21 Burst results for "Rebecca Herschel"

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Points. The NASDAQ closed down 39 points. The S and P 500 was up five points. This is NPR. Louisiana Governor John Bell, Edwards says Hurricane Laura left a path of destruction along the U. S Gulf Coast or has since week into a tropical storm but slammed into southern Louisiana is a powerful Category four hurricane really today with sustained winds of 150 MPH, NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports. It's the third storm since 2017 to hit land with such Catastrophic power. Hurricane Laura got its power from the hot water in the Gulf of Mexico. The water on the surface of the Gulf is about 4 F warmer than the historical average. Climate. Scientists say that was enough to help Laura intensify really quickly in 24 hours before the storm hit the coast. It's maximum wind speeds nearly doubled. That's similar to what happened to Hurricane Harvey in 2017 before it hit the Texas Coast and Hurricane Michael in 2018 when it hit the Florida Panhandle. Climate change is causing sea surface temperatures around the world to rise. Which makes dangerous storms. More common. Rebecca Hirscher NPR news while winded water Our problem in parts of the South Today, continued firing heat are plaguing the West Coast. Thousands have been forced to flee their homes in California's wildfires continue to burn their while Cooler weather and higher committee has given some help. Though firefighters in recent days large fires continue burning in and around the San Francisco Bay area. Those fires have claimed the lives of at least seven people, including two men missing from the Santa Cruz area..

Hurricane Laura U. S Gulf Coast NPR Gulf Hurricane Harvey Hurricane Michael Louisiana West Coast Rebecca Hirscher Rebecca Herschel Texas Coast Santa Cruz San Francisco Bay Mexico California John Bell Florida Edwards
'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

All Things Considered

00:59 min | 1 year ago

'Extremely dangerous' Hurricane Laura slams into Louisiana as Category 4

"John Bell, Edwards says Hurricane Laura left a path of destruction along the U. S Gulf Coast or has since week into a tropical storm but slammed into southern Louisiana is a powerful Category four hurricane really today with sustained winds of 150 MPH, NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports. It's the third storm since 2017 to hit land with such Catastrophic power. Hurricane Laura got its power from the hot water in the Gulf of Mexico. The water on the surface of the Gulf is about 4 F warmer than the historical average. Climate. Scientists say that was enough to help Laura intensify really quickly in 24 hours before the storm hit the coast. It's maximum wind speeds nearly doubled. That's similar to what happened to Hurricane Harvey in 2017 before it hit the Texas Coast and Hurricane Michael in 2018 when it hit the Florida Panhandle. Climate change is causing sea surface temperatures around the world to rise. Which makes dangerous storms. More common. Rebecca Hirscher NPR news while winded

