seeing wrestling over. The definition some members of congress. Call this an act of war now. Cyber experts in the intelligence community. Do see it as a big deal but more along the lines of traditional espionage albeit on a massive scale i spoke about this with p w singer cyber expert at the new america think tank. This was not an act of war. This is more cold war style back and forth espionage stealing secrets. That's why you've seen the reaction from the intelligence community to be a mix of. Oh my god what just happened and gosh. We got a tip the hat to them. What a coup for them so. There is no clear way to respond greg. What are the range of options here. Traditional spying might generate public criticism Kicking out suspected spies perhaps some sanctions. But when this happened it really hasn't changed the behavior of russia any other adversaries they still seek hacking is a low cost high return proposition singer says the us can and needs to do much more and should create deterrence in in two ways gave a boxing analogy saying the us needs to punch back harder and also develop more resiliency to absorb the growing number of cyber blows. I make the parallel to my tyson. You don't hit him. He'll punch you back in the face versus muhammad ali rope a dope through resilience where you don't hit me because it just won't work out for you. What else do we know. So we know that the government and private companies were both hacked. What do we know about the private companies. We haven't heard that much from them. Have we know that's right. But we are hearing more of the hackers clearly targeted many tech companies in. This makes a lot of sense. They that hackers want these cutting edge cyber tools. These companies have so presumably. The hackers can use them themselves in the first organization to detect. This hack. two weeks ago was fire. I of prominent cyber security farm fire. Icao kevin mantius spoke with all things considered yesterday and he said these hackers were extremely sophisticated and once they got into the system. They cured out. An operation was specifically designed to attack fireeye. He realized very early on as they launched their own investigation that this was a level of tradecraft he'd never seen before and he said the scale of this hack really drives home the need for a strong national cyber policy. It's time this nation comes up with some doctrine on what we expect. Nations rules of engagement to be. And what will our policy or proportional response speed of folks. Violate the doctrine. Because right now there's absolutely esscalation in cyberspace it. It just seems astonishing that we don't yet have the doctrine in the year. Twenty twenty the. Us however does have a lot of cybersecurity might what is preventing us from using it more effectively. While you're still seeing a lot of things that are in the works Security cyber agency was just launched in twenty eighteen at focused on the elections this year and by all accounts did a did a did a good job right now. There's the military authorization bill on the president's desk waiting to be signed it has money for additional cyber upgrades in by all accounts. You're seeing a lot more cooperation between the government and private tech companies. But this country is losing huge sums of money Do to these cyber attacks and Couple of years ago the nsa director paul nakasone was at his confirmation hearing and he was asked if adversaries. Fear the us in cyberspace. He said the answers absolutely not. Npr's greg mary. Thanks so much. Greg my pleasure.

Greg Myra Steve Mnuchin Senator Ron Wyden Biden Administration Greg Treasury Department Us Government Muhammad Ali Rope NPR Noel New America Treasury Russia Kevin Mantius Wrestling Congress United States Boxing Paul Nakasone
Chicago man stabbed in face in Red Line attack

The Sinatra Hours

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago man stabbed in face in Red Line attack

"Chicago Police are investigating a stabbing on the Red Line overnight. WGN's James Sears has details. A 50 year old man was stabbed while writing the red line through the south loop just before two police say a man sitting across from him stabbed him in the face with a knife cutting his skin. He was taken to the hospital in fair condition. The other man fled the scene after the attack. Police say he has gray hair and was wearing black jeans and a black jacket. Please don't know what

James Sears WGN Chicago
Chicago's CTA Red Line Service Halted From Fullerton To Garfield Due To Smoke In Subway; Train Evacuated At Cermak

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago's CTA Red Line Service Halted From Fullerton To Garfield Due To Smoke In Subway; Train Evacuated At Cermak

"47 as Sita Red line is currently stopped her between Cermak, Chinatown and also Fullerton because of multiple track fires that are being reported on the C T a red line into the downtown area. So State Street is also closed between Roosevelt's an 11th. While they check this out, the red line is being rerouted to the El tracks

Cermak Fullerton Roosevelt
Person Pushed Onto CTA Tracks in Chicago, Struck By Train In Serious Condition

Eye on Travel

00:31 sec | 6 months ago

Person Pushed Onto CTA Tracks in Chicago, Struck By Train In Serious Condition

"Is in serious condition after being pushed onto the red line tracks following a physical altercation last night, according to police Just after 7 15 last night, police responded to the Jackson Red Line in the report. Of a person on the tracks. Police believe the man was pushed onto the tracks. After that verbal altercation turned physical. He was struck by the train and taken to Northwestern in serious condition. The age of the victim is not available. No suspects right now are in custody as detectives continue to investigate.

