35 Burst results for "Rebecca Hersher"

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

Environment: NPR

03:28 min | 2 months ago

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

"The oceans are rising globally. The average sea level is more than eight inches higher now than it was an eighteen eighty in the trend is accelerating. npr's rebecca hersher has the story about a new satellite. That could help. Scientists understand how climate change is changing our seas. Here's her story. If you live near the coast you've probably seen. Booties and other contraptions edge that measure. What's going on in the ocean including how high the water is but when it comes to understanding global climate change. There is no substitute for satellite data from space. You can see the whole thing. Josh willis is a scientist at nasa. He's leading the us team. That's launching a new satellite called sentinel six in collaboration with the european space agency. Sentinel six zip around the globe. Eight hundred miles up and look at the surface of all the oceans. It's really kind of an incredible feat of technology. We can actually measure the water level with an accuracy of about one inch from eight hundred miles up. Centeno six uses radar to make continuous measurements. A radar beam comes down out of the satellite it bounces off that surface and then it measures the signal coming back and by figuring how long it takes to go down and come back. You can tell how far away the water is. If you know how far away the water is you can figure out how high it is relative to the land sentinel. Six is the latest in a string of satellites that do this kind of measurement going back to the nineties but those missions were somewhat ad and scientists couldn't always be sure that there would be an exhibition mission when the current one ended. Which is a nightmare when you're trying to understand how the climate is changing overtime. Which is why they are really excited. This time the satellite will be up there for five years and then another identical satellite will launch to another five years so a decade of reliable data llewellyn thompson studies oceans at the university of washington. I use that data every day in my research thompson has been studying how. The oceans have been changing for decades. She says obviously sea level rise is tangibly important to people who live on the coasts but ocean changes affect everyone. What happens in the ocean doesn't stay there. For example currents and ocean temperatures affect weather in fish populations we can also use to sea level measurements. Understand how currents are changing how ocean story heat and hotter oceans can drive more powerful hurricanes and scientists use steel data from satellites to figure out exactly how hot the oceans are getting too because water gets bigger as it gets hotter so by knowing the sea level. We have an indication of how much the ocean has expanded. Because of warning josh willis of nasa says the sentinel six satellite is crucial because climate change is happening fast in the past scientists had to make do with less data about the oceans but now the earth rapidly warming climate scientists need as much information as possible about what's happening around the globe. Sea level is continuing to rise. And we can't stop measuring it. Every year every decade we're remaking the climate and raising sea levels higher and higher sentinel is scheduled to launch a november twenty first from california rebecca. Hersher npr news.

Rebecca Hersher Josh Willis Centeno European Space Agency NPR Llewellyn Thompson Nasa Sentinel University Of Washington Thompson United States The Sentinel California
What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

Environment: NPR

03:52 min | 4 months ago

What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

"What does the president's decision to leave? The Paris Agreement meant for Climate Science Rebecca Hersher is with NPR's clients. I'm science team, good morning becky good morning. So, we have this agreement that the US has now out of but two hundred other countries are still in it. How is humanity broadly doing on carbon emissions? Well humidity broadly is not doing great when you look at the hard numbers that scientists look at, it's bad. Global emissions are still going up, which is a nightmare if you studied global warming because the earth is already about two degrees Fahrenheit hotter than it was last century. So humans are on track for catastrophic warming in the next few decades. Okay how is the US specifically doing? Well to answer that I want to go back a little bit. So if you add up all the co two in other carbon that countries have spouted since industrialization, the US has omitted the most and I, think that's really important because the US emissions have been going down slightly for a while now but they've never fallen really dramatically and that's different from European countries, which also omitted a lot of carbon historically but had slashed their missions in the last few decades. So there's another piece of context here. That is really important, which is that president trump announced three and a half years ago that he was going to pull the US out of this agreement. Today. November, it'll be official but in the meantime in those three and a half years have his administration's policies led to more climate emissions. It's a good question. It's hard to be definitive, but here's what scientists say it probably made a difference. So the US promised under the Paris agreement to reduce emissions by about twenty-five percent by twenty twenty-five most analysts say that if the policies of the Obama administration is like limits from on emissions from cars and trucks and power plants if those it continued for the last four years, the country would likely be on track for that goal. Instead, the US seems to be looking at more like a sixteen or seventeen percent decrease in emissions, which is not insignificant. How is the US on track to reduce emissions by sixteen seventeen percent if the federal government and its policies are working in the opposite direction? Right, I think that's a really interesting question. So one thing is that the global economy is changing. Renewable Energy is getting cheaper. The market for electric vehicles is growing so that cut some emissions right off the bat and more than half of US state say they're trying to meet the twenty twenty, five percent goal that the US originally set under the Paris Agreement and especially in the last year, there's been a huge movement by corporations promising to decarbonised their operations and that's become a really big question in the science community where they're trying to model future warming. And asking this interesting question, which is what will be the main driver of emissions reductions in the next ten years will it actually be national policies? The things we tend to focus on the Paris Agreement or will it be corporate policies state policies even city policies? Oh I bet the engine, the answers to that will be interesting and let me ask you Leslie say Joe Biden Does Win the election could he put the US back in the Paris climate agreement? Yes yes. So As we said we'll be formerly out the day after the election president trump wins a second term. The US will remain out of the agreement US missions will fall slowly if. He said he will reenter. He can do that. As soon as he takes office. If he wins, the big thing would be trying to work with Congress to pass new renewable energy and transportation policies, and that would have to happen pretty quickly to avoid the most catastrophic warming. Rebecca Hersher with NPR's climate team. Thanks becky. Thanks so

United States Paris President Trump Rebecca Hersher NPR Donald Trump Becky Congress Federal Government Joe Biden Official Twenty Twenty Obama Administration Leslie
What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

Environment: NPR

06:03 min | 4 months ago

What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

"The Gulf coast faces catastrophic flooding after yet another hurricane this when Sally London to shore. Early this morning meanwhile, record setting fires have been burning in the West for weeks. These climate fueled disasters are not only dangerous. They're costly billions of dollars have been lost so far. This year NPR's climate team has been looking into what that means for the economy and for families nate. Rot is an Oregon and Rebecca Hersher is just back from the Gulf Coast Natan Rebecca. Hello to both of you hither. And Becky, let's put this first question to you. We know that climate change makes a year like this one more likely to occur. That's because hotter temperatures helped drive bigger more damaging wildfires and hurricanes. But what do we know about the economic toll that takes? Well, you know unfortunately, this isn't the first year that the US has had this kind of back to back situation with fires and storms, and that's kind of thing as you said, global warming helps fuel and the federal government and actually tracks the status. So we have some idea of how expensive. These things are and the cost is just huge. So in the last five years, the US has experienced more than five hundred billion with a B., dollars in losses directly from climate fueled weather disasters, and that's not including twenty twenty s disasters that will likely be in the tens of billions five, hundred, billion dollars in the last five years enormous amount of money nate outside Eugene Oregon near one of the major fires burning give us some sense of what those fires mean for the local economy there. Well, they've just been devastating businesses here in Eugene. Up. and down the state that it had to close just because of the smoke and a lot of these businesses were already just hanging on by a thread because of the pandemic then you've got the direct damages from the fires lost homes timber buildings lost infrastructure I talked to a telecom worker the other day at the incident command post with a firearm near, and he had just gotten back from being in the burnt area His name is Rob Robertson and he described the scene where like a ghost forest he said they lost something. Like sixty miles worth at telephone poles, it had been built and he says each of those poll costs about ten thousand dollars we're looking at you know multimillions worth of infrastructure to replace I. Mean it's just there's so much infrastructure out there that that's been destroyed now, and that's just in one valley from one fire in a state that's got fires in. You know basically from north to south and Robinson was frustrated because he said, he felt like there were things that we could do right now decrease risked infrastructure, but we haven't because it costs money. On that point when it comes to wildfires, for example, what can be done to decrease their long-term costs. So it's going to take a big change in the status quo right now, we spend billions of dollars just about every year fighting fires, you know trying to put him out and fire colleges, land managers even firefighters will tell you that money would be way better spent on the front end. Here's Sara ultimate pope, a former smoke jumper who now runs a force collaborative in southern Oregon we do have a lot of work that we need to do on our forest to get them back to. A more healthy state where they're going to be resilient in the face of climate change and resilient to disturbance, and to do that, we're going to have to invest in them. So she says, we're going to need more prescribed fire thinning more management of these places, and that is going to cost a lot of money. You know billions of dollars. So that's wildfires. Then there's hurricanes and Rebecca as we mentioned, you just got back from the Gulf Hurricane Sally is dumping rain on the Gulf Coast and Hurricane Laura destroyed towns along the Louisiana Texas border. Late last month gives sense about the hurricane cost. Well. You know hurricanes are consistently the most expensive disasters that we see especially hurricanes that caused a lot of flooding like sally and that's really bad news because that's exactly the kind of storm that's more common as the earth gets hotter this year has been really bad. There have already been ten climate driven disasters that cost more than a billion dollars each that was as of July. One thing to remember is that where people live really matters you know the number of homes in flood prone areas, it's skyrocketed in las three decades. So the seam disaster today is going to cause more damage hurt more homes than if it had happened previously. So zoning laws building codes, they are really important and climbing experts say that there are economic benefits to be had if we build in more resilient ways. Rebecca innate. We've been talking about the overall economic costs of climate fueled disasters, but let's go to a more personal level. How does this affect families and what do we know about how surviving a fire or flood affects people financially Well. The effects are really dramatic for a lot of people especially poor people if you don't have savings to fall back on or gave can't afford adequate insurance, a disaster can totally derail a family's finances for decades people whose home is their only source of wealth. For example, they're more likely to end up renting even years later, bankruptcy is more likely there. are other costs to like for example, research suggests that young people who survive a hurricane, they're less likely to enter college. It takes longer to graduate if they do go and survivors also have long term mental and physical health problems often, and that can interfere with work that obviously hits income or create new costs of their own. These are extreme weather disasters. We've been focusing on, but what about the financial hit from less dramatic or less immediately noticeable climate impacts like the gradual rise of temperatures. So yeah, I mean rising temperatures and heat waves hurt agriculture health certainly electrical bills. You know you have warmer waters affecting fisheries and then there's just the down the road impacts ecological decline you know are in extinction crisis. Right. Now that climate change is only going to make worse and we depend on ecosystems for everything from clean water and air or two places to go where we can just escape from it all and I don't really know how you put a price tag on something like that. That's NPR's climate team nate rot and Rebecca. Hersher. Thank you both of you. So. Much. To be here.

