20 Burst results for "Rebecca Roy"

Monitor Show 23:00 10-21-2023 23:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

00:29 sec | Last month

Monitor Show 23:00 10-21-2023 23:00

"Interactive brokers clients earn up to 4 .83 % on their uninvested instantly available USD cash balances rate subject to change. Visit ibkr .com slash interest rates to learn more. That goes all the way up until March, we'll see what the DC circuit says. Thanks so much, Rebecca. That's Professor Rebecca Roy fee of New York Law School. This is Bloomberg Law on Bloomberg Radio. I'm June Grosso stay with us today's top stories and global business headlines are coming up right now.

Rebecca Rebecca Roy New York Law School Ibkr .Com June Grosso Today March DC Bloomberg Radio Up To 4 .83 % Bloomberg Law Professor
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:53 min | Last month

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

"Interactive brokers clients earn up to 4.83% on their uninvested instantly available USD cash balances rate subject to change. Visit ibkr.com slash interest rates to learn more. The gag order that stands and he runs right up to the line and kind of pushes it and she admonishes them and this is kind of a game that goes all the way up until March. Thanks so much, Rebecca. That's Professor Rebecca Roy fee of New York Law School. I'm June Grosso and this is Bloomberg broadcasting 24 hours a day at Bloomberg.com and the Bloomberg Business Act. This is Bloomberg radio.President Biden is appealing to American citizens for support in the wars in Israel and Ukraine. So I caution the government of Israel not to be blinded by rage and here in America. Let us not forget who we are. We reject all forms. All forms of hate during a rare prime time address to the nation on Thursday. Biden argued support for the two nations is key to national security as he prepares to ask for Congressional aid. The president plans to send Congress a supplemental funding request tomorrow. The FBI continues to monitor threats in the US and overseas as the Israel Hamas conflict rages on the FBI has seen an increase in threats against Jewish Muslim and Arab communities. They're looking into the credibility of any and all threats and working closely with state and local law enforcement agencies. A number of Republican lawmakers say they've received death threats after voting against Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan for Speaker of the House. Both representatives Drew Ferguson of Georgia and Marionette Miller Meeks of Iowa said they received threats after they pulled their support for Jordan on the second speaker vote Wednesday.

Monitor Show 23:00 10-20-2023 23:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:53 min | Last month

Monitor Show 23:00 10-20-2023 23:00

"Interactive brokers clients earn up to 4 .83 % on their uninvested instantly available USD cash balances rate subject to change. Visit ibkr .com slash interest rates to learn more. The gag order that stands and he runs right up to the line and kind of pushes it and she admonishes them and this is kind of a game that goes all the way up until March. Thanks so much, Rebecca. That's Professor Rebecca Roy fee of New York Law School. I'm June Grosso and this is Bloomberg broadcasting 24 hours a day at Bloomberg .com and the Bloomberg Business Act. This is Bloomberg radio. President Biden is appealing to American citizens for support in the wars in Israel and Ukraine. So I caution the government of Israel not to be blinded by rage and here in America. Let us not forget who we are. We reject all forms. All forms of hate during a rare prime time address to the nation on Thursday. Biden argued support for the two nations is key to national security as he prepares to ask for Congressional aid. The president plans to send Congress a supplemental funding request tomorrow. The FBI continues to monitor threats in the US and overseas as the Israel Hamas conflict rages on the FBI has seen an increase in threats against Jewish Muslim and Arab communities. They're looking into the credibility of any and all threats and working closely with state and local law enforcement agencies. A number of Republican lawmakers say they've received death threats after voting against Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan for Speaker of the House. Both representatives Drew Ferguson of Georgia and Marionette Miller Meeks of Iowa said they received threats after they pulled their support for Jordan on the second speaker vote Wednesday.

Rebecca Thursday Wednesday Drew Ferguson Israel Congress Ukraine Rebecca Roy FBI America President Trump March Two Nations New York Law School Bloomberg Business Act Marionette Miller Meeks Jim Jordan United States Bloomberg Jordan
"rebecca roy" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:32 min | 8 months ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"You're down to one lane right before 57th and a little slow through there otherwise looking good. Next traffic 8 O 8 news radio one O 5 9. Heck with the forecast was mostly sunny today becoming breezy milder a high of 59 to 9 mostly clear and breezy low of 43 tomorrow clouds and some sunny breaks along with a couple of showers mainly in the afternoon and a high of 61° then Tuesday mostly cloudy breezy and mild with strong severe thunderstorms in the afternoon and evening and watch out storms can bring damaging winds flooding downpours hail and even an isolated tornado again that's Tuesday. Looking at a high of 65 that day. Outside currently 31° and are partly clowning skies at 7 59. Featuring the news that matters and breaking news at any time. This is Chicago's news traffic and weather station. News radio one O 5 9 WB M coming up in the next half hour news radio ami severe weather system across multiple states is now blamed for over two dozen deaths more ahead from CBS News, also. I'm veron black, a Chicago public schools teacher is arrested and charged with stalking mayor lightfoot and causing a disruption outside of her home. And governor pritzker surveys deadly tornado damage in Illinois today, 31° outside, heading up to 59. It's 8 o'clock. This is CBS News on the hour. Presented by indeed dot com. I'm Stacy Lynn in Washington, more than two dozen deaths are being blamed on the severe storms at starting Friday in the south and Midwest and spread across the country. Hundreds of thousands are without power. Cody combs lives in Little Rock, Arkansas. He was in his work van when the tornado barreled through. Once I realized that it cracked the windshield and I saw some branches and rocks and stuff just hitting the side of the van. I just laid right across both seats and tried to get myself as low to that as possible. In Wisconsin, they're dealing with a different type of storm, a spring snowstorm, over a foot of the white stuff making roads a slick mass. It's slippery, there's no grip with this snow and getting stuck everywhere. I just take it easy, drive nice and slow. Just kind of hang back on cars. Northern Wisconsin could get even two more possible storms in the upcoming week. A lot of unanswered questions regarding the indictment of former president Trump. CBS News legal contributor, Rebecca Roy fee says his team will likely try to take this case out of Manhattan

