4 Burst results for "Rebecca Sigh"

"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

14:12 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Hi this is Kelly. You're listening to her in the collaboration between two broads talking politics and author Rebecca side where we look at the movement to elect our first woman puzzle La Melissa Everyone. This is vote. Her in which is a series of two prods talking politics collaboration with author Rebecca Beck aside and today instead of a special guest like we often half. We're GONNA do sort of a wrap up of the year. It's the final episode of the year in a look ahead to next year so I am joined in this by my two broads. Co Hosts Afi. Hey Sophie Hey friends and we are also of course joined joined by our partner in this venture Rebecca Sigh of low Rebecca. Hi Impair so I am going to turn this over to Rebecca now to talk about some of the topics that we're gonNA discuss them this episode. So hello everybody delighted to be here with you after this wonderful year together with two bras and was filthier. So FIU Kelly on this mission to Inspire motivate talk about voting in more women and particularly a woman president. We debated aided Just before we started the show whether we should lead with a discussion of wine cage but we we've decided that We didn't really learn about wine caves until late last night and what we did learn about in the course and get to think about and you all got to think about. During the course of the year we're amazing lessons nsen inspirational stories From the women we have interviewed so our thought was. I'm going to just run through some big ideas that at least for me we're very meaningful in the course of the years episodes and then we're going to have a discussion about those and Kellyanne Sophie. We'll get their thoughts And then we'll have a brief look into next year and what it may herald And wish you all a wonderful New Year and happy the holidays after that so as you may all have gathered. I'm sort of on the big idea front. has a personal matter I I love advocacy and inspirational inspirational efforts. So when I was thinking about these Big Ideas One of the first the very first came to me as a longtime pro choice choice. Advocate is the fact that we heard expressed over and over and unwavering commitment to reproductive rights and notably back in June owner so we interviewed both Senator Klobuchar and Senator Gillibrand and on the side had a brief exchange with Senator Warren. In both of those longer interviews just such a clear compelling commitment to the notion of reproductive rights which we don't take bake lightly. I'm sure you don't and is notable in this year when We face some real barriers to Roe V. Wade still being the law land. Of course the coal voter in concept of part of what's behind that is the notion of increasing women's executive political power you're in addition to their legislative power and as a strategy electing a woman president of course but we also saw and had a discussion discussion about executive political power in a variety of institutional contexts. So for instance we talk with Jill wine banks noted. MSNBC you see commentator about that in her work we talked about it with Jan Schakowsky congresswoman from Illinois As the leader of the House of Representatives it is we of course talked about it with senators closure and Gillibrand importantly we talked about it with Illinois State Senator Toi Hutchinson and As head of an important National Organization of legislators now a an executive in the office of the Governor here in Illinois Roy and also notably. We talked about this notion of executive power and how women may exert it With embassador earthworm cousin. The past head out of the World Food Program and in that context. We got this chance to hear from an explorer. And just be so grateful for in my view the bold Sometimes scary truth counting on the part of some of the women we interviewed really all of them but Two who stories in particular of interviewees stood out for me. One was the story of Anna Valencia. Who is a leader and an official well here in the city of Chicago and the second was from Korea? Jerome Pierre also a commentator on television author and leader of move on and in that context we saw a notwithstanding all the barriers that women face who seek due to engage in public life or in politics we also saw the dreams can come true and I think that's important for us as we. Jason Moran Post Impeachment Days Looking to what may happen and the US Senate and notably. I come back again to ambassador cousin and her story of growing up as a young woman in the poor community on the west side of Chicago and then fifty years later on the world stage as is a leader of the UN. We also in the context of you know looking at what young women need to think about may already be thinking about may already Eddie be doing. We had a great interview with an Moses. I should say Dr Anne Moses who was the founder of ignite and which trains as you may know Oh young women to enter politics and she reported on a recent survey and also some anecdotal evidence but On the fact packed up young women are really committed to politics to policy. Change for instance on climate matters and I guess last but not least then I know there are other ideas but these are the ones as I said the. Jump to mind for me We were reminded from time to time certainly by watching doing the news and seeing what's happening that Women candidates just like women activists and women elected officials recognized kick nuys that We are bending toward justice as Dr King talked about. We don't know how long it's GonNa take. And but we meet need to stay committed and Linda Hirshman A great author of several books about women leaders Made that point. Join to us in her interview. So I throw those out for us to think about as the year moves on and and turn to Kelly and Sophie Kerber thoughts. Yeah wonder sort of pick up on where you started with the a lot of reproductive rights reproductive justice. You know and I think that ah whether it's because women are in the mix in the presidential race or because there are so many women activists pushing it. It's clearly something that that the male candidates