Natan Rebecca Gulf Coast Eugene Oregon Oregon NPR Sally London Nate Rot Rebecca Hersher United States Hurricane Sally Federal Government Becky Rob Robertson Hurricane Laura Robinson Sara
Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 5 months ago

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

"D. Y. E. N., dot com slash NPR to learn more many people who lose their homes wildfires or in hurricanes did not know they were in harm's way. You can understand that this might happen. You know that the houses near the words or near the. Coast, but you don't quite realize the risk don't quite realize the extent of the danger. One major real estate site is now showing a homes flood risk along with photos of the kitchen and living room so that people will know this is one way that climate change has become a more direct part of home-buying. A long-term decision that a lot of people make our reporting from NPR's climate team starts with NPR's Rebecca Hersher. It's obvious to a lot of Americans that climate change means more flooding more than a thousand homes and businesses are flooded in the Jackson Mississippi Southern Louisiana Sixty thousand homes north. West of Omaha is still dealing with the math more than four hundred homeowners. Even, though government flood maps have been around since the seventies, there was no mention of flooding on real estate websites until today Leslie Jordan is a vice president of the website realtor dot com, which lists more than one hundred, ten, million homes. Flooding is the most common costly natural disaster in the US. So realtor DOT COM has added flood information to every listing Jordan says that's thanks in part to a new privately funded fled information project called flood factor. Matt E B. is one of the CO founders of. Flood factor which rates houses on a scale from one to ten. So if it's very likely a very deep flood, you'll get a flood factor of ten for that property. If it's very unlikely, then it'll be a flood factor one, the ratings take into account climate change particularly sea level rise and more extreme rain ev says that kind of Info has actually been out there for years. It's just that regular people haven't had access to it. A. Democratization of this information is the way that we like to think about. It because there are people who already have this information and they're already acting on it people like mortgage insurance companies and large real estate developers, some of which have fought against public flood disclosure laws. So are other real estate sites also going to add this information. Can you say We are hopeful and happy to engage in those conversations with folks and that less than specific answer made my colleague Pr's Climate Team Lauren summer wonder what is going on with the other real estate websites so she called them i. I I asked Zillow if they're thinking about publishing flood, risk their number of challenges with that, and it's something that I think sooner or later would be a great feature to include Jeff. Tucker is an economist at Zillow who has studied how the homes they help sell art risk from climate change hundreds of billions of dollars just tremendous amount of real estate at risk primarily from coastal flooding for instance, Tucker. Says the company has had internal discussions about including flood risk, but they expect pushback from some users the current. May Be very unhappy to have that kind of information surfaced. If they're interested in selling their home, I heard the same thing from Taylor Mar lead economist at red. Fin. Could this actually reduce the value of this existing homeowner and essentially take away a lot of their net worth Marceau's on the buyer side Redfin survey show that three quarters of them. WanNa know about natural disasters before making an offer but he says that Info can't. Crowd out other fell on the website. If we made the whole front page just about flood risk, they might not be as easily able to navigate how long the commute is. For example, Maher says they're looking at testing including flood

NPR Dot Com Zillow Leslie Jordan Marceau United States Tucker Jackson Mississippi Southern L D. Y. E. N. Omaha Matt E B. Rebecca Hersher Vice President Maher Redfin WAN Jeff
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 7 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Would not be doing that inspectors confirm shall serve a seven year term Rebecca Hersher NPR news this is NPR news it is seven forty two this is KCRW news I met Gillam overnight firefighters have been battling a fast moving wildfire near the one to one in San Luis Obispo officials issued an evacuation warning for some areas near Pismo beach we've seen fires break out in Santa Clarita along the four oh five freeway near Bel Air and in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in recent days none of that is unusual for a southern California summer but there's never been a fire season here in the midst of a global pandemic so how does cal fire fight wildfires while social distancing when you get back to the base camps are we may be looking at a spreading people out so that people are standing as close together in line waiting for getting their meals for example were standing in a room or an outdoor space I'm listening to the morning briefings we're just going to see people spread out more than we have in the past David shoe is a retired cal fire officials he told KCRW's press play that one upside is the pandemic has left a lot of vacant rooms because of the limited amount of traveling that's being done there also just happens to be lots of hotel rooms available so we may be working hand in hand with them to look at putting people in hotel rooms but all of this is straining state and local resources governor Gavin Newsom is already projected a fifty four billion dollar budget shortfall this year and he says cuts to some programs that help prevent wildfires could be on the way it's seven forty four that case your W. the Los Angeles Police.

Gillam Pismo beach Santa Clarita Bel Air KCRW Gavin Newsom Los Angeles Police Rebecca Hersher NPR San Luis Obispo Santa Barbara Ventura California David
As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 8 months ago

As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

"Hundreds of factories, refineries, farms and mines across the country say they cannot comply with environmental regulations because of the pandemic. This is according to an NPR review of hundreds of state environmental records. Those records show that companies have asked for a wide range of special permission during this pandemic including things like delaying checking for leaks in storage tanks and measuring pollution from smokestacks and pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher is here to talk about this, Becky, hi, there. Okay, so industry is saying there's a pandemic. We need some special allowances here. What exactly are we talking about? Well, it's a real drag. Some of the issues are relatively minor like submitting an annual report late, but I also found a fair number of substantial requests, mostly from industries that release a lot of pollution like landfills have been asking states to relax pollution monitoring rules hog farms have asked for permission to house extra animals, because meatpacking plants per temporary closed and oil and gas companies ask for states back off and enforcement of a wide range of environmental regulations. I mean, be understand why an oil or gas company has trouble being able to check for pollution because of a pandemic. Well there are a couple of reasons. Navy furloughs get in the way like if employees who usually right in filed pollution appurtenant working because of the pandemic, another reason the companies gave is that a lot of pollution monitoring is done by outside contractors and they were trying to limit people coming onto facilities because of the virus. We know these details, though because a small number of states make them public, but another problem here is that no one is systematically keeping track of these types of nationwide requests. no-one keeps an eye on. Who On these industries and with? They're asking for right now. Why is that? Well in March? The Environmental Protection Agency the EPA put out a pandemic policy that said companies don't need to warn federal regulators if they feel like the pandemic interfering with routine pollution, monitoring or testing instead, they said states could keep track of that information if they choose to. The EPA says, this is out, works it partners with states, and that is how a lot of environmental regulation. Regulation works although former EPA officials say this policy gives industries a lot of leeway now some states are doing this kind of tracking, but I've found that most kids don't publish any information about which companies say. The pandemic is getting in the way, and that means most Americans who live near factories refineries farms. They have no way to know whether the pandemic is causing extra pollution. I mean that kind of uncertainty is is a big problem for for people who live near these sorts of facilities I would imagine. Especially for people who live downstream or down wind of facilities that have have violated environmental laws in the past on a found a fair number of examples like this, so for example there's a minor Indiana in early April, the mine said it was releasing wastewater with high levels of ammonia and small particles, because they were cleaning buildings with a lot of bleach to kill the virus that same mino ins repeatedly violated the clean water act passed by releasing water with two small particles in it and I talked to a local resident who lives downstream. He was really frustrated. John Blair. The air pollution is visible. The water pollution is less visible and you know I mean almost anything could be blamed on the virus I suppose. Now. The state told the mind to stop releasing water with titles, Manja and many of the requests I looked at were denied, but the only reason we know about that interaction is because Indiana published a publicly in most states are not doing which means most Americans are in the dark. Pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher. Becky thanks for that reporting. Thanks so

EPA Rebecca Hersher Becky Reporter Indiana Environmental Protection Agenc NPR Navy Manja John Blair
Monday marks official start of hurricane season

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Monday marks official start of hurricane season

"The Atlantic hurricane season begins today NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports federal forecasters are expecting an above average number of storms this year forecasters expect three to six major hurricanes with wind speeds of one hundred ten miles per hour but they weren't even relatively weak storms can be deadly climate change is causing sea levels to rise and many storms are also dumping more rain which means flood risk is going up in much of the U. S. NPR's Rebecca Hersher

NPR Rebecca Hersher
The Pandemic Cut Down Car Traffic. Why Not Air Pollution?

