35 Burst results for "Rebecca Herscher"

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes to Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:47 min | 8 months ago

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes to Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

"Climate. Change is driving more severe flooding across the country. The latest example being from the northeast united states but an npr investigation finds the top. Federal housing agency is selling flood-prone holmes to families without fully disclosing the risk at the same time the federal government is spending millions of dollars to move people out a flood zones rebecca hersher from. Npr's climate team is here rebecca. We're talking about the. Us department of housing and urban development hud. What did your investigation find. Well how'd is mainly known for subsidized rental housing but also sells homes and we found that thousands of those homes around the country are located in flood zones and the people who buy them generally. Don't get any information about flood risk until after they've decided to buy and that raises a lot of questions about how hood is dealing with climate change. Climate change is caused residential flood damage in the. Us to skyrocket. Hud's mission is to provide safe affordable housing so hud says it's important to sell these homes for low prices in make sure they don't sit vacant but many of the housing experts we spoke with said it's very concerning that it'd be selling homes that are prone to flooding and basically allowing families to move into harm's way. Where are these homes located. You said they were all around the us any particular hot spots. Yes so i should say. These are houses that were foreclosed on by banks and then handed over to hud to be sold an. Npr analyzed data from twenty seventeen to twenty twenty. It's nearly one hundred thousand homes that hud sold and in that time. Hud sold flood-prone houses in almost every state but there were hot spots as you said so louisiana florida and new jersey all stuck out a larger proportion of the homes that hud sold in those states. Were in flood zones.

Federal Housing Agency Rebecca Hersher NPR Us Department Of Housing And U HUD Holmes Federal Government Rebecca United States Louisiana New Jersey Florida
Is Hurricane Ida the Result of Climate Change?

Consider This from NPR

01:54 min | 9 months ago

Is Hurricane Ida the Result of Climate Change?

"You might remember a few weeks back. We told you about a landmark report from the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change. It warned that human caused climate change is accelerating and that we're running out of time to avoid its most catastrophic effects and that extreme weather events are more likely as a result right now hurricane can ida is making its dangerous trek towards a us gulf coast hurricane ida is exactly the kind of event that scientists were talking about on saturday evening. Ida was a modest category two storm with one hundred and five mph winds but it's poise to rapidly intensify and that's what it did just as forecasters predicted so hurricane ida has strengthened to a category three storm with winds of one hundred fifteen miles an hour trump saturday night maximum sustained winds of one hundred thirty miles per hour into sunday morning. It's now up to one hundred forty five miles per hour side. A gut stronger by the hour is storm has strengthened yet again. The last time we spoke sustained winds were one forty five. They're now up to one fifty. I wanted to all of this at the storm up to be at. Its most powerful. Just as it made landfall over louisiana bring as much as twenty inches of rain in some areas with the potential for destructive storm surge yesterday so how did i to get so powerful so fast so climate change is basically supercharging storm. That's rebecca hersher correspondent for. Npr's climate team. We spoke on monday. Climate change does is. It adds fuel to hurricane fuel in the form of heat so hurricanes over water you can think of them like engines spinning up like a propeller on a plane and the energy for that propeller comes from the heat in the water as the earth gets hotter because of climate change the water on the surface of the ocean. It also guitar. So there's more energy for storms like ida to get really big and really

Hurricane Ida Us Gulf Coast UN Hurricane Rebecca Hersher Louisiana NPR
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on Short Wave

"Becky. The main thing. I took away from the big. Un climate report last week was that climate change is accelerating which is really scary. Because it makes it feel like we're running out of time to control the speed and severity of global warming. Yeah totally and we can put some terrifying numbers behind that scary feeling right so the earth is already almost two degrees. Fahrenheit hotter than it wasn't late eighteen hundreds The rate of warming since nineteen seventy is the fastest in two thousand years. The same goes for sea level rise. It's accelerated since the nineteen seventies ex but the science also makes it clear that it is not too late to control global warming. So we're living through a really exciting moment because everything that humans do now when it comes to climate change will have impacts for the rest of our lives. But why is that like. Why should this moment feel exciting. Instead of dreadful to be clear it can feel both ways like a good climate therapist. Okay go on yes. But here's the case for why it's exciting so the earth is on track for catastrophic warming right now so if humans don't cut greenhouse gases quickly we could see five six even seven feet of sea level rise on average by the end of the century but the flip side of that is that if humans do basically stop burning oil and gas and coal this decade next decade. Then that doesn't happen and yeah that's going to be really really hard. But under that scenario sea levels rise a lot more slowly and they max out at maybe a foot which is a huge difference. Right if we're thinking about kids who are in elementary school right now. In coastal cities all around the world. We'd be saving them from life changing sea level rise this same goes for other impacts from climate change. You know if adults alive today can manage to virtually stop burning fossil fuels in the next twenty years or so. Life looks a lot less polluted a lot less dangerous for kids. Who are alive today.

becky Becky hersher Becky rebecca hersher emily
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on Up First

Up First

05:14 min | 10 months ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on Up First

"When it it comes to extreme weather. This summer has been a disaster heat waves. Floods and other extreme weather events are killing people around the world and looking ahead. the forecast. For more extreme droughts wildfires in hurricanes are all pretty bad the culprit of course is climate. Change here to talk more. About how global warming is driving. This dangerous weather is rebecca hersher from. Npr's climate team. Good morning rebecca. Good morning so let's start with a heat. Heat wave in june set new records in many parts of the. Us another is on the way. Of course it is summer. You sign up for this time of year. But how unusual is what we're experiencing right now. Yeah last month was the hottest june ever recorded in the us for more than the century. And that's about four degrees hotter on average and we really saw extreme heat waves. Come through like in the pacific northwest. More than one hundred people died. In that event there have also been new heat records in europe middle east and the arctic and scientists say a lot of those broken records would be extremely unlikely without climate change at the same time. We're seeing extreme drought in the western. Us and overseas in places like northern and southern africa that leads of course to wildfires house. Climate change making those things worse. Well you know it all goes back to that heat so the heat dries out the land and the vegetation exacerbates drought and then when wildfires do come through. They burn hotter. They move more quickly. And one of the most worrisome places where fires are burning and this is for the third year in the row is siberia. And that's a big concern because the soils. They're they're either pete or permafrost. They are rich in organic matter when fires hit them. It releases even more carbon into the atmosphere okay. So that's heat and drought on the other end of things. There have been more. Flash floods were what arises and overtakes areas really quickly. It's happening in a lot of places. Yeah fast-moving water is really dangerous. And hundreds of people have been killed just in the last few weeks so central. China got about a year's worth of rain in less than a day. People are talking. In the subway cars really horrifying images from their germany and belgium's are rainstorms. That turned entire towns into rivers. Swept away homes. In mumbai india rain triggered landslides that buried neighborhoods and here in the us. There were dramatic flash floods in arizona after a heavy rain. so that's all really deadly. But at a scientific level these water disasters are not surprising. Scientists have issued warnings about this exact thing for years rebecca. What's a mechanism here. I mean how exactly does a hotter earth lead to more flash flooding right so basically hot air plus hot water means tons of moisture in the air so you can think of it like a sopping wet sponge and when that waterfalls in a short amount of time. That's when you get this extreme rain. So for example scientists say that during the floods this month in europe the warm air was as saturated as the air during a hurricane europe. It just isn't built to handle hurricane levels of rain and there's also a potential wind connection so as the earth heats up some climate models show that the winds in the upper atmosphere. Slow down in some places and those wins they carry our weather systems like boots in a stream so when the wind slows down the weather lingers and if that whether it was a rainstorm means longer rains you know and it's important to say the these questions are the cutting edge of climate science. This is what scientists are working on right now is answering these questions. Lots of questions. Rebecca hersher. Npr climate team. Thanks so much so much.

rebecca hersher rebecca Npr pacific northwest europe us arctic siberia middle east pete africa belgium mumbai germany China arizona india Rebecca hersher
Biden Reinstates Obama-Era Federal Flood Protection Standard

NPR News Now

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Biden Reinstates Obama-Era Federal Flood Protection Standard

"Reinstating building standards meant to protect against floods. Npr's rebecca hersher reports the standards had been repealed by the trump administration. President biden included the building standards and one of the executive orders. He signed shortly after he took office. The standards were originally put in place by the obama administration but we're rescinded by the trump administration in two thousand seventeen the standards apply to federally funded buildings including government buildings hospitals public housing and water treatment plants. The must be constructed in ways that protect against floods for example by elevating the first floor off the ground flooding is getting more frequent and severe in many parts of the us because of climate change. The standard is meant to protect against both sea level rise and extreme rainstorms rebecca hersher npr news pharmaceutical

Rebecca Hersher Trump Administration President Biden Obama Administration NPR United States
NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

Environment: NPR

03:28 min | 1 year ago

NASA Satellite To Measure Global Sea Level Rise

"The oceans are rising globally. The average sea level is more than eight inches higher now than it was an eighteen eighty in the trend is accelerating. npr's rebecca hersher has the story about a new satellite. That could help. Scientists understand how climate change is changing our seas. Here's her story. If you live near the coast you've probably seen. Booties and other contraptions edge that measure. What's going on in the ocean including how high the water is but when it comes to understanding global climate change. There is no substitute for satellite data from space. You can see the whole thing. Josh willis is a scientist at nasa. He's leading the us team. That's launching a new satellite called sentinel six in collaboration with the european space agency. Sentinel six zip around the globe. Eight hundred miles up and look at the surface of all the oceans. It's really kind of an incredible feat of technology. We can actually measure the water level with an accuracy of about one inch from eight hundred miles up. Centeno six uses radar to make continuous measurements. A radar beam comes down out of the satellite it bounces off that surface and then it measures the signal coming back and by figuring how long it takes to go down and come back. You can tell how far away the water is. If you know how far away the water is you can figure out how high it is relative to the land sentinel. Six is the latest in a string of satellites that do this kind of measurement going back to the nineties but those missions were somewhat ad and scientists couldn't always be sure that there would be an exhibition mission when the current one ended. Which is a nightmare when you're trying to understand how the climate is changing overtime. Which is why they are really excited. This time the satellite will be up there for five years and then another identical satellite will launch to another five years so a decade of reliable data llewellyn thompson studies oceans at the university of washington. I use that data every day in my research thompson has been studying how. The oceans have been changing for decades. She says obviously sea level rise is tangibly important to people who live on the coasts but ocean changes affect everyone. What happens in the ocean doesn't stay there. For example currents and ocean temperatures affect weather in fish populations we can also use to sea level measurements. Understand how currents are changing how ocean story heat and hotter oceans can drive more powerful hurricanes and scientists use steel data from satellites to figure out exactly how hot the oceans are getting too because water gets bigger as it gets hotter so by knowing the sea level. We have an indication of how much the ocean has expanded. Because of warning josh willis of nasa says the sentinel six satellite is crucial because climate change is happening fast in the past scientists had to make do with less data about the oceans but now the earth rapidly warming climate scientists need as much information as possible about what's happening around the globe. Sea level is continuing to rise. And we can't stop measuring it. Every year every decade we're remaking the climate and raising sea levels higher and higher sentinel is scheduled to launch a november twenty first from california rebecca. Hersher npr news.