Jackson
Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

TIME's Top Stories

07:22 min | 6 months ago

Hawaii Wants to Lure Visitors---but Keep Out Covid-19

"Hawaii is riding out the covid. Nineteen storm but geographic isolation isn't the blessing it may seem by a. hundred algata when hawaii's corona virus infections were rising in late august. Honolulu mayor kirk caldwell visited doctors in the covid. Nineteen ward of the queen's medical center the state's largest hospital. I could see it in their faces and in their eyes caldwell says the concern and fear. They had that by the following week. If things didn't change they were not going to be able to care for people that they were going to have to put them intense outside. It was a crisis that leaders in the fiftieth state hoped they would never face between march and may when a stay at home order was in place. Hawaii was averaging only a couple of new cases every day but as some restrictions were lifted in june resulting in a patchwork of state and local rules. The numbers soon began inching up by late. July hawaii was metaphorically ablaze with the bulk of cases centered on oahu. Home to two thirds of the state's population. The island lost one hundred and nineteen. New cases underlie thirtieth by mid august. It was averaging over two hundred today four days after his hospital. Visit with more than three hundred and fifty people hospitalized for covid nineteen symptoms on his island issued a second lockdown order with the blessing of hawaii governor. David ige our hospital administrators had informed us. If we didn't do something that they would become overwhelmed says he gay three months later. It seems hawaii's response may have worked as a new deadly wave of coronavirus infections sweeps across the us. Hawaii is one of the only states in the country experiencing relative reprieve. It reported one hundred and thirteen new cases on november twenty third according to data from johns hopkins university slightly more than its weekly average of one hundred six daily new cases. Only vermont reported fewer cases that day hawaii the fortieth most populous state has a low case. Count even when adjusted for population as of november twenty third. It has a weekly average of seven cases per one hundred thousand residents the lowest in the country by comparison. The highest per capita figure is belong to north dakota at one sixty and wyoming at one fifty four infection levels in hawaii have stayed relatively steady since mid-september while nearly every other state has experienced an increase it remains to be seen whether a slight uptick in recent days could be the start of a new upward trend however how has a wii so far avoided another major covid nineteen surge. The clearest reason is apparent on any world map geography. It's so obvious yet. It plays such a big role says thomas lee. An assistant professor of epidemiology at the university of hawaii at manoa and co chair of the hawaii pandemic applied modeling workgroup. He also served as the lead outbreak. Modular and forecaster for the hawaii emergency management agency this spring for hawaii. The pacific ocean has helped serve as the world's biggest moat travelers arriving there by plane. Essentially the only means of reaching the state with cruise lines. Shuttered have since march required to self quarantine for two weeks though since mid-october visitors can avoid isolation if they test negative within seventy two hours of arrival while the rules may have kept visitors from seating new infection clusters. They have also devastated. Hawaii's tourism sector which accounts for nearly a quarter of its economic activity. Some hawaiian leaders. Still don't think they're doing enough to prevent infections part of a broader split among hawaiians over whether and how to welcome visitors back during a pandemic derek kawakami mayor of quite county says new infections on his islands are related to the reopening of travel from the continental us. He's proposed a requirement that travelers get tested a second time after arriving. This virus requires layer upon layer of intervention and mitigating measures. Kawakami says we have to be able to respond quickly and boldly because it can spread like wildfire kawais. Recent uptick is tiny in relative terms on november twentieth. It reported six cases. Its second highest one day count so far but kawakami has good reason to be worried koci home to around. Seventy two thousand people has just nine. Icu beds and fourteen ventilators. Isolated and with limited healthcare capacity and uncontrolled. Outbreak could quickly spell disaster. The holy grail is prevention. So that is what we put our blood sweat and tears into here on kobe. Kawakami says we're almost always on the red line. A similar imperative applies across the entire state of one point. Four million people with nowhere to turn of hawaii's healthcare system is overwhelmed leaders. There have little choice but to be proactive. In preventing covid nineteen outbreaks. We are geographically remote and so our healthcare system is really vulnerable says catherine purple an associate professor of health policy and management at the university of hawaii minoa there really is a strong motivating factor to try to keep those numbers under control. Hawaii's isolation then is a double edged sword. Thousands of miles of ocean are a good tool to stop travelers from seating new corona virus clusters but if infection spin out of control anyway. Assistance could be a long time coming. We have been from the very beginning focused on the science and public health recommendations because we are twenty five hundred miles away from any help. Says the governor. We learned a long time ago. That we have to be self reliant and that we have to act as a community epidemiologists say it's difficult to attribute hawaii's relative covid nineteen success to any one factor isolation included for one thing cold weather which is forcing many americans indoors where the virus can spread. More easily is unheard of in most of hawaii. Honolulu's thanksgiving day forecast is eighty two and sunny. Other government measures may also have played a part unused hotel rooms and a wa who have been repurpose to isolate nineteen patients and restrictions on inter island. Travel have prevented. Local spread mask wearing has helped as well on kauai and a who mask. Mandates were instituted in april while an august survey found that ninety. Six percent of hawaiians are masking up. Unlike for many americans. Wearing masks to prevent illness isn't an entirely foreign concept for hawaiians public health experts. Say that's likely due to the states relative proximity to asia where facial coverings tend to be more prevalent. Many hawaii residents. Who commented for this article also cited the state's heritage and cultural values as a reason for high adherence to public health mandates. We have a culture here that comes from the first people's the native hawaiians called ball says the term juliana means responsibility and it does the people here in hawaii still leaders in hawaii have come under pressure over cove nineteen restrictions caldwell says people sometimes drive down his street to yell outside his house either at him or his wife and daughter. Some people certainly have reason to be upset. Travel restrictions have ravaged the state's tourism dependent economy hawaii's overall unemployment rate was more than fourteen percent in october according to the us department of labor the worst in the country for the second month in a row called bo says he understands people's frustrations but needs to prioritize. Public health. people are impacted. Their businesses are impacted. their life dreams are impacted. He says. I get why they're upset. But i also believe that in order to protect health and safety which is always the most important thing that comes first. And i think it's tied directly to the economy to after months of travel restrictions. Guy says the state's pretrial testing program finally bringing in visitors and helping hawaiians get back to work while keeping cova level stable still. Despite hawaii's current low case counts it remains to be seen if the state's leaders can revive tourism based economy while at the same time staving off a devastating rise in cases which would likely put the tourism business back on ice anyway depend on travel. Uk says but everyday day. I get comments from members in our community that continuing to bring visitors into hawaii during this time is really putting our community at risk. It's something that weighs very heavily on myself. And the mayor's every day as we see the virus counts increasing on the mainland.