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:53 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Good morning, I'm Nathan Hager. And I'm Karen Moskow in U.S. stock index futures are little changed this morning. We check the markets all day long here on Bloomberg with S&P and Dow futures that'll change NASDAQ futures are lower down a quarter percent or 27 points. The Dax in Germany is up about two tenths of a percent. Ten year treasury down 5 30 seconds, yield 3.45% they yield on the two year 4.12% and nymex crude oil is up 1%. It is $79, 17 cents a barrel of 78 cents, Nathan. Okay, Karen, we'll get back to the markets in a minute, but we begin with a growing political and now legal issue for President Biden. Attorney general Merrick Garland has named a special counsel after two sets of classified documents were found in one of the president's offices, and now inside his garage, President Biden says he has been cooperating fully. The Department of Justice was immediately notified. And the lawyers arranged for the Department of Justice to take possession of the document. So you're going to see, we're going to see all this unfold the President Biden says he does take classified documents seriously. New York law professor Rebecca Roy, he says, this puts the president in a difficult position. None of this is good, and it should be troubling. And it should be troubling to Americans regardless of your political affiliation. No president, no former vice president should be taking classified documents and putting in them someplace, keeping them someplace like a garage, even if that garage is locked. New York law schools Rebecca Roy fee spoke with our Washington correspondent Joe Matthew on Bloomberg sound on, catch the show weekdays at 5 p.m. eastern on Bloomberg radio or download sound on wherever you get your podcasts. Meantime, Nathan geopolitics is in focus for President Biden today. He is meeting with Japanese prime minister fumio kushida at The White House. Bloomberg's at Baxter reports, there is expected to be an update on the nation's global security agreement. Both sides have already said that the alliance has never been stronger, but National Security Council spokesman John Kirby says threats from Russia and China are causing the agreements to be updated. We modernizing alliance by announcing that attacks two from and within space could lead to the invocation of article 5 of the U.S. Japan security treaty. Kirby says Japan is stepping up. Its commitment to the alliance, and it will pay huge dividends. In San Francisco, I'm at Baxter Bloomberg daybreak. Thanks, Ed. We turn back to markets. Now, earnings for big banks kick off this morning, JPMorgan, Citigroup Bank of America and Wells Fargo all report quarterly results. And we get a preview with Bloomberg's Charlie wells. There have been so many pressures for these large American banks, there's the concern about a potential recession that we've been debating about for the past few weeks. There have been issues with a slowdown in deal making that is really hurt fees. It's looking like at some of these major banks investment banking revenue for the fourth quarter could be down about 51% and overall profits at these large banks are looking like in the fourth quarter they could be down about 15%. Bloomberg's Charlie wells says the outlook from bank CEOs may draw more attention this morning than the actual numbers. Unless we await those results in Nathan, global stocks are heading for a healthy gain this week. They're growing optimism that easing inflation will lead to less aggressive rate hikes. Here's Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker. In my view, the days of us raising them 75 basis points at a time are surely passed. In my view, types of 25 basis points will be appropriate going forward. Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker made the comments after yesterday's consumer price data which showed inflation continued to slow in December. And we may get more clues Karen on the direction of interest rates when a couple of fed officials speak again today. New York fed president John Williams, Minneapolis fed president Neil kashkari and Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker will all speak at separate events today. Well, in the UK, Nathan the British economy and expected they grew in November. Let's go to London and get the latest with Bloomberg daybreak, Europe banker, Stephen Carroll, Stephen good morning. Good morning, Cara than Nathan. The UK economy may avoid tumbling into recession for a little longer thanks to November's surprise, .1% growth in GDP, consumer facing services helping to boost out button in particular, spending on hospitality during the World Cup, strikes though affected activity in the postal and railway industries, the figures may strengthen calls for further interest rate rises from the Bank of England as inflation in the UK remains near the highest level in four decades in London. I'm Stephen Carroll, Bloomberg daybreak. Steven, thanks, staying in Europe, Sweden's inflation rate reached double digits for the first time in more than three decades in December. Inflation rose by an annual rate of 10.2% last month that was higher than expected. Well, back here in the U.S., Nathan, we're seeing a big pay cut for one of the country's premiere executives. Apple's CEO Tim Cook will see his total compensation decline this year, and we get more from Bloomberg's Doug prisoner. Apple cited investor feedback, as well as a request from cook himself, the pay reduction will be more than 40% this year to $49 million, and most of that will take the form of stock grants. Apple has drawn criticism about cook's previous $99 million compensation package from groups such as institutional shareholder services. The advisory firm said half of the rewards didn't depend on performance criteria like the company's share price. Last year, a majority of Apple shareholders voted to approve cook's package in New York, I'm Doug prisoner Bloomberg daybreak. Okay, Doug, thank you and in China today news that government entities are set to take so called golden shares in units of Alibaba and Tencent. That suggests Beijing is moving to ensure greater control over key players in the Internet arena, the shares could let officials influence the industry over the long term. S&P futures are down two points down futures up 25 NASDAQ futures are down 29 points. Straight ahead, your latest local headlines and a check of sports. This is Bloomberg.

President Biden Rebecca Roy Philadelphia fed Patrick harker Nathan Charlie wells Nathan Hager Karen Moskow Merrick Garland Bloomberg Department of Justice Joe Matthew Bloomberg sound Bloomberg radio Japanese prime minister fumio John Kirby
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Nathan Hager And I'm Karen Moscow, and U.S. stock index futures are little changed this morning. We check the markets all day long here on Bloomberg with S&P and Dow futures that'll change NASDAQ futures lower down a tenth of a percent or 14 points. The Dax in Germany is up a third of a percent ten year treasury down one 32nd yield 3.44% in a yield on the two year 4.11% nymex crude oil up four tenths of a percent, Nathan. Karen, we'll get back to markets in a minute, but we begin with a growing political and now legal issue for President Biden. Attorney general Merrick Garland has named a special counsel after two sets of classified documents were found in one of the president's offices, and now his garage, President Biden says he has been cooperating fully. The Department of Justice was immediately notified. And the lawyers arranged for the Department of Justice to take possession of the document. So you're going to see, we're going to see all this unfold the president says he takes classified documents seriously. New York law school professor Rebecca Roy says this puts the president in a difficult position. None of this is good and it should be troubling and it should be troubling to Americans regardless of your political affiliation. No president, no former vice president should be taking classified documents and putting in them someplace keeping them someplace like a garage, even if that garage is locked. New York law schools are spoke with our Washington correspondent Joe Matthew on Bloomberg's sound on, catch the show weekdays at 5 p.m. eastern on Bloomberg radio or download sound on, wherever you get your podcasts. Meantime, Nathan geopolitics is in focus for President Biden today. He's meeting with Japanese prime minister fumio kushida at The White House, Bloomberg's at Baxter reports, there is expected to be an update on the nation's global security agreement. Both sides have already said that the alliance has never been stronger, but National Security Council spokesman John Kirby says threats from Russia and China are causing the agreements to be updated. We modernize the alliance by announcing that a tax two from and within space could lead to the invocation of article 5 of the U.S. Japan security treaty. Kirby says Japan is stepping up. Its commitment to the alliance, and it will pay huge dividends. In San Francisco, I met Baxter Bloomberg daybreak. Thanks, Ed. We now turn to the markets, our earnings for big banks kick off this morning. JPMorgan Citigroup Bank of America and Wells Fargo all report quarterly results, we get a preview from Bloomberg's Charlie wells. There have been so many pressures for these large American banks. There's the concern about a potential recession that we've been debating about for the past few weeks. There have been issues with a slowdown in deal making that is really hurt fees. It's looking like at some of these major banks investment banking revenue for the fourth quarter could be down about 51% and overall profits at these large banks are looking like in the fourth quarter they could be down about 15%. Bloomberg's Charlie wells says the outlook from bank CEOs may draw more attention this morning than the actual numbers. Well, as we await those results in Nathan, global stocks are heading for a healthy gain this week and they're growing optimism that easing inflation will lead to less aggressive rate hikes. Here's Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker. In my view, the days of us raising them 75 basis points at a time are surely passed. In my view, types of 25 basis points will be appropriate going forward. Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker made the comments after yesterday's consumer price data, which showed inflation continued to slow in December. And we may get more clues, Karen, on the direction of range interest rates. And a couple more fed officials speak today. New York fed president John Williams, Minneapolis fed chief Neil kashkari and Philadelphia fed president Patrick harker all speak at separate events today. Money UK, Nathan, the British economy unexpectedly grew in November. Let's go live to London and get the latest at Bloomberg a day break Europe anchor Stephen Carroll. Good morning, Stephen. Good morning, car than Nathan. The UK economy may avoid tumbling into recession for a little longer thanks to November's surprise .1% growth in GDP, consumer facing services helping to boost out button in particular, spending on hospitality during the World Cup. Strikes, though, affected activity in the postal and railway industries, the figures may strengthen calls for further interest rate rises from the Bank of England as inflation in the UK remains near the highest level in four decades in London. I'm Stephen Carroll, Bloomberg daybreak. Stephen, thanks staying in Europe, Sweden's inflation rate reached double digits for the first time in more than three decades in December, inflation there rose by an annual rate of 10.2%. That was higher than expected. Back here in the U.S., Nathan, we're seeing a big pay cut for one of the country's premier executives. Apple's CEO Tim Cook will see his total compensation decline this year. We get more from Bloomberg to Doug Krishna. Apple cited investor feedback, as well as a request from cook himself. The pay reduction will be more than 40% this year to $49 million, and most of that will take the form of stock grants. Apple has drawn criticism about cook's previous $99 million compensation package from groups such as institutional shareholder services. The advisory firm said half of the rewards didn't depend on performance criteria like the company's share price. Last year, a majority of Apple shareholders voted to approve cook's package in New York, I'm Doug prisoner Bloomberg daybreak. Doug, thank you, and in China today we have news that government entities are set to take so called golden shares in units of Alibaba and Tencent. That suggests Beijing is moving to ensure greater control over key players in the Internet arena. The shares could let officials influence the industry over the long term. Futures are little change this morning sewer down futures while NASDAQ futures are lower down about two tenths of a percent or 16 points. Straight ahead your latest local headlines plus a check of sports and this is Bloomberg.