to feel that they need to be all in on the Democratic side on a reproductive rights. You know we saw women women activists earlier in the air pushing Joe Biden To say that he would get rid of the Hyde Amendment which he clearly was reluctant to do and and so I think having women on the stage in the debates having women out there giving speeches on the campaign trail is important in not just because they are going to tackle these issues if they are elected but because they are making sure. These issues are front and center and that all of the candidates have to be talking about that and I think that's going to be really crucial moving forward and we're seeing that not just in the presidential race. Of course you know we're seeing that In all the congressional the races and things too but I I think that's so so important in this presidential race I will say. I've been a little disappointed by the lack ACA focus on reproductive rights in the debates. Sometimes it comes up every once in a while I'll but it doesn't seem to have the same sort of sticking powers some of the other issues it just sort of every once in a while in a debate will come up for two or three candidates and I would really like to see the kind of focus on on reproductive rights that the debate moderator subdued putting on healthcare for example where we have to have the same healthcare debate every single time maybe one of those times instead we could have had discussion of reproductive rights. Because as much as you know all the candidates like most Americans support art row v Wade remaining intact. That's not the only issue right like I'd like to hear what they wanNA do about funding. I'd like to hear more about how they would like to get rid of the Hyde Amendment and sort of how they would spread abortion access across the country. What they would do for states where they have made abortion Jin very very difficult to get MS? They're going to be any sort of federal programs to help those people you know. I'd like to hear more about that on the debate. Stage the age and I feel like the moderators haven't always given me at as so I you know I think they are starting to make a little more clear. This relationship between gene climate change and its effects on recent gender. You know how people who are marginalized you're gonNA feel the effects more. They're not drying that a distinctly as much with reproductive rights and really spending to reproductive justice. In a way that I think is important. That's what you're getting at Sophie And I think that having although I love having fewer people on the debate stage I'm not GONNA lie. I think getting to the point where there are fewer and where unfortunately fortunately the really top candidates are white and largely male. Means that there's even fewer opportunities for that you know people like comma harass people at Callan Castro. You are talking in those terms. But there were aren't in the mix anymore at least beat stage And so you know. It's not going as far as they could and should but but it's certainly going further than we saw for years ago. I think that that partially goes back to that idea that you know there. Is this arc. It bends toward justice. I think also may go back to the idea and this is something we'll be looking at in the coming years well about whether so to speak. It's a women's issue and therefore subsidiary to broader policy. An issue matters or whether so to speak. Every issue is a women's issue and to your point Sophie deserve equal time. And I think that's that's a challenge for us the challenge and we'll be one. I stink said it. You know one of the other things that I want to come come back to tease out. A little bit is this idea of executive political power and and electability more largely That's a term that's been thrown around a lot this year. What is electile -bility? It seems to be sort of the the thing people care most about open. No one can define a an you know ends up meaning looking like the person who's been in the job before and I I think that you you know. We're we're starting to see all of the candidates in the presidential election. Finally try to make the case a little more about why they are the electable. The one that wasn't something they were focusing on as much before. And they're all trying these distinctions. I you know and and seeing someone like Warren who is not making that that distinction in terms of gender but as saying you know I've tackled corruption. I have lots of plans for corruption. We're going against the most cropped President Administration we've ever seen that's the distinction. We need to make an you know. I think it's interesting that That really none of the women have ever tried to say. You know the distinction. The reason that I'm electable is because because I'm a woman but I think that you know. Sometimes there are people making the argument the other way saying to the men you know. Are you electable this year. It's it's a year of a woman you know like women are the ones winning all the races in in Congress and in down ballot I can a man can a white man win this year and so I think that's an interesting. I don't think that's necessarily getting down to to all the voters think that's just something that sort of the media is talking about but I think it's a really interesting spin. I agree with you and I kind of noticed this yesterday. As part of the debate where there was a moment where Pete Footage Amy Klobuchar. Where sort of at loggerheads And Pete footage kept coming back to I'm a millennial Enga- and I was elected in Indiana the NFL and Amy Klobuchar did not counter with. Well I'm a woman and that makes me really electable and the Democratic Party. She just started talking about her policies and and so. I think it's really interesting that no one has made the explicit electability argument and I'm thinking it's probably because of an in two thousand sixteen or candidate was the woman and she lost but she but you're right but she lost the Electoral College. And I think I think that people are taking the wrong lesson from that. Sometimes I think they're saying oh well that proves that a woman can't win the presidency and would would it proves. Is that a lot of women..