Hawaii Kirk Caldwell Queen's Medical Center David Ige Hawaii Emergency Management Ag Kawakami Honolulu Derek Kawakami Caldwell Koci Thomas Lee Oahu Catherine Purple University Of Hawaii Minoa Johns Hopkins University Manoa University Of Hawaii
Joe Biden names picks for secretary of State, Homeland Security chief, director of national intelligence

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:12 min | 6 months ago

Joe Biden names picks for secretary of State, Homeland Security chief, director of national intelligence

"Well we're going to get to our first look now at the president-elect's newest cabinet members later today. The team which includes obama administration alums will assemble in delaware for an official announcement this afternoon. Anthony blinken will serve as secretary of state he previously served as deputy secretary of state and deputy national security adviser. Alejandra york us will be the first latino and the first immigrant to become homeland security secretary. He served as deputy homeland secretary and director of citizenship and immigration services. April heinous will become the first woman to hold the role of director of national intelligence. She previously as a national security lawyer. And deputy cia director. Jake sullivan will become national security adviser. He was five national security adviser and was a top aide to hillary clinton. While she was secretary of state linda. Thomas greenfield will be named. Us basseterre to the u. n. And former secretary of state john kerry will be the climate on roy and former federal federal reserve chair. Janet yellen will be the first woman ever become treasury secretary. If she is confirmed by the senate would an impressive list let's bring in former. Nato supreme allied commander retired four-star navy. Admiral james redis. He is chief. International security diplomacy and less for nbc news and msnbc and former treasury official on morning joe economic analyst. Steve rattner joins us as well. Good to have you both admiral. Let's begin with some of president-elect biden's foreign policy selections the wall street journal opinion page said. They were internationalists but also said on the other. Hand talking about blinken and Jake sullivan they were also more hawkish. On some obama era debates. Mr sullivan supported antitank mrs for ukraine which president obama posed. Mr blinken favored the iraq war in two thousand and two intervention in libya. Mr blanket was known for repeating the mantra superpowers. Don't bluff regarding mr obama's red line fiasco about the use of chemical weapons and syria. I would take that like me. You you agree. Superpowers don't bluff. You don't draw red line and then step back from it. And apparently that's what our new secretary of state Believes as well. Well let's start with the team itself kind of step back for a minute show and this is the most experience group coming in That i can remember certain going back to bush lawn and before that maybe to the kennedy administration if you listen to the titles that make it. Just read off deputy to this deputy to that do this. These are now people who are stepping up to cabinet level. They are experienced. They are well prepared boy. How refreshing is that number two and maybe more importantly joe. This is a very collegial team. This he'll give you a sports analogy. This one's for mike barnicle. This is like the one thousand nine hundred eighties celtics basketball team. They don't really care who. The high score is more interested in getting assists that running up the score out there on the field trying to make each other look good. It's that kind of group. And i worked with all of them when i was supreme allied commander in. They were in all their jobs. And then finally. You're absolutely right. This is an internationalist group. A little bit of hawkish edge to it. But i think that's okay one. It's tempered as you see from this group by that that instinctive desire to reach out into the international world. They'll look for allies. They'll look for coalitions. They'll look to work with international organizations. I think this is a a fine selection and will serve the nation. Well

Jake Sullivan Anthony Blinken Alejandra York Thomas Greenfield Janet Yellen Admiral James Redis Steve Rattner Barack Obama Blinken Mr Sullivan Mr Blinken Mr Blanket Mr Obama Delaware John Kerry Hillary Clinton Nbc News CIA Msnbc United States
"red line" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