President Biden Bloomberg Philadelphia fed Patrick harker Nathan Charlie wells Nathan Hager Karen Moscow Merrick Garland Rebecca Roy Department of Justice Joe Matthew Bloomberg radio Japanese prime minister fumio John Kirby Baxter Bloomberg JPMorgan Citigroup Bank of Ame Stephen Carroll
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Year, really interesting to have you on Ben, thank you so much for your time Bloomberg's currency and rate strategist van ram. Let's get more on our top stories now from Leon garon's. Stephen good morning to you. The UK economy has defied shrinking expectations and did grew grow last November. GDP rose 0.1% in the month, a positive beat on The Economist's estimate solve 0.2% drop, the largest contribution to growth came from consumer facing businesses in a month where the World Cup did start, the Bank of England now anticipates the economy is about to slip into a slump that will last until 2024. Bank of England policymaker Catherine Mann says it may take a significant recession to tame inflation here in Britain when the BOE raised rates by 50 basis points to 3.5% last month, man alone voted for a 75 basis point hike in a speech in Manchester, man set out a bleak outlook, noting the UK productivity lags much of the rest of the G 7. And finally, the Chinese government is set to take a so called golden shares in units of tech giants, Alibaba and Tencent, according to a corporate database, Beijing bought 1% of an Alibaba digital media subsidiary and that was last month. The share structure could grant government officials influence over the industry, including the power to nominate directors. Global news, 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake, powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Leanne guerin's, this is Bloomberg, Caroline. Thanks so much Leanne Goran's with our top stories still ahead on Bloomberg daybreak here will be looking to what to expect from the U.S. bank earnings reports that come today, JPMorgan Bank of America, Citigroup, reporting fourth quarter numbers later Bloomberg's Charlie wells will be joining us to discuss that. Honestly, to bring back daybreaker, we're live from London, this is Bloomberg. Bloomberg radio on demand and in your podcast E on the latest sound on podcast, New York law school professor Rebecca Roy fee on the appointment of a special counsel to investigate the discovery of classified documents tied to President Biden. It's really hard to know, but I think in this climate, it's just the smart thing to do. There is so much speculation right now about the Department of Justice. And it's under a haze of questions, both from the left and from the right. And so in a certain way, it's kind of a prophylactic move that makes it such that whatever is the outcome. There's a little bit more faith in that outcome if it comes from a special counsel than if it came from somebody who's directly reporting to the attorney general. There will be, of course, tandem investigations in Congress and so forth, but Department of Justice is the one that we need to pay attention to Rebecca based on what you know now, is this going to come down to a matter of intent or is Joe Biden in trouble here? In absolutely comes down to a matter of intent. And that's the thing that really tips this from being a situation in which a former vice president, current president, mishandled documents to one in which there is some kind of criminal liability. And it's important to note that mishandling documents itself is problematic and is something that the government should be aware of and seek to protect future future presidents and future vice presidents from prevent them from doing. But in this situation, the question of whether or not there would be any criminal charges, absolutely comes down to what was the former vice president and current president's intent in keeping these documents

Bloomberg van ram Leon garon Bank of England Catherine Mann Alibaba Chinese government Leanne guerin Leanne Goran JPMorgan Bank of America Charlie wells UK Rebecca Roy Tencent BOE President Biden
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"About retail inflation cooling in December CPI fell last month at a rate of a tenth of 1% compared to November and this sets us up to begin to expect a slower pace of fed rate hikes. And for that reason we had a rally in both stocks and bonds today with the Dow industrial average picking up about 6 tenths of 1% similar gain for the NASDAQ comp and in the broader market, we had energy shares leading the S&P to a gain of around three quarters I checked at three tenths of 1%. Then when it comes to earnings, we heard from American Airlines today saying that its fourth quarter profit and revenue will exceed expectations helped in large part by robust holiday demand, shares in American today were up nearly 10%. We'll hear from Delta tomorrow before the market opens and will also hear from the big banks in the morning, including JPMorgan and city. Ten year treasury down and yield today by nearly ten basis points to 3.44%. I'm Doug Krishna, that's your Bloomberg business flash. Doug, thank you. Attorney general Merrick Garland made the announcement this afternoon. After it was revealed, a second batch of classified documents tied to Joe Biden had been discovered. I'm here today to announce the appointment of Robert Hur as a special counsel, pursuant to Department of Justice regulations governing such matters. Robert Hur. Get used to that name, Garland gave some details about the second discovery. We learned of this around this time yesterday, actually, right in the middle of sound on. Remembering the first batch was found 6 days before the midterm elections, early November. In the office that Joe Biden used as president. Here's Garland again. On December 20th, President Biden's personal counsel and foreign mister lausch that additional documents bearing classification markings were identified in the garage of the president's private residence in Wilmington, Delaware. President Biden's council informed mister louse that those documents were among other records from the period of the president's service as vice president. The FBI went to the location and secured those documents. Garland there is referring to John lausch. You've probably heard that name. The U.S. attorney for the northern district of Illinois, who was tasked with reviewing the documents. Now it will be under the purview of special counsel her. Reaction today, although actually, we got to add one more. Fast forward to today. This morning, President Biden's personal counsel called mister lausch and stated that an additional document bearing classification markings was identified at the president's personal residence in Wilmington, Delaware. There it is. So a third? Joe Biden did speak today. He was not supposed to be talking about this. It was an event on the CPI who was supposed to talk about inflation, and he did take a question on this. My lawyers reviewed other places where documents in my of from my time as vice president were stored and they finished the review last night. They discovered a small number of documents of classified markings and storage areas and file cabinets in my home in my personal library. Now, it's unclear exactly what he meant by personal library press secretary karine Jean Pierre was not able to clarify that afterwards in the news briefing. And that was an exercise all on its own that we'll get into. But let's talk about right now what we actually know with the real expert Rebecca Roy fee is Professor of law at New York law school, former assistant district attorney for New York county, and Rebecca, welcome back. With this special counsel, do you think would have been appointed if there was not already one investigating Donald Trump? You know, it's really hard to know, but I think in this climate, it's just the smart thing to do. There is so much speculation right now about the Department of Justice. And it's under a haze of questions, both from the left and from the right. And so in a certain way, it's kind of a prophylactic move that makes it such that whatever is the outcome. There's a little bit more faith in that outcome if it comes from a special counsel than if it came from somebody who's directly reporting to the attorney general. There will be, of course, tandem investigations in Congress and so forth, but Department of Justice is the one that we need to pay attention to Rebecca based on what you know now, is this going to come down to a matter of intent or is Joe Biden in trouble here? It absolutely comes down to a matter of intent. And that's the thing that really tips this from being a situation in which a former vice president, current president, mishandled documents to one in which there is some kind of criminal liability. And it's important to note that mishandling documents itself is problematic and is something that the government should be aware of and seek to protect future future presidents and future vice presidents from prevent them from doing. But in this situation, the question of whether or not there would be any criminal charges absolutely comes down to what was the former vice president and current president's intent in keeping these documents where they were kept. Okay, so with that said, Rebecca, how important if at all are the contents of these files? Will the contents and the level of classification dictate the outcome of this trial or does that not matter if they are directly referred back to the archives and DoJ? Well, you know, for sure what's in those documents is critical for the national security question and the question of how grave a mishandling this was. And so, you know, on that side of things, absolutely. I think the public really wants to know what's in there and how important it was as I'm sure are the people within the Department of Justice who are tasked with protecting our national security. In terms of the question of criminal liability, it's less directly relevant what's inside these documents. There are certain statutes that only apply to classified documents. And others that apply more broadly to documents that are owned by the government. And so there was a lot of discussion when there was this question about Mar-a-Lago and former president Trump about what was in those documents and where they classified and whether he declassified them. And it was a bit of a red herring because there's only that one statute that applies to classified documents. There are plenty of other statutes that criminalize the retention or wrongful willful withholding of government documents in an unauthorized location. The details surrounding that storage matter, we've spent a lot of time talking about the room at Mar-a-Lago, whether the lock had been put on the room, who was coming and going, surveillance video. In this case, the president himself said that it