Short Wave

05:18 min | 8 months ago

The Pandemic Cut Down Car Traffic. Why Not Air Pollution?

"So there was definitely one picture but I remember seeing a freeway in Los Angeles arguably the traffic capital of the United States and there were no cars. It was like empty for your way clear blue sky and now you came here on this podcast and you're taking that all away from me. Well actually the air was cleaner in Los Angeles in March. It was the longest stretch of cleaner that had been recorded in decades. And you know that's a big deal for la because there is not great. Sometimes there's high levels of ozone Which is a pollutant that sworn by all the that comes out of tail pipes and smokestacks and power plants? What it does is it. It mixes in the air ground level. You add some sunlight and you've got ozone and it's not good stuff it exacerbates respiratory and cardiovascular illness so it makes sense that everybody would be pretty psyched about cleaner air. Yeah and it seemed like that made sense right with all the lockdown and people staying at home. I mean they started asking the air regulators about that like Philip fine of the South Coast Air Quality Management district through a lot of pressure on us to come up with the answer that everyone wanted to hear which the is that the covid nineteen measures have cleaned the air and southern California. But here's the thing it was also really Ramey in. La During the same time and rain helps clear out the air so as the weather is dried out. Recently air quality has gotten worse again. I mean went back to the unhealthy. Category actually yeah. Okay so I guess when you think about. There was this forty percent reduction in traffic and only a fifteen or so decrease in ozone in lots of parts of the country. It's not nothing right like not much. Not A ain't nothin' yeah. It certainly helped some but you know believe it or not sound kind of strange cars are not. La's biggest source of pollution comes to the pollutants that make ozone And that's actually true in a lot of places in the US Which is fine told me that means what's happening. Now with reducing car traffic just enough read a lot of newspaper articles over the past couple weeks decided if only we can have people telecommute one day a week across the entire base in our air quality problems will be solved and unfortunately it's not that simple. That's because the big source in La is trucks A reason is because there's just a lot of shipping that comes through the ports of L. A. and Long Beach and they handle about thirty percent of the country's shipping container traffic and that gets moved around on trucks after it comes in so traffic. It didn't decrease as much as the car. Traffic did so that pollution was still being omitted. Okay so trucks are the problem in La. Becky would about places yet so other places have other pollution sources like Pittsburgh. We looked at Pittsburgh and ozone only felt by nine percent about between mid-march and the end of April and when I asked atmospheric chemists about this they were like the reason is coal. Oh the Col- cold. It's burned to make electricity primarily but also call. It's used to make steel right. The history of Pittsburgh is all about steel scar. Have some very active industrial sources near the city in this kind of at the University of Pittsburgh? Emily Elliott says Cole is really dirty work in closer proximity to the places that are generating power coal fired power plants in the Ohio River valley that contribute quite a bit to pollution. Okay Sup- Pittsburgh has coal. La Trucks anything else. I should know about. Yeah Houston has this thing with factories. Oh Right Rebecca Hersher. We've talked about that on the show before indeed. We have and for those who might not remember Houston has one of the largest concentrations of petrochemical facilities in the country so to see how ozone levels have changed their versus other places. That was an interesting question for us. And what we found. Is that those facilities. They mostly kept operating during the pandemic actually in fact a lot of them they make the raw materials for masks and gloves the PCP hospitals need so desperately right now. So I'm guessing that ozone levels decrease a lot in Houston exactly ozone decrease less in Houston than did in La okay so it sounds like industrial pollution versus pollution from our like. Private cars is a big deal. Are Scientists looking into that? Becky like how much industry plays into this. Yeah they are. And it's possible that the overall air chemistry has also changed when we remove cars from the picture which is kind of an intriguing idea like air pollution is kind of a soup of different chemicals and bits and that soup is different now. And there's something even more confusing that happens with that soup that Air Chemistry and this is really strange to stay with me. This is really strange. So say with me as actually sure. We've tagline so go ahead you're at home. Will we mention that stuff coming out of tail? Pipes and other sources is what makes ozone rates that stuff is nitrogen oxide so nitrogen. Oxides helped form ozone. But here's where it gets weird under some conditions you know. In the short term nitrogen oxides can break down ozone molecules

Los Angeles Pittsburgh Houston United States Air Chemistry Becky University Of Pittsburgh Philip California Ramey Pipes Col- Cold Long Beach Rebecca Hersher Ohio River Valley Emily Elliott L. A. Cole
Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

Environment: NPR

02:35 min | 8 months ago

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

"Hurricane season is coming and federal forecasters are predicting that there will be between six and ten hurricanes in the Atlantic this year. That's above average Jerry. Bell is the lead Hurricane Forecaster at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The Twenty Twenty Atlantic. Hurricane season is expected to be busy one. Npr's Rebecca Hersher reports. If the forecast turns out to be correct. This will be the fifth year in a row with above average hurricane activity in the Atlantic. That's the most consecutive years ever recorded bell says we're expecting yet another above normal season and now is the time to make sure that you're getting prepared. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is asking state and local governments to consider issuing evacuation orders earlier than they would have in the past in order to give people more time to safely leave their homes while maintaining as much social distance as possible. Carlos CASTILLO OF FEMA says Americans in hurricane prone areas should also pack different supplies than they would have be prepared to take cleaning items with you like so panna tiger disinfecting wipes or general household cleaning supplies to disinfect surfaces. You may touch regularly. Fema is also urging people to stay with family or friends or in hotels rather than in shelters if they can forecaster Jerry. Bell says the main reason for the large number of storms in the forecast is phenomenon called the Atlantic multi. Takeo Oscillation basically the wind temperatures in the Atlantic have been really good for making strong hurricanes since about nineteen ninety five that will probably change in the next few years as normal climate fluctuations happen that's separate from manmade climate change but climate change is making the storms that do form more damaging for one thing bell says sea levels are rising sea levels mean more storm on Dacian as a hurricanes approaching and warmer air and water mean that hurricanes are more likely to drop catastrophic amounts of rain. When they make landfall think hurricane harvey in two thousand Seventeen or Hurricane Florence in twenty eighteen and he says rain and storm surge affect more people than they used to our coastlines. Were built up tremendously over the last several decades so that there's potentially many more millions of people in harm's way every time a hurricane threat together normal climate variability plus the effects of human caused climate change plus the pandemic add up to a potentially deadly summer and fall hurricane season officially begins on June first and runs until November first Rebecca Hersher NPR needs.

Hurricane Bell Atlantic Twenty Twenty Atlantic Hurricane Florence Forecaster Federal Emergency Management A Jerry Rebecca Hersher Npr National Oceanic Atmospheric A Rebecca Hersher Takeo Oscillation Harvey NPR Carlos Castillo Dacian
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:14 min | 9 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Public radio programming that highlights issues including diversity racism equality anti semitism and sexism it's seven thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin good morning with huge numbers of job losses and furloughs millions of Americans are being pushed to the brink of affection after hurricane or other natural disaster FEMA the Federal Emergency Management Agency would start up a legal assistance program to help people at risk of losing their homes that has not happened in the pandemic in the economic crisis it created and here's about her sure has been investigating and she joins us now good morning good morning so first off just explain what kind of legal help FEMA usually provides still the usually private legal hot lines and these are staffed by the American Bar Association for free but the federal government they pay up to five thousand dollars per hotline that's the cover equipment and software so basically the number is a number that anyone can call they can get legal help but because FEMA hasn't made the money available there are only three states that have high winds right now and walk through why there would be demand for legal help because of the corona virus yeah so after any disaster people actually need lawyers to help them register for food stamps and unemployment there increases in domestic violence after disasters need help with that and housing is a really big issue an eviction is a particularly interesting right now because it puts people and communities at higher risk known for spreading the virus yeah so what example for the demand right now there are small FEMA funded hotlines in a couple places these are places that had weather disasters this spring but the Bar Association says that most people who are calling them are calling about covert nineteen the question is is whether or not Jackie people are getting the help they need if they have all these problems and they're calling out for help because of cove it are they getting that assistance they're not I mean there is a lot of demand but lawyers say that tenants especially are calling a lot so I talked to one man in New Orleans his name's Bobby Parker he is a renter he's a sanitation worker on Bourbon street he's been furloughed and he was late with his rent in April because he didn't have enough money so he went to work one day and when he got back he told me this after marking in our doors in our locker chain the landlord had changed the locks in his apartment did he tell the weather there was a rule against evictions he did because there is there is a moratorium on evictions right now he said it didn't work you love getting a lawyer through legal aid group who fought the evictions eventually won but it took more than two weeks and he said it in that time he alternated between sleeping on a friend's at a friend's house and they're bad with them and sleeping outside him Mister Parker what do you think would have happened if you didn't have a lawyer over here our main problem B. I got to be a victim which had been tested positive for cold nineteen fighting for my life I truly do he says he was really scared and that's in part because he's HIV positive so he's at higher than average risk if you were to get the virus lawyers legal aid groups just like the one that helped him say that without FEMA funded hotlines it's harder to give people this kind of help has FEMA said anything about this they didn't comment they said that outstanding requests for help like this are under review the White House declined to comment the thing to remember here is the president has the ultimate power to unlock this money and more than thirty governors have asked for this type of assistance NPR's Rebecca Hersher thank you so much we appreciate it thanks so much has some barber shops and hair salons reopen across this country it is natural for people to ask is a hair cut really an essential service for.