Rebecca Hersher Josh Willis Centeno European Space Agency NPR Llewellyn Thompson Nasa Sentinel University Of Washington Thompson United States The Sentinel California
What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

Environment: NPR

03:52 min | 1 year ago

What Will 2021 Hold For U.S. Climate Diplomacy?

"What does the president's decision to leave? The Paris Agreement meant for Climate Science Rebecca Hersher is with NPR's clients. I'm science team, good morning becky good morning. So, we have this agreement that the US has now out of but two hundred other countries are still in it. How is humanity broadly doing on carbon emissions? Well humidity broadly is not doing great when you look at the hard numbers that scientists look at, it's bad. Global emissions are still going up, which is a nightmare if you studied global warming because the earth is already about two degrees Fahrenheit hotter than it was last century. So humans are on track for catastrophic warming in the next few decades. Okay how is the US specifically doing? Well to answer that I want to go back a little bit. So if you add up all the co two in other carbon that countries have spouted since industrialization, the US has omitted the most and I, think that's really important because the US emissions have been going down slightly for a while now but they've never fallen really dramatically and that's different from European countries, which also omitted a lot of carbon historically but had slashed their missions in the last few decades. So there's another piece of context here. That is really important, which is that president trump announced three and a half years ago that he was going to pull the US out of this agreement. Today. November, it'll be official but in the meantime in those three and a half years have his administration's policies led to more climate emissions. It's a good question. It's hard to be definitive, but here's what scientists say it probably made a difference. So the US promised under the Paris agreement to reduce emissions by about twenty-five percent by twenty twenty-five most analysts say that if the policies of the Obama administration is like limits from on emissions from cars and trucks and power plants if those it continued for the last four years, the country would likely be on track for that goal. Instead, the US seems to be looking at more like a sixteen or seventeen percent decrease in emissions, which is not insignificant. How is the US on track to reduce emissions by sixteen seventeen percent if the federal government and its policies are working in the opposite direction? Right, I think that's a really interesting question. So one thing is that the global economy is changing. Renewable Energy is getting cheaper. The market for electric vehicles is growing so that cut some emissions right off the bat and more than half of US state say they're trying to meet the twenty twenty, five percent goal that the US originally set under the Paris Agreement and especially in the last year, there's been a huge movement by corporations promising to decarbonised their operations and that's become a really big question in the science community where they're trying to model future warming. And asking this interesting question, which is what will be the main driver of emissions reductions in the next ten years will it actually be national policies? The things we tend to focus on the Paris Agreement or will it be corporate policies state policies even city policies? Oh I bet the engine, the answers to that will be interesting and let me ask you Leslie say Joe Biden Does Win the election could he put the US back in the Paris climate agreement? Yes yes. So As we said we'll be formerly out the day after the election president trump wins a second term. The US will remain out of the agreement US missions will fall slowly if. He said he will reenter. He can do that. As soon as he takes office. If he wins, the big thing would be trying to work with Congress to pass new renewable energy and transportation policies, and that would have to happen pretty quickly to avoid the most catastrophic warming. Rebecca Hersher with NPR's climate team. Thanks becky. Thanks so

United States Paris President Trump Rebecca Hersher NPR Donald Trump Becky Congress Federal Government Joe Biden Official Twenty Twenty Obama Administration Leslie
What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

Environment: NPR

06:03 min | 1 year ago

What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

"The Gulf coast faces catastrophic flooding after yet another hurricane this when Sally London to shore. Early this morning meanwhile, record setting fires have been burning in the West for weeks. These climate fueled disasters are not only dangerous. They're costly billions of dollars have been lost so far. This year NPR's climate team has been looking into what that means for the economy and for families nate. Rot is an Oregon and Rebecca Hersher is just back from the Gulf Coast Natan Rebecca. Hello to both of you hither. And Becky, let's put this first question to you. We know that climate change makes a year like this one more likely to occur. That's because hotter temperatures helped drive bigger more damaging wildfires and hurricanes. But what do we know about the economic toll that takes? Well, you know unfortunately, this isn't the first year that the US has had this kind of back to back situation with fires and storms, and that's kind of thing as you said, global warming helps fuel and the federal government and actually tracks the status. So we have some idea of how expensive. These things are and the cost is just huge. So in the last five years, the US has experienced more than five hundred billion with a B., dollars in losses directly from climate fueled weather disasters, and that's not including twenty twenty s disasters that will likely be in the tens of billions five, hundred, billion dollars in the last five years enormous amount of money nate outside Eugene Oregon near one of the major fires burning give us some sense of what those fires mean for the local economy there. Well, they've just been devastating businesses here in Eugene. Up. and down the state that it had to close just because of the smoke and a lot of these businesses were already just hanging on by a thread because of the pandemic then you've got the direct damages from the fires lost homes timber buildings lost infrastructure I talked to a telecom worker the other day at the incident command post with a firearm near, and he had just gotten back from being in the burnt area His name is Rob Robertson and he described the scene where like a ghost forest he said they lost something. Like sixty miles worth at telephone poles, it had been built and he says each of those poll costs about ten thousand dollars we're looking at you know multimillions worth of infrastructure to replace I. Mean it's just there's so much infrastructure out there that that's been destroyed now, and that's just in one valley from one fire in a state that's got fires in. You know basically from north to south and Robinson was frustrated because he said, he felt like there were things that we could do right now decrease risked infrastructure, but we haven't because it costs money. On that point when it comes to wildfires, for example, what can be done to decrease their long-term costs. So it's going to take a big change in the status quo right now, we spend billions of dollars just about every year fighting fires, you know trying to put him out and fire colleges, land managers even firefighters will tell you that money would be way better spent on the front end. Here's Sara ultimate pope, a former smoke jumper who now runs a force collaborative in southern Oregon we do have a lot of work that we need to do on our forest to get them back to. A more healthy state where they're going to be resilient in the face of climate change and resilient to disturbance, and to do that, we're going to have to invest in them. So she says, we're going to need more prescribed fire thinning more management of these places, and that is going to cost a lot of money. You know billions of dollars. So that's wildfires. Then there's hurricanes and Rebecca as we mentioned, you just got back from the Gulf Hurricane Sally is dumping rain on the Gulf Coast and Hurricane Laura destroyed towns along the Louisiana Texas border. Late last month gives sense about the hurricane cost. Well. You know hurricanes are consistently the most expensive disasters that we see especially hurricanes that caused a lot of flooding like sally and that's really bad news because that's exactly the kind of storm that's more common as the earth gets hotter this year has been really bad. There have already been ten climate driven disasters that cost more than a billion dollars each that was as of July. One thing to remember is that where people live really matters you know the number of homes in flood prone areas, it's skyrocketed in las three decades. So the seam disaster today is going to cause more damage hurt more homes than if it had happened previously. So zoning laws building codes, they are really important and climbing experts say that there are economic benefits to be had if we build in more resilient ways. Rebecca innate. We've been talking about the overall economic costs of climate fueled disasters, but let's go to a more personal level. How does this affect families and what do we know about how surviving a fire or flood affects people financially Well. The effects are really dramatic for a lot of people especially poor people if you don't have savings to fall back on or gave can't afford adequate insurance, a disaster can totally derail a family's finances for decades people whose home is their only source of wealth. For example, they're more likely to end up renting even years later, bankruptcy is more likely there. are other costs to like for example, research suggests that young people who survive a hurricane, they're less likely to enter college. It takes longer to graduate if they do go and survivors also have long term mental and physical health problems often, and that can interfere with work that obviously hits income or create new costs of their own. These are extreme weather disasters. We've been focusing on, but what about the financial hit from less dramatic or less immediately noticeable climate impacts like the gradual rise of temperatures. So yeah, I mean rising temperatures and heat waves hurt agriculture health certainly electrical bills. You know you have warmer waters affecting fisheries and then there's just the down the road impacts ecological decline you know are in extinction crisis. Right. Now that climate change is only going to make worse and we depend on ecosystems for everything from clean water and air or two places to go where we can just escape from it all and I don't really know how you put a price tag on something like that. That's NPR's climate team nate rot and Rebecca. Hersher. Thank you both of you. So. Much. To be here.

Natan Rebecca Gulf Coast Eugene Oregon Oregon NPR Sally London Nate Rot Rebecca Hersher United States Hurricane Sally Federal Government Becky Rob Robertson Hurricane Laura Robinson Sara
Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 1 year ago

Major Real Estate Website Now Shows Flood Risk

"D. Y. E. N., dot com slash NPR to learn more many people who lose their homes wildfires or in hurricanes did not know they were in harm's way. You can understand that this might happen. You know that the houses near the words or near the. Coast, but you don't quite realize the risk don't quite realize the extent of the danger. One major real estate site is now showing a homes flood risk along with photos of the kitchen and living room so that people will know this is one way that climate change has become a more direct part of home-buying. A long-term decision that a lot of people make our reporting from NPR's climate team starts with NPR's Rebecca Hersher. It's obvious to a lot of Americans that climate change means more flooding more than a thousand homes and businesses are flooded in the Jackson Mississippi Southern Louisiana Sixty thousand homes north. West of Omaha is still dealing with the math more than four hundred homeowners. Even, though government flood maps have been around since the seventies, there was no mention of flooding on real estate websites until today Leslie Jordan is a vice president of the website realtor dot com, which lists more than one hundred, ten, million homes. Flooding is the most common costly natural disaster in the US. So realtor DOT COM has added flood information to every listing Jordan says that's thanks in part to a new privately funded fled information project called flood factor. Matt E B. is one of the CO founders of. Flood factor which rates houses on a scale from one to ten. So if it's very likely a very deep flood, you'll get a flood factor of ten for that property. If it's very unlikely, then it'll be a flood factor one, the ratings take into account climate change particularly sea level rise and more extreme rain ev says that kind of Info has actually been out there for years. It's just that regular people haven't had access to it. A. Democratization of this information is the way that we like to think about. It because there are people who already have this information and they're already acting on it people like mortgage insurance companies and large real estate developers, some of which have fought against public flood disclosure laws. So are other real estate sites also going to add this information. Can you say We are hopeful and happy to engage in those conversations with folks and that less than specific answer made my colleague Pr's Climate Team Lauren summer wonder what is going on with the other real estate websites so she called them i. I I asked Zillow if they're thinking about publishing flood, risk their number of challenges with that, and it's something that I think sooner or later would be a great feature to include Jeff. Tucker is an economist at Zillow who has studied how the homes they help sell art risk from climate change hundreds of billions of dollars just tremendous amount of real estate at risk primarily from coastal flooding for instance, Tucker. Says the company has had internal discussions about including flood risk, but they expect pushback from some users the current. May Be very unhappy to have that kind of information surfaced. If they're interested in selling their home, I heard the same thing from Taylor Mar lead economist at red. Fin. Could this actually reduce the value of this existing homeowner and essentially take away a lot of their net worth Marceau's on the buyer side Redfin survey show that three quarters of them. WanNa know about natural disasters before making an offer but he says that Info can't. Crowd out other fell on the website. If we made the whole front page just about flood risk, they might not be as easily able to navigate how long the commute is. For example, Maher says they're looking at testing including flood

NPR Dot Com Zillow Leslie Jordan Marceau United States Tucker Jackson Mississippi Southern L D. Y. E. N. Omaha Matt E B. Rebecca Hersher Vice President Maher Redfin WAN Jeff
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Would not be doing that inspectors confirm shall serve a seven year term Rebecca Hersher NPR news this is NPR news it is seven forty two this is KCRW news I met Gillam overnight firefighters have been battling a fast moving wildfire near the one to one in San Luis Obispo officials issued an evacuation warning for some areas near Pismo beach we've seen fires break out in Santa Clarita along the four oh five freeway near Bel Air and in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in recent days none of that is unusual for a southern California summer but there's never been a fire season here in the midst of a global pandemic so how does cal fire fight wildfires while social distancing when you get back to the base camps are we may be looking at a spreading people out so that people are standing as close together in line waiting for getting their meals for example were standing in a room or an outdoor space I'm listening to the morning briefings we're just going to see people spread out more than we have in the past David shoe is a retired cal fire officials he told KCRW's press play that one upside is the pandemic has left a lot of vacant rooms because of the limited amount of traveling that's being done there also just happens to be lots of hotel rooms available so we may be working hand in hand with them to look at putting people in hotel rooms but all of this is straining state and local resources governor Gavin Newsom is already projected a fifty four billion dollar budget shortfall this year and he says cuts to some programs that help prevent wildfires could be on the way it's seven forty four that case your W. the Los Angeles Police.

