12 Burst results for "Rebecca Morse"

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 2 months ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Island, Sacramento. Is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The 2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year. Then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there's a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35 miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with Hurricane iota. It happened with Hurricane ADA, which hit basically the same place a couple weeks ago. I talked to a climate scientist in the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hotter air and hotter water in this year's used to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coast in the potential pass of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they've survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on alert for basically months, and it's also really expensive. You know, As of October 7th, there have been 16 climate driven disasters that caused at least $1 billion in.

Hurricane Iota Hurricane iota Gulf NPR Mary Louise Kelly Rebecca Morse Sacramento Rebecca Herscher US Ari Shapiro Gulf Coast Island Caribbean Central America Atmospheric Research Becky Mexico scientist
"rebecca morse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | 2 months ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KCRW

"Last year to help teams stay agile, aligned and connected. Learn more at at last see in dot com. 63 degrees currently in downtown L, a 61 along the coast in Santa Monica, and it is 78 in Palm Springs. It's KCRW is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The 2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named Storms so far, a new record and six of those storms have been devastating major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hits Central America this week. It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before the season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded. That includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35 miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which hit basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist in the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hotter air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on alert for basically months, and it's also really expensive. You know, As of October 7th, there have been 16 climate driven disasters that caused at least $1 billion in.

Hurricane Iota Gulf NPR Santa Monica Mary Louise Kelly Rebecca Morse KCRW Palm Springs US Ari Shapiro Gulf Coast Rebecca Herscher Caribbean Atmospheric Research Central America Becky Mexico scientist
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:09 min | 2 months ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It, Lassie in to help team stay Agile, aligned and connected. Learn more at it, lassie and dot com. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Ari Shapiro. The 2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before the season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded. That includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there's a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hotter air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on alert for basically months, and it's also really expensive. You know, As of October 7th, there have been 16 climate driven disasters that caused at least $1 billion in.

Hurricane Iota Gulf NPR Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Rebecca Morse US Gulf Coast Rebecca Herscher Caribbean Atmospheric Research Becky Mexico Central America scientist National Center
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:08 min | 2 months ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hot air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on on alert alert for for basically basically months, months, and and it's it's also also really really expensive. expensive. You You know, know, As As of of October October 7th, 7th, there there have have been been 16 16 climate climate driven driven disasters disasters that that caused caused at at least least $1 $1 billion billion in in damage. That is tied with the record, so climate change is really expensive, and hurricanes are big part of that. That's Rebecca Herscher of NPR's climate team. Thanks for putting this into perspective for us. Thanks so much.

Hurricane Iota Gulf NPR Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Rebecca Morse Rebecca Herscher US Gulf Coast Caribbean Central America Atmospheric Research Becky Mexico scientist National Center
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 2 months ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Ari Shapiro. The 2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hot air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on alert for basically months, and it's also really expensive. You know, As of October 7th, there have been 16 climate driven disasters that caused at least $1 billion in.

Hurricane Iota Gulf NPR Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Rebecca Morse Rebecca Herscher US Gulf Coast Caribbean Central America Atmospheric Research Becky Mexico scientist National Center
2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 2 months ago

2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

"2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hot air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on on alert alert for for basically basically months, months, and and it's it's also also really really expensive. expensive. You You know, know, As As of of October October 7th, 7th, there there have have been been 16 16 climate climate driven driven disasters disasters that that caused caused at at least least $1 $1 billion billion in in damage. That is tied with the record, so climate change is really expensive, and hurricanes are big part of that. That's Rebecca Herscher of NPR's climate team. Thanks for putting this into perspective for us. Thanks so much.

Hurricane Rebecca Herscher Central America Hurricane Iota Hurricane Ada NPR Becky Rebecca Morse Gulf Of Mexico National Center For Atmospheri Caribbean Atlantic United States Gulf Wolf Gulf Coast
"rebecca morse" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eye radio on talk radio vij 60 g s cervo feeds red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara what was that you were just reading me from a river brit beef break after we went into the break oh above the flag lemme go back to it so so they went back uh when when morris the lady group first reported it than roofs times found out that she had mistaken the flags she pointed out she pointing to the current political climate as a possible reconfirm mix a sh here's the quote maybe that's the story we're so stressed by all things political unhealthy things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh mm i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were gonna have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay she's a crime author in new york times bestselling author specializes in crime and she didn't know the dental she didn't know that as she didn't know the difference between lynagh region flag and a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags he can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify a but i i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not going to pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the taxes in the american flag i can identify love you might recognize japan's flag the uniqueness of the note pan not i said every flag i i couldn't do every flag had no idea no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts what was that why did people put the japanese flag on no idea on shirts and the states by the way not not in japan in japan they were like no we know what the flag looks like the canadian flag without incident that any flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling the s ryan us curley us when the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the adult it to.