06:55 min | 11 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Start Here

"War in Afghanistan has been going continuously now for eighteen years primarily of course between the US and the Taliban, but over the last year we've been reporting attempts by the US and the Taliban to reach a peace to get the US out hopefully in the name of saving lives I really believe the Taliban wants to do something to. Show that we're not always being time. Well. On Friday the New York Times reported that amid these peace talks, Taliban fighters were being offered cash to kill American troops, not being offered by their commanders, but by Russian spies, a military official has now confirmed this account to ABC News without. Let's go to Colonel Stephen, Ganor. A former marine and State Department official now a contributor to ABC colonel gathered the sounds like essentially a bounty system. Right? What do we know about it? It is about system, or at least we knew what we believe is a bounty system, Brad, and the scary thing is, it's been going on apparently since throughout two thousand. Thousand and nineteen, so it's been going on for quite a while being run by Russian intelligence, you know the US and Russia for years during the Cold War have trained proxies to fight the other country, but when you directly pay somebody whether it's criminals or the Taliban to kill Americans that crosses the line into a war crime, and so that would make Russia look much worse, but should it be surprising over all that Russia would want to beef up this conflict. Right because I'm you know if a couple of American soldiers get killed? All of a sudden you got more calls from the states to you know we can't leave now. He can't give. The Alabama satisfaction and we have to stay will. Russia would love that. They love to see America I in a quagmire right. Russia loves to see US. Troops killed in faraway lands. they themselves paid a terrible price in Afghanistan for their incursion. Superpowers aren't supposed to lose. As Vietnam was for us. Afghanistan has been a sobering experience for the Soviet Union and so they're paying back. The US, but they're doing it in a way. That's that's illegal by common law and it's Terry terribly destablizing to the to the relationship navy briefed told me Vice President, pence, or chief-of-staff Mark Meadows about the so-called attacks on our troops in Afghanistan by Russians, he tweeted. Can you walk me through the US response because the? The white. House didn't say yes. This happened. No, this didn't happen. Instead they just said the president and the vice president were never briefed on this. But what is that supposed to mean right? The reporting we're seeing is that this was known as early as January been passed up the chain, common knowledge by the chief stationed in Kabul. Lead to the CIA station, so people had to know the CIA had no. We know that the national security. Security Adviser chaired a meeting in March to discuss the issue so at least the national. Security Adviser knew why the president didn't know that hard to fathom. The director of national intelligence is denying that the president knew about it, but he's not denying the intelligence so either. The president knew and didn't do anything or didn't know which could even be more problematic for the White House reporting says that the President's Daily briefing that big intelligence book. Book of the highest secrets of the US has put in front of the president every day had this intelligence in it now other presidents, it or it got pulled by somebody before it got to him. That's a question, but certainly as national security adviser knew about it why it wasn't raised to them. It's hard to say with him. All Roads Lead to Putin. He will. Not I know what the Russians have on the president politically personally. Financially or whatever it is think about what's happened since we've known this. The president has invited Mr Putin to the White House, and the president has pushed for Russia to join the g seven, and by the way getting along with Russia's a great thing getting along with Putin and Russia's a great thing hard to square that with knowing that these trying. They're trying to kill her. SAS need our troops neff Ghanistan illegally. and. So that's the big question. I WanNa ask you Colonel Kanye does what does this then say about the US Russia relationship, and whether that dynamic is different from the Putin trump relationship. From from a political perspective, there's only so much you could ignore. And this is going to be hard for the president to ignore, but there's a bigger question here Brad and that is the unit that is doing this a unit in the in the intelligent part of the Russian military gru, not the KGB, but the GRU call to nine one one five, and this unit is designed to create instability in Europe. They've already been tied to assassination attempts to coup attempts, and apparently they're the ones that are providing the money here Britain blames Russia for the we spy poisoning now it's emerged the same Russian. Military Intelligence Unit allegedly targeted UK. UK and other NATO forces in Afghanistan so all this ties back to a very shadowy Russian military intelligence units, the doing things to disable is not only Afghanistan, but in Europe which means this isn't gonNA. Go Away soon because it involves far more than just the United States, and for what it's worth. The Russian government and the Taliban continued to deny any of this happened president trump tweeted last night. He was never informed about this. Because intelligence officials didn't find the information credible. What we do know is this made it to top intelligence and military officials, and yet the commander in chief says not to him Colonel Your. Thank you, thank spread. In one last thing Godzilla his arrived. The hazy skies in the southeast. Some of that's a tribute to that. DASA came off of Africa earlier this week. This minute heard about this gigantic dust storm. Sahara Desert Nafta will in recent days it is arrived in the US and the scale of all of this is actually hard to wrap your mind around, so here's how it works every year around June. Monsoon winds kick up a ton of sand from the Sahara. Remember the desert is the size. Size of the US Manland, so there's a ton of Santa kick up this year. Scientists say was an amount. They haven't seen in decades. When the plume gets high enough, it starts to ride. The trade winds come miles above the ocean can travel almost five thousand miles in three days this year. The winds have been so strong that African dust could arrive in the mid west, it's been known to carry tiny particles, but think about it also bacteria from. Even live. Locusts have been caught up in the journey before air quality in Atlanta today. The Carolinas Louisville as well. The biggest concern here for Americans is poor air quality respiratory infections, but there are some good things to come out of this to those winds actually help replenish soil in the south. American rainforest. They reverse erosion on Caribbean islands. Importantly they can also help counteract tropical storm winds meaning fewer hurricane southeast in the meantime all that hazy AIRF- means people along the Gulf coast are seeing some incredible sunsets. Reason stay inside for a hot second. Hey, if you're enjoying the show, a five star rating and review on Apple, podcasts is a huge way to help us out. Do it right on your phone. It's easy. Also check us out on twitter instagram. Facebook at start your ABC Brad Milkey cinemark..

US president Taliban Afghanistan Russia Vice President Brad Milkey Mr Putin Colonel Stephen Military Intelligence Unit official ABC News ABC New York Times State Department Security Adviser
"red line" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