President Biden Robert Hur Joe Biden Garland Doug Krishna Merrick Garland Department of Justice John lausch mister lausch Wilmington Delaware karine Jean Pierre Rebecca Roy fee American Airlines JPMorgan Rebecca
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Way of putting it? You know, I don't think that he has decided that an indictment is necessarily the way to go. I don't think that I think if you're, if you're handing something over to a special counsel, I think it's because there are you seriously think and indictment might be warranted. And I don't imagine that he would have handed this over to Jack Smith thinking to himself, yeah, Jack Smith will wind up this case and do nothing. So I think it's reasonable to conclude that the attorney general thinks that there are some serious criminal conduct and potential charges that are warranted, but I doubt that he has reached a conclusion because, you know, he's relying on Jack Smith for his judgment in that regard. I wonder, does this slow, he mentioned, you know, this will help agents continue their work. Will it slow things down as this architecture is put in place or does it accelerate the investigations that are already running? You know, that's a great question. I don't really think it will slow things down much. Obviously, as he explained in the press conference, some of the investigators who have been working on this case for a long time will continue on and they can create continuity. So all that really needs to happen is that the new special counsel needs to be briefed on everything that's going on. But that really can happen at the same time as their progressing. So my guess is if it slows things down, it's really not by a significant amount and it can proceed pretty much on pace. I want to bring people back not very long to the former special counsel Robert Mueller, as he was announcing the results of the Mueller report had finally concluded, listen. And as that fourth in the report after that investigation, if we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so. We did not, however, make a determination as to whether the president did commit a crime. That day let down a lot of people who were hoping that this would lead to an indictment or some sort of criminal charge. He mentioned at that time that because it was outside the scope of his of his authority, that he would not be the one to bring charges. Is that going to happen again does this have to go back to the DoJ back to the attorney general for that determination? No, this is entirely different because now Donald Trump is no longer president. So what happened there was that the special counsel special counsel Mueller had no power at least interpreted his role as having no power to indict because you can not at least in his interpretation indict a sitting president. And that's why he didn't come to any conclusion, because he figured, well, you know, people want to know the facts and the charge when he gets out of office. Exactly. The proper way of holding him responsible is impeachment, and then once he's out of office, a set of prosecutors can proceed if they want to proceed. But of course, things are different right now because even if the former president is a candidate, he has announced his candidacy and his campaign. He's not the president. And so there is no barrier to indicting him here. And so it's well within the job description of the special counsel to determine that charges are necessary and to bring those charges through a grand jury. So I don't think we would end up seeing that again. So the talk about the timing of Donald Trump's campaign announcement this week said, you know, he thinks he's bringing himself some protections potentially by doing this legal protections means nothing in this case. Right. I mean, it means nothing. It certainly has political meaning. And it certainly makes the job of the special counsel harder. But in terms of its ultimate effect on whether on the decision whether to charge, it doesn't, it doesn't bear on that. We're learning a lot as we do this all over again. Do you have a gut check that this leads to something meaningful? And if it does, in the throes of a presidential campaign? You know, I really don't know. It's hard to read the tea leaves. I would say that what we can conclude is that attorney general Garland thinks that there's at least substantial evidence of criminal conduct here and that it's worth an independent person taking a look at that. Two separate cases mean two separate results or is this all going to be folded into one massive investigation? My guess is it's going to be one investigation, although it is too distinct pieces of that investigation. So how that proceeds I'm not entirely sure either. We have a lot to learn yet. I hope you're going to come back and walk us through it Rebecca is very great to have you back very helpful to hear your insights Rebecca Roy, for your Professor of law at New York law school has been very helpful to us as we've worked our way through a legally challenged existence here for Donald Trump. The former assistant DA for New York county and up next, former assistant

Jack Smith Mueller Donald Trump Robert Mueller DoJ Garland Rebecca Roy Rebecca New York law school New York county
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To have Alison Williams coming up at just moments to give us some thoughts on some of these big bank earnings. We had a lot today a lot more coming next week and we'll stay on top of that. Of course, markets mixed here. Let's head down to Washington D.C. right now. Check in with Amy Mars Amy. All right, thank you, Paul inflation is spreading deeper into the U.S. economy, and that slamming the door on hopes the Federal Reserve will dial back interest rate hikes, core inflation excluding food and energy. Jump to a 40 year high of 6.6% in September from a year ago, that was faster than forecast JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon told a conference, the fed probably won't be able to cool the U.S. economy without bringing on a recession. I don't know if it could be a soft landing. I don't think so, but it might mild recession or tough recession. My point in the tough recession, yeah, you would expect the market under the 20 or 30%. I'm not going to keep across those three things. But for all of us, you have to worry about risk. Yeah, of course, you should plan for those things. Jamie Dimon says his gut tells him the Federal Reserve will have to raise rates higher than four and a half percent in order to tame inflation. The House committee investigating last year's attack on the capitol has voted to subpoena former president Donald Trump. Lawmakers want to question him about the 2021 riot and are demanding documents and testimony about his role, law professor Rebecca Roy fee at New York law school tells Bloomberg how the committee arrived at a Trump subpoena. What the indication was at the end of that hearing was that the only person who could or people who could connect those dots have either pled the 5th or are Donald Trump. And so without the testimony of those people, we are left to infer what actually happened. Professor Rebecca Roy Fiat New York law school on Bloomberg sound on, which you can hear weekday afternoons at 5 on Bloomberg radio. The move comes just weeks ahead of midterm elections to determine control of Congress. Global news, 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists

Alison Williams Washington D.C. Amy Mars Amy fed Jamie Dimon U.S. JPMorgan Rebecca Roy Donald Trump Paul Bloomberg House committee New York law school Professor Rebecca Roy New York Congress
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Now, with the latest news from New York City and around the world, here's Michael Barr. Lisa John, the January 6th House committee display new evidence that showed the Secret Service had received tips, a potential violence nearly two weeks before the capitol riot, committee member democratic congressman Adam Schiff. According to the source of the tip, the Proud Boys plan to march armed into D.C.. They think that they will have a large enough group to march into D.C. armed the source reported, and will outnumber the police so they can't be stopped. Congressman Schiff along with the rest of the committee voted to subpoena former president Trump, Rebecca Roy Professor of law at New York law school was asked one how the committee arrived at a Trump subpoena. What the indication was at the end of that hearing was that the only person who could or people who could connect those dots have either pled the 5th or are Donald Trump. And so without the testimony of those people, we are left to infer what actually happened. Professor Roy fee made her comments on sound on which airs at 5 p.m. on Bloomberg. The U.S. Supreme Court handed former president Trump a loss in his fight over records, the FBI seized from his Mar-a-Lago estate. The high court refused to intervene and reinstate a special master's authority to review a set of key documents with classified markings. Pentagon officials are reacting after NATO's secretary general Jens Stoltenberg said Russia would be crossing a very important line if it used nuclear weapons in Ukraine in Brussels defense secretary Lloyd Austin said he would not speculate about hypothetical scenarios but added that the U.S. and its allies are focused on the war 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Russia could choose to deescalate and could choose to end this war because Putin started this war as a matter of choice. Secretary Austin called Putin's reference to nuclear weapons irresponsible and reckless. Lie from the Bloomberg interactive broker studios, this is global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake. Powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts and more than a 120 countries, I'm Michael Barr. This is Bloomberg. With a Bloomberg business of sports report, I'm Michael Barr. The goat is the latest owner of a major league pickleball team. Quarterback Tom Brady joined other investors, including former pro tennis player Kim Clijsters to buy a team. Brady and clysters are the latest to join a growing number of current and former pro athletes buying pickleball teams. Others include LeBron James and draymond green, former saints quarterback Drew Brees and former pro tennis player James Blake. A Madrid court froze more than €50 million or $48.7 million of a Qatari broadcasters assets after Spanish top flight soccer competition aliga requested the step in a spat over unpaid TV rights. The amount is said to cover wet pianos after it failed to settle a bill for rights for broadcasting matches to a base being owns rights broadcast league as matches in more than 30 countries in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Middle East, with the Bloomberg business of sports report. I'm Michael Barr. Burden LLP accountants and advisers presents industry chat with Jeff Kovacs, partner and head of the technology and life sciences practice. Software as a service or SaaS companies are transforming the enterprise software

Michael Barr Lisa John capitol riot Congressman Schiff president Trump Rebecca Roy Roy fee D.C. Adam Schiff Bloomberg Lloyd Austin House committee New York law school Secret Service Secretary Austin Putin Bloomberg interactive broker s Jens Stoltenberg Donald Trump Russia
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I have to ask you, it's somewhat unrelated, but I don't always have Rebecca Roy fee on the phone. The Supreme Court today, handing Donald Trump a loss. This happened the same day as his hearing in his fight over records from Mar-a-Lago, the documents case refusing to intervene and reinstate the special master's authority to review some classified documents, does that give the Department of Justice the upper hand to start moving forward with its case or has it been doing so behind the scenes this whole time? Yes, I mean, I think it has been doing so. It has been proceeding. Nobody expected that the Supreme Court would take up that case. It was decided and well argued and well reasoned in the 11th circuit and it seemed quite a stretch that the former president would think that the Supreme Court would take up this case, but I know he believes in some sense that the Supreme Court Justice of whom he appointed him something that that's not the way the judiciary works and I really doubt that they feel that way. As far as the DoJ goes with the January 6th committee, I know that there's been confusion about whether they would make a criminal referral, but we now know the DoJ is well underway with its own case. Did the committee help the DoJ in its investigation or was this truly a political exercise or an exercise for the sake of history? So I imagine that Merrick Garland was certainly paying attention to these hearings, but said that the investigation was well underway. It was underway. We now know from before the January 6th hearings even commenced. So I don't think that there's any reason to think or assume that Merrick Garland is taking his cue from the hearings or from Congress and as well he shouldn't, I think that is a separate investigation that's proceeding in its own pace and not influenced in any way by the January 6th hearings. So no, I don't think so. Rebecca Roy, great to have you from New York law school, former assistant DA, New York county. It's great to have you back on Bloomberg as we try to get our hands around. Everything that we saw and heard today in this hearing, of course, well, I'm always watching, so you don't have to. And the moment that I described, see this aid, I guess, took this film this video on a cell phone, walking backwards, looking at Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi plowed through the hall with their security into the undisclosed location and they started making frantic phone calls. In this case, to the Secretary of Defense

Rebecca Roy Department of Justice Supreme Court Merrick Garland Donald Trump Lago confusion New York law school New York county Congress Bloomberg Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Each member of the panel took time to take part in this exercise today, typically we've only heard from a few in each hearing. We heard from all 9 today and were joined now once again by Rebecca Roy fee, who was with us earlier in this whole process and back to day to talk to us on Bloomberg. Joseph Solomon distinguished Professor of law at New York law school, former assistant district attorney for New York county, it's great to have you back here Rebecca. Let's start with the matter at hand, and that's the vote to compel to subpoena Donald Trump to testify. We don't think that is going to happen after Republicans take the majority, do we? I don't think it's going to happen anyway. The subpoena will go out and you will disregard that subpoena even if it were to go out before the change in administration or sorry rather the change in makeup of the House of Representatives. So I think this was more a symbolic ask than it was an act designed to actually obtain his testimony or documents from him. If Democrats somehow keep the house in this committee remains a going concern is at a different story? I really don't think it is. I mean, I think he's going to resist that subpoena and we've seen before that then Congress can perhaps refer this to the entire house and then if the house remained democratic they could perhaps make a referral to the Department of Justice, but I really don't think imagine that the Department of Justice would pursue contempt of Congress case against the former president. We heard some pretty interesting