NPR
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:00 min | 10 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Says new Yorkers two years old and over will have to wear face coverings when riding public transit taxis or ride hailing cars on the long introduced New York the global temperature in March twenty twenty was the second hottest on record NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports there's more than fifty percent chance that this will end up being the hottest year ever recorded global temperatures continue to rise because of climate change that trend is clear in the latest data from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration may June and July are forecast to be hotter than average in most of the U. S. except the upper plains states that follows the second hottest March going back to eighteen eighty the water in the Gulf of Mexico had its hottest March ever this year no a climate scientists say warmer than average temperatures will likely continue this summer although it's too soon to predict exactly how hot the water will be hotter water makes powerful web hurricanes more likely the next three months are also predicted to be Rainier than average in the central U. S. and almost everywhere east of the Mississippi River Rebecca Hersher NPR news the Dow closed up thirty three points in the day at twenty three thousand five hundred thirty seven you're listening to NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include progressive insurance committed to offering a streamlined shopping experience where home and auto can be bundled together now that's progressive learn more at progressive dot com or one eight hundred progressive you're listening to greater LA KCRW show that connects you to the people and places of southern California I see two tickets if you're like me watching sports as part of the soundtrack to your life remember Kirk Gibson's World Series home run she.

New York NPR Rebecca Hersher Mexico California Kirk Gibson Rainier Mississippi River
Scientists expect spring floods to be milder than last year

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

Scientists expect spring floods to be milder than last year

"Widespread flooding is likely this spring that's according to federal weather forecasters NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports the northern plains are most at risk for major flooding the Dakotas Minnesota and parts of the Gulf coast are at risk for moderate and major flooding between April and June according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the southeastern U. S. is also a risk soil is already saturated so heavy spring rain could cause flooding heavy rain is getting more likely in much of the U. S. as the earth gets hotter forecasters say this spring's flooding will likely be above average but not as severe as the record breaking floods last year along the Mississippi River and its tributaries none the less this year's funding could have serious implications if water damages homes since Americans are trying to isolate themselves in their houses due to the corona

Rebecca Hersher Dakotas Minnesota Mississippi River
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:51 min | 11 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on NPR News Now

"From the impact of the krona virus. Pandemic stocks closed modestly higher today. The Dow one hundred and eighty eight. Points THE NASDAQ. One hundred and sixty points. Today you're listening to NPR. Widespread flooding is likely this spring. That's according to federal weather forecasters. Npr's Rebecca Hersher reports the northern plains or most at risk for major flooding the DAKOTAS Minnesota and parts of the Gulf coast are at risk for moderate and major flooding between April and June according to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration the southeastern. Us is also a risk soil is already saturated so heavy. Spring Rain could cause flooding. Heavy rain is getting more likely much of the. Us As the earth gets hotter forecasters say this spring's wedding will likely be above average but not as severe as the record breaking floods last year along the Mississippi River and its tributaries nonetheless. This year's flooding could have serious implications if water damages homes since Americans are trying to isolate themselves in their houses due to the corona virus outbreak. Rebecca Hersher. Npr news the corona virus pandemic that is sweeping. The Globe is having a disaster defect on the nation's employment picture from historic lows. The number of out of work Americans is expected to rise significantly as companies being laying people off or shutting down entirely in the week ending March fourteenth. The number of people seeking unemployment aid rose by seventy thousand to two hundred eighty. One thousand for most analysts. Expect THAT NUMBER TO SOAR IN COMING WEEKS. Crude oil futures prices after falling by roughly twenty four percent yesterday rebounded in the other direction today after announcement by the Energy Department and plans to initially by up to thirty million barrels of oil. The Nation's strategic petroleum reserves. Where was up a dollar or four dollars and eighty five cents today to end the session at twenty five twenty two a barrel in New York? I'm Jack Speer. Npr News in Washington..

NPR Rebecca Hersher National Oceanic Atmospheric A Jack Speer Mississippi River DAKOTAS Minnesota Washington Energy Department New York
Climate Change Affected Australia’s Wildfires, Scientists Confirm

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 11 months ago

Climate Change Affected Australia’s Wildfires, Scientists Confirm

"Scientists have confirmed that Australia's recent wildfires were exacerbated by human caused climate change and beers Rebecca Hersher reports extremely hot weather is driving large damaging fires the analysis was conducted by more than a dozen climate scientists it focuses specifically on southeastern Australia where bush fires destroyed thousands of homes and killed more than two dozen people in twenty nineteen and twenty twenty although bush fires are normal and important part of Australian forest ecosystems the authors found that as very hot weather gets more common large intense fires are also getting more likely they estimate that the weather conditions that drove the most recent fires are at least thirty percent more likely now than they were in the year nineteen hundred the study was made possible by increasingly sophisticated climate models that allow scientists to quickly assess the role of climate change in specific fires storms and heat waves Rebecca Hersher

Australia Rebecca Hersher Bush
Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

Environment: NPR

05:18 min | 11 months ago

Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

"Australia is still recovering from bushfires destroyed. More than two thousand homes. Some of those homes may not be rebuilt. The government of one Australian state has historically offered to purchase empty. Lots where fire has destroyed homes. The goal is to help people moved to safer places but NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports that there was this crucial flaw in how that policy was rolled out. Donna Wilson late to cigarette and pollster truck out of the parking lot at the real estate firm. She manages in King Lake Victoria just bicycle idea from. Hey Ya damn houses. To houses went as in went up in flames on February seventh. Two thousand nine bushfire destroyed a huge chunk of this town. This whole straight pretty much weight. The flames moved so quickly that many people couldn't escape one hundred. Seventy three people died in a matter of hours most of them in and around king leak thousands of homes were destroyed three days later then. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd address the Australian parliament the seventh February. We become each national memory as a day of disaster of death and of morning. Black Saturday as it came to be called was Australia's most devastating modern bushfire event five times more deadly than the country's most recent fires and one of the questions that emerged afterward was whether all the houses that earned should be rebuilt. Maybe it was too dangerous. The solution was to try a set of policies. That would give people a choice. You can either build a new house. That was more fire resistant or sell your land to the government and move somewhere else. Wants land was sold to the government. Home could never be built on it again. It was an experiment. The assumption among policymakers was that the more traumatized a homeowner was by the fires. The more likely they would be to sell and relocate and Donna Wilson says to some extent that was true. It was a a godsend for little king. Lake is a small town. So Wilson knew a lot of the people who are coming into a real estate office after the fires and many of them were really struggling. Everything they owned was gone. Many of them had lost family or neighbors in the fire so selling their land to the government and preventing anyone from living there again was both simple and reassuring national. They couldn't deal with a all. They dislike that idea that no no build on that block. But as the so-called buyback scheme unfolded it became clear that it wasn't working for everyone. A key problem was the detained almost two years for the government to commit to it. And in the meantime people had already decided what to do even people who had nearly died in the fires last onto Kookaburra court. Then you will arrive at your destination on one hundred five degree day in February of this year. Npr producer Meredith. Rizzo and I drove the half hour from King Lake Down to flower gale. A town of about six hundred people surrounded by tree covered ridges. It's almost eleven years to the day since black Saturday. High joke the seventy year old Joe. Millburn takes us into his new living room. Which is right where his old living room used to be. In fact on black Saturday Joe was sitting right here reading when the power went out it was evening and I looked over the to the window between the Kurds and it was a red stripe and before sunset so when the front and the sky was read within an hour his entire neighborhood was on fire. He remembers trying to get to his neighbor's house for help. And I looked up and this is the only time I thought it was not die. The fight was about. It muscle he and his neighbors and their grandchildren piled into two cars and drove through the smoke and flames to an empty field. That had already burned. They watched as the fire devoured. The ridges. Joe's house was gone. His fire insurance policy provided enough to build a new house and he thought that was the only option available to him so less than a year after the fire he went for it outside the building by the time. Now it's going to do. The BUYBACK MISSED OUT AGAIN. Story my life by the time the government was ready to pay people like Joe for their land. He was already living in his new house. I wouldn't build this and in the decade. Since the forest has re grown the fire danger is high. Officials recognized that the delays in rolling out. The buyback offer made it difficult for many people to use it. Craig Lapsley was. Victoria's Fire Services Commissioner after the two thousand nine blazes leaks acution took forever and it was extremely frustrating. Make decisions so what did I do in the end? Most people who lost their homes on Black Saturday did not sell to the government and many people rebuilt houses in places with very high fire risk but Lapsley says he thinks that offering buybacks was a good idea especially when that option was coupled with more stringent building standards. Those are lessons that other parts of Australia and the US are looking to as they grapple with how to help people make safer decisions about where and how to live Rebecca Hersher NPR news.