07:07 min | 11 months ago

"red line" Discussed on Start Here

"It's Monday June twenty ninth. We flat in the curve, so we could handle work over cases well, they've arrived. We start here. State and local leaders hit the pause button, or in some cases rewind. We don't have ICU beds. Staff to come in anymore. We don't have ambulances to spare yet. After Munster prepare for this hospital still might not be ready like doctors will reduce sprinting toward a cliff. The president thinks his supporters including one who shouted white our and he did it with comment that said, thank you to the great people of the villages. If the tweet is disturbing, he had heard of tweets for break it down and military officials knew of a Russian bounty scheme to shoot American soldiers from a political perspective. There's only so much you can. And this is going to be hard for the president of nor so, what is the White House say no one told the president. From ABC News this start here. I'm Brad Milkey. It's very easy to treat covid nineteen or something where you know you re put your so we're learning more about a summer tradition that happens every year with Lakeway students. It's a large party called Pong fast and because of this year's party. Nearly three hundred students could have been exposed to covid nineteen. There have been several mass gatherings lately. Were people especially young people have said. Corona virus, whatever got to live my life. It's a risk I'm willing to take. This is the two of me having. It! In Maryland. I mean who organized rallies to reopen businesses. Guess what got sick I crashed later in the day. Mercy Room. I thought I was actually having a stroke. is in the past. Says he's okay, although frankly to see his post, he sounds pretty shook up by how hard this virus it, but the notable thing here is that he is refusing to tell contact tracers who he might have come into contact with recently in Michigan at least eighty five people contracting the virus after eating out at the same restaurant, and that is the thing none of us are making choices that will only affect ourselves. By the time you find out you have been nineteen chances. Are you've already spread it several people particularly if you're not wearing a mask. Omar face. I can't do it. I just hang on to this I rush, and you ain't might me do. This woman at a north, Hollywood trader Joe's enraged after being asked to put on a mask? Doctor Without. We yesterday, we learned that the number of confirmed cases worldwide has risen past ten million again. That's just confirmed cases the biggest hotspots right now Latin America sub Saharan. Africa is becoming a concern and the United States that is where this virus is money possible to spread the quickest start this week with ABC's chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton Dr Ashton Youth. The curve is I'm flattening as it were. What is the most concerning part of that to you? Well First Brad. I think when you look at the curve. We have to distinguish. Are we looking at the curve of the entire United States? Are we looking at the Sun Belt? Are we looking at an individual state or region within that state? It's not a one size fits all picture, but in general. Let's go back a little bit in terms of not taking. This seriously not putting in place the necessary measures, we have a second chance now as a society. To put in place, the necessary public health interventions to put in place the world. Health Organization really urged governments to set a test positively percentage at or below five percent to us as a measure of how they're testing capacity is doing and how the viruses doing, and in fact when the United States set dating and reopening criteria. We just barely met that. We eat in right below five percent. Florida South Carolina, Georgia and Nevada, all reporting daily records for new corona virus cases and look at Nevada in particular, the state had never reported more than five hundred cases in a day until now eleven hundred new cases on Saturday alone it now we're seeing states in the US. Brad that are at fifteen percent fourteen percent. So to say going in the wrong direction is an understatement. The major hospital systems here in Arizona notched. Twenty percent increase in Cova patients in just a twenty four hour period, but here's really the biggest concern Brad remember back a few months ago. Everyone was talking about this phrase flat in the curve. Flatten curve well. There's another part to flattening the curve in. It's called reason the line, and what that refers to is the capacity of the US healthcare system to respond not only to Cova nineteen pandemic, but to the run of the mill things that we have to deal with in medicine every single day. Essentially a flat in the curb before it gets up to that that red line of our medical. Because after that people to stop getting care like you have to choose between who lives in who'd is like? It's Nasty Yep, and that's when we say we're drowning. We're doing right now is our issue. We're expanding those beds capabilities for the Kobe Icu. we are also having worry plans for expanding floor beds for these patients with higher level monitoring. That's when hospital emergency rooms are full, and they have to go on what's called diversion meaning they call the nine one one system and say don't bring your ambulances here because we don't have beds for. For any patients, and when I say any patients, Brad I mean any patients with asthma. Attacks Falls car accidents, heart attacks appendicitis. You name it. They don't have room and we're already seeing that in some states, and it's not just the room it's. The supplies were hearing about supply chain. demands are not being met because of the shutdowns in China and India interrupting are generic drug supplies in prescriptions that have nothing to do with covert. That's exactly what I'm talking about, and we're talking about things like antibiotics, epinephrine Lasix, which we use as a diuretic for patients with congestive heart failure these shortages predated the pandemic, no question. But the Department of Homeland Security now released at the end of last week, a report saying they're over two hundred drug and medical supply shortages caused partially by the shutdown in China and India for the COVID pandemic. Arizona nurse Bridget Harrigan Valentin to help hard hit New York flying back home to help just days ago. She told ABC News. The conditions were bad, but now she says they're even worse. A we had to move patients out of an entire unit so that we could dedicate the whole new unit to Kobe patients so. So you know as a doctor when when I see reports and here physicians saying we, we don't have ICU beds. We don't have staff.

Brad Milkey United States ABC News president Arizona Munster Maryland Cova Michigan ABC Mercy Room epinephrine Dr Jennifer Ashton Lakeway Africa Kobe Omar face stroke. Nevada Bridget Harrigan Valentin
"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"The question i had at the time and the question i asked ben rhodes was did obama know deep down that he wouldn't get support from congress like congress was kind of his out this is what a lot of reporters thought at the time then says he did not ask obama that question he says to ask it would imply that he didn't believe obama really wanted to get congressional authorization any did believe him but also there's a different question that you could've asked right was like which one was your preference like do you want to go to war in syria or not and you didn't ask that i didn't ask that and i think i think is preference was to not go to warn syria the first time i heard the name ben rhodes was actually in two thousand twelve year before all this happened he had invited a group of journalists who covered the middle east to go to the white house and talk to obama about syria i was one of those journalists but i didn't go npr doesn't allow its reporters to advise the government but ben and i did keep in touch as reporter and source what i didn't know at the time what i know now because of the book is ben called this meeting to convince obama to intervene in syria i wanted him to walk into that meeting here this kind of unvarnished view of how bad things were and how much people wanted the united states to be doing more and walk out of that meeting someone more inclined to do something so the journalists sit at the table with obama talk about how bad the situation is in syria but instead of convincing obama intervene the meeting does the opposite makes him more inclined to stay out of syria this is what ben writes in his book and when i read it my kind of freak out because i can't help thinking as crazy as it might sound what if i had been there do you know the stories i could've told that guy what if i would've showed him one picture or told him about one thing not saying i would have told them to bomb syria i would have told him what i saw there benz like honestly wouldn't mattered where i had heard a call to action he had kurt a call to not go there like he had heard a re affirmation of his fear that this is so complex it is such a mess there's proxy wars taking place terry wars taking place there extremists taking root that like we can't fix this place it's not enough to say you care about until ben <music> still ben kept trying to convince obama to do something in syria until of course august twenty thirteen chemical attack when us intervention almost happened but didn't happen i asked ben how he felt after that was all over i remember just going off as soon they're like opening a beer young like that's it yeah this is not going to work out the way i hoped it would and i don't know what i can do about the sitting in the most powerful building the world and i got nothing here the arab spring was over this thing that had felt so much hope those knocking them well club yeah the club of people who thought they could change stuff but realized that didn't have the juice for me it has meant years of guilt that i just couldn't do better for all the incredible syrians i met simply did not deserve to be bombed by their own government that i wasn't christiane amanpour who's reporting on the war in the balkans led to air strikes which led to a peace deal for ben it meant eventually changing what he believed to come to think more like obama a lot of times us intervention does not make things better so ben stopped going to meetings about syria i had i know answers i just had no i ran out of of of things to say instead he writes he started focusing on things that could work supporting the removal of unexploded ordinance in laos country that was bombed by the us and not made better by