Hurricane Laura U. S Gulf Coast Gulf Hurricane Harvey Hurricane Michael Rebecca Hirscher Rebecca Herschel NPR Texas Coast John Bell Louisiana Mexico Edwards Florida Panhandle
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Students walked out of class Monday and Tuesday to protest what they see is the destruction Ebeling of sexual assault and harassment yesterday some of the protesters occupied the school district offices with the men changes including an earlier start to consent education here senior centers you turn your blind hi and you turn your cheek to someone who is crying for help someone who doesn't fit in a classroom with the person that is well here with the students are saying how the districts responding and why the issue has reached a boiling point after brewing for years that's all next after this new live from NPR news in Washington I'm she Stevens US Attorney General William Barr has agreed to testify before the house Judiciary Committee next month committee chair Jerrold Nadler says the panel has some concerns about how bars running the justice department Democrats want to know why bar over ruled for federal prosecutors who requested up to nine years in prison for trump confidante convicted of obstruction and witness tampering in the Russia pro the prosecutors quit the case after bar intervene president trump senior adviser and son in law Jared Kushner is trying to revive efforts to overhaul the nation's immigration system is NPR's Frank or doing as reports Kushner hopes to unite Republicans on the issue before the elections in November the plan calls for the United States to adopt a merit based immigration system that places greater emphasis on job skills and also reorganizes the department of homeland security and creates an immigration czar position who will direct it's three immigration related agencies the cushions plan faces daunting odds there is a divide between what business interests want and what immigration restriction is groups are willing to accept and Democrats are expected to denounce any effort that does not address the eleven million undocumented immigrants living in the US the White House says no final decisions have been made but that the president wants a rational immigration policy that protects American jobs and U. S. borders Franco or Dona as NPR news the chairman of the Iowa Democratic Party says he'll step down as soon as the replacement is chosen toy prices announcing his resignation just over a week after the state failed democratic presidential caucuses blamed on technical glitches prices the party will meet Saturday to elect his successor Hong Kong as per confirmed its fiftieth case of the corona virus and Paris Rebecca Herschel reports at the slow but steady spread of the disease in the city is putting a strain on doctors the outbreak in Hong Kong has brought the city's hospital system to a standstill patients who need treatment for other ailments from heart disease to diabetes to broken bones must be checked for symptoms of covert nineteen and elective surgeries have been delayed until the outbreak is over doctor offered Wong is a cardiologist at a public hospital in the city he has stopped seeing heart disease patients because he's on a so called dirty team treating covert nineteen patients we don't need to be heroes I mean I don't want to be heroes I just want to be a normal doctor doctors in Hong Kong are being rotated off thirty teams every four to six weeks Rebecca Herscher NPR news Hong Kong name on a cruise ship turned away by four Asian governments because of fear of coronaviruses finally docked in Cambodia but the more than two thousand passengers passengers and crew will have to undergo health checks before disembarking this is NPR news in Texas the man accused of killing twenty two people and in el Paso Walmart has pleaded not guilty to a string of federal charges KP arrays Mallory false reports that authorities allege the suspect told police he was targeting Mexicans twenty one year old Patrick Chrissy has appeared in a police are in tight with his hands and feet and shackles he waived his right to hear all the charges against him ninety counts in total including forty five hate crime charges prosecutors say just before the August third shooting the suspect posted an anti my grant white supremacists greed online saying the attack was a quote response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas the department of justice as Attorney General William Barr will ultimately decide whether to seek the death penalty the alleged gunman also faces a state capital murder charge for NPR news I'm Mallory Falk in el Paso American national Christina coke says she had some sore muscles but the weather problems readjusting to gravity after spending nearly eleven months at the international space station cook discussed her record breaking mission with reporters Wednesday in Houston I feel great I'm really fortunate a lot of people because of the different nervous similar system things then changes that go on for micro gravity when you're reacting to one G. into earth you might experience a motion sickness and things like that I'm really fortunate in that I have not experienced that but what I have noticed is that my balance is taking a little while to get used to it last October cook was part of the first all female space walking team she returned to earth last week I'm sure Stevens.