FIU Kelly executive Pete Footage Amy Klobuchar Chicago Senator Gillibrand Senator Warren Roe V. Wade Sophie Kerber president Rebecca Illinois Rebecca Beck Rebecca side Kellyanne Sophie Senator Toi Hutchinson Rebecca Sigh Linda Hirshman Jill wine
"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Hello everyone. This is Rebecca five guest with sofi and Kelly on the voter in segment of two bras and welcome to this show where really excited about doing this. We're hoping that you will find it. Interesting invaluable, and inspirational and most important we're looking forward to sharing what we know and working together to make this dream of voting in our next woman. President come true. So let your friends snow welcome. And let's get going. Thanks. Are you listening? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. We are back for our fifth episode of the vote hurt in series. I am here with my co host Sophie, hey, Sophie. Hey, Kelly and joining us again is our partner in this venture author Rebecca sigh of Hira Becca high to be here yet, thanks for joining us again. So for listeners who have not been listening to the full vote her in series. You should go back and listen to the first four episodes, but we are talking about the effort to elect the first woman president in this is an especially good time to be doing it. Because there are so many women running for president. So we're going to continue the discussion that we were having in the fourth part of the series talking about some of the systemic issues that women face in becoming elected being elected to executive positions. But especially to the. Presidency. So Rebecca where would you like to pick up our conversation on this? Well, we covered a lot of ground the other day. But you know, there were some things we touched on. And I thought we could delve more deeply, and particularly now that I think the races, you know, really heating up and just read this morning that the molar reports going to be released soon. And so these candidates are going to I'm guessing being a whole new phase of you know, what they're saying and doing and campaigning. And it may well be depending on what said about the molar report, for instance, that there are some women on the Republican side who, you know, make some noise. And so in that context thought we might, you know, start today's discussion by talking about the fact that it's, you know, not a given, and we should say that out loud and discuss it that the first woman president will be pro-choice woman or even democrat, right? And that there are certainly women on the Republican side. There may be some independent women who you know. Decide to run just as men have who don't. Share the sort of progressive agenda that the four main candidates on the democratic side share. And so I thought that would be important for us to look at. And you know, there's been a lot of discussion in the past about Nikki Haley, and you know, after she resigned from the UN ambassador position, Hugh months ago. Of course, she was asked well is your next running for president? And she said, of course, no. But then in the meanwhile, you probably saw this too. She's got a book coming out. She's got some think tank projects, and there's really, you know, the possibility of that. And what does that mean, you know for women if we have a woman president who's anti-choice and quite conservative on other women's issues? I think sometimes Republicans may be like two to devoting, you know, in general, they don't seem to like women's issues. But I think sometimes. The they sort of give themselves out when they vote for women. Well, we'll look we support strong women too. And there are Republican women like Kellyanne Conway who liked to play this sort of feminism card, even though you know, really what they're doing is often not all that supportive of other women or women's rights in general. But you know, I think that that that we've ERI well could see that just like we saw Sarah Palin nominated for vice president who is, you know, certainly, no friend to women's issues were sort of an interesting question because I I recently read a book about the history of the Kucuk clan in the mid twentieth century, and you know, basically in the nineteen twenties, and there was a whole chapter on the women leaders of the clan. And I mean, I don't think I've ever heard about this before, but the author who's brilliant..