ben rhodes obama two thousand twelve year
"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"The white house team starts what ben calls a full court press to get the votes in congress bainer says he supports it personally but won't help with any votes the administration realizes house is a lost cause they push for a resolution by the senate foreign relations committee but it starts to look like they won't be able to get enough votes in the full senate then obama ben and the team go to a g twenty summit in russia and on the flight home obama tells ben something surprising about says he talked to putin and suggested that the us and russia destroy syria's chemical weapons and putin agreed for days later the syrian government also agrees which means the us will not bomb syria my fellow americans and then neither wanna talk to you about syria obama announced the plan to destroy the chemical weapons in part because of the credible threat of us military action as well as constructive talks that i had with president putin the russian government has indicated a willingness to join with the international community in pushing assad to give up his chemical weapons the assad regime has now admitted that it has these weapons and even said they joined the chemical weapons convention which prohibits their use the us and the un eventually removed thirteen hundred tons of chemical weapons and destroy them experts say that's more than any us air strikes could have accomplished but for so many syrians it's heartbreaking like look assad got away with it again he destroys some chemical weapons and the international community leaves them alone to keep his own people america's not the world's policeman terrible things happen across the globe and it is beyond our means to right every wrong but when would modest effort and risk we can stop children from being gassed to death and thereby make our own children safer over the long run i believe we should act.

senate russia obama us syria syrian government russian government assad white house congress ben president putin un america thirteen hundred tons
"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"Still inside the administration the plan to bomb syria is going forward secretary of state john kerry goes out makes a big speech denouncing bizarro assad basically making the case for a strike slum cite the risk of doing things we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing ben says staffer start to talk about how obama will announce the bombing primetime speech or not and then obama goes for a walk with his chief of staff denis mcdonough who was against intervention after that ben and some others get called to the office and i walk up there and i was the first guy in the in the room in a bomb on the desk and he says to me you know i've got a big idea and i remember just being like well you're the guy dea guy you know and he says i decided to go see congressional authorization for acting syria like that thing the republicans are preemptively accusing me of not doing i'm gonna do it one of the biggest criticisms of obama was that when he was campaigning in two thousand seven he told the boston globe quote the president does not have power under the constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation unquote so on that day in the oval office obama reminds ben and others about that quote and he's i agree with that guy like i that's what i believe i'm that guy like i believe in the national law and constitutional law and he's like we can't keep going into wars and middle eastern countries this way like there's too much power in the presidency i'm trying to show that i mean what i say that in a democracy like we all have to be behind these decisions so they go around the room and nearly everybody is like all right let's ask congress vice president joe biden says congress will support obama they'll be there for you on this he says the only person who didn't think he would get get sport from congress susan rice national security adviser rich i have to say and it was interesting because i wouldn't put this in the most delco way possible i think as an african american like susan saw the nature of the opposition to him in a way that was different from biden in that biden was like well these guys are always hard on you but but on something like this they'll be there and susan's like you know they'll never be there we contacted susan rice about this but she declined to comment so then.

syria john kerry assad obama ben boston globe president joe biden congress susan rice chief of staff denis mcdonough vice president
"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"In washington ben was watching all of this from the white house the videos and pictures posted by syrian activists and ben and other people in the white house believed in this idea called the responsibility to protect an idea that countries have a right to act on other countries if those other countries are committing mass atrocities so it's august twenty sixth two thousand thirteen and so we're waiting outside the oval office and jim coppers there the deny director of national intelligence and he looked kind of unusually agitated and he kind of volunteers that it's not a slam dunk that assad order this come weapons attack and i'm media ly thought well this is weird why say slam dunk because slam dunk of course is the same phrase george tenet the former head of the cia used to describe his certainty that saddam hussein had weapons of mass destruction in that caused grave damage the reputation of the both because that was wrong but also because after the rock war went bad the bush people kind of blamed tenant so in this moment clapper tells ben the evidence of a chemical attack in syria is not a slam dunk because it hasn't been fully verified yet on the ground then they go into the oval office and clapper tells obama he has high confidence chemical weapons were used and that assad was responsible but then he paused and he said you know but but it's not a slam dunk and even did air quotes when he said it has to clapper jim no one asked you if it was a slam dunk according to ben clapper told us he doesn't remember this exchange but says it totally could have happened and benzes it was at this point he realized just how much this was all about avoiding the mistakes that were made in iraq everybody overland lessons from over learned or learned depending on your perspective but the intelligence fini was the first out of the gate busy say we're not playing the part that we played in iraq right i felt the burden and obama he had to respond to this awful event in syria while bearing the additional weight of the war in iraq which caused his own intelligence community to be cautious his military to be wary of slippery slope is closest allies to distrust us led military adventures in the middle east the press to be more skeptical of presidential statements the public to oppose us words overseas and congress to see matters of war and peace as political issues to be exploited like that is the legacy of iraq right there you know to me that paragraph is not like self pity or even analysis like that is the world that we live that week still thinks keep moving the military starts drying plans but that u n team is still on the ground so like i'm just gonna call kimoon myself so abam calls the un secretary general benz there with him and obama tells bond ki moon you really have to get your people out and ban ki moon is like but we have to verify that this was in fact a seren gas attack an obama mimicking cannot stress you porn is that they get out and again the only reason you would want them to leave is if you're going to bump syria that phone call was on a monday and bon kimoon's team stays in syria for a few more days and in those days a lot happens what's interesting to look back on this whole episode is a series of factors converge of the course of the week that ultimately changed bombs calculus if that team was out he might have bomb syria under tuesday i'm utterly convinced of that.