JOE Donna Wilson Australia NPR Rebecca Hersher Craig Lapsley King Lake Victoria Australian Parliament Prime Minister Kevin Rudd Kookaburra Court Fire Services Commissioner King Lake Down Victoria Rizzo Meredith United States Producer
Rain Brings New Worries To Burned Areas In Australia

Environment: NPR

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Rain Brings New Worries To Burned Areas In Australia

"Rain in the forecast for the east coast of Australia. And that's good news for firefighters still fighting blazes near some of the country's largest cities but ran after after fires can also create problems can even be dangerous and Beers Rebecca Hersher. Has This report when I called pattern. I'm in this week. He was in Melbourne walking outside. And I could hear the wind through the phone for smokey. We are expecting thunderstorms says a lot. More Humid Nyman is a forest hydrologist. He studies is how drought and wildfires can affect drinking water supplies and while the rain in the Australian forecast is a good thing. The thunderstorms worry. Him Is this a lot of Raines. Spread out over six months. That's a good outcome if there are short. Intense bursts of rainfall made through thunderstorms. Those are the ones that are problematic. Nick problematic because thunderstorms are more likely to drop a lot of rain in a short amount of time and areas. That burned can't absorb a lot of water for a couple of reasons. I wildfire removes vegetation which means that. The rainfall hits the soil directly. Second the vile fire heats the soil which causes something called water-repellent exellency or hydrophobia city. Which means that doesn't absorb into the soil so most of the rain becomes surface runoff. That runoff can sweep the soil and ash downhill hill and into streams and lakes. If a lot of sediment gets into reservoirs. The water gets really cloudy. And it can't be sterilized which means people can't drink it right now. The biggest drinking water concerns or for the areas around Canberra and Sydney water officials of setup filters at the reservoir that provides Sydney with the majority of its water to trap sediment and intense rain after fires can also be dangerous. A prime example. I'm and says is what's happened in California in recent years John. McNeil is the assistant. Didn't fire chief for Ventura County California. An area that has a similar landscape to many of the places that are burning in Australia in two thousand thirteen. A wildfire started in the hills there. Yeah it was called. The Springs Fire Wind caused the fire to burn hot and fast removing most of the vegetation and leaving the soil. Hard and Ashi at the base of the burnt hills were about two to three hundred homes. There's a small kind of retirement. Enclave of single family dwellings below the area that burn and year after the fire. There was a rainstorm voluntary. Evacuations tonight in Camarillo for people living near the hillside burn. Last year spring fire. The rain fell on hard soil. There were no plans to hold the dirt in place. Mud and rocks came loose and sped downhill the high impact areas it just completely leveled leveled the homes there would be some walls standing and then it was just completely sheared off from the debris and pretty sizeable rocks. That were coming down. Luckily people had evacuated evacuated in time. No one was killed. The risk of debris flows is rising in parts of California and Australia because of climate change and because of housing development relevant patterns. Hotter weather is drying out plants and soil exacerbating drought in making intense wildfires. More likely people are also building homes and and wildfire prone areas and as the earth gets hotter extreme. Rain is getting more common in Australia. The forest hydrologist Petr Nyman has found that debris flows are already getting more frequent and severe in the southeastern part of the country. That's where this year's fires are burning. The rainfall over the next six six months is going to be critical if there's a storm than they might be really widespread issues across the whole east coast of Australia. All of this requires a quick period habit for emergency officials from fighting the fires to protecting homes and water supplies from the quenching rains. Rebecca Hersher N._p._R. News.

Humid Nyman Australia Rebecca Hersher California Melbourne Petr Nyman Camarillo Sydney Canberra Nick Ashi Raines Ventura County California Mcneil John
2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record

Environment: NPR

02:29 min | 1 year ago

2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record

"Last year was the second hottest ever recorded. It's the latest scientific confirmation that the planet is getting steadily hotter and NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports. This fact is is more and more obvious to humans going about their daily lives. Twenty nineteen was the second hottest year on record. According to the latest data released by the National Oceanic and atmospheric ear could ministration and NASA records. Go back more than a century so twenty nineteen is the second hottest twenty sixteen was the hottest and the third hottest artist was two thousand. Fifteen Gavin Schmidt is the director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The fact is is Wilmington. Every year we add one extra. The data points to this cross. The main thing here is is not really the ranking but is the consistency of the long term trends that we're seeing. The long term trend goes back decades AIDS. The two thousand ten were the hottest decade ever before that the two thousands had that title and so on the earth getting steadily hotter every decade. Today the planet is about one degree Celsius warmer than it was in the Mid Twentieth Century. Twenty eighteen report. By the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that warming of one point five degrees Celsius would be catastrophic for millions of people the warming up until now cincinnati seventeen has been quite close Oceania kind of extrapolate. That Ford knew would imagine that we would cost one point five in around twenty thirty five but of course that depends on what we do with emissions human emissions of greenhouse gases are the overwhelming driver of global warming and right now global emissions are rising the US has omitted the most total co two. Who of any country? The data released today also illustrate how different regions are being affected. The Arctic is warming three times faster than the rest of the planet. Hot Hot Ocean. Water helped power dangerous. Cyclones in disrupted fisheries in the continental. US rain patterns are changing. D.C Aren't works on. Forecasting Noah Noah he says hotter temperatures are making droughts more severe. A warmer atmosphere is a thirstier atmosphere sucking up moisture and dumping rain all at once. It's or seeing the largest event getting larger that means more flood risk for example in two thousand nineteen big rainfall events drove record breaking floods along the Mississippi tippy river and its tributaries and as the Earth keeps getting hotter. All of these trends will keep getting more pronounced. Rebecca Hersher N._p._R.

Rebecca Hersher United States Nasa Noah Noah Mid Twentieth Century Gavin Schmidt Mississippi Tippy River NPR United Nations Intergovernment National Oceanic Goddard Institute For Space St Wilmington Director Cincinnati Arctic Oceania Ford
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 1 year ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

Mozambique Maputo Lake Mozambique United States Southern Africa Tampa Bay National Institute Of Meteorol Africa Europe Salma Mouse Us Navy President Trump Moose Cossio Temba Edward Mondlane University Japan Rebecca Hersher Salam Antonio Chaos
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 1 year ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

Climate Liability Lawsuits Could Help With Costs Of Adapting To A Hotter Earth

Environment: NPR

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Climate Liability Lawsuits Could Help With Costs Of Adapting To A Hotter Earth

"In New York world leaders attended a United Nations summit on Climate Change. UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez opened the meeting by challenge in in countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately. We can do it limiting warming to one point. Five degrees is still possible receivable but it will require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society. Are we gonNA food use Lens fool our transport what's and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a plan some are also beginning to wrestle with a big question who is responsible people for the effects of global warming. NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek to answer that question there about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies companies in the US right now. My goldberger runs the Saban Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. All of these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years. There's the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty-one companies including Exxon. BP Shell and Chevron there are the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel in Boulder County Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change. It's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits do focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado. The lawsuits alleged that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now in the future because the cases allege oil oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenges climate change through robust investments in technology innovation efficiency improvements and cleaner fuels rules. Berger says the suits are somewhat similar to pass cases brought against other industries. The comparison that most people are most familiar with is the comparison to tobacco the massive tobacco settlement hinged on similar legal arguments that tobacco companies were partially responsible for the harm caused by cigarettes. Other industries have faced similar suits. It's with a variety of outcomes lead paint a specis gun an opioid manufacturers in fact this is the second wave of climate change suits against oil companies a previous set of cases in the early two thousands failed. Berger says something key has changed in the intervening years the science the ability to attribute attribute particular impacts to climate change has vastly improved as climate models have gotten more sophisticated and as climate change itself has gotten more present doesn't in our daily lives the connection between say destructive hurricanes and the warming earth has gotten easier to argue and climate related lawsuits are showing up in other parts the world two cases in the Netherlands France and India have all looked the legal system to require companies and governments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and then there's the argument that climate change is a human rights issue good morning everyone. My name is Maryelle chick CBA Khasan. I'm the research nurse in November of last year representatives from the Human Rights Commission of the Philippines sat in a room in London and listen to people tell their stories of surviving the massive typhoons that hit that country one after another in recent years but Kasan recounted how her family survived Typhoon Haiyan in two thousand thirteen my grandmother everyone was just praying. We were saying saying the second floor of the hotel. So from where we were we could see the water levels levels rising until the ground floor was fully submerged. You can see the water the cars floating when the water went down she and her her family walked hours home through streets covered in debris and bodies because explained how the storm wrecked the economy of her home city cut off drinking water and and killed thousands of people she was one of the hundreds of people who testified before the Human Rights Commission at multiple hearings around the world. The inquiry relied on the same team underlying climate science as recent lawsuits have researched that connects fossil fuel companies to the effects of climate change including stronger tropical storms and although the commission is not itself illegal body. Its final report later this year. We'll still carry weight explains Burger. The most important thing that could come out of it is is a declaration of violation of human rights and you know that's a powerful thing. Nobody wants to be accused of being human rights violator. It's one piece of a nascent nascent push to change the business models of the world's fossil fuel companies and as climate science gets more sophisticated and climate change is ever more present in the lives lives of average people that pressure is likely to keep increasing Rebecca Hersher N._p._R.