President Rebecca sigh Nikki Haley Kelly vice president president Sarah Palin Kellyanne Conway Sophie Hira Becca partner UN executive sofi Hugh
"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca sigh" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"This is Kelly with two brads talking politics were here for our third installment of the vote her in segment of the podcast. Joining me today is my coho. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and our partner on this project, Rebecca sigh of high Rebecca hi glad to be here. Yes. Real heavy use. So we're at the third installment here. So last time around if you haven't listened yet we talked about the early history of women running for president in the US. And now we're going to talk about sort of the the next section of time. So post Gracie Allen, pre Hillary Clinton. And I think we're we're talking about this in general because we think it's really important information. But it's very fitting, of course, that we're doing this during women's history month. So the the next big installment will be Hillary Clinton, and we'll talk about that in some detail. So we'll we'll end right before that for this one. So let's talk. Then let's sort of start in on on what we're talking about here. Last time we talked about as really early people who ran and one of the points. We made was that they were running, and it's sort of independent or third party kind of races. And so now, we're looking at people who actually were running for major party nominations whit. What do we think is sort of the the important thing to think about in that? Yeah, that's the big difference kind of mid century of the twentieth century. Although it is important to note that a number of women throughout of the twentieth century did seek nominations for smaller parties where you know. There was probably little expectation of even getting on the ballot, but they did set forth and express a point of view. And I think it's important for us to acknowledge that group of women to but you're right starting in. Nineteen sixty four actually with Margaret chase. Smith women have run in the major party primaries or sought the nomination or been placed in nomination. And I think a lot of us know about surely Chisholm in nineteen seventy two, and I guess we'll talk about her in a minute. But the first person was Margaret chase Smith, a Republican from Maine, and her story was initially kind of kin to, you know, a lot of women's experience in elected office, which is that you know, they took a seat that their husband and held or something like that. And in her case that was the truth of the case for her. But what also happened was she then started to run herself. And she is the first woman who in her own right served in both the congress and the Senate in the United States successfully for you know, several decades and after. Asking the party to consider her as the Republican nominee. They rejected her and she ran anyway. So she's really a an amazing figure both for her courage electorally and also as we were talking about a minute ago for her courage on some issues that resonate today. So I was really glad when I was writing voter in and looking at all this, you know, to sort of study up on her because I didn't know everything about this. And it was just incredible may favorite thing about her. I think when she announced that she was running for president. She said I have few allusions and no money, but I'm staying for the finish. When people keep telling you, you can't do thing you kind of like to try. Yes. You are my kind of she was a Republican. But she's my kind of woman. Right, right. I thought it was interesting from Maine. I feel like Maine has type right has a bent towards moderate, Republican female senators. I mean, you know, they have Olympia Snowe. They have Susan Collins who is not as moderate or she likes to believe, but still somewhat more within the Republican party. I think it's interesting that maintenace sort of the home of the moderate, Republican female Senator. Yeah. You know, I I grew up in a democratic family. And so, you know, Margaret chase Smith was sort of out there on the, you know, the periphery when we would sit at the dinner table and discuss things, but I do recall, my parents who were stalwart Democrats, you know, giving her proper, right? You know, because of what you're saying that she was moderate she stood up, you know, for certain important things in their minds..

Margaret chase Smith Maine Kelly Republican party Hillary Clinton Sophie president Margaret chase United States Rebecca sigh Susan Collins Olympia Snowe Chisholm Gracie Allen partner Senator congress Senate
"rebecca sigh" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca sigh" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Chicken soup. This is essential for your complete recovery for which all of us are rooting here. And we really want you back and fighting for him real soon. One of my I would say, dearest and newest friends, Mike Bauer Rebecca sigh. Yes, I joined Chris, and Dave I've known Michael I would say a couple of decades at least treasured his forthrightness and enthusiasm for the process. So Michael my very best wishes. I'm Rebecca side. Most recently, the author of a book called vote her in your guide to electing our first woman president I'm excited to tell you that since I was last year. It has come out in audio as well as Brent very good. And we'll talk about that later in the broadcast. Stephanie had you been on with Michael many times many times, and Michael I'm really hoping you get better because I've enjoyed. Our rides home after the show. I'm sorry. I'll be glad to give you a ride and pick you up any time as so get better soon because I know where you live and again from all the people in Evanston, mostly Democrats. I say get well wishes to Michael, okay, we continue, and I I offer my expression of of get well wishes as well. And again, you're one of our favorite guests around here. So so get back, and and also your usually available at the last minute, which we really appreciate it. But it's great and again to your. To your partner. Roger, I know you've been together for a long long time, and he's been helping with chicken soup and everything else the last weekend and hopefully for many many years to come. So so good luck to you. I want to ask just follow up a little bit on on where? How