white house washington
"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"On this red line statement now there was a direct association between a series of chemical weapons and military response by the united states issues a stern warning to syria stated that these threat of chemical biological warfare in syria is what he called a red line mentioned the possibility of military action for the first time and riff becomes doctrine so that was the summer of two thousand twelve then august twenty first two thousand thirteen so i was sitting on a plane with my wife waiting to take off for the first vacation that we'd had in years and literally it's taxing the tarmac and i started to get all these reports some simply horrific images are coming out of syria what you're going to look at is the immediate aftermath of an alleged chemical attack by the syrian government activists are calling the chemical masoka say falsified rockets with toxic agents the grisly images posted to youtube wednesday showed men women children either dying or already showing the bodies of lifeless children of doctors trying to desperately resuscitate others hundred reportedly were killed these reports from people who i knew knew what they're talking about if these reports are true it has serious indications for the united states the obama administration has said the use of chemical weapons would cross a red line so what happens now you could immediately tell this much bigger event than anything we'd seen the national security council calls meeting and so i had the strange experience of leaving my family driving out to this fbi field office parking in parking lot to really annoyed looking guys let me 'cause they're working on weekend and ben patches in on a secure video link in what really impressed me in that meeting is marty dempsey the chairman joint she's staff said look i have told you before that you shouldn't intervene because up until now ben says dempsey thought intervening in syria would lead the us down a slippery slope with no clear end in sight but this event is big enough that i think we have to do something just to register just to do something to do something as they went around the room most people agreed it was time to take action and ben says it seemed like obama was leaning toward it too but there was a problem obama got very focused on the fact that there was a u n team on the ground in syria was going to go to collect samples for investigation in abomination can we get them out of there and he really was pressing on this we gotta do everything we can to get that team out so his body language he didn't say i'm ordering strike he did say i'm ordering you to prepare the set of options to position military assets there and so the the feeling in the room you were by video conference of these was entirely like we're going to do this what were you thinking i was incredibly energize and as offals e vent was i was thinking well we're now finally going to do something about this and i'm pacing back and forth in this parking lot in oregon you know mapping out essentially the plan to rule out the war and i think it's important to say to people like getting energized about like an airstrike is no all your but the point is like for me at least it was like finally somebody's going to let this guy no he can't kill people anymore yes as awful as it is to be energized by the prospect of of war it felt like this is it this the moments let's do this as well as we can.

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on Embedded

"Four protesters are killed i know this videos like the one you're hearing from that day and because i know a guy named ibrahim abbas eat he was there one of the four guys who was killed was his friend i saw the blood i so they are how they they they lose them live and this is when the cycle starts repeating over and over across syria people protests the regime kills people people protest more more people get killed or detained and tortured in detention then guys like abraham and his friends venture ly get guns start fighting back and syrian uprising becomes a war so now ben rhodes early two thousand twelve he's working out of his office in the west wing the year before u s and nato launched airstrikes libya dictator muammar qaddafi was later killed and by two thousand twelve reporters keep asking what the administration is going to do about syria at that point it was reasonable for people believe that while these people went into libya so they'll probably going to syria but in libya ben says the very first military option was clear bomb gaddafi's troops were traveling on this one road to this one city to kill civilians in syria cheryl assad's forces were killing civilians all over like there was no obvious military plan to stop in syria it was never like a moment where it was like if you do x you will prevent why but there was one thing the administration was worried about in syria is odd and his regime we're sitting on top of a enormous stockpile of chemical weapons and benz as the biggest fear in the white house was that assad would use those chemical weapons or give them to hezballah this militant group that supported him then in the summer of two thousand twelve get report that their fear is about to become a reality assad is about to use or transfer those weapons and the administration decides they need to send a message what we ended up doing is number one we wrote in delivered warnings to the assad regime directly which was unusual we didn't usually communicate with them at that point to iran into russia essentially saying do not cross line you will be held accountable in some fashion for this they have obama go out and deliver a speech basically saying the same thing we will continue to make it clear outside and those around him that the world is watching and that they will be held accountable by the international community and the united states they make the tragic mistake of using those weapons and the language was carefully chosen to essentially mirror the private messages that we're sending those governments so they would know the us takes this very seriously but the plan was to keep the threat and big use like don't say what exactly the us would do then about a month later is doing a press conference tells me that you guys have been missing me chuck todd i think asked a question about chemical weapons use in military action in particular envision using military instantly nothing else say keeping become a weapon and this time the language is not carefully chosen obama kind of riffing we have been very clear to the assad regime but also to other players on the ground bad a red line for us is we start saying a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized that would change my calculus that would change my question and there was for the first time red line it's the same thing he told syria iran and russia in private but now it has a name and let's be clear at the time ben rhodes believed the us should have already intervened in syria to stop us chemical weapons are not and so to me it was a sense of of course we should do this but i did think though that we had essentially taken a public position that had not been carefully prepared and then in that same press conference obama repeats that's a red line for us and adds a threat of force there would be normal consequences if we start saying movement on the chemical weapons front or the use of chemical weapons that would that would change my calculations significantly thank you the press conference ends reporters really start honing in.