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:39 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Joan Kroc whose bequests serves as an enduring investment in the future of public radio and by the listeners of KQED high wind advisory in effect through early tomorrow morning gusts up to fifty miles per hour and same for Sacramento although that advisory is lifted tonight at ten o'clock for high winds this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Michelle Martin we're going to begin today with a look ahead to New Hampshire where voters will head to the polls in just two days for the second nominating contest of the twenty twenty presidential election the primary there follows the tumultuous Iowa caucuses and a sharp elbow debate among most of the democratic contenders on Friday night both events have scrambled some of the races key storylines NPR Scott dentro joins us now from Hanover New Hampshire hi Scott Hey there so for months it seemed as if Joe Biden was the clear front runner at least he was acting like it and his main focus was president trump but now he's lashing out at Bernie Sanders and people to judge what happened well when you're the Lecter ability candidate you come in fourth place and I won that could repeat itself in New Hampshire you need to change things up what's striking to me is that the entire campaign Joe Biden basically ignored the fact he was running in a primary and talk almost exclusively like he was already the nominee then suddenly this weekend he shifts gears he's running a negative attack questioning and belittling judges experience as the mayor of south bend and and and criticizing budget for comparing himself to Barack Obama he talked about this with reporters this weekend come on man you think these guys this guy's not of rock Obama in but a judge had a pretty quick response to that talking to CNN today well he's right I'm not and neither is he so there you go and judges saying that this is about the future invited as long on the past and judge is seeing an uptick in the polls drawing a lot of big excited crowds this weekend okay and what about the other candidate on the top of the polls in New Hampshire senator Bernie Sanders well he's feeling pretty confident this is a state that Sanders won by more than twenty points for years ago everyone expects that margin to be much tighter Tuesday no matter who's on top but Sanders thinks his message about radical change to the political system plays really well here I've been traveling with him all weekend and he's got big you know you can feel the energy in the room when he's talking no matter where he I was in New Hampshire as you hear this style was like how do we stop birdies open oh my god the people of standing up fighting for justice how do we stop that working people what do you should wages these trade agreements people want healthcare for how do we stop it well they ain't gonna stop it and one interesting thing about this weekend is that right now most of the fires going on between booty judging by then in there by March leaving Sanders alone of course it's a larger field in these three men what's the state Tuesday for the rest of the field I'm thinking particularly about senator Elizabeth Warren who seem to have a strong start she did all of last year she was regarded with the best organized campaign the one who could to mobilize voters you can argue she's the one that that hit that exact middle ground the Democrats are looking for right now that progressive message but with a track record of working with the establishment and yet it seems at the moment like she's being pushed to the side that debate Friday where she didn't get much speaking time really crystallizing that I think Elizabeth Warren really has a lot of pressure to do better in New Hampshire than she did in Iowa even though she out performed for polls it's been a sudden the focus on judging by then leading her out of the mix I think enclosures also somebody to watch she's seen a lot of searching polls in the last few days as I think a lot of moderate democratic voters way their choices right now she could be someone they end up with that is NPR Scott dentro he's in Hanover New Hampshire Scott thank you so much thanks Michelle my all things considered co host ari Shapiro is also in New Hampshire where he's been talking to voters and he is about to introduce us to one of them how ARE hi Michelle so where we going today I'm taking you to the home of a man named Carlos Cardona and he stands out in a lot of ways he is a young Latino Democrat in an overwhelmingly old white Republican part of the country this is Laconia New Hampshire about an hour north of Manchester and at his big lavender house on a lake with a rainbow flag flying in front he has made it his mission to host as many democratic candidates as possible so how many candidates as he actually been able to get to this rural conservative part of his state he told us thirty thirty candidates just over the last year the first thing he showed me when I walked into his home was a big serving platter covered in the candidate signatures Joe by then this one I think it's done and build Arianna Williamson Bernie Sanders had to sign it twice I couldn't signature very well there so we had inside of there you must be very persuasive to get them all come to accounting I people either love me or they hate me like a I I I'm Porter Rican we don't give up Jenna resilience and determination a really built into his life story in Puerto Rico Carlos Cardona and his family lived in what he calls a shanty firewood walls red dirt floor we actually used to name the mice that would come through our kitchen and as a teenager when his family lived in Massachusetts he came out of the closet and he was homeless for awhile I was sixteen years old I had left my parents my mom was diagnosed with cancer I had come out a year prior to that it was very difficult and a very Catholic family so today he takes his access to presidential candidates very seriously he talks to them about what his relatives who are still importer Rico have experienced since hurricane Maria my father caught a bacteria from drinking bad water he will forever be disable sorry I lost an uncle who committed suicide because he can have enough to eat and he didn't want to starve to death so you can tell this is someone who does what he sets his mind to and he set his mind to bringing presidential candidates to his community I'm gonna play you some more of our conversation here in our first came it was injury ang and more as a guy with no name recognition of the time because maybe the bigger names are a little reluctant right and basically I actually print out pictures for us yeah under Yang flanked by some people our committee came out and support of this venture and I said to them regardless of who your favorite is please come out there's a mission to this the mission is to highlight not how we feel about a candidate but our communities so in here I'm sure you've got bind supporters Bernie Sanders supporters was more looking that is all there actually I don't see an intriguing supporter in that picture right people that I know and you know it just shows that you know just took a little bit of work at first of convincing people that this was the right thing to do you're able to get people to come to this small county in the middle of New Hampshire and I'm sure that there are people in small counties all over the United States who would love to get the candidates and the attention but because they're not in New Hampshire they can't they had seen where do you do I want every state to have the same opportunity that we have here absolutely people ask me do you think the Hampshire she continued first of the nation my answer is yes New Hampshire is not like any other state in places like Iowa California Texas Florida the conversation is maybe a little bit lost specially because money is so driven in politics in those big states New Hampshire being so small and so culturally the culture here's so political but can I add another and yeah beyond small and culturally political white I mean this state is ninety three ninety four percent white it's one of the whitest states and quickly diversifying than I can stay even more props for putting somebody like myself in the position that they have put I've never had an issue with race or we've even sexual orientation here in the state I'm looking at this platter with all of the names of all the presidential candidates you posted here in your home and I'm thinking about the stories you've told us of growing up in which you describe as a chance importer Rico of being homeless as a high school or and now living in this big beautiful house with a husband and kids and hosting presidential candidates what's it like to look back on this journey for my mom is most emotional for me you can't help when you come from party to feel guilty with the people that you've left behind I know I did it the right way I know I did everything my family ever told me to do work hard it'll pay off but you know you just can't help but it's something that you're like I wish I can do it for everybody else and his mom who he just mentioned was upstairs helping to take care of his brand new baby born as he told us just a month before primary day what are we thank you for that I look forward to hearing more you're welcome Michelle switching gears now to the corona virus outbreak in China officials say the number of infections has now risen to more than thirty seven thousand with more than eight hundred people dead in Hong Kong officials have instituted a mandatory fourteen day quarantine for anyone entering the territory from the mainland so far the outbreak has been kept relatively under control in Hong Kong but as NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports the constant warnings have a lot of people on edge Hong Kong's subway system is modern fast and spotless but these days there are constant announcements about washing your hands reminders of the stations up next.