Human Rights Commission NPR Rebecca Hersher Berger United Nations New York Secretary General Antonio Guti Colorado Rhode Island Saban Center Exxon Columbia University United States Burger
U.N. Climate Summit Sets Stage For New National Emissions Promises

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 1 year ago

U.N. Climate Summit Sets Stage For New National Emissions Promises

"As we've been hearing this morning. World leaders are meeting in New York. Today they are holding a special United Nations Climate Change Summit Twenty twenty as the deadline for countries to make bigger bolder promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions but but many of the world's biggest economies are struggling to keep up with their previous promises. NPR's Rebecca Hersher has this carbon report card. Let's start with a couple. Oh basic climate science facts that world leaders are staring down today faction number one. The average temperature on our planet has already increased about one degree Celsius Celsius since Pre Industrial Times co eleven studies global emissions at the World Resources Institute think tank you've seen the Arctic hitting record highs and a scorching watching summer in Europe and the United States leaving hundreds dead and July was the warmest month on record ever globally and this is just one degree Celsius warming storms are getting more frequent and severe sea levels are rising and heat waves and droughts are getting longer which brings us to fax number two if the earth gets one and a half degrees degrees Celsius hotter. All of those things get significantly worse. Many animals go extinct. Many people will be forced to move which is why leaders from nearly two hundred hundred nations are meeting in New York because fact number three right now. The world is on track for about three degrees of warming by the end of the century so yeah it's not good. Angel Shoe is a researcher at Yale and US College in Singapore. I spoke to her via skype and fortunately national governments are really a falling behind when it comes to delivering the ambition and the emissions cuts that we really need to avoid dangerous climate change national governments including the US the second largest greenhouse house gasometer in the world behind China the US has promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions significantly by two thousand twenty five the good news overall carbon emissions. It's have gone down in the last decade mostly because companies stopped burning coal but under the trump administration that trend has slowed what ended up happening in two thousand eighteen gene was a spike in emissions from the United States and that also occurred in China's well so that's what's really worrisome but shoo says those are kind of silver lining the Chinese government government has been investing a lot in renewable energy like solar and hydro power and Electric Public Transit and appears to be planning more and because it's not a democracy the leaders who make climate promises can't be voted out of office and what's really encouraging about China's when the leadership is committed to something they can really follow through India. Yeah has also signalled it might be getting ready to promise big emissions cuts and it's on track to achieve its current emissions promises. Levin says many countries recognize. There's is a lot to gain from burning less coal gas cutting down fewer trees clean water and clean air and more efficient food production there such such tremendous benefits that can be born by climate action which brings us back to the United States. The federal government is currently trying to roll back policies that would control greenhouse gas emissions things like limits on emissions from power plants and oilfields and cars meanwhile hundreds of state and local governments are doing the opposite visit passing local regulations making local emissions promises all of which puts the US delegation at today's meeting in an awkward position and raises the a question if the U._S. is no longer leading international climate action who will

United States New York United Nations China World Resources Institute Federal Government NPR Twenty Twenty Angel Shoe Rebecca Hersher Europe Levin Pre Industrial Times Yale Singapore
George Lubar, Rebecca Hersher And Special Counsel discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

George Lubar, Rebecca Hersher And Special Counsel discussed on NPR News Now

"Scientists is lodging a whistle blower complaint against the centers for disease control and prevention n._p._r.'s rebecca hersher reports awards. He was the agency's leading expert on the relationship between climate change and public health as a longtime climate epidemiologists that the c._d._c. george lubar often spoke publicly about how global warming could increase health risks it can worsen respiratory illness threatened drinking water supplies and drive more deadly storms lubar was also an author of the two most recent national climate assessments and worked with the u._n.'s panel on climate change a whistleblower complaint. That's been filed on his behalf alleges that shortly after president trump's inauguration duration the c._d._c. merged lubers unit with another and limited his ability to speak publicly about climate change and health. The complaint argues that when lubar pushed back against against these changes the agency then sought to fire him as retaliation. The complaint is being considered by the u._s. Office of special counsel rebecca hersher n._p._r. News the

George Lubar Rebecca Hersher Special Counsel Donald Trump President Trump U._N.
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Where Rebecca hersher men brought her eleven year old granddaughter Abby, you know, Mustangs dole that many people had them basal to special doors to defy adopters. Most have enough space for horse and no history of animal abuse, anybody else killings and been six who's approved gap. Well, a completely wild horse and five hundred dollars up front. The other five hundred comes one year later, it's done official, but it's not why we're here. I can see why they're doing it because it goes poor people to take a chance on the maximum number of wild horses. You can be paid to take its four Beal Emma's adoptions have not up nearly forty percent since the thousand dollar incentive began in March, but the humane society and American wild horse campaign say bail 'em needs to focus its budget on fertility control, Nikki, Batiste reporting, Williamson county sheriff, Robert showed he then in central Texas. Makes his case to county commissioners as they considered whether to extend the contract with the production, company of live PD on a and E judge Bill grefell junior said, he's a fan of the concept of the show. I like what I see a life PD, because it reflects who we are I've seen Justice. But yet, I've seen compassion grefell two commissioners voted to extend the contract who voted to end it. They will figure out the terms of the new contract at a later meeting. Stop your chance to win one thousand dollars..

Rebecca hersher Beal Emma Bill grefell Abby Williamson county Robert official Batiste Nikki Texas five hundred dollars one thousand dollars thousand dollar forty percent eleven year one year
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well on the money front the timetable is coming together, but the amounts aren't which has a lot of people worried and delegates are getting really hung up on how to keep track of how much greenhouse gas each country releases into atmosphere. So this is actually really the key to the rules, but it's really complicated because we're talking about mostly colorless odorless gas, that's everywhere on earth. So the rules have to be super specific about how you count how much each country releases. Why is it so complicated to measure greenhouse gas emissions? Just in the last couple months. We've seen several reports on global levels of greenhouse gases going up. So clearly scientists know how to do this. Yeah. But on a smaller scale, it gets a lot harder. So I'll give you an example take a country that exports electricity to its neighbor. Let's say that country has been using coal for a long time. And they have a coal fired. Power plants really dirty releases CO two they replace it with the wind farm. What's a lot less emissions, right? But each country gets the claim that emissions reduction is the country that paid the money that selling the electricity that paid to put in that wind farm, or is it the one that's buying it that maybe said we've out by cleaner energy. So if you don't really really clear rules on lot you end up with complicated answers to those questions, and you end up double counting, which is really scary because you could end up meeting your mission circuits on paper. But then in fact, emissions won't go down that much and the earth will continue to warm dangerously NPR's, Rebecca hersher in Poland. Thanks, becky. Thank you..

becky Rebecca hersher Poland NPR
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rebecca hersher, NPR news. Police have arrested the operator of the limo company involved in a deadly crash last weekend that killed twenty people. Upstate New York. He's been charged with negligent homicide incident has also bringing new attention to an old problem. The limousine loophole in safety standards. NPR's Camilo domino has more new cars and buses have to meet federal safety standards. But if you take a car cut it in half and stretch it out to the size of a bus. You don't have to prove that it meets either set of standards. Those stretch limousine can be dangerous and crashes because they may lack structural features such as side-impact protections. Sometimes they're short on seatbelts, some limos are safer than others. But Rosemary shea ham. The president of consumers for auto reliability and safety says it shouldn't be up to individuals to find safe limos. No, no, no. You know, it's up to the limousine company. Provide safe transportation, and it's up to state and local governments to enforce that in the absence of federal regulations. Camilo Domino's sqi NPR news major selloff on Wall Street today. The Dow fell eight hundred and thirty one points to twenty five thousand five hundred ninety eight that's a drop of three percent. The NASDAQ was down three hundred and fifteen points. This is NPR from K Q E news. I'm Alex Helmick. Santa Clara county district attorney Jeff Rosen is launching a legal challenge against the state's newly signed law that prohibits fourteen and fifteen year olds from being charged as adults in criminal court. Peter Jon Shuler reports. Rosen contends the law is unconstitutional because it goes against the intention of the voter approved proposition fifty seven that measure allows judges rather than prosecutors to decide whether to try certain juvenile's as Dulce Rosen says the new law takes away that judicial discretion even an especially violent crimes it's too blunt an instrument it's a blank. Kinda one-size-fits-all approach. The juvenile. Justice advocates argue that the new law recognizes that children are different and should be treated differently. Under the law on Peter Jon Shuler, news, UC, Berkeley chancellor, Carol, Chris is denouncing the anti semitic. Flyers found on campus recently. The flyers blamed Jewish people for the sexual allegations against supreme court Justice Brett Kavanagh, they were allegedly authored by a group tied to a Neo Nazi website, Justin Greenwald is a junior at UC Berkeley. And a Senator for the associated students of the university of California. He authored a proposal condemning the flyers to be voted on tonight. What are the things that? I really passionate about is making sure that these antisemitic incidents which has happened in the past at UC Berkeley, don't happen again. And that when they do happen people are made aware of them. So they don't just go onto the cable similar flyers were found at UC Davis on Monday they've.