Gillam Pismo beach Santa Clarita Bel Air KCRW Gavin Newsom Los Angeles Police Rebecca Hersher NPR San Luis Obispo Santa Barbara Ventura California David
As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 2 years ago

As EPA Steps Back, States Face Wave Of Requests For Environmental Leniency

"Hundreds of factories, refineries, farms and mines across the country say they cannot comply with environmental regulations because of the pandemic. This is according to an NPR review of hundreds of state environmental records. Those records show that companies have asked for a wide range of special permission during this pandemic including things like delaying checking for leaks in storage tanks and measuring pollution from smokestacks and pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher is here to talk about this, Becky, hi, there. Okay, so industry is saying there's a pandemic. We need some special allowances here. What exactly are we talking about? Well, it's a real drag. Some of the issues are relatively minor like submitting an annual report late, but I also found a fair number of substantial requests, mostly from industries that release a lot of pollution like landfills have been asking states to relax pollution monitoring rules hog farms have asked for permission to house extra animals, because meatpacking plants per temporary closed and oil and gas companies ask for states back off and enforcement of a wide range of environmental regulations. I mean, be understand why an oil or gas company has trouble being able to check for pollution because of a pandemic. Well there are a couple of reasons. Navy furloughs get in the way like if employees who usually right in filed pollution appurtenant working because of the pandemic, another reason the companies gave is that a lot of pollution monitoring is done by outside contractors and they were trying to limit people coming onto facilities because of the virus. We know these details, though because a small number of states make them public, but another problem here is that no one is systematically keeping track of these types of nationwide requests. no-one keeps an eye on. Who On these industries and with? They're asking for right now. Why is that? Well in March? The Environmental Protection Agency the EPA put out a pandemic policy that said companies don't need to warn federal regulators if they feel like the pandemic interfering with routine pollution, monitoring or testing instead, they said states could keep track of that information if they choose to. The EPA says, this is out, works it partners with states, and that is how a lot of environmental regulation. Regulation works although former EPA officials say this policy gives industries a lot of leeway now some states are doing this kind of tracking, but I've found that most kids don't publish any information about which companies say. The pandemic is getting in the way, and that means most Americans who live near factories refineries farms. They have no way to know whether the pandemic is causing extra pollution. I mean that kind of uncertainty is is a big problem for for people who live near these sorts of facilities I would imagine. Especially for people who live downstream or down wind of facilities that have have violated environmental laws in the past on a found a fair number of examples like this, so for example there's a minor Indiana in early April, the mine said it was releasing wastewater with high levels of ammonia and small particles, because they were cleaning buildings with a lot of bleach to kill the virus that same mino ins repeatedly violated the clean water act passed by releasing water with two small particles in it and I talked to a local resident who lives downstream. He was really frustrated. John Blair. The air pollution is visible. The water pollution is less visible and you know I mean almost anything could be blamed on the virus I suppose. Now. The state told the mind to stop releasing water with titles, Manja and many of the requests I looked at were denied, but the only reason we know about that interaction is because Indiana published a publicly in most states are not doing which means most Americans are in the dark. Pure science reporter Rebecca Hersher. Becky thanks for that reporting. Thanks so

EPA Rebecca Hersher Becky Reporter Indiana Environmental Protection Agenc NPR Navy Manja John Blair
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Cities across the country Baltimore has been full of protests all week and they've been peaceful while thousands of people are marching in the city mourning the death of George Floyd in protest and police long time activists are using the moment to pass on the lessons they learned in two thousand fifteen when violent anti police demonstrations rocked the city NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports both residents have merged at least half a dozen times in the last week the biggest demonstration was on Monday night thousands of people close part of a major highway downtown calling on the city to spend more money on education and health and less money on the police department artist and educator Aaron Maybin helped advise the teenagers who organized a peaceful protest not only a testament restrict rocket if the test the strength of our community that decided that we weren't going to have to repeat a repeat of twenty fifteen that year a twenty five year old named Freddie gray died in police custody years of police violence and intimidation in majority African American neighborhoods boiled over and people took to the streets some people damaged property the police reacted with widespread arrests Kwame rose was one of the people who marched in twenty fifteen I became kind of known as the face of protest in Baltimore Rosa spent this week not sleeping trying to prevent the kind of unplanned violence and arrests that happened five years ago I don't want young people going to jail there's too many black people in jail as it is especially during a pandemic to be clear rose supports the protests happening across the country violent and otherwise for one thing he says mass demonstrations work after twenty fifteen the federal government sued the Baltimore police department for using discriminatory and violent tactics the department is slowly trying to change this week Baltimore mayor Jackie young thanks to the police department for controlling crowds and said anyone who breaks the law during a protest.

Baltimore George Floyd NPR Rebecca Hersher Aaron Maybin Baltimore Rosa Freddie gray Kwame rose Jackie young
Monday marks official start of hurricane season

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Monday marks official start of hurricane season

"The Atlantic hurricane season begins today NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports federal forecasters are expecting an above average number of storms this year forecasters expect three to six major hurricanes with wind speeds of one hundred ten miles per hour but they weren't even relatively weak storms can be deadly climate change is causing sea levels to rise and many storms are also dumping more rain which means flood risk is going up in much of the U. S. NPR's Rebecca Hersher

NPR Rebecca Hersher
The Pandemic Cut Down Car Traffic. Why Not Air Pollution?

Short Wave

05:18 min | 2 years ago

The Pandemic Cut Down Car Traffic. Why Not Air Pollution?

"So there was definitely one picture but I remember seeing a freeway in Los Angeles arguably the traffic capital of the United States and there were no cars. It was like empty for your way clear blue sky and now you came here on this podcast and you're taking that all away from me. Well actually the air was cleaner in Los Angeles in March. It was the longest stretch of cleaner that had been recorded in decades. And you know that's a big deal for la because there is not great. Sometimes there's high levels of ozone Which is a pollutant that sworn by all the that comes out of tail pipes and smokestacks and power plants? What it does is it. It mixes in the air ground level. You add some sunlight and you've got ozone and it's not good stuff it exacerbates respiratory and cardiovascular illness so it makes sense that everybody would be pretty psyched about cleaner air. Yeah and it seemed like that made sense right with all the lockdown and people staying at home. I mean they started asking the air regulators about that like Philip fine of the South Coast Air Quality Management district through a lot of pressure on us to come up with the answer that everyone wanted to hear which the is that the covid nineteen measures have cleaned the air and southern California. But here's the thing it was also really Ramey in. La During the same time and rain helps clear out the air so as the weather is dried out. Recently air quality has gotten worse again. I mean went back to the unhealthy. Category actually yeah. Okay so I guess when you think about. There was this forty percent reduction in traffic and only a fifteen or so decrease in ozone in lots of parts of the country. It's not nothing right like not much. Not A ain't nothin' yeah. It certainly helped some but you know believe it or not sound kind of strange cars are not. La's biggest source of pollution comes to the pollutants that make ozone And that's actually true in a lot of places in the US Which is fine told me that means what's happening. Now with reducing car traffic just enough read a lot of newspaper articles over the past couple weeks decided if only we can have people telecommute one day a week across the entire base in our air quality problems will be solved and unfortunately it's not that simple. That's because the big source in La is trucks A reason is because there's just a lot of shipping that comes through the ports of L. A. and Long Beach and they handle about thirty percent of the country's shipping container traffic and that gets moved around on trucks after it comes in so traffic. It didn't decrease as much as the car. Traffic did so that pollution was still being omitted. Okay so trucks are the problem in La. Becky would about places yet so other places have other pollution sources like Pittsburgh. We looked at Pittsburgh and ozone only felt by nine percent about between mid-march and the end of April and when I asked atmospheric chemists about this they were like the reason is coal. Oh the Col- cold. It's burned to make electricity primarily but also call. It's used to make steel right. The history of Pittsburgh is all about steel scar. Have some very active industrial sources near the city in this kind of at the University of Pittsburgh? Emily Elliott says Cole is really dirty work in closer proximity to the places that are generating power coal fired power plants in the Ohio River valley that contribute quite a bit to pollution. Okay Sup- Pittsburgh has coal. La Trucks anything else. I should know about. Yeah Houston has this thing with factories. Oh Right Rebecca Hersher. We've talked about that on the show before indeed. We have and for those who might not remember Houston has one of the largest concentrations of petrochemical facilities in the country so to see how ozone levels have changed their versus other places. That was an interesting question for us. And what we found. Is that those facilities. They mostly kept operating during the pandemic actually in fact a lot of them they make the raw materials for masks and gloves the PCP hospitals need so desperately right now. So I'm guessing that ozone levels decrease a lot in Houston exactly ozone decrease less in Houston than did in La okay so it sounds like industrial pollution versus pollution from our like. Private cars is a big deal. Are Scientists looking into that? Becky like how much industry plays into this. Yeah they are. And it's possible that the overall air chemistry has also changed when we remove cars from the picture which is kind of an intriguing idea like air pollution is kind of a soup of different chemicals and bits and that soup is different now. And there's something even more confusing that happens with that soup that Air Chemistry and this is really strange to stay with me. This is really strange. So say with me as actually sure. We've tagline so go ahead you're at home. Will we mention that stuff coming out of tail? Pipes and other sources is what makes ozone rates that stuff is nitrogen oxide so nitrogen. Oxides helped form ozone. But here's where it gets weird under some conditions you know. In the short term nitrogen oxides can break down ozone molecules