Joan Kroc Sacramento KQED
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

"Beijing says more than thirty seven thousand people are now infected with the novel coronavirus in mainland China and an additional eighty nine people have died this weekend NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports the death toll now exceeds eight hundred the latest fatalities underscore the ongoing spread of the corona virus in mainland China the number of people killed by the virus now exceeds the number of people killed by the two thousand to two thousand three sars outbreak however in the novel coronavirus appears to be less dangerous than sars was the World Health Organization says the majority of cases are mild the majority of new deaths were in who bay province where the outbreak began late last year travel to and from China remains restricted in an effort to control the virus is spread in neighboring Hong Kong which was hit hard by the sars outbreak authorities have instituted a mandatory quarantine for anyone coming from the mainland we're back to her sure NPR news Hong Kong

Coronavirus outbreak: Death toll reaches 814, with more than 37,000 people infected as of Sunday in China

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus outbreak: Death toll reaches 814, with more than 37,000 people infected as of Sunday in China

"Beijing says more than thirty seven thousand people are now infected with the novel coronavirus in mainland China and an additional eighty nine people have died this weekend NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports the death toll now exceeds eight hundred the latest fatalities underscore the ongoing spread of the corona virus in mainland China the number of people killed by the virus now exceeds the number of people killed by the two thousand to two thousand three sars outbreak however in the novel coronavirus appears to be less dangerous than sars was the World Health Organization says the majority of cases are mild the majority of new deaths were in who bay province where the outbreak began late last year travel to and from China remains restricted in an effort to control the virus is spread in neighboring Hong Kong which was hit hard by the sars outbreak authorities have instituted a mandatory quarantine for anyone coming from the mainland we're back to her sure NPR news Hong Kong