deeply the president. You think is hurt when people like Ann Coulter. Rush Limbaugh attack him is that is that a deep cut. You know? I I don't think he is. And I'm one of these people, you know, I was converted baseman. I've never been a, you know, always Trumper by any means. But I think I think that. Step back a little bit. I know that his mantra was build the wall. And that that struck a vibe with a significant portion of the base or a certain portion of the base, I'll say, but a lot of Trump's support came despite that, and I would not say that across the board. Everybody is at every Republican that voted for Trump is a die hard wall supporter. We understand that. It's significant that it's important. But remember Trump was elected for a lot of other reasons, and those other reasons still hold very firm and true for a lot of people. So I do not think it hurts him with his base. And I don't think it hurts him with the people that voted for him for other reasons. Chris Roebling, I think this episode is actually going to strengthen Trump. I think this episode is shows his base that he was in there fighting. He was in there doing everything that he could. I think the next three weeks we're going to show that he's in there doing everything that he can I don't think people are going to be as upset with him for the failures of Paul, Ryan, etc. I think they're going to focus their anger on Nancy Pelosi, if she continues in her obstructionism, so I think that in terms of Trump reelect right now, he's doing okay. So I think that could change, and I think the fact that Ann Coulter or that a Rush Limbaugh gets mad at him. I think that there there are a lot of folks out there who are gonna love him. No matter what. But it only confounds the critics if there's a fight on the right? And and that's probably good for Trump going into reelect as well to me. And the media loves it the media love. They they don't understand any of it saying that the anger is still do. But they they misread what? Rush Limbaugh, and how they interpret what what Donald Trump means for the Republican party. It's it's not what Democrats and the media to portray. There's a he has a much different kind of meeting. And that is that he, you know, he brought in a sense a sensibility back to the office a willingness to fight up against some of the ridiculous accusations. By pundit. Or if you are a talk show host. Yeah. You don't have to get to three hundred and seventy electoral votes. Seventies. We're going to change it. Back to back to the democratic side. Because I want to switch gears and talk about other people that are running for president, including we've at three US senators running now, unless you look like, you know, before we get there like you're ready to pounce on Ann Coulter a little bit. No, I'm ready to pounce on the the people through the looking glass on the other side of the table here. What what it wasn't the pundits who forced Donald Trump thirty seven days ago in response to an Coulter. And Rush Limbaugh having a freakout over the deal that he did two days ago that he could have done thirty seven days ago was Donald Trump who did that his no hang on Chris? You can't reinvent history. Donaldson had authorized Donald Trump authorized. Donald Trump had authorized Mitch McConnell to do this deal. He had he he had authorized Republicans to do the deal. They were prepared to do the deal. Mitch would not have called it without the White House authorization, and they were doing the deal and all of a sudden that's one Ann Coulter and Rush Limbaugh freaked out. And that's what Donald Trump shut down the government. So let's not reinvent history. Please. And I think there's one other point here since we're on the democratic side of the table now, which is to say that I actually think that you know, whatever Coulter and Rush Limbaugh are doing what the polls show is that the president's popularity has significantly declined over these thirty seven days. So they're not the ones as Dave just said running for office. The president is Furthermore, I read this afternoon that there are Republicans saying publicly this is in in reported that they're worried about whether he can be a viable candidate next time around because his poll numbers are so low and are going lower now. He may decide to run anyone who wants to. We're going to talk about this. You know, anyone who can say they want to run for president. If they want to they may not win. But the fact of the matter is that the consensus seemed to be among these Republicans diminishing polling creates a problem for a prospective candidate. And that's the position Donald Trump and his reelection and his reelect right now is in the high thirties. So I don't know how you you find that. That's a comfortable place for an incumbent to be hold on. Hold on. You said he's doing fine. And I talked about is speaking about his base. And I was speaking about his base going into reelection. And I think his base is concerned to see that. He keeps a promise of trying to get this thing done can't win again with. I'm sorry. If he doesn't have that base. He's not gonna win. Has to have that base to win and winning is going to require I having the base. And I think we're all aware that the Trump social media campaign is already identified many many millions of support. I mean, you're you're looking at the most sophisticated campaign in history coming at you. So I did not win the popular vote two years ago. I I'm well aware of Bill Clinton twice. Okay. I'm not worried about Rebecca. So I think the the thing here is that, you know, what's that expression about the numbers matter? The point is that if his polling numbers are going down. That means fewer people are likely to vote for him even fewer than we're willing to vote for him two years ago. And what that means in the four key states, take Michigan. I was there afternoons I'm thinking about it ten thousand votes somewhere between ten and eleven thousand votes. If just some of those people who are now saying I didn't like being thrown out of work decide Michigan goes a different way. So I think that yes, you're right. He starts with the base. But he ain't got a whole lot more right now. The one.

Donald Trump Ann Coulter president Rush Limbaugh Trump Michael I Chris Roebling Rebecca side Mike Bauer Dave I Brent Bill Clinton Stephanie Nancy Pelosi Evanston Michigan Republican party partner