Los Angeles Pittsburgh Houston United States Air Chemistry Becky University Of Pittsburgh Philip California Ramey Pipes Col- Cold Long Beach Rebecca Hersher Ohio River Valley Emily Elliott L. A. Cole
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Think we're all just kind of dumbfounded I talked to a friend today they had six feet of water and they're just down the block friends that we know have water up to their second level and then there's some houses that were washed away also so this is our home here of the house looking at a brick house we're pumping it out right now Porter and her husband had hooked up this big blue hose to try to clear some of the flood water from the basement we headed inside and she showed me around with our basement we actually stop the calls in the middle of the night and it had risen to about six to eight inches all right here we are rounding the corner down I see the basement stairs yeah I see water homes so we have a floating basement so looks dry and so I step on it and now I feel like I'm walking on Mars you're walking across floorboards and there are there's a location beneath you yeah if but but here's our floor board so it's about a foot about a photo op we saved quite a few things but a lot of things that are just ruined here's our bathroom believes in your shower yeah I mean what what's usually down there where did you lose the kids toys are down there I have a craft room pool table work out room yesterday our research we have a freeze small freezer that was working and then it was floating today it must feel like dealing with the corona virus was already a crisis does this feel just like one thing after another you know I feel none today it's really emotional so I worry more about the lost all I spoke with a neighbor who has done this twice already we had a flood in twenty seventeen and she's like I can't do this again and I I understand I mean they have like six feet of water yeah I mean how do you prepare for this next time I mean you think you're more prepared we bought a pump we bought we have generators what is going to move forward we're gonna clean this up and you know hopefully we can rebuild so what do you think these next few months look like this has been a hard hard spring I don't know I'm not certain where that where that's going to take us yeah I need the people who are already suffering are offering to help I mean what about the city of one I think it's just gonna be a lot of work I don't think anybody here is ready to give up you know so you know some people had to walk away because the water just keep on right right I think that's just gonna get a result yeah I think that's what's going to take all summer well I wish you all the best of luck thank you very much I appreciate you taking the time out today that's don Porter talking to us from her home in Midland Michigan hurricane season is coming and federal forecasters are predicting that there will be between six and ten hurricanes in the Atlantic this year that's above average Jerry bell is the lead hurricane forecaster at the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the twenty twenty at Lana Kerr Kane season is expected to be a busy one NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports if the forecast turns out to be correct this will be the fifth year in a row with above average hurricane activity in the Atlantic that's the most consecutive years ever recorded bell says we're expecting yet another above normal season and now is the time to make sure that you're getting prepared the Federal Emergency Management Agency is asking state and local governments to consider issuing evacuation orders earlier than they would have in the past in order to give people more time to safely leave their homes while maintaining as much social distance as possible Carlos Castillo of FEMA says Americans in hurricane prone areas should also pack different supplies than they would have be prepared to take cleaning items with you like soap hand sanitizer disinfecting wipes or general household cleaning supplies to disinfect surfaces you may touch regular FEMA is also urging people to stay with family or friends or in hotels rather than in shelters if they can forecaster Jerry bell says the main reason for the large number of storms in the forecast is a phenomenon called the Atlantic multi decadal oscillation basically the wind and temperatures in the Atlantic have been really good for making strong hurricane since about nineteen ninety five that will probably change in the next few years as normal climate fluctuations happen that's separate from man made climate change but climate change is making the storms that do form more damaging for one thing bell says sea levels are rising it will mean more storm inundation and the hurricanes approaching and warmer air and water I mean that hurricanes are more likely to drop catastrophic amounts of rain when they make landfall think hurricane Harvey in twenty seventeen or hurricane Florence and twenty eighteen and he says rain and storm surge affect more people than they used to our coastlines it builds up tremendously over the last several decades so that there's potentially many more millions of people in harm's way every time a hurricane threat together normal climate variability plus the effects of human caused climate change plus the pandemic add up to a potentially deadly summer and fall hurricane season officially begins on June first and runs until November first Rebecca Hersher NPR you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news support for K. easy you'll come from K. I. O. N. news channel five forty six keeping viewers informed about coronavirus covert nineteen answering questions and addressing concerns with continued updates on air and online it K. I. O. N. five forty six dot com the CEO of booking dot com they own OpenTable and kayak to name a couple he does expect this economy to make it through the other side of this pandemic but it is going to be a long haul in that war is not just coming out with the vaccine is winning the financial it's coming out so we have an economy that people can grow and develop their futures at I'm gonna resolve what the CEO of booking dot com sees in his first of all next time on market place that's market place just ahead at five thirty today on ninety point three K. easy U. N. K. E. C. U. dot org and just ahead on All Things Considered a little shoe shop or little shoe repair shop that has been operating in Atlanta for more than fifty years but off to the shop down the owners are struggling to keep.

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

Environment: NPR

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane Season Will Be Above Average, NOAA Warns

"Hurricane season is coming and federal forecasters are predicting that there will be between six and ten hurricanes in the Atlantic this year. That's above average Jerry. Bell is the lead Hurricane Forecaster at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The Twenty Twenty Atlantic. Hurricane season is expected to be busy one. Npr's Rebecca Hersher reports. If the forecast turns out to be correct. This will be the fifth year in a row with above average hurricane activity in the Atlantic. That's the most consecutive years ever recorded bell says we're expecting yet another above normal season and now is the time to make sure that you're getting prepared. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is asking state and local governments to consider issuing evacuation orders earlier than they would have in the past in order to give people more time to safely leave their homes while maintaining as much social distance as possible. Carlos CASTILLO OF FEMA says Americans in hurricane prone areas should also pack different supplies than they would have be prepared to take cleaning items with you like so panna tiger disinfecting wipes or general household cleaning supplies to disinfect surfaces. You may touch regularly. Fema is also urging people to stay with family or friends or in hotels rather than in shelters if they can forecaster Jerry. Bell says the main reason for the large number of storms in the forecast is phenomenon called the Atlantic multi. Takeo Oscillation basically the wind temperatures in the Atlantic have been really good for making strong hurricanes since about nineteen ninety five that will probably change in the next few years as normal climate fluctuations happen that's separate from manmade climate change but climate change is making the storms that do form more damaging for one thing bell says sea levels are rising sea levels mean more storm on Dacian as a hurricanes approaching and warmer air and water mean that hurricanes are more likely to drop catastrophic amounts of rain. When they make landfall think hurricane harvey in two thousand Seventeen or Hurricane Florence in twenty eighteen and he says rain and storm surge affect more people than they used to our coastlines. Were built up tremendously over the last several decades so that there's potentially many more millions of people in harm's way every time a hurricane threat together normal climate variability plus the effects of human caused climate change plus the pandemic add up to a potentially deadly summer and fall hurricane season officially begins on June first and runs until November first Rebecca Hersher NPR needs.

Hurricane Bell Atlantic Twenty Twenty Atlantic Hurricane Florence Forecaster Federal Emergency Management A Jerry Rebecca Hersher Npr National Oceanic Atmospheric A Rebecca Hersher Takeo Oscillation Harvey NPR Carlos Castillo Dacian
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Public radio programming that highlights issues including diversity racism equality anti semitism and sexism it's seven thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin good morning with huge numbers of job losses and furloughs millions of Americans are being pushed to the brink of affection after hurricane or other natural disaster FEMA the Federal Emergency Management Agency would start up a legal assistance program to help people at risk of losing their homes that has not happened in the pandemic in the economic crisis it created and here's about her sure has been investigating and she joins us now good morning good morning so first off just explain what kind of legal help FEMA usually provides still the usually private legal hot lines and these are staffed by the American Bar Association for free but the federal government they pay up to five thousand dollars per hotline that's the cover equipment and software so basically the number is a number that anyone can call they can get legal help but because FEMA hasn't made the money available there are only three states that have high winds right now and walk through why there would be demand for legal help because of the corona virus yeah so after any disaster people actually need lawyers to help them register for food stamps and unemployment there increases in domestic violence after disasters need help with that and housing is a really big issue an eviction is a particularly interesting right now because it puts people and communities at higher risk known for spreading the virus yeah so what example for the demand right now there are small FEMA funded hotlines in a couple places these are places that had weather disasters this spring but the Bar Association says that most people who are calling them are calling about covert nineteen the question is is whether or not Jackie people are getting the help they need if they have all these problems and they're calling out for help because of cove it are they getting that assistance they're not I mean there is a lot of demand but lawyers say that tenants especially are calling a lot so I talked to one man in New Orleans his name's Bobby Parker he is a renter he's a sanitation worker on Bourbon street he's been furloughed and he was late with his rent in April because he didn't have enough money so he went to work one day and when he got back he told me this after marking in our doors in our locker chain the landlord had changed the locks in his apartment did he tell the weather there was a rule against evictions he did because there is there is a moratorium on evictions right now he said it didn't work you love getting a lawyer through legal aid group who fought the evictions eventually won but it took more than two weeks and he said it in that time he alternated between sleeping on a friend's at a friend's house and they're bad with them and sleeping outside him Mister Parker what do you think would have happened if you didn't have a lawyer over here our main problem B. I got to be a victim which had been tested positive for cold nineteen fighting for my life I truly do he says he was really scared and that's in part because he's HIV positive so he's at higher than average risk if you were to get the virus lawyers legal aid groups just like the one that helped him say that without FEMA funded hotlines it's harder to give people this kind of help has FEMA said anything about this they didn't comment they said that outstanding requests for help like this are under review the White House declined to comment the thing to remember here is the president has the ultimate power to unlock this money and more than thirty governors have asked for this type of assistance NPR's Rebecca Hersher thank you so much we appreciate it thanks so much has some barber shops and hair salons reopen across this country it is natural for people to ask is a hair cut really an essential service for.

NPR
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Were significantly lower than the two previous weeks Scott Horsley NPR news Washington taking a look at the numbers the Dow was up thirty three points today the nasdaq rose a hundred and thirty nine points global temperature in March of twenty twenty was the second hottest on record NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports is up more than fifty percent chance this will end up being the hottest year ever recorded global temperatures continue to rise because of climate change that trend is clear in the latest data from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration may June and July are forecast to be hotter than average in most of the U. S. except the upper plains states that follows the second hottest March going back to eighteen eighty the water in the Gulf of Mexico had its hottest March ever this year no a climate scientists say warmer than average temperatures will likely continue this summer although it's too soon to predict exactly how hot the water will be hotter water makes powerful web hurricanes more likely the next three months are also predicted to be Rainier than average in the central U. S. and almost everywhere east of the Mississippi River Rebecca Hersher NPR news and in fact a new study finds much of the western U. S. is baking in what scientists are calling an emerging mega drop the study in the journal science blaming almost half the problem on human impacts on global warming you're listening to NPR most churches in America have moved their services entirely online but many regular worshippers are not participating that's one of the findings from a new poll on how the corona virus is affecting the nation's churches here's NPR's Tom gjelten the poll from the public religion research institute found that ninety seven percent of US Christians who normally go to church at least a few times a year did not attend in person Easter services handled by a three to one margin they think stay at home orders.

Washington NPR Rebecca Hersher Mexico America Scott Horsley twenty twenty Rainier Mississippi River Tom gjelten
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Says new Yorkers two years old and over will have to wear face coverings when riding public transit taxis or ride hailing cars on the long introduced New York the global temperature in March twenty twenty was the second hottest on record NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports there's more than fifty percent chance that this will end up being the hottest year ever recorded global temperatures continue to rise because of climate change that trend is clear in the latest data from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration may June and July are forecast to be hotter than average in most of the U. S. except the upper plains states that follows the second hottest March going back to eighteen eighty the water in the Gulf of Mexico had its hottest March ever this year no a climate scientists say warmer than average temperatures will likely continue this summer although it's too soon to predict exactly how hot the water will be hotter water makes powerful web hurricanes more likely the next three months are also predicted to be Rainier than average in the central U. S. and almost everywhere east of the Mississippi River Rebecca Hersher NPR news the Dow closed up thirty three points in the day at twenty three thousand five hundred thirty seven you're listening to NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include progressive insurance committed to offering a streamlined shopping experience where home and auto can be bundled together now that's progressive learn more at progressive dot com or one eight hundred progressive you're listening to greater LA KCRW show that connects you to the people and places of southern California I see two tickets if you're like me watching sports as part of the soundtrack to your life remember Kirk Gibson's World Series home run she.