Rebecca Roy fee Joseph Solomon New York law school New York county Bloomberg Donald Trump Rebecca House of Representatives Department of Justice Congress house
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A 100%. I mean, and your client is always the person that you serve. But you are have to abide by court rules and you have to represent your client within the bounds of the law. And so these lawyers are struggling to do that without doing some damage to their client. But they have a client that's not easy who's not easy to control on a client who's very interested. And the narrative, the public narrative and the public opinion and is trying to manage that in a way that in some instances like the one you mentioned could very well hurt his legal case. And so so far he's done a great job of at least with his supporters, convincing them that this is all a witch hunt, but the question is whether that will survive within our court system. And I think what you're seeing now is that it's not fairing as well as you might have thought. Well, it sounds to me like the special master might not have been the best idea as you look back at some of the legal maneuvering on his side. Was that was that a poor move? I think it was a poor move. I mean, it didn't really get them much. It wouldn't have gotten them much, even if the special master were continuing to review those a hundred classified documents. And so and yet, it sort of boxed him into a corner where as you said, there is a spotlight on the fact that he hasn't made certain assertions in court that he is making out in public. And a lot of reasonable conclusion that if he's not willing to make those statements in court, that's because they're not true. Are you able to count the number of cases against Donald Trump right now? I mean, we're thinking what, four? Legitimate legal fronts against the former president because you've got Georgia. The case in Georgia, you've got the case in New York from yesterday. You've got two separate cases from the Department of Justice on overturning. And then you overturn the election. The New York State criminal. That's right. So we're at a half dozen. And Manhattan district attorney has said is continuing. Even though a lot of people looking from the outside, I thought that was petering out. It's not clear. Rick Davis, on the program yesterday referred to death by a thousand cuts. I mean, is it plausible that a lot of these will be resolved at the same time and between now and the presidential election? Yeah, I mean, it's possible, but it does seem like many of these are fairly serious and that the amount of proof that the investigators have in each different case. You know, it varies, but it seems that at least some of these cases are fairly strong. And so how he can withstand these and whether he can continue to have a political future despite them remains to be seen. Well, incredible. Rebecca, thanks for joining us, Rebecca Roy, if you law professor in New York law school, former assistant DA in Manhattan, who has a sense of what is going on in that office with us here on sound on, keep in mind that the former president has said that the FBI planted items when they searched Mar-a-Lago. And of course, as you heard, just as recently as last night said he declassified all the documents that we're talking about, I'll just thinking about it as enough to declassify. We're going to put this to the panel next Genie chanzeaux is with us Bloomberg politics contributor joined today by Doug high Republican strategist on the fastest hour in politics. I'm Joe Matthew this is Bloomberg. The business and market news of Asia. China is urging the U.S. to man ties. It's more important than ever to global business to finance and to your portfolio. We're seeing mixed markets here in the Asia Pacific. This is where you get it. We're still struggling with these worries over the slower growth scenario Bloomberg daybreak Asia. Tonight at 6 eastern

New York State criminal Georgia Donald Trump Rick Davis Manhattan Rebecca Roy Department of Justice New York law school New York Genie chanzeaux Doug high Rebecca Joe Matthew Bloomberg FBI Asia China U.S. Asia Pacific
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Used in former president Trump's residence in Mar-a-Lago. I've been trying to look at it here. Looks like it's about 38 pages long. And a lot of it is blacked out. That is the redacted part that they're saying for various reasons have to be kept secret from the public because of possible jeopardy. Now we want to turn to somebody who really knows a lot about the law and about criminal law and constitutional law. She's Rebecca Roy for New York law for each school Professor of law, where she is codeine for faculty, scholarship. So we've both just gotten this and you can't ask us exactly know what's in a professor. But give us your initial impression, as I say, a lot of it is blacked out. I guess that's not a big surprise. Right. We all expected to have a huge amount of this blacked out. The judge was considering the harm that releasing this would do to the ongoing investigation. I've had already indicated that he had some sympathy for the Department of Justice here and it's concerns about the integrity of the investigation about the safety of witnesses and potentially tipping off the targets of this investigation about its future moves. And so it is unsurprising that a huge amount of the information here is blacked out and what we really want to do when we have a chance to read this closely is to look to see what remains there. But I think from my first glances, it does seem like what remains is not all that much more than what we knew already from the search warrant, which is the crimes that they believed they had probable cause to suspect that he had committed and basically we have that again. We may have a few more pieces of information, but a lot of the basis for the knowledge that these documents were at Mar-a-Lago and what was in them is going to be blacked out in that affidavit. Let's go back to first principles if we could professor and remember who's asking for this affidavit to be made public in the first place. And what is the basis for that request? Right. And that's an excellent question because as you know, Donald Trump himself and his lawyers did not intervene in the case and request that this affidavit be made public. So this is in response. This redacted affidavit is made public in response to a request by media organizations. And those media organizations were making a claim that the public has a right to know this is based on a First Amendment. Argument and is very good one to make the criminal justice system is not in our country entirely opaque. Now there are parts of it that have to remain so in order to protect and preserve the government's ability to conduct these sorts of investigation, but there's always a balancing in these kinds of cases between the public's right and need to know what's going on in the criminal justice system. Obviously, the public has a strong interest in understanding and knowing what's going on in the criminal justice system. So that's on one side. And then that's being weighed against the government's ability to conduct this investigation efficiently and effectively. And so this is kind of the product. All these black lines and the back and forth and court is a product of that balancing between the interests and it's the media organizations that stepped up here to voice the interests of the public in accessing information, which is often the case. Professor, as you say, the public has an interest in all the criminal justice system and knowing what goes on, make sure it's fair is being done the correct way. It's probably the reason why the public has by and large access to criminal trials in this country. At the same time, this is not just any kernel proceeding. This is one involving a former president of the United States. And this is asking you to speculate, and I know that I'm not supposed to do that. But do you think this would come out the same way if this were not the former president of United States in normally you would not be able to go into a court could you and ask for a redacted version of an affidavit in support of a search warrant? Right. I mean, it's incredibly unusual because it's not the timeline that things usually proceed in. Ultimately, target would receive the all of this information, but only after an indictment came down. And so this is out of order in a way. And it's out of order precisely for the reason that you suggest, which is that the public interest is especially high heightened and urgent in this situation because there's such a strong interest in knowing what is happening with this investigation into the former president. It is so vital and important to our democracy and therefore, you know, if we're talking about a balance, the weight on that side on the public's need to know is much larger in a case like this where there is such a great public interest. And usually you do see these kinds of intervening on the part of the media in very high profile cases, but even in terms of very high profile cases. This case is even more high profile. So you can see that the court was really struggling with this question of trying to get as much as he could to the public without crippling the investigation. And I think, you know, at least from a first glance in the affidavit, the court ended up agreeing with the Department of Justice that at least a large part of what was the basis for this search warrant has to remain under wraps. Thank you so very much. That's terribly helpful. Thank you professor. That's Rebecca rofi, New York law school professor and codeine for faculty scholarship coming up. We get