eric harley gary mcnamara us morris rebecca morse new york times bestselling japan 60 g
"rebecca morse" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The flags she pointed out she pointed to the current political climate as a possible recent poor mix of sh here's the quote maybe that's the story we're so stressed by all things political apathy things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were going gonna have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay she is a crime author in new york times bestselling author specializes in crime and she didn't know the dental she didn't know that if she didn't know the difference between linda region flag at a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags he can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify be like i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not going to pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the texas in the american flag i can identify you might recognize japan swag the uniqueness of the note pan not as that every flag i i couldn't do ever i flag at no i yet no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts hopes that why did people put the japanese flag the idea on shirts and the states by the way not not in japan in japan they were like now we know what the flag looks like the canadian flag without incident in yeah flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling yes ryan you assume out curley us when the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the adult it to first class the first class united so come you don't ask seven at the you know five team members in the end the coach's shows as a total seven seats at would have had to been available upraids available in the.

texas us curley rebecca morse new york times bestselling japan
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WCHS

"Bed it's red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara what was that the we were just reading me from a rubber break after we went into the break oh a at all the various flag lemme go back to so with so they went back uh when when morris the leading group first reported it and roofs times found out that she had mistaken the flags she pointed out she pointed to the current political climate as a possible reconfirm mix of sh here's a quote navy that's the story we're so stressed by all things political that we see things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh mm uh i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were gonna have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay she is a crime author in new york times best selling author specializes in crime and she didn't know the dental she didn't know that as she didn't know the difference between london region flag and a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags you can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify be like i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not going to pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the texas in the american flag i can identify you might recognize japan's flag the union is the pan not as that every flag i i couldn't do evrony flag out no i yet no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts hopes that why did people put the japanese flag unknown idea on shirts and the states by the way not not in japan in japan there were like no we know what the flag looks like the canadian flag without incident in yeah flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling yes ryan who has kurl us won the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on that they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the adult it to.

eric harley gary mcnamara texas us ryan morris rebecca morse new york japan
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WJR 760

"One i thought it's red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara what was at do we were just reading me from a river break after we went into the break oh uh above the flag lemme go back to so they went back uh when when morris the lady who route first reported it and roofs times found out that she had mistaken the flags she pointed out she pointed to the current political climate as a possible reconfirm mix of sh here's a quote maybe that's the story where so stressed by all things political that we see things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh uh uh i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were gonna have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay she's a crime author in new york times best selling author specializes in cry and she didn't know the dental she didn't know that as she didn't know the difference between luna region flag and a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags he can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify a like i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not gonna have pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the texas in the american flag i can identify you might recognize japan swag the uniqueness of the note pan not as at every flag i i couldn't do ever i flag had no idea no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts hopes that why did people put the japanese flag on no idea on shirts and the states by the way not not in japan in japan there were like no we note the flag looks like the canadian flag vile incident in the eye flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling the s ryan you assume will occur us when the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the adult it to first class.

eric harley gary mcnamara texas us morris rebecca morse new york japan
"rebecca morse" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Sms fades red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara what was that that we were just reading me from a roberto brit beef break after we went into the break oh uh over the flag let me go back to so so they went back uh when when morris the lady group force reported it and roofs times found out that she had mistaken the flags she pointed out she pointing to the current political climate as a possible reason for mix of here's the quote maybe that's the story we're so stressed by all things political that we see things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh mm uh i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were going to have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay she is a crime author in new york times best selling author specializes in crime and she didn't know the dnc she didn't know that as she didn't know the difference between linda region flag and a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags he can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify i'd be like i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not going to pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the taxes in the american flag i can identify you might recognize japan swag the uniqueness of the note pan not i said every flag i i couldn't do every flag had no idea no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts hopes that why did put the japanese flag on no idea on church and the states by the way not not in japan in japan the right now we know what the flag looks like the canadian flag vile incident flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling yes ryan who has narrowed kurl us when the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the adult it to.

eric harley gary mcnamara us ryan roberto brit morris rebecca morse new york japan
"rebecca morse" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca morse" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Right i thought it's red eye radio he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara what was that there were you were just reading me from a roberto break after we went into the break oh uh above the various flag lemme go back to so they went back uh when when morris the lady group first reported it and roofs times found out that she had mistaken the flags she pointed out she pointed to the current political climate as a possible reconfirm mix of sh here's a quote maybe that's the story we're so stressed by all things political that we see things that aren't fair maybe that's the story it and you can start with me oh my gosh i i just uh uh uh i'm not going to shake my head i'm not going to give it that much energy just amazing i remember though that campus were they thought there were nooses right there were gonna have a rally the next day um they thought they had found some nooses hanging from trees now she's actually a crime author to this woman who reported it rebecca morse okay is a crime author in new york times best selling author specializes in crime and she didn't know the densely she didn't know that as she didn't know the difference between the norwegian flag and a confederate flag i have a nephew that's an expert on on flags you can look at it and tell you boom i'm not gonna say i can identify be like i know that it's not a confederate flag i'm not going to pretend to admit i could identify every flag except of course the texas in the american flag i can identify you might recognize japan's flag the union is of the ban not as that every flag i i couldn't do every flag had no idea no the japan flag which some for some reason in the 80s people started putting on shirts hopes that why did people put the japanese flag unknowing dan on church and the states by the way not not in japan in japan they were like no we know what the flag looks like the canadian flag without incident in yeah flags at halfmast though after the us won the curling yes ryan us now kurl us when the curling gold on you see where they wanted to come back on they were they were trying to get a free upgrade the.

eric harley gary mcnamara texas us morris rebecca morse new york japan