New York NPR Rebecca Hersher Mexico California Kirk Gibson Rainier Mississippi River
Scientists expect spring floods to be milder than last year

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Scientists expect spring floods to be milder than last year

"Widespread flooding is likely this spring that's according to federal weather forecasters NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports the northern plains are most at risk for major flooding the Dakotas Minnesota and parts of the Gulf coast are at risk for moderate and major flooding between April and June according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the southeastern U. S. is also a risk soil is already saturated so heavy spring rain could cause flooding heavy rain is getting more likely in much of the U. S. as the earth gets hotter forecasters say this spring's flooding will likely be above average but not as severe as the record breaking floods last year along the Mississippi River and its tributaries none the less this year's funding could have serious implications if water damages homes since Americans are trying to isolate themselves in their houses due to the corona

Rebecca Hersher Dakotas Minnesota Mississippi River
Climate Change Affected Australia’s Wildfires, Scientists Confirm

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Climate Change Affected Australia’s Wildfires, Scientists Confirm

"Scientists have confirmed that Australia's recent wildfires were exacerbated by human caused climate change and beers Rebecca Hersher reports extremely hot weather is driving large damaging fires the analysis was conducted by more than a dozen climate scientists it focuses specifically on southeastern Australia where bush fires destroyed thousands of homes and killed more than two dozen people in twenty nineteen and twenty twenty although bush fires are normal and important part of Australian forest ecosystems the authors found that as very hot weather gets more common large intense fires are also getting more likely they estimate that the weather conditions that drove the most recent fires are at least thirty percent more likely now than they were in the year nineteen hundred the study was made possible by increasingly sophisticated climate models that allow scientists to quickly assess the role of climate change in specific fires storms and heat waves Rebecca Hersher

Australia Rebecca Hersher Bush
Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

Environment: NPR

05:18 min | 2 years ago

Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

"Australia is still recovering from bushfires destroyed. More than two thousand homes. Some of those homes may not be rebuilt. The government of one Australian state has historically offered to purchase empty. Lots where fire has destroyed homes. The goal is to help people moved to safer places but NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports that there was this crucial flaw in how that policy was rolled out. Donna Wilson late to cigarette and pollster truck out of the parking lot at the real estate firm. She manages in King Lake Victoria just bicycle idea from. Hey Ya damn houses. To houses went as in went up in flames on February seventh. Two thousand nine bushfire destroyed a huge chunk of this town. This whole straight pretty much weight. The flames moved so quickly that many people couldn't escape one hundred. Seventy three people died in a matter of hours most of them in and around king leak thousands of homes were destroyed three days later then. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd address the Australian parliament the seventh February. We become each national memory as a day of disaster of death and of morning. Black Saturday as it came to be called was Australia's most devastating modern bushfire event five times more deadly than the country's most recent fires and one of the questions that emerged afterward was whether all the houses that earned should be rebuilt. Maybe it was too dangerous. The solution was to try a set of policies. That would give people a choice. You can either build a new house. That was more fire resistant or sell your land to the government and move somewhere else. Wants land was sold to the government. Home could never be built on it again. It was an experiment. The assumption among policymakers was that the more traumatized a homeowner was by the fires. The more likely they would be to sell and relocate and Donna Wilson says to some extent that was true. It was a a godsend for little king. Lake is a small town. So Wilson knew a lot of the people who are coming into a real estate office after the fires and many of them were really struggling. Everything they owned was gone. Many of them had lost family or neighbors in the fire so selling their land to the government and preventing anyone from living there again was both simple and reassuring national. They couldn't deal with a all. They dislike that idea that no no build on that block. But as the so-called buyback scheme unfolded it became clear that it wasn't working for everyone. A key problem was the detained almost two years for the government to commit to it. And in the meantime people had already decided what to do even people who had nearly died in the fires last onto Kookaburra court. Then you will arrive at your destination on one hundred five degree day in February of this year. Npr producer Meredith. Rizzo and I drove the half hour from King Lake Down to flower gale. A town of about six hundred people surrounded by tree covered ridges. It's almost eleven years to the day since black Saturday. High joke the seventy year old Joe. Millburn takes us into his new living room. Which is right where his old living room used to be. In fact on black Saturday Joe was sitting right here reading when the power went out it was evening and I looked over the to the window between the Kurds and it was a red stripe and before sunset so when the front and the sky was read within an hour his entire neighborhood was on fire. He remembers trying to get to his neighbor's house for help. And I looked up and this is the only time I thought it was not die. The fight was about. It muscle he and his neighbors and their grandchildren piled into two cars and drove through the smoke and flames to an empty field. That had already burned. They watched as the fire devoured. The ridges. Joe's house was gone. His fire insurance policy provided enough to build a new house and he thought that was the only option available to him so less than a year after the fire he went for it outside the building by the time. Now it's going to do. The BUYBACK MISSED OUT AGAIN. Story my life by the time the government was ready to pay people like Joe for their land. He was already living in his new house. I wouldn't build this and in the decade. Since the forest has re grown the fire danger is high. Officials recognized that the delays in rolling out. The buyback offer made it difficult for many people to use it. Craig Lapsley was. Victoria's Fire Services Commissioner after the two thousand nine blazes leaks acution took forever and it was extremely frustrating. Make decisions so what did I do in the end? Most people who lost their homes on Black Saturday did not sell to the government and many people rebuilt houses in places with very high fire risk but Lapsley says he thinks that offering buybacks was a good idea especially when that option was coupled with more stringent building standards. Those are lessons that other parts of Australia and the US are looking to as they grapple with how to help people make safer decisions about where and how to live Rebecca Hersher NPR news.

JOE Donna Wilson Australia NPR Rebecca Hersher Craig Lapsley King Lake Victoria Australian Parliament Prime Minister Kevin Rudd Kookaburra Court Fire Services Commissioner King Lake Down Victoria Rizzo Meredith United States Producer
Rain Brings New Worries To Burned Areas In Australia

Environment: NPR

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Rain Brings New Worries To Burned Areas In Australia

"Rain in the forecast for the east coast of Australia. And that's good news for firefighters still fighting blazes near some of the country's largest cities but ran after after fires can also create problems can even be dangerous and Beers Rebecca Hersher. Has This report when I called pattern. I'm in this week. He was in Melbourne walking outside. And I could hear the wind through the phone for smokey. We are expecting thunderstorms says a lot. More Humid Nyman is a forest hydrologist. He studies is how drought and wildfires can affect drinking water supplies and while the rain in the Australian forecast is a good thing. The thunderstorms worry. Him Is this a lot of Raines. Spread out over six months. That's a good outcome if there are short. Intense bursts of rainfall made through thunderstorms. Those are the ones that are problematic. Nick problematic because thunderstorms are more likely to drop a lot of rain in a short amount of time and areas. That burned can't absorb a lot of water for a couple of reasons. I wildfire removes vegetation which means that. The rainfall hits the soil directly. Second the vile fire heats the soil which causes something called water-repellent exellency or hydrophobia city. Which means that doesn't absorb into the soil so most of the rain becomes surface runoff. That runoff can sweep the soil and ash downhill hill and into streams and lakes. If a lot of sediment gets into reservoirs. The water gets really cloudy. And it can't be sterilized which means people can't drink it right now. The biggest drinking water concerns or for the areas around Canberra and Sydney water officials of setup filters at the reservoir that provides Sydney with the majority of its water to trap sediment and intense rain after fires can also be dangerous. A prime example. I'm and says is what's happened in California in recent years John. McNeil is the assistant. Didn't fire chief for Ventura County California. An area that has a similar landscape to many of the places that are burning in Australia in two thousand thirteen. A wildfire started in the hills there. Yeah it was called. The Springs Fire Wind caused the fire to burn hot and fast removing most of the vegetation and leaving the soil. Hard and Ashi at the base of the burnt hills were about two to three hundred homes. There's a small kind of retirement. Enclave of single family dwellings below the area that burn and year after the fire. There was a rainstorm voluntary. Evacuations tonight in Camarillo for people living near the hillside burn. Last year spring fire. The rain fell on hard soil. There were no plans to hold the dirt in place. Mud and rocks came loose and sped downhill the high impact areas it just completely leveled leveled the homes there would be some walls standing and then it was just completely sheared off from the debris and pretty sizeable rocks. That were coming down. Luckily people had evacuated evacuated in time. No one was killed. The risk of debris flows is rising in parts of California and Australia because of climate change and because of housing development relevant patterns. Hotter weather is drying out plants and soil exacerbating drought in making intense wildfires. More likely people are also building homes and and wildfire prone areas and as the earth gets hotter extreme. Rain is getting more common in Australia. The forest hydrologist Petr Nyman has found that debris flows are already getting more frequent and severe in the southeastern part of the country. That's where this year's fires are burning. The rainfall over the next six six months is going to be critical if there's a storm than they might be really widespread issues across the whole east coast of Australia. All of this requires a quick period habit for emergency officials from fighting the fires to protecting homes and water supplies from the quenching rains. Rebecca Hersher N._p._R. News.

Humid Nyman Australia Rebecca Hersher California Melbourne Petr Nyman Camarillo Sydney Canberra Nick Ashi Raines Ventura County California Mcneil John
2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record

Environment: NPR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

2019 Was The 2nd-Hottest Year On Record

"Last year was the second hottest ever recorded. It's the latest scientific confirmation that the planet is getting steadily hotter and NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports. This fact is is more and more obvious to humans going about their daily lives. Twenty nineteen was the second hottest year on record. According to the latest data released by the National Oceanic and atmospheric ear could ministration and NASA records. Go back more than a century so twenty nineteen is the second hottest twenty sixteen was the hottest and the third hottest artist was two thousand. Fifteen Gavin Schmidt is the director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The fact is is Wilmington. Every year we add one extra. The data points to this cross. The main thing here is is not really the ranking but is the consistency of the long term trends that we're seeing. The long term trend goes back decades AIDS. The two thousand ten were the hottest decade ever before that the two thousands had that title and so on the earth getting steadily hotter every decade. Today the planet is about one degree Celsius warmer than it was in the Mid Twentieth Century. Twenty eighteen report. By the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that warming of one point five degrees Celsius would be catastrophic for millions of people the warming up until now cincinnati seventeen has been quite close Oceania kind of extrapolate. That Ford knew would imagine that we would cost one point five in around twenty thirty five but of course that depends on what we do with emissions human emissions of greenhouse gases are the overwhelming driver of global warming and right now global emissions are rising the US has omitted the most total co two. Who of any country? The data released today also illustrate how different regions are being affected. The Arctic is warming three times faster than the rest of the planet. Hot Hot Ocean. Water helped power dangerous. Cyclones in disrupted fisheries in the continental. US rain patterns are changing. D.C Aren't works on. Forecasting Noah Noah he says hotter temperatures are making droughts more severe. A warmer atmosphere is a thirstier atmosphere sucking up moisture and dumping rain all at once. It's or seeing the largest event getting larger that means more flood risk for example in two thousand nineteen big rainfall events drove record breaking floods along the Mississippi tippy river and its tributaries and as the Earth keeps getting hotter. All of these trends will keep getting more pronounced. Rebecca Hersher N._p._R.