"red line" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"Active roy that is i think a more elegant way of stating what i was trying to get at before which is that you know if you concludes the uh the 2015 nuclear agreement had the signatures of russia and china on it is not the most effective way to control the nuclear threat or the various other threats including the terrorism threat that iran poses to its neighbors in in others around the world uh then you have to start looking at water options to reveal all the perhaps don't necessarily require our russian her chinese assent and certainly the kinds of things that you're talking about her examples of for your ways that uh one can continue to apply sanctions brochure either within the framework of the agreement wore i in ways that look beyond the specifics of the nuclear deal uh the construct getting you there but i also thank you i i think the most important thing here is to not fuel blake we are constrained entirely by what is on paper in that 2015 agreement there are a lot of problems that agreement a wasn't intended to soften air perfectly wouldn't solve even if it tried and they're also lauded other tools that are available to deal with these problems that aren't within the confines of this one agreement now the ought beat the white house has said from the beginning they didn't want the deal to be the focus of our ron policy as obama made it they wanted a comprehensive approach in my worry is by setting a red line like this president trump does make it the focus of his iran policy and um you know what what happens if the european partners a don't agree and trump pulls out of the dealer doesn't pull out of the deal house pre serious consequences there either way one thing's for sure you don't want to set a red lie you don't follow through on we learned that from the last president.

roy russia china white house the deal obama red line trump president iran ron
"red line" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"red line" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"The red line of the green light it all bleep this bleep that bleep the so so as to the cops will come in this a he got to stop that and when they don't stop at they get that they get logged or at least they get written the ticket because i don't think you're allowed to swear and if it's turban the peace will you replaced one of the four letters with an asterix i you know i would still say that they you know it's the eh if i'm a cop out on the highway and it apparently this trucker's around all the time on this uh i weigh in everybody's been complaining about it sooner or later somebody is going to some sooner or later it's going to lead to a road rage incident so i'm just saying i don't i think they got a right to tell her just get get rid of that plate and if there's no leap obama i would still say was beat it would be bad no i don't i don't think there should be i don't think the i think the problem lies the f word i think the products the problem i don't care if it's says bleep all bomber bleep trump i i i think that it's just it's just got a clause the disturbances it's going to cause road rage do you think grace case it's one of those cases wearing thin conservatives need to walk the walk all we talk about as we should be able to say when we why why are they suppressing what we can say and then it hurt someone's feelings are mixed someone of sat and then we want to take it off the truck just just don't pay any attention to it and move on i think the the sheriff's department has come up with a rather they're just go into the record just go into the warrants file and the you know somebody who's guys got a bumper sticker like that prague just got a worn out for their arrest a bad check fraud i don't know shoplifting something like that at least and that's what up so so now widen now she's back in court and maybe they can work something out david what do you think i i.

red line obama prague fraud david grace shoplifting
"red line" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"red line" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The headmaster who has sure enough now departed from the school i don't want to be rude added another sternly but he was a thief we've had enough of corruption also he wouldn't less have a football tournament even he promised us one the year before several heads knotted vigorously and agreements we saw the revolution on the television and we learned if you wanted to change something in your life this is what you do interjected one small boy named the meds who round the sip of his tracksuit top up and down as he spoke i'm sorry he concluded but the football tournament is a red line today many of egypt's revolutionaries are not behind bars but this conceptualization a revolution not just the toppling of a figureheads like the mushir but a fought deep perea imagining of power and sovereignty won capable of sweeping away the mood deer and many others like him in its wake is proving far harder for the state of anquish contained within it is courage and hope that belongs to us all the kids railed off a list of the ways in which their lives had changed since the revolution began the school bullies who the other children refer to as the playground shelter or police have been chased away in clohessy's students regularly walked out if they felt disrespected and refused yelled at any move by the teachers i asked one of the quieted children his thoughts and he pondered silently for a moment shyly biting his finger egyptian people are lion's he concluded that lost looking up at me we wish shouted but now we rule thank you very much and.

red line egypt clohessy
"red line" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"red line" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"I'll tell you guys what i was up to submit minutes thing week for me but one of the shows the you want to talk about this on tv is called the tunnel yes tunnel the tunnel and this is at show that shows on pbs is it about the red line now i'm never going to live my life in our allies ever title and it's a really excellent thriller series starring steven d'alene who's a british actor that i feel should have had the career that tom hill soon as having for some reason steven d'alene isn't a household name and didn't date date taylor swift but he's if you look them up you'll recognize him and he's really he's very handsome and very classy and he plays a police officer in kent england and the tunnel that they're talking about as the tunnel between france and england oh card and the production crew was the first production crew to get permission to actually film in that tunnel because obviously they have huge security sure issues but it is a fascinating piece of technology and a fascinating kind of culture and machine unto itself and so they they pivot a crime or abuse lee a murder earned disappearance that happens in or around that tunnel and then the rest of the series is about solving at and so his opposite number in calais is played by clements poesy of beautiful french actress and they work together they they they have a nice friendship there not romantic but.

red line steven d'alene officer kent england france murder calais tom hill england clements poesy