NPR Peter Jon Shuler Camilo domino Jeff Rosen UC Berkeley Justin Greenwald negligent homicide New York UC Davis Rebecca hersher Dulce Rosen Santa Clara county Rosemary shea Alex Helmick president Brett Kavanagh Berkeley
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Protests are continuing to disrupt. The hearing Scott detro- NPR news. The embattled mayor of Chicago Rahm Emanuel will not seek a third term next year today he told reporters that while it's been the job of lifetime. It's not the job for a lifetime. In recent months. Protesters angry about the city's response to ongoing shootings have been demanding a manuals resignation. The inspector general for the Environmental Protection Agency is disclosing that nearly two million dollars in taxpayer. Money was misspent unwarranted secret service protection. NPR's Rebecca hersher reports. Former EPA administrator Scott Pruitt inappropriately received law enforcement protection twenty four seven the internal watchdog says the twenty four seven protection for it was initially requested by the Trump administration's transition team Pruitt's spokespeople frequently explained that his security detail was a response to threats he received from the public. The administration was supposed to reassess the cost and threats to Pruitt two weeks after he took office in two thousand seventeen. Gene bloom worked on the inspector general's newly released report we found evidence, they cost analysis. But no threat analysis was found the cost of protecting the head of the EPA jumped from one point six million to three point five million in just eleven months while Pruitt was in office, the current EPA administrator does not receive round the clock protection. Rebecca, hersher, NPR news. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Julianne Welby New York City. Speed cameras will be turned on in time for the start of school despite the state Senate failing to reauthorize the program mayor de Blasio signed the legislation this morning, even though this is not the way we would like to see government function. In the end Justice has been served by stroke pen today, we're going to set things right? The city's speed camera program expired in July after the state legislature didn't vote to renew it in a rare moment of unity between the mayor and governor Cuomo. The pair worked together to re up the program with Cuomo signing an executive order reactivating, the cameras and the city council writing legislation. The executive order is only good for thirty days. More than half a million dollars in unpaid fines. That's how much the Kushner family real estate firm has racked up for various, New York City sanitation and building violations. Most of the fines were incurred over the last five years much of them while presidential adviser, Jared Kushner was running the company company officials blamed many of the fines on renters and businesses in its buildings last month, the company was fined two hundred ten thousand dollars for filing construction documents claiming it had no rent stabilized tenants when it actually had hundreds New York City's first lady, Shirley, Anne McRae is. Backing zephyr teach out for state attorney general that's according to the New York Times the endorsement gives teach out one of her highest profile supporters leading up to the competitive democratic primary on September thirteenth. The move is also McRae's latest solo foray into politics. She said she's considering a run for office. Her husband, mayor de Blasio has not yet made an endorsement in the attorney general's race heat advisories in effect until nine o'clock tonight right now, eighty nine degrees in midtown. Support for NPR comes from Fidelity Investments taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow preserve and manage their wealth. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. The -delity brokerage services LLC..

New York City Scott Pruitt Environmental Protection Agenc NPR mayor de Blasio Rebecca hersher Anne McRae Rahm Emanuel administrator governor Cuomo Jared Kushner Scott detro attorney New York Times Chicago Trump administration Julianne Welby executive Senate
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"His study in the coming months Rebecca hersher NPR news This is, NPR news It's eighty. News I'm Tara Siler it's harvest time for, many big California crops. Including almonds and pistachios it's also an uncertain time for these and many other farmers poised to take a hit as a result of the ongoing wrangling between the US and other countries over tariffs that's according to a new study from the agricultural issues, center at UC Davis which looks at what. Higher tariffs could cost US farmers growing ten nut. And fruit crops professor Daniel Sumner is the center's director, and the study's. Co author and professor you looked at crops, like, almonds, and pistachios. Oranges raisins table grapes can you give us some idea of what kind of financial impact these? Industries are facing top. The list is almonds they're our biggest, export crop in California and we a revenue loss of more than one point five. Billion dollars for Armand so that's a big number no matter. How you. Slice it the statues Is, also through four hundred million in walnuts about three hundred million. So this would. Be close to twenty percent of Amun revenue, maybe more we don't. Know how this crops gonna turn out you know this is agriculture harvest go up and down this looks like a big harvest for a number of these crops with the losses may be larger than I'm giving you but it's twenty percent of revenue, or more that sounds pretty serious for California very serious very serious and can can the crops. Possibly be shifted to other markets are we talking primarily, China here and. Where else well yeah China India Turkey Mexico, China's, the, biggest one. In general but it turns out India's a little bigger FRANZ it's not that somebody's going to? Leave the hardest the. Trees unharvested they're going to harvest the, walnuts they're going to sell them the major loss is that in order to sell. Them in the remaining markets the prices will be lower in. What the Industry would like was would. Be some aid from somebody presumably USDA and the Trump administration has already announced about what twelve billion dollars in federal aid for farmers to to. Soften that's right in the the issue for the growers out, here is. That almost all of that is your marked for. Soybeans or, hogs things that we don't really produce in. Very little of it seems to be destined for these crops so overall we could be talking about more than three billion, dollars losses that doesn't seem to have entered. The calculations back in Washington and, the growers, that you've. Been talking to do they fear there are more tariffs coming? Down the pike will they just don't know I? Won't, use, the, word, fear, 'cause, I I haven't seen that sentiment, vote I will say is there's uncertainty and concern. And uncertainty is a big deal in markets so, it's a real. Concern that we may lose something. Here and that it's hard. To get it back once you lose it and I also it seems that, the crops that you looked at at least Are not crops that can be you know this farmers can't. Diversify these crops this harvest time these announcements really came in the middle of the summer there's nothing you can do about any. Of these crops and even if it was frankly the soybean crop in Iowa It's, in the ground it's. Growing there's. Nothing. You can do about it for this year every grower I know is. Saying get this thing solved just as soon as possible September's better than October and October's better than November's solve it as soon, as you can okay well thank you so much you welcome. Professor, Daniel Sumner is the director of the agricultural issues center at UC Davis he co authored along with tristen Hanan a steady estimating the financial impact of tariffs various nut and fruit industries in the US and I'm Tara Siler. QE news coming up, these spring court nominee Brad Kavanagh meets with some, important red state Democrats..

UC Davis Daniel Sumner Tara Siler professor US California China NPR director Brad Kavanagh Rebecca China India Turkey Mexico USDA India Washington Armand Hanan Trump Iowa
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To sell out America proves the Russians must have something personally politically or financially on. President Trump earlier house speaker Paul Ryan and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell reaffirmed America's. Alliance with NATO and Europe it was a departure from President Trump's. Remarks ahead of the meeting with Putin when Trump called, the Twenty-eight nation European Union a trade. Folk Trump's summit with Putin was held days after special. Counsel Robert Muller indicted twelve Russian military intelligence officers for their roles in the hacking of. Democratic Party, and other government, computer systems in other, news the Environmental Protection Agency is considering limits on the science it uses to make regulations NPR's. Rebecca hersher, reports many, scientists are alarmed by. The proposal air water and chemical regulations are based on scientific studies for example studies. About how, particulates in the air affect. People's lungs or how common chemicals, affect cancer risk many of those studies analyzed confidential medical data information that's used. For research but not released the public now the EPA with support from fossil fuel and chemical industry groups is arguing. That, such, research isn't trustworthy because the, raw data can't be made public the proposed rule. Would exclude such studies from Regulatory consideration many scientists and doctors disagree at a packed public hearing dozens of. People testified. That the rule would undermine the scientific process and would weaken public health, regulations Rebecca hersher, NPR news this is NPR and you're listening to WNYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd the. Former New. York state Senate, leader and his son have been found guilty of bribery. And extortion it's the fourth corruption, conviction, of a. Major state official far this year Karen, DeWitt reports, from Albany dean and Adams scallops had been. Convicted in, two thousand fifteen of crimes that included the elder scales arranging no show jobs were three hundred. Thousand dollars for his son but the conviction was overturned on appeal in the retrial jury for the. Second, time found both Scelo skill ty- on all counts in the second trial dean skeleton took the stand and testified that he did help get his. Son jobs but he said it wasn't an Exchange for political favors in the. End the jury didn't buy his version they instead agreed. With the prosecution that the job payments to Adam actually bribes and a federal judge has temporarily blocked, the government, from transferring. Any migrant children who had been sent to New York until. They can meet. With their attorneys hundreds of kids were sent to foster care agencies in New York after being separated. From their parents at the US Mexico border and must now be reunited, with them but Hassan she, fa- kala of the legal aid society in New York says the government was starting to move the children without telling their attorneys asking for is forty eight hours so, that we have.

President Trump New York Putin NPR Rebecca hersher Senate dean skeleton Environmental Protection Agenc America Mitch McConnell NATO Robert Muller President Democratic Party Europe Paul Ryan European Union
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the US political system Trump's eagerness to sell out America proves the Russians must have something personally politically or financially. On, President, Trump earlier house speaker Paul, Ryan and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell reaffirmed America's. Alliance with NATO and Europe it was a departure from President Trump's remarks ahead of the meeting with Putin when Trump call the twenty Eight-nation European Union a trade fo- Trump's. Summit with Putin was held days after special counsel Robert Muller indicted twelve Russian military intelligence. Officers for, their roles in, the hacking of Democratic, Party and other government computer systems in other news the Environmental Protection Agency is considering limits on. The science, it uses, to make regulations NPR's. Rebecca hersher reports many scientists are alarmed by the proposal air water and chemical regulations are. Based on, scientific studies for example studies about how particulates in the air, affect people's lungs or how common chemicals affect cancer risk many of those studies. Analyzed confidential medical data information that's used for research but not released the public now the EPA with support from fossil. Fuel, and, chemical industry groups is arguing, that such research isn't trustworthy because the raw data. Can't be made public the proposed rule would exclude such studies from regulatory consideration many scientists and doctors disagree At a packed public hearing dozens of people testified that the role. Would undermine the scientific process and would weaken public health regulations Rebecca hersher, NPR news this, is NPR from k. q. e. d. news I'm Tiffany Cam high San Francisco's.