Rebecca Hersher United States Nasa Noah Noah Mid Twentieth Century Gavin Schmidt Mississippi Tippy River NPR United Nations Intergovernment National Oceanic Goddard Institute For Space St Wilmington Director Cincinnati Arctic Oceania Ford
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 2 years ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

Mozambique Maputo Lake Mozambique United States Southern Africa Tampa Bay National Institute Of Meteorol Africa Europe Salma Mouse Us Navy President Trump Moose Cossio Temba Edward Mondlane University Japan Rebecca Hersher Salam Antonio Chaos
In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

Short Wave

09:49 min | 2 years ago

In Mozambique, Meteorologists Can't Keep Up With Climate Change

"Okay. So so you visited a country that doesn't have super great meteorological data and there are a lot of countries that have this issue but I chose Mozambique and Southern Africa. Okay why sound sound well. Mozambique is a good example of a place where you don't have great weather data and you're dealing with the effects of climate change in a really obvious way so there's -ceptable bowl to cyclones to droughts and floods there's a very long coastline a big river delta and Mozambique was hit by two big cyclones. Last year they're experiencing a drought this year. So yeah it's a place where these issues are front and center. So what does that actually look like for meteorologists in Mozambique. They basically can't can't tell what the weather's going to be is that right. Yeah not that accurately at least so to see how it unfolds. I went to visit Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology and I hung out with the lead meteorologist Cossio Tampa Bay will. He did his job for morning and on the day I went. It was actually a good example because there was rain in the forecast which is normal and the capital Maputo where we were is pretty flood-prone like if it gets maybe an inch and a half of rain some of the streets will flood. Oh that's not a lot. Yeah not a lot not good so with rain in the forecast while I was there is just sitting at his computer. He has all these tabs open and he is looking at weather maps from Europe from Japan from the US Navy from from the US National Oceanic Administration like up the road here thousands of miles away and he's just like going through these tabs and trying to figure out what's going to happen the resolution of the maps looking at over Mozambique. It's not that great like it's just like big things of clouds over the whole country yet. No it's not good. Yeah Yeah it makes his job super hard so like on this particular day he wanted to know when it would rain and how much but instead all he could really say was that it was going to read some amount sometime sometime in the afternoon in some parts of the area around the capital which is not enough information. If you WanNa like close roots or make sure that people aren't endanger Moose and he told me like right now. We are using global models but what we need is a weather. Model all our own for Mozambique's with better resolution because the weather threats are getting more severe weather threats are we talking about so he's specifically talking about whether other that's worse because the climate is changing. He was really explicit about that. So for example the two cyclones that hit this ear. Cyclones can happen in a normal year right without climate change. But it's a lot more likely you'll get two big storms forming when you're with climate change got US Earth Guitar and if you're a Cossio Temba you're sitting in your office. He and his colleagues were not able to tell where the worst flooding from those storms was going to happen until after they made landfall right right and then at that point it's too late. You're not you're just fixing things instead of trying to prevent things from being damaged or people exactly which is not where you want to be. So what do they need. Well you need better weather forecasting and that means you need two things need better data about what is happening and you need better computer models about what could happen in the future. And I talked to the scientists in Maputo in the capital who basically trains all of the meteorologist's Mozambique he works at the university. Edward Mondlane University city there. His name is Antonio Chaos and he is very focused on the first thing the data itself used to say garbage in garbage out about the model itself doesn't solve anything he's talking about better raw local measurements about like wind and humidity and rain like really basic stuff and Gnat is something that we really take for granted in the US Africa as a continent maybe excluding little bits of Africa discussed the of metrological skull daytime even on the continent side. And it's worse when you go to oceanside oceanside he's talking about the data that's actually collected along the coast out at sea which is where cyclones forum. It's where a lot of whether comes from and there is just not a lot of reliable local data there. Are there any efforts to to fix that to get more more data. Yeah so there's this one example that I think really encapsulates what's going on. So in the early two thousands Mozambique's government and the World Bank Anthony at this German company came together and they installed to weather radar stations on the coast of Mozambique and one of the two towers was in the town of shot which is only like three hours from the capital. And I was going there anyway. I wanted to see it because I had heard that the president himself cut the ribbon when it was opened in two thousand four presidents love to cut ribbons. No matter where you are they love it. So I visit this place and the guy who unlocks the gate for me. Is this this Guy Salomao mouse and he's the janitor for the local meteorology office and for years. He has been walking like three miles up this hill to dust. Sweep and keep it clean. Can we go inside your body red ladder you into a hole in the ceiling. Can you hear that. You're very echoey dome and telescope sort of And it looks fine but Salam mouse tells me this story. While we're standing up there in the dark it goes like like this so the radar is installed into four and before that people in this area and he's from here they didn't take the weather forecast very seriously because often they were wrong so like when there was flooding predicted people would just stay in their homes. Leave their cattle out in the low lying fields and often bad things would what happened so then in two thousand eight four years after the radars installed. There's the storm and there's heavy rain and there's wind in the local meteorologists can see from the radar data that the storm is stalled. Like it's not moving and so they put out a warning they're like. Hey guys be careful. The storm is not over. It's going to be like two to three days. Do not go out. Like don't go to areas and they were right okay and people were super impressed. Like Salma Mouse Remembers people saying like were you talking to God with that thing. Oh okay wow so yeah this radar made people really really proud proud good but then shortly after that the radar started to malfunction. That's what they do they do that. They're they're really hard to keep calibrated. And it's extra hard when you're not in place that's had radar in the past. There's not one of expertise in the area. The company that made it was from Germany and like local technicians. Didn't necessarily fairly heavily expertise they needed or the parts and in the end this particular radar towers. It stopped working altogether around twenty thirteen. And what really kills kills me is like mouse. Janitor has been keeping it clean anyway ever since like going there every few days gotta have imagine. That's like extremely frustrating right. He's like maintaining you keeping it clean like ready for somebody to come in there but he has no idea if and when somebody's GonNa actually make it work again yeah. I asked him this because I was driving up the wall and he was like of course it does yes. It is extremely annoying and he still hopes it'll start working again. Yeah so if it if it doesn't start working again is weather radar in that area. The only way meteorologists can get information about the local weather or is there something else else that they can do. Yeah that's the big question and a lot of meteorologists and climate scientists. I talked to you about this issue. They said that in the long term for places like Mozambique the better option maybe satellite data. There are already whether satellites up there in orbit collecting information about a lot of the world. And if you could just get that information mission to the people that need it it might be a better source. But it's an enormous amount of data. That's coming down. So you need great Internet. You need computing power so you need more training for the people who actually going to use this data plus you need a better weather models put it all into and all of that is super expensive and and I think we all know that governments generally don't have lots of cash around just waiting to be invested in science generally speaking no look the science slush fund. It hasn't been something that you know. I mean we're doing all right over here but it's not great. Yeah exactly and Mozambique is no different like Muslim because not a rich country they do not. I have a ton of money lying around to like totally upgrade their weather systems or they would have already done it and every time. There's a disaster. That's more money out the door or to help with the immediate recovery which is important but it's a vicious cycle exactly and actually the Paris climate agreement has something built into it to help countries Lake Mozambique deal with the effects of climate change and prepare for the future. It's called capacity building and it's a mechanism that's supposed to have richer countries the countries countries that historically contributed the most climate change. Help foot the bill for smaller countries countries. That didn't contributed so much to climate change to prepare right and I feel like that's just going to be a question that keeps coming up kind of over and over which is who should shoulder the burden for the challenges that are caused by climate. Change right yeah yeah yeah. It's really hard question. And there's what should happen and there's what is happening to like up until now. Even though most countries say they agree with the idea that richer countries the help foot the bill the actual not of money changing hands is relatively small higher Rebecca Hersher. I appreciate you appreciate you

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You. Then we just decided to let it go. And now they're really having to deal with that situation because the Arkansas river is flooding their stores underwater, and they're going to have to rebuild it on their own. So just listening to that story. You can see that. It's so important to get this, right? So how can it be fixed? Well, it depends on who you ask. Ask certainly in the short term, we need a way to get the national foot insurance program out of debt. Get rid of those billions of dollars on their books and most people agreed that they need new maps to convey risk better. But we also need a way to plan ahead and take action before floods happen. This is what we call flood mitigation. And I talked to the former head of the national flood insurance program ROY right about this a great national flood insurance program finds a way to couple mitigation and insurance together. So right now, he's actually the head of the insurance institute for business and home safety. So I think it's really notable there that he's talking about going beyond insurance policies, when he talks about mitigation that word he's talking about having the government help pay for stuff that makes flooding less damaging even preparing for flooding before it happens that stuff like raising buildings higher, maybe putting in floodwalls dating drainage systems stuff. That's collective that addresses things at the community level. Not just for India. Vigil homes and businesses like one off and that feels really important right now because of climate change. Of course. Yes, and funds are getting dramatically more expensive in part because people love living in flood prone areas in climate change is making seized get higher. It's making rainstorms worse. So flood insurance policy, the needy Grady of how much it costs who can afford it. How we deal with flood risk. That is climate policy. That's NPR science reporter Rebecca hersher. Thank you so much. Thanks. You're listening to NPR news. You're listening on K Q E public radio. It's eight eighteen support for weedy comes from the law firm, Fenwick and west helping technology and life sciences companies.

Arkansas river NPR India Fenwick Rebecca hersher Grady reporter
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"Out of debt. Get rid of those billions of dollars at around their books and most people agree that they need new maps to convey risk better. But we also need a way to plan ahead and take action before floods happened. This is what we call fled mitigation. And I talked to the former head of the national flood insurance program ROY right about this a great national flood insurance program finds a way to couple mitigation and insurance together. So right now, he's actually the head of the insurance institute for business and home safety. So I think it's really notable there that he's talking about going beyond insurance policies, when he talks about mitigation that word he's talking about having the government help pay for stuff that makes flooding less damaging even preparing for flooding before it happens that stuff like raising buildings higher. Maybe putting in floodwalls updating drainage systems stuff. That's collective that addresses things at the community level. Not just for. Vigil homes and businesses like one off and that feels really important right now because of climate change, of course. Yes. And they're getting dramatically more expensive in part because people love living in flood prone areas in climate change is making sees get higher. It's making rainstorms worse. So flood insurance policy, the needy Grady of how much it costs who can afford it. How we deal with flood risk. That is climate policy. That's NPR science reporter Rebecca hersher. Thank you so much. Thanks. You're listening to NPR news. Support comes from Los Angeles nonprofit organization of dedicated volunteers, working one on one with children, who have experienced abuse neglect. Casa LA works to provide advocacy for children in the child welfare system to ensure they have the support and services in the areas of education, healthcare, and housing currently there. Two hundred and eighty four children on the wedding list who can benefit from having a cost volunteer. Make a difference in the life of a child. More at causa L A dot org. What makes good design?.