Rebecca Roy Trump Department of Justice Mar Donald Trump New York government United States Rebecca rofi
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg law with June gross from Bloomberg radio Justice clarence Thomas is facing calls to recuse himself from any cases involving the 2020 election or the January 6th insurrection This after revelations that his wife Jenny Thomas repeatedly pushed to overturn the presidential election in a series of checks with Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows Thomas did not recuse himself from a case involving the release of former president Donald Trump's White House records to the January 6th committee and he was the only justice to vote against turning the records over Democrats like senator dick Durbin are calling for Thomas to recuse himself in these cases while Republicans like senator Josh hawley say it's not necessary To think that he would consider a case where his wife is frequently contacting the chief of staff for the president and giving advice on matters that are going to be ultimately litigated by the court that is the ultimate conflict of interest She's an independent person you know And she's got her own political views She's been doing this a long time And if you want to take issue with her that's fine but she's not on the bench She's on the bench Joining me is ethics expert Rebecca Roy fee a professor at New York law school Rebecca what are the rules for recusal that Supreme Court Justices follow There are rules that are drafted for all judges And those rules require a judge to disqualify himself or herself whenever that judge's impartiality might reasonably be questioned But that's a really broad role And in general there are some more specifics about when judges normally recuse themselves And the general proposition is interpreted in light of those more specific rules And one thing that's kind of important also is that Supreme Court Justices are a little bit different than other judges in that There is no one to take their place when they recuse themselves And so for that reason it's generally a good idea for judges to be a little bit more conservative about exercising their discretion to recuse themselves in particular cases If a party thinks that a Supreme Court Justice would be biased there's no mechanism for trying to force a recusal Is there No Party can and many times has requested recusal but it's really at this point up to the discretion of that individual justice whether or not to do so Part of that is because of the separation of powers you can't really have let's say congressional rule because that might be unconstitutional But you could imagine a situation in which the Supreme Court as a whole were to decide whether a particular justice were to recuse him or herself But for the most part the Supreme Court has shied away from doing that in part out of a kind of collegiality and the idea that once you've reached the point where your Supreme Court Justice you should be trusted to make that decision on your own And the law also says that judges should not participate in proceedings in which their spouse has an interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome of the proceeding Right So that's one of those more specific rules that I mentioned earlier That goes to defining this question of when a justice is impartiality could be reasonably questioned because that's such a broad proposition that the more specific ones have more bite so to speak because essentially they're getting at the problem of impartiality but in a very specific kind of way that's been tried in the past So according to the texts that have been revealed Ginny Thomas weighed in on Trump's legal team legal strategy She was actively involved in trying to get the election overturned justice Thomas participated in two cases related to the 2020 election He was the only justice who dissented when the Supreme Court allowed the release of records from the Trump White House to the committee Should he have recused himself from those cases My view in this matter is that for the case having to do with the email specifically justice Thomas if he knew that his wife had emails that were at issue in that case should have recused Because in that case then she might have had an actual interest So more than just sort of her own ideological agenda She might have had a personal interest either criminal liability civil liability or at least personal embarrassment at issue in that case And so it seems to me that he if he knew really should have recused The other cases for me are a harder call because what it is that is her interest is less concrete And that makes it more difficult and not clear cut because Supreme Court Justices in the past It's very clear that there's a record for recusing themselves in cases in which let's say they have a financial and trust or a spouse has a financial interest or they're connected to a party in the litigation All of those are cases in which you see most Supreme Court Justices recusing themselves in most cases But the connection here is a little bit more attenuated And so I think therefore you have to look at the particular case And see whether or not there's a concrete interest rather than just a sort of broad ideological interest because that's the kind of case that you really can't have Supreme Court Justices were to use in all the time I mean if you remember president Trump called for justices Sotomayor and I have given the Berg to recuse themselves in old Trump related cases because they had said some things indicating their bias against him And that's not the way this system works So we have to find a line between those two where it's not just like there's a strong ideological interest There's actually has to be some kind of concrete interest at stake Ginny Thomas has said that her work doesn't present a conflict with her husband's work on the Supreme Court Justice Thomas has written that they were one being an amalgam and called her his best friend In one of the texts Ginny Thomas said to Mark Meadows thank you needed that This plus a conversation with my best friend just now I will try to keep holding on America is worth it Also she reportedly mentions her husband's name in speeches and communications with other activists So does that drag the justice into it Yeah again it's a tough issue I think it looks bad in many many ways but I also think we have an interest in not thinking of thousands as one and the same I mean you can think of situations now We have like two professional people and one of them is a judge and one of them is let's say very active in involved in the local chapter of the ACLU Now that doesn't mean that the judge I think would have to recuse himself in every case involving the ACLU more broadly And this underlying question of how to interpret the spousal relationship And so in the modern day I don't think we want to impute all of the statements all of the activity all of the ideological leanings of one spouse to another spouse But again at a certain point it crosses over to being something inappropriate And I think that is the point at which interest plays a role So you can't say just because Jimmy Thomas has said things that if she were justice on the Supreme Court it would make it clear that she's already decided how she would rule in a case That doesn't mean that I think that justice commas would have to recuse If he hasn't made similar remarks But at a certain point if she is so involved that her emails are at issue and there's a case that concerns those emails Well that's an interest And to me that's point at which he has to accuse Thanks Rebecca That's professor Rebecca Roy fee of New York law school Coming up next Supreme Court cases testing the scope of workplace arbitration You're listening to Bloomberg Burden Drivers who switch and save with progressive save over $700 on average and those savings add up imagine what you could buy in.

Supreme Court Ginny Thomas Jenny Thomas Mark Meadows Thomas senator dick Durbin senator Josh hawley Rebecca Roy Bloomberg Justice clarence Thomas White House Trump Thomas New York law school Trump White House Donald Trump Rebecca president Trump Mark Meadows Sotomayor ACLU
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Justice Thomas has written that they were one being an amalgam and called her his best friend In one of the texts Ginny Thomas said to Mark Meadows thank you needed that This plus a conversation with my best friend just now I will try to keep holding on America is worth it Also she reportedly mentions her husband's name in speeches and communications with other activists so does that drag the justice into it Yeah again it's a tough issue I think it looks bad in many many ways but I also think we have an interest in not thinking of spouses as one and the same I mean you can think of situations now We have like two professional people And one of them is a judge And one of them is let's say very active in involved in the local chapter of the ACLU Now that doesn't mean that the judge I think would have to recuse himself in every case involving the ACLU more broadly And this underlying question of how to interpret the spousal relationship And so in the modern day I don't think we want to impute all of the statements all of the activity all of the ideological leanings of one spouse to another spouse But again at a certain point it crosses over to being something inappropriate And I think that is the point at which interest plays a role So you can't say just because Ginny Thomas has said things that if she were justice on the Supreme Court it would make it clear that she's already decided how she would rule in a case That doesn't mean that I think that justice commas would have to recuse He hasn't made similar remarks But at a certain point if she is so involved that her emails are at issue and there's a case that concerns those emails Well that's an interest And to me that's point at which he has to accuse Thanks Rebecca That's professor Rebecca Roy fee of New York law school Coming up next Supreme Court cases testing the scope of workplace arbitration You're listening to Bloomberg Adventure.