Beijing China NPR Rebecca Herschel World Health Organization Hong Kong
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Track the young people setting sail across the Atlantic Ocean on a raft what could possibly go wrong doesn't get your last jacket ready we probably that judgment storytelling would be this breaks live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein Beijing is confirming more than thirty four thousand cases of the new corona virus in mainland China alone more than seven hundred twenty have died is NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports Hong Kong is now imposing a mandatory quarantine for anyone arriving from the mainland anyone coming from mainland China into Hong Kong is now required to remain in their homes or hotel rooms for fourteen days even if they have no symptoms of the novel corona virus that has sickened tens of thousands of people in China and killed more than seven hundred visitors who don't quarantine themselves could be jailed for up to six months Hong Kong's government warned the new rules took effect midnight on Friday the day before the number of people crossing the border into the city was up by about a third as travelers tried to get in before the quarantine rules began the World Health Organization says the vast majority of corona virus cases are mild we're back her sure NPR news Hong Kong the US military says its assessing an attack on American and Afghan forces in eastern Afghanistan officials of provided no details on casualties and it's not clear whether it's an insider attack or the Taliban or isis affiliate are behind it democratic presidential hopeful Pete booted judges back on the campaign trail in New Hampshire after rivals targeted him during a debate last night NPR's Sam green glass reports the former south bend mayor rally supporters in Keene this morning outside a packed auditorium on the campus of Keene state college the line stretched down the sidewalk inside supporters crowded the balconies and the judge did not talk much about his rivals but he did say he's the candidate bass prepared to beat Donald Trump and made this subtle nod to Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden I also don't think we can take the risk of excluding anybody from this effort of saying thing that if you're not either for a revolution or status quo then you don't fit I think we're going to defeat this president by inviting everybody to be at our side the judge is looking for a strong showing here in New Hampshire building on his virtual first place tie in Iowa Sam green glass NPR news Keene New Hampshire a soldier in Thailand is killed at least twenty people in a shooting rampage the shooter has yet to be apprehended Michael Sullivan reports details remain sketchy but police say the soldiers shot a superior officer and several others at the base before making his way to a nearby mall graphic videos posted on social media showed several victims on the street outside inside the shooter appears to have posted Facebook videos of himself in the mall saying he was tired and complaining he couldn't move his finger anymore Facebook has since removed his posting this is NPR live from KQED news I'm Michelle Wiley state officials say they found the body of an endangered gray wolf and Shasta county this week fewer than a dozen of these walls are known to live in the Golden State where conservationists are monitoring their population I'm Rick Weiss is a wolf advocate with the center for biological diversity and says the wolf called are five four were radio collar to track her movements between California and Oregon to doctors even one wall is pretty devastating we're really in the early stages of recovery for Wilson California department of fish and wildlife in the is investigating the cause of death officials noted in their non spent that killing a wolf is a potential crime is subject to jail time and penalties sixteen labs around the state should be able to start testing for the new coronavirus by next week including a lab in Richmond officials with the California department of public health announced this past week the service will provide more rapid results than sending test of the centers for disease control and prevention in Atlanta that takes up to a week well in state testing is expected to be complete within two days to date CGC tests have confirmed six cases of the new corona virus in California including two in Santa Clara.

Atlantic Ocean
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In China strategy to contain the outbreak also a story from the street to Santiago Chile about the high price paid by protesters seeking reform here about how damage from climate change flooding may affect voters in Davenport Iowa plus a four year olds poignant ditty about dinosaurs finding love it's Sunday February second groundhog day and to to twenty twenty the news is next live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein the the World Health Organization has declared a public health emergency of international concern due to the virus the consul general Wong dong law says places with good public health systems like San Francisco needed to worry okay so yes potential for viruses press two countries in the lead in a public health we shop you protest do meanwhile across the bay area lunar new year celebrations are taking place despite a few cancellations in certain places like Palo alto San Francisco resident Michael long without the ocean avenues lunar new year celebrations Saturday love says he's not at this point concerned about the corona virus as it's been largely concentrated in the region of Wuhan that event cancellations here are necessary in this vicinity is geographic vicinity probably was an over reaction full just because of the fact that there's been so much more media exposure to to this particular contagion that everybody's really panicking Livvie Lee David also from San Francisco says news of the virus freaked out her eighth grade daughter she I think came down with a flu last week and so she was really concerned and so she had actually started looking at symptoms of that corona virus thinking that that might have impacted her bay area public health officials have stressed that there's no evidence suggesting the novel coronavirus is spreading in the region advising instead to get the flu shot as a flu is circulating locally I'm Julie chain KQ reading news who they think can win against president Donald Trump and many islands are still undecided but the remaining candidates are making their cases in back to back rallies across the state the four US senators and the race will have to be back in DC Monday morning for more hearings in the impeachment trial Australian authorities of lifted a state of emergency near the capital Canberra NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports firefighters are slowly bringing a massive bush fire south of the city under control the fire started in a national park nearly a week ago and days of hot dry weather helped feed the flames as temperatures soared above one hundred degrees going into the weekend authorities warned that the fire could expand rapidly and threaten villages on the outskirts of Canberra but helicopters and fire crews successfully held back the blaze officials now say the immediate danger has passed although the fire will likely continue to burn for weeks farther south the hottest most fire prone weeks of the year are just beginning while bush fires are a natural an important part of Australian ecosystems climate change is driving longer and worst of your fire seasons in populated parts of the country we're back to her sure NPR news Victoria Australia this is NPR massive swarms of locusts are spreading through East Africa Somalia's declaring a national emergency as the insects threaten its food supply Kenya calls it the worst locust outbreak in seventy years the Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco forty Niners face off for the NFL's Super Bowl championship later today San Francisco is going for a sixth title and his Greg Echlin reports they're relying on a quarterback who's played in the Super Bowl twice before but in a different role San Francisco forty Niners quarterback Jimmy garage below went to the Super Bowl with the New England Patriots two times as a backup quarterback but since the two thousand seventeen trade with the patriots Ravelo is running the show for the Niners he says he got some advice from last year's Super Bowl winning quarterback Tom Brady yeah yes I mean fax this guy you know good luck and everything like that and you know it's not going into business you know wasn't wasn't too complicated or anything just a win in two thousand eighteen garage blows season was cut short by a knee injury the team the forty Niners were playing that day the Kansas City Chiefs the team the Niners will play in Super Bowl fifty four for NPR news I'm Greg Eklund spring will come early to the northern hemisphere at least according to punk to Tony fill and or at least a group of top hat wearing man on a tiny hill in Pennsylvania this morning they say the famed ground hog did not see his.