NPR Los Angeles Casa LA Rebecca hersher Grady reporter
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To have to rebuild it on their own. So just listening to that story. You can see that. It's so important to get this, right? So how can it be fixed? Well, it depends on who you. Ask certainly in the short term, we need a way to get the national insurance program out of get get rid of those billions of dollars at our on their books and most people agree that they need new maps to convey risk better. But we also need a way to plan ahead and take action before floods happen. This is what we call flood mitigation. And I talked to the former head of the national foot insurance program, ROY right about this a great national flood insurance program finds a way to couple mitigation and insurance together. So right now, he's actually the head of the insurance institute for business and home safety. So I think it's really notable there that he's talking about going beyond insurance policies, when he talks about mitigation that word he's talking about having the government help pay for stuff that makes flooding less damaging even preparing for flooding before it happens. That's raising buildings higher maybe putting in floodwalls dating drainage systems stuff. That's collective that addresses things at the community level. Not just for. Visual homes and businesses like one off and that feels really important right now because of climate change. Of course. Yes, and funds are getting dramatically more expensive in part because people love living in flood prone areas and climate change is making seized get higher. It's making rainstorms worse. So flood insurance policy, the needy, greedy of how much it costs who can afford it. How we deal with flood risk. That is climate policy. That's NPR science reporter Rebecca hersher. Thank you so much. Thanks. WNYC's supporters include the Joyce, the presenting palabras making its return with two programs featuring vintage standards from across the decades. June eleventh to twenty nine tickets at Joyce dot org. I'm Richard Hake and to bring you morning edition. I have to get up early really early. But that's not going to stop me from attending WNYC's.

WNYC Richard Hake NPR Joyce ROY Rebecca hersher reporter
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"The national flood insurance program, and so far, every plan has set aside big money for mapping technology like lighter. Rebecca hersher, NPR news. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Let's go back to high school for this next story. Specifically, a high school reunion, one graduating class celebrated their reunion this past week, but it was their seventy fifth consecutive reunion. They graduated in nineteen forty four from Philadelphia's central high school and they've gotten together every year since they graduated would join now by jewel silk. He's ninety two retired lawyer and the organizer of these reunions. Welcome to the program. Thank you. We should mention that it was your son who wrote into weekend addition to alert us to this story. He's clearly proud of you. Very nice. Can you tell me a little bit of, of the history of your high school? Yeah. Central high school is the second oldest public high school in the United States. It started in eighteen hundred and thirty six, and we had very, very good teachers and as a result, those who went to central, and I feel this.

Central high school NPR Rebecca hersher United States Philadelphia seventy fifth
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And how much he cooperated with investigators. We don't know many more details beyond that NPR's Philip Ewing. The, the information came in newly unsealed documents from federal court in Washington, the national. Weather service is warning a significant and severe weather event is developing in the planes, damaging winds and possible tornadoes could strike the central US hail could fall. That's larger than two inches in diameter. There's also a growing danger of flash flooding, the last twelve months have been the wettest ever recorded in the United States. NPR's Rebecca hersher reports it is a problem for farmers. The twelve months from may twenty eighteen April twenty nineteen had more rain than any year on record in the US, according to the latest analysis from the National Oceanic and atmosphere administration in addition to record breaking flooding in the midwest. The southeast New England and Pacific northwest have also been soaked. That's been bad news. For farmers planting of corn. Soybeans and spring wheat or a way behind schedule. It's been good news for much of America's western range lands were categories. All that rain means the grass is more plentiful than it has been in years. More extreme rain is consistent with whether. Patterns driven by climate change in much of the country. East of the Mississippi Noah predicts the wetter than average weather will continue into the summer, Rebecca hersher, NPR news. Mexican officials say a child, migraine has died in the custody of Mexican immigration officials or Valencia of member station. K J Z reports.

NPR US Rebecca hersher Philip Ewing National Oceanic Washington Mississippi New England America twelve months two inches
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"How much he cooperated with investigators. We don't know many more details beyond that NPR's Philip Ewing. The, the information came in newly unsealed documents from federal court in Washington. The national weather service is warning a significant and severe weather. Weather event is developing in the planes, damaging winds and possible tornadoes could strike the central US hail could fall. That's larger than two inches in diameter. There's also a growing danger of flash flooding, the last twelve months have been the wettest ever recorded in the United States. NPR's Rebecca hersher reports it is a problem for farmers. The twelve months from may twenty eighteen April twenty nineteen had more rain than any year on record in the US, according to the latest analysis from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration in addition to record breaking flooding in the midwest. The southeast New England and northwest have also been soaked. That's been bad news. For farmers planting of corn. Soybeans and spring wheat are all way behind schedule. It's been good news for much of America's western range lands were categories. All that rain means the grass is more plentiful than it has been in years. More extreme rain is consistent with weather patterns driven by climate change in much of the country east. The Mississippi Noah predicts the wetter than average weather will continue into the summer, Rebecca hersher, NPR news. Mexican officials say child migraine has died in the custody of Mexican immigration officials or Valencia of member station. K J Z reports.

NPR US Rebecca hersher National Oceanic Atmospheric A Philip Ewing Washington Mississippi New England America twelve months two inches
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:14 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. Thousands of government scientists aren't working because of the government shutdown and that's affecting university. Researchers they collaborate with as NPR's Rebecca hersher reports Jacquelyn Campbell PHD works at Iowa State University. My mom introduces me as this is my daughter. She's a doctor, but not the type that helps people. I generally get that look like what Dr Campbell studies legalzoom's specifically. She works on making genetic information about beans peas available to scientists around the world to help them help farmers increase yields and feed people who usually when people ask, you know, what do you do the first thing? I ask is do you enjoy that tree bean salad that you have and in a very tiny way I helped with that. But since the government shutdown in December Campbell's life has been totally upside down. I she works in a building. That's least by the US department of agriculture now has a sign on the front door due to the government shutdown. This office is closed Campbell is one of four workers out of forty who aren't federal employees. So the office has been pretty lonely and normal office stuff has gotten really hard to she has to use her personal cell phone. And the poster printer is useless because the people who know how to use it or furloughed, which is a problem because there's a huge research meeting next week that Campbell now has extra work to prepare for one of my other colleagues. I am giving her presentation because USDA researchers won't be there to present their latest findings about the best way to raise and grow the food. We eat research that's paid for by taxpayers. And there's one more way that the shutdown is affecting Campbell and her family every day that the shutdown goes on the probability of being losing my job at the end of March increase. Her job is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation that money runs out in. In March, the NSF is shutdown days that could be used to apply for more NSF funding or find new money are ticking by I love signs. I love my job. There's not a day when I don't come in. I'm just like sitting at my desk when I was like, yes. Let's. And my nose now. And I kind of just look around going like, okay. What's next in a different sense? Because now everything is up near Rebecca hersher, NPR news. Allegations of sexual abuse have followed Robert Kelly better known as our Kelly for years, but he's remained one of the most powerful and popular figures in our and be music after the surviving R Kelly docu series aired on lifetime this weekend. Things may be changing a prosecutor in Chicago is asking victims to come forward music stars are distancing themselves from Kelley journalists. Jim dear goddess has spent nearly two decades investigating allegations against our Kelly. He joins me now. Welcome to the program. Hi. And as we start this discussion, we should say some content here is maybe disturbing to some people want to let you know at the start. Now R Kelly has been accused of a number of instances of abuse, especially for very young women. Can you describe the biggest allegations, you know, all the the very first story published in the Chicago Sun-Times in December of two thousand. I think that the nut graph of that story on day one. It has been true now for eighteen years R Kelly has consistent. Abused his position of wealth and fame to pursue illegal sexual relationships with underage girls and throughout this time. And now, especially with the docu series are Kelly has denied these allegations. One thing that the documentary revealed where the number of people around who helped bring young women into his inner circle. Can you talk about what you encountered in your reporting along these lines? There are any number of enablers around Kelly. Everybody from studio tape operators to managers and the record industry. He still signed as of today to RCA records Sony Music, the concert industry, the radio industry publicists lawyers. I mean, it's been an incredible gravy train that has enabled a pattern of predation that I think is rivaled only in pop culture by the allegations against Bill Cosby, and what's more horrifying. In this case is they're fourteen fifteen sixteen year old girls. Now, our colleagues on weekend all things considered spoke with surviving R Kelly executive producer dream Hampton over the past weekend. She shared her thoughts on why people have been so slow to care about these allegations, he chooses girls that a lot of his fans dismiss disbelieve, and for all kinds of complicated and historical reasons, we don't believe we don't necessarily believe that, you know, black girls. We don't afford them innocence in the same way. We don't afford boys. Innocence. Can you talk about some of the victims that you have met what they said about what happened when they tried to tell people what was going on look the one quote that crystallized for me in November two thousand which seems like my entire life ago was an associated Kelly's who had walked away because he could no longer live with seeing the behavior. He was. Seeing said night after night after night. There are twenty beautiful young women in the green room backstage and nineteen of them are twenty one years old and night after night after night Robert goes after the little teenage girl with acne staring at her shoes in the corner too shy to talk to anyone and those girls were not going to be believed now dream Hampton has also said that she asked a number of celebrities for interviews including Jay z, and Dave Chapelle that they they turn those interviews down in the end only one major musician agreed to speak. It was John legend. Why is it so hard for people in the music industry to speak up because he has generated a quarter of a billion dollars of income with his record sales. You know, the list is extraordinary. I mean, it it runs from selene Dion who recorded with him to lady Gaga who only came out this morning to say, she regretted. Having done a song called do what you want with my body with R Kelly. She said that today in the midst of her campaign for an Oscar for a star is born I had called six times since July twenty seventeen to ask her for a comment. She said it today. You know, one of the reasons he was such a lucrative star. Is he not only sold one hundred million copies of his own records. But he sold tens of millions of copies for the artists. He produced you've seen a few cycles now if people turning against Kelly, and then kind of forgetting about the allegations does this time feel different. I wish I could say this time feels different audi-. You know, he's at a different point. You know, he's a fifty one year old aging R&_B star. And no one's buying his records anymore. And the mute are Kelly movement of activists black women has affectively shut down his ability to perform in concert. But I don't know if law enforcement finally acts and the courts bring Kelly to Justice, I honestly don't know. It's it's a student of popular music. I don't think any story in the history of popular music compares to this. And I well, no. The history from Chuck Berry to Jimmy page. But we're talking here already. You know, I think I'm being conservative. But the women I've spoken to on the record and the women who've talked to me off the record. I believe sixty women over thirty years, and I'm probably being conservative. Jim de regattas is host of the public radio show. Sound opinions? He has reported extensively on the allegations against our Kelly. Thank you for speaking with us. Oh, you're most welcome..