President Trump Trump NPR Putin Rebecca hersher Environmental Protection Agenc America Mitch McConnell US President Senate Robert Muller NATO European Union
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bruce for every new parking lot or wider road communities should also build things like storm water retention ponds and larger storm drains but many places big and small have not kept up with both development and climate change a big example houston is scrambling to expand reservoirs and reinforced by us after hurricane harvey on a smaller scale something similar is playing out in places like ellicott city why does this call so they measure this at eighty four inches kevin blume shows me a pipe across the street from his business it was built decades ago to contain a stream that used to run alongside his family home where his grandmother was born making this bigger is one of a handful flood control measures the county is considering bloom thinks that's not enough the approach to change some homes may not be where they currently are because they need to give it back to the stream that includes his family's home it's becoming clearer and clearer to him that if the floods are here to stay the house will have to go rebecca hersher npr news you're listening to all things considered from npr news and julie deppish continues to keep an eye on the bay area traffic situation we do have trouble coming off the upper deck the bay bridge the harrison street off ramp is shut down by fire crews they deal with that car the hit the guardrail do you have a stall in pleasanton westbound five eighty before foothill partially blocking the left lane it is sluggish back to santa rita road and heads up coming off the dumbarton bridge eastbound eighty four before dakota they're dealing with a three vehicle wreck senator vibe at pretty slammed back to art would julie deppish for kiki we brought to you by unbound.

senator santa rita pleasanton julie deppish npr bloom kevin blume Bruce water retention dakota dumbarton bridge ellicott city harvey houston eighty four inches
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered from npr news mary louise kelley and i'm audie cornish scientists are one step closer to understanding how modern birds evolved to have beaks npr's rebecca hersher reports on a new study that goes back millions of years to a bird like dinosaur from kansas birds are direct descendants of dinosaurs but researchers still don't know exactly how we got from velociraptor to a seagull barred engine buller is a paleontologist at yale who's focused on one crucial part of that evolution the head the first thing i think one would notice is that birds have a beak the other thing they have is an enormously enlarged brain dinosaurs don't have any of that it's a big step between a tooth snout and a beak the heads of dinosaurs like floss raptor the jaws were filled with large teeth and they'd large muscles and powerful bite to figure out how snouts turned into peaks and little dino brains grew into big bird brains fuller studies the ancient creatures that were narrowly halfway between velociraptor and birds one of them is a creature that lived in kansas about one hundred million years ago called nick it looks like a really aggressive seagull like a perfect mash up between a bird and dinosaur it sits at a really pivotal kind of position in the lucien of birds it had a beak with teeth in it but the overall shape of the arneses skull was less clear because the fossils available where from the eighteen seventies and weren't that complete which is why bowler was really excited in two thousand fourteen when he got his hands on a newly discovered the ernest fossil embedded in a slab of rock he did a cat scan of the whole rock and ended up with a high resolution three d image to things jumped out about what he saw in the new fossil i the bone configuration would have allowed the animal to pinch with its peak the way parrots and other birds grasp nuts very carefully it's the earliest example of that pinching ability and it appears to support a very cool idea perhaps the bird beak is basically a surrogate hand think of it this way as the clause of raptors evolved into the wings of birds their faces compensated by gaining dexterity the team also found ichthyologist is brain was large like a modern bird but surprisingly the jaw was muscular linka dinosaur until now scientists had assumed that no animal would have both.

louise kelley kansas yale nick npr rebecca hersher one hundred million years
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eat and scientists believe that daily migration might be mixing up the water let's hear about this new research from npr's rebecca hersher i'm not talking about like goldfish or something these animals are less than a centimeter long things like krill and little types of shrimp so the idea that as their swimming along somehow there swimming generates enough energy to turn the oceans it's a little hard to believe so hard that most ocean agra fers who study what makes up the ocean think it's silly the general consensus today would be the animals have nothing to do with ocean nixon john berry is notably not an oceanographer he is an engineer at stanford and he noticed that oceanographers were assuming something about these little creatures about ten years ago there were even papers they can publish saying that it was physically impossible for these tiny organisms to have an effect but all of those papers may be assumption that the flow they create would only be as large as the individual animals small swimmers we've small wakes basically but he thought what happens when they gather in big groups might they be more powerful so they tested it to berry put a bunch of tiny shrimp in an eight foot tall tank and used light to attract them upwards in a big group mimicking the daily migration that happens with ocean creatures as these animals starts swimming upward each of them kicks a little bit of fluid backwards think of newton's law for every action there's an equal and opposite reaction shrimp kicks upward water goes down another shrimp kicks and another and another and then pretty soon you have this vertical stampede upward of the shrimp and you're getting rush downward a distance much larger than the individual animals to kick the water they found the jet of water behind the swarm of shrimp is pretty powerful slower than rip current but faster than the mixing caused by things like wind that's surprising even more surprising all these little creatures maybe affecting our lives to oceans soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere carbon dioxide that would otherwise cause the planet to warm even more and the turning from those little animals might play an important role in that process rebecca hersher npr news.

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"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Surface to eat and scientists believe that daily migration might be mixing up the water let's hear about this new research from npr's rebecca hersher i'm not talking about like goldfish or something these animals are less than a centimeter long things like krill and little types of shrimp so the idea that as their swimming along somehow there swimming generates enough energy to turn the oceans it's a little hard to believe so hard that most ocean agra fers who study what mixes up the ocean think it's silly the general consensus today would be that animals have nothing to do with ocean nixon john carey is notably not an oceanographer he is an engineer at stanford and he noticed that oceanographers were assuming something about these little creatures about ten years ago there were even papers being published saying that it was physically impossible for these tiny organisms to have an effect but all of those papers may be assumption that the flow they create with only be as large as the individual animals small swimmers we've small weeks basically but he thought what happens when they gather in big groups might they be more powerful so they tested it to berry put a bunch of tiny shrimp in an eight foot tall tank and used light to attract them upwards in a big group mimicking the daily migration that happens with ocean creatures as these animals starts swimming upward each then kicks a little bit of fluid backwards think of newton's law for every action there's an equal and opposite reaction shrimp kicks upward water goes down another shrimp kicks and another and another and then pretty soon you have this vertical stampede upward of the shrimp and you're getting rush downward a distance much larger than the individual animals to kick the water they found the jet of water swarm of shrimp is pretty powerful slower than a rip current but faster than the mixing caused by things like wind that's surprising even more surprising all these little creatures maybe affecting our lives to oceans soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere carbon dioxide that would otherwise cause the planet to warm even more and the churning from those little animals might play an important role in that process rebecca hersher npr news.

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"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are the only insect that produces food we can eat and colonies are disappearing at an alarming rate the trouble with beans next time on one eight one a tonight at eleven this is all things considered from npr news i'm ari shapiro elsa chang a new study of brown bears in sweden has found a surprising trend mother bears are spending longer with their cubs than they used to as npr's rebecca hersher reports hunting policies have a lot to do with the change brown bears are large dangerous and shy so the best way to study them is to tag them we can recognize them because they wear gps caller and tax so it's possible to link what's happened to a bearishness orleans live in them what happened play during his life fanny peltier studies predators at sherbrooke university in quebec we talked over skype she's been studying bear motherhood for years right around this time of year mother bears emerged from their dens with their cubs this is when the real child rearing begins and how long it takes depends be careful there either one and a half year old enough year so there's very few all along if he mailed will stay with records but fanny analyzed decades of data and found more and more bear mothers are choosing to spend that extra year would their young a thirty percent increase since two thousand five the reason so female n poems they are protected from hunting sweden where the data she analyzed came from is one of many places where it's illegal to shoot a bear with cubs you might think mothers are sticking around to protect their kids but it's actually the other way around if you leave your cubs at one year and a half then you become by target white if you stay for a bit longer with your costs then a your predicted an extreme here so there's a cure benefits of being longer infamy groups this isn't the first time a hunting policy has had unintended consequences for animals preferentially harvesting larger fish has led some species to mature at smaller sizes rams hunted for their large horns eventually develop smaller ones peltier says changes like that are a reminder that hunting roles can have profound effects on the animals left behind rebecca hersher npr news.

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"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is also behind bars so this is it's really just a deep regional problem and it's really fascinating the way a single case single huge case is really now shining lights on these dark corners around the region are we at a pivotal moment for latin america when you see all these different cases of corruption is not that there's more corruption but that the scrutiny is greater and the tolerance for that corruption is much less than previously we have increasingly aggressive independent media around the region there is a growing middle class or more educated and also i think it's worth remembering that many latin american countries only transition back to democracy two or three decades ago and so their institutions including the judiciary and prosecutors are still only really mature during now from that transition siemian table is a freelance reporter based in lima thank you very much elsa a new study of brown bears in sweden has found a surprising trend mother bears are spending longer with their cubs than they used to as npr's rebecca hersher reports hunting policies have a lot to do with the change brown bears are large dangerous and shy so the best way to study them is to tag them we can recognize them because they wear gps caller and tags so it's possible to link what happened to a bear orlenas live in them what happened with play during his life fanny poetry studies predators at sherbrooke university in quebec we talked over skype she's been studying bear motherhood for years right around this time of year mother bears emerged from their dens with their cubs this is when the real child rearing begins and how long it takes depends be careful there either one and a half year two and year so there's very few along if he male will stay with regards but fanny analyzed decades of data and found more and more bear mothers are choosing to spend that extra year with their young a thirty percent increase since two thousand five the reason so female 'em coupes they are protected from hunting sweden where the data she analyzed came from is one of many places where it's illegal to shoot a bear with cubs you might think mothers are sticking around to protect their kids but it's actually.

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