Ginny Thomas Mark Meadows Justice Thomas ACLU America Supreme Court Thanks Rebecca Rebecca Roy New York law school Bloomberg Adventure
"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is facing calls to recuse himself from any cases involving the 2020 election or the January 6th insurrection This after revelations that his wife Jenny Thomas repeatedly pushed to overturn the presidential election in a series of texts with Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows Thomas did not recuse himself from a case involving the release of former president Donald Trump's White House records to the January 6th committee and he was the only justice to vote against turning the records over Democrats like senator dick Durbin are calling for Thomas to recuse himself in these cases while Republicans like senator Josh hawley say it's not necessary To think that he would consider a case where his wife is frequently contacting the chief of staff for the president and giving advice on matters that are going to be ultimately litigated by the court that is the ultimate conflict of interest She's an independent person you know And she's got her own political views She's been doing this a long time And if you want to take issue with her that's fine but she's not on the bench She's on the bench Joining me is ethics expert Rebecca Roy fee a professor at New York law school Rebecca what are the rules for recusal that Supreme Court Justices follow There are rules that are drafted for all judges And those rules require a judge to disqualify himself or herself whenever that judges impartiality might reasonably be questioned But that's a really broad role And in general there are some more specifics about when judges normally recuse themselves and the general proposition is interpreted in light of those more specific rules And one thing that's kind of important also is that Supreme Court Justices are a little bit different than other judges in that There is no one to take their place when they recuse themselves And so for that reason it's generally a good idea for judges to be a little bit more conservative about exercising their discretion to recuse themselves in particular cases If a party thinks that a Supreme Court Justice would be biased there's no mechanism for trying to force a recusal Is there No Party can and many times has requested recusal but it's really at this point up to the discretion of that individual justice whether or not to do so Part of that is because of the separation of powers you can't really have let's say congressional rule because that might be unconstitutional But you could imagine a situation in which the Supreme Court as a whole were to decide whether a particular justice were to recuse him or herself But for the most part the Supreme Court has shied away from doing that and part out of a kind of collegiality and the idea that once you've reached the point where your Supreme Court Justice you should be trusted to make that decision on your own And the law also says that judges should not participate in proceedings in which their spouse has an interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome of the proceeding Right So that's one of those more specific rules that I mentioned earlier That goes to defining this question of when a justice is impartiality could be reasonably questioned because that's such a broad proposition that the more specific ones have more bite so to speak because essentially they're getting at the problem of impartiality but in a very specific kind of way that's been tried in the past So according to the texts that have been revealed Ginny Thomas weighed in on Trump's legal team legal strategy She was actively involved in trying to get the election overturned Justice Thomas participated in two cases related to the 2020 election He was the only justice who dissented when the Supreme Court allowed the release of records from the Trump White House to the committee Should he have recused himself from those cases My view in this matter is that for the case having to do with the email specifically justice Thomas if he knew that his wife had emails that were at issue in that case should have recused Because in that case then she might have had an actual interest So more than just sort of her own ideological agenda She might have had a personal interest either criminal liability civil liability or at least personal embarrassment at issue in that case And so it seems to me that he if he knew really should have recused The other cases for me are a harder call because what it is that is her interest is less concrete And that makes it more difficult and not clear cut because Supreme Court Justices in the past It's very clear that there's a record for recusing themselves in cases in which let's say they have a financial and trust or a spouse has a financial interest or they're connected to a party in the litigation All of those are cases in which you see most Supreme Court Justices recusing themselves in most cases But the connection here is a little bit more attenuated And so I think therefore you have to look at the particular case And see whether or not there's a concrete interest rather than just a sort of broad ideological interest because that's the kind of case that you really can't have Supreme Court Justices recuse in all the time I mean if you remember president Trump called for justices Sotomayor and I've given the Berg to recuse themselves in old Trump related cases because they had said some things indicating their bias against him And that's not the way this system works So we have to find a line between those two where it's not just like there's a strong ideological interest There's actually has to be some kind of concrete interest at stake Ginny Thomas has said that her work doesn't present a conflict with her husband's work on the Supreme Court.

Supreme Court Jenny Thomas Mark Meadows Thomas senator dick Durbin senator Josh hawley Rebecca Roy White House Trump New York law school Donald Trump Thomas Ginny Thomas Trump White House Rebecca Justice Thomas president Trump Sotomayor Berg
"rebecca roy" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca roy" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And makes contact with law. It is then and only then that you hear shots wobbles spoke during a court hearing in which a judge refused to order the public release of the body cam video of last week's fatal shooting of the 42 year old black man, Jim Krystle, a CBS There's Greensboro, North Carolina, Rudy raided the Manhattan home of former Mayor Rudy Giuliani was raided by federal agents who confiscated things like cell phones and computers. CBS News Legal contributor. Rebecca Roy Fee says it's part of the Justice Department's investigation into the business dealings of the attorney for former President Trump whether or not you Giuliani has been fully cooperating whether the prosecutors believe that because if they did, they wouldn't need to execute this warrant. They would just send a subpoena and asked him and his lawyers to give them the necessary documents. New CDC numbers out today on just how effective these vaccines are for the elderly. Your CBS is Alexander Tin. The Fizer and Madonna. Vaccines are 94% effective at shielding seniors from covert 19 hospitalization. That's according to new research released by the CDC today, the latest data showing the vaccines are effective in the real world. The Supreme Court is considering the case of a former cheerleaders. Pro family lay social media post that could affect the free speech rights of millions of public students. Brandy Levi was 14 when she made a furious Snapchat post off campus on a Saturday that led to a year long banned from her cheerleading squad. The family sued and its attorney A C L U lawyer, David Cole, argues of schools can't discipline a student off campus. Same First Amendment rights apply to you is applied everybody else. But the school's lawyer, Lisa Black, told the justices campus speech, particularly on social media, can be disruptive. It is appealing a lower court ruling that the First Amendment bars public schools from regulating off campus speech. Alison Keep CBS News Washington Former astronaut Michael Collins has died after a battle with cancer at the age of 90. Improvised to the moon was the pilot for the command module on Apollo 11 stripped to the moon in 1969. What? Our left of trading the Dow is down. 75, NASDAQ up 16 S and P up eight. This is CBS News. This hour's newscast is presented by Rocket mortgage when you want the ability to adjust your loan options in real time rocket can Washington State Cougars are required to get a covert vaccine more on the newly released rules coming up after traffic with Kenny Klein? When you're JBL Lemon earlier stalls south on five and Thorne Lane recently cleared but expect residual delays. In fact, our travel time from Tacoma to Olympia is just under 40. Minutes in Seattle, a stalled truck north five. It's Seneca also just cleared from seeing minor crowding and rented on north and 167 approaching four or five and the foundry bash on Southworth. Fairies are both running 22 20 or 10 to 22 minutes behind schedule..

Brandy Levi Jim Krystle Lisa Black David Cole Michael Collins Tacoma Olympia Rebecca Roy Fee CBS Seattle Giuliani Kenny Klein 94% 1969 Manhattan 10 14 Rudy last week Thorne Lane
Five NC Officers Resign After Leaving Man Who Overdosed Unattended While He Suffered Seizure

WBZ Afternoon News

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

Five NC Officers Resign After Leaving Man Who Overdosed Unattended While He Suffered Seizure

"Office is and the FBI. For 37 in Kentucky. Recordings of the grand jury proceedings in the Briana Taylor case are out. But 20 hours of those recordings now public, CBS NEWS Legal contributor Rebecca Roy FEA thinks the public wants to know more about the charge is presented to the grand jury by Attorney General Daniel Cameron. What charges were presented. He says that he presented only the charge against the officer who's stray bullets hit men through another apartment. The question is, did he give the grand jury on opportunity? Did he? Show them all the facts such that if they had disagreed with him and thought that the larger charge was appropriate, they might have brought it now the dramatic and conflicting accounts of what exactly happened in the home back on March, 13th have led to nationwide protests against systemic racism and police brutality. Taylor shot and killed in her home back in March. During that raid, one officer charged with wanton

Attorney General Daniel Camero Briana Taylor Officer Rebecca Roy Fea FBI Kentucky CBS