Robert Kelly R Kelly Campbell NPR US department of agriculture Rebecca hersher Audie Cornish Kelly Ari Shapiro Jacquelyn Campbell PHD Dr Campbell National Science Foundation Chicago Sun-Times Iowa State University Hampton Sony Music government Bill Cosby selene Dion
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:41 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KCRW

"And from Americans for the arts. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. I'm Ari Shapiro. Thousands of government scientists aren't working because of the government shutdown and that's affecting university. Researchers they collaborate with as NPR's Rebecca hersher reports Jacquelyn Campbell PHD works at Iowa State University. My mom introduces me as this is my daughter. She's a doctor, but not the type that helps people and I get that. Look like what Dr Campbell studies legalzoom's specifically. She works on making genetic information about beans and peas available to scientists around the world to help them help farmers increase yields and feed people who usually when people ask, you know, what do you do the first thing? I ask is do you enjoy that three being salad that you have? And in a very tiny way I helped with that. But since the government shutdown in December Campbell's life has been totally upside down. I she works in a building. That's least by the US department of agriculture now has a sign on the front door due to the government shutdown. This USC offices closed Campbell is one of four workers out of forty who aren't federal employees. So the office has been pretty lonely and normal office stuff has gotten really hard to she has to use her personal cell phone. And the poster printer is useless because the people who know how to use it are furloughed, which is a problem because there's a huge research meeting next week that Campbell now has extra work to prepare for one of my other colleagues. I am giving her presentation because USDA researchers won't be there to present their latest findings about the best way to raise and grow the food. We eat research that's paid for by taxpayers. And there is one more way that the shutdown is affecting Campbell and her family every day that the shutdown goes on the probability of being losing my job at the end of March increase. Her job is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation that money runs out in. In March, the NSF is shutdown days that could be used to apply for more NSF funding or find new money are ticking by I love signs. I love my job. There's not a day when I don't come in. I'm just like sitting on my desk when I was like, yes. Let's. And I sit at my desk now, and I kind of just look around going like, okay, what's next in a different sense? Because now everything is up in the air. Rebecca hersher, NPR news allegations of sexual abuse have followed Robert Kelly better known as R Kelly for years, but he's remained one of the most powerful and popular figures in our and be music after the surviving art Kelly docu series aired on lifetime this weekend. Things may be changing a prosecutor in Chicago is asking victims to come forward music stars are distancing themselves from Kelley journalist. Jim dear goddess has spent nearly two decades investigating allegations against our Kelly. He joins me now. Welcome to the program. Hi, audie. And as we start this discussion, we should say some content here is maybe disturbing to some people want to let you know at the start. Now R Kelly has been accused of a number of instances of abuse, especially for very young women. Can you describe the biggest allegations? You audie. A the very first story. I published in the Chicago Sun-Times in December of two thousand. I think that the nut graph of that story on day one. It has been true now for eighteen years are Kelly has consistently abused his position of wealth and fame to pursue illegal sexual relationships with underage girls and throughout this time. And now, especially with the docu series are Kelly has denied these allegations. One thing that the documentary revealed where the number of people around who helped bring young women into his inner circle. Can you talk about what you encountered in your reporting along these lines? There are any number of enablers around Kelly. Everybody from studio tape raiders to managers and the record industry. He's still signed as of today to RCA records Sony Music the concert industry, the radio industry, publicists lawyer. I mean, it's been an incredible gravy train that has enabled a pattern of predation that I think is rivaled only in pop culture by the allegations against Bill Cosby, and what's more horrifying in. This case is they're fourteen fifteen sixteen year old girls. Now, our colleagues on weekend all things considered spoke with surviving R Kelly executive producer dream Hampton over the past weekend. She shared her thoughts on why people have been so slow to care about these allegations. But he chooses girls that a lot of his fans dismissed and just believe in for all kinds of complicated and historical reasons, we don't believe we don't necessarily believe that, you know, black girls. We don't afford them innocence in the same way. We don't afford back boys. Innocence. Can you talk about some of the victims that you have met what they said about what happened when they tried to tell people what was going on. Look the one quote that crystallized it for me in November two thousand which seems like my entire life ago was an associated Kelly's who had walked away because he could no longer live with seeing the behavior. He was seeing said night after night after night there are twenty beautiful young women in the green room backstage and nineteen of them are twenty one years old and night after night after night Robert goes after the little teenage girl with acne staring at her shoes in the corner too shy to talk to anyone and those girls were not going to be believed now dream Hampton has also said that she asked a number of celebrities for interviews including a Jay z, and Dave Chapelle that they they turn those interviews down in the end only one major musician agreed to speak. It was John legend. Why is it so hard for people in the music industry? Speak up because he has generated a quarter of a billion dollars of income with his record sales. You know, the list is extraordinarily. I mean it it runs from Celine? Dion who recorded with him to lady Gaga who only came out this morning to say, she regretted having done a song called do what you want with my body with R Kelly. She said that today in the midst of her campaign for an Oscar for star is born I had called, you know, six times since July twenty seventeen to ask her for a comment. She said it today. You know, one of the reasons he was such a lucrative star. Is he not only sold one hundred million copies of his own records. But he sold tens of millions of copies for the artists. He produced you've seen a few cycles now of people turning against Kelly. And then kind of forgetting about the allegations. Does this time feel different? I wish I could say this time feels different Audie. You know, he's at a different point. You know, he's a fifty one year old aging R&_B star. And no one's buying his records anymore and the mute R Kelly movement of activists black women has effectively shutdown his ability to perform in concert, but I don't know if law enforcement finally acts and the courts bring Kelly to Justice. I honestly don't know. It's it's, you know, I'm a student of popular music, and I don't think any story in the history of popular music compares to this. And I I well, no. The history from Chuck Berry to Jimmy page, but we're talking here. Audie. I think I'm being conservative. But the women I've spoken to on the record and the women who've talked to me off the record. I believe sixty women over thirty years, and I'm probably being conservative. Jim de regattas is host of the public radio show. Sound opinions? He has reported extensively on the allegations against our Kelly. Thank you for speaking with us, or you're most welcome. This is NPR news. KCRW sponsors include focus features, presenting won't you be my neighbor. The documentary film that explores the life and legacy of Mr. Rogers now nominated for best documentary of the year by the producers guild of America directed by Morgan.

Robert Kelly NPR Campbell Audie Cornish US department of agriculture Rebecca hersher R Kelly Ari Shapiro Kelly Jacquelyn Campbell PHD Dr Campbell National Science Foundation Chicago Sun-Times Iowa State University Hampton Sony Music government Bill Cosby John legend
"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:14 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hersher" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. Thousands of government scientists aren't working because of the government shutdown and that's affecting university. Researchers they collaborate with as NPR's Rebecca hersher reports Jacquelyn Campbell PHD works at Iowa State University. My mom introduces me as this is my daughter. She's a doctor, but not the type that helps people generally get that look like what Dr Campbell studies legalzoom's specifically. She works on making genetic information about beans and peas available to scientists around the world to help them help farmers increase yields and feed people. Usually when people ask, you know, what do you do the first thing? I ask is do you enjoy that three Bs alad that you have and in a very tiny way I helped with that. But since the government shutdown in December Campbell's life has been totally upside down. I she works in a building. That's. Leased by the US department of agriculture now has a sign on the front door due to the government shutdown. This USDA offices closed Campbell is one of four workers out of forty who aren't federal employees. So the office has been pretty lonely and normal office stuff has gotten really hard to she has to use her personal cell phone. And the poster printer is useless because the people who know how to use it are furloughed, which is a problem because there's a huge research meeting next week that Campbell now has extra work to prepare for one of my other colleagues. I am giving her presentation because USDA researchers won't be there to present their latest findings about the best way to raise and grow the food. We eat research that's paid for by taxpayers. And there is one more way that the shutdown is affecting Campbell in her family every day that this shutdown goes on the probability of being losing my job and the end of March increase her job is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation that money runs out in March. Search the NSF is shutdown days that could be used to apply for more NSF funding or find new money are taking by I love science. I love my job. There's not a day when I don't come in. I'm just like sitting at my desk. And I was like, yes. Let's. And my best now, and I kind of just look around going like. Okay. What's next in a different sense? Because now everything is up in the air. Rebecca, hersher, NPR news. Allegations of sexual abuse have followed Robert Kelly better known as R Kelly for years, but he's remained one of the most powerful and popular figures in our and be music after the surviving R Kelly docu series aired on lifetime this weekend. Things may be changing a prosecutor in Chicago is asking victims to come forward music stars are distancing themselves from Kelley journalists. Jim dear goddess has spent nearly two decades investigating allegations against R Kelly. He joins me now. Welcome to the program. Hi. And as we start this discussion, we should say some content here is maybe disturbing to some people who wanna let you now at the start. Now are Kelly has been accused of a number of instances of abuse, especially for very young women. Can you describe the biggest allegations, you know, the very first story published in the Chicago Sun-Times in December of two thousand. I think that the nut graph of that story on day one. It has been true now for eighteen years R Kelly has consistent. Abused his position of wealth and fame to pursue illegal sexual relationships with underage girls and throughout this time. And now, especially with the docu series are Kelly has denied these allegations. One thing that the documentary revealed where the number of people around who helped bring young women into his inner circle. Can you talk about what you encountered in your reporting along these lines? There are any number of enablers around Kelly. Everybody from studio tape raiders to managers and the record industry. He's still signed as of today to RCA records Sony Music, the concert industry, the radio industry publicists lawyers. I mean, it's been an incredible gravy train that has enabled a pattern of predation that I think is rivaled only in pop culture by the allegations against Bill Cosby, and what's more horrifying. In this case is they're fourteen fifteen sixteen year old girls. Now, our colleagues on weekend all things considered spoke with surviving R Kelly executive producer dream Hampton over the past weekend. She shared her thoughts on why people have been so slow to care about these allegations, he chooses girls that a lot of his fans dismiss and disbelieve and for all kinds of complicated in historical reasons. We don't believe we don't necessarily believe that, you know, black girls. We don't afford them innocence in the same way. We don't afford batboys innocence. Can you talk about some of the victims that you have met what they said about what happened when they tried to tell people what was going on look the one quote that crystallized for me in November two thousand which seems like my entire life ago was an of Kelly's who had walked away because he could no longer live with seeing the behavior. Was seeing said night after night after night. There are twenty beautiful young women in the green room backstage and nineteen of them are twenty one years old and night after night after night Robert goes after the little teenage girl with acne staring at her shoes in the corner too shy to talk to anyone and those girls were not going to be believed now dream Hampton has also said that she asked a number of celebrities for interviews including Jay z, and Dave Chapelle that they they turn those interviews down in the end only one major musician agreed to speak. It was John legend. Why is it so hard for people in the music industry to speak up because he has generated a quarter of a billion dollars of income with his record sales. You know, the list is extraordinarily mean, it it runs from selene Dion who recorded with him to lady Gaga who only came out this morning to say, she regretted. Having done a song called do what you want with my body with R Kelly. She said that today in the midst of her campaign for an Oscar for a star is born I had called six times since July of twenty seventeen to ask her for a comment. She said it today. One of the reasons he was such a lucrative star. Is he not only sold one hundred million copies of his own records. But he sold tens of millions of copies for the artists. He produced you've seen a few cycles now of people turning against Kelly. And then kind of forgetting about the allegations. Does this time feel different? I wish I could say this time feels different audi-. You know, he's at a different point. He's a fifty one year old aging R&_B star. And no one's buying his records anymore. And the mute are Kelly movement of activists black women has affectively shut down his ability to perform in concert. But I don't know if law enforcement finally acts and the courts bring Kelly Justice, I honestly don't know. It's it's, you know, I'm a student of popular music, and I don't think any story in the history of popular music compares to this. And I well know the history from Chuck Berry to Jimmy page, but we're talking here. Audie. I think I'm being conservative. But the women I've spoken to on the record and the women who've talked to me off the record. I believe sixty women over thirty years, and I'm probably being conservative. Jim dear regattas is host of the public radio show. Sound opinions? He has reported extensively on the allegations against our Kelly. Thank you for speaking with us. Oh, you're most welcome..

Robert Kelly R Kelly Campbell NPR US department of agriculture Rebecca hersher Audie Cornish Kelly Justice Ari Shapiro Jacquelyn Campbell PHD Dr Campbell Jim Chicago Sun-Times National Science Foundation Iowa State University Hampton Sony Music government Bill Cosby