Santiago Chile China
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:31 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"By some over the state's new bail reform laws that and most forms of cash bail Barkley says they need to be fixed so it's kind of issues we have millions of people leaving New York state we have a six billion dollar shortfall so all we have huge issues facing New York the police report FOR called released Tuesday shows the former assembly leader had a blood alcohol content twice the legal limit and the call told the tow truck driver that his wife was driving saying you know how women drive Barkley says he saddened and disappointed by his predecessors actions the owner of the famed spotted pig restaurant has agreed to pay two hundred forty thousand dollars and share a share of his profits to eleven former employees who accused him of sexual harassment the settlement was brokered by New York state Attorney General tish James who announced the agreement earlier today how high profile the establishment or house seemingly powerful the owner is today's settlement reiterates the fact that we will not tolerate sexual harassment of any form in the workplace premium will also step down from managing or operating the restaurant though he says he disagrees with some of the allegations and president robin schedule the rally in South Jersey for later this month in the district of a congressman who recently flipped parties over to the Republicans the campaign stop is set to take place at the Wildwood convention center in representative Jeff rand ruse district Andrew left the Democratic Party last month after he decided not to support the impeachment of president trump and trump later endorsed van roost at reelection bid from the oval office the rally is one of a number of events the president has scheduled at the beginning of the election year more on this story is coming up on All Things Considered after news headlines tonight rain before nine o'clock snow overnight low of thirty four currently it's forty one degrees and it's overcast in Central Park at seven oh six support for NPR comes from the corporation for public broadcasting and the estate of Joan Kroc is the Questor of season and during investment in the future of public radio from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro we have some breaking news tonight reports of rocket attacks in Iraq Iranian state run TV says Iran has targeted the all assigned air base that is a US base in the and our province of western Iraq Iran of course vowed to retaliate for the U. S. killing of Iranian general Qassem Soleimani and your White House correspondent Franco or doing as is here in the studio Franco what else do we know at this hour well we are learning that you where we are learning this moment by moment and apparently there is a statement from the Iranian revolutionary guard that says the fierce revenge by the revolutionary guard has begun and of course we also know that the US has been saying they've been preparing for a run in retaliation has the White House said anything tonight about these attacks they're not saying much at this point only that they're seeing reports and that the president has been briefed and is closely monitoring the situation as well as he's also consulting with his national security team now American officials of course were aware of the potential for Iran to strike back how prepared were they for this and what have they said about the American response well they have been saying that they are prepared for a response and prepared for a run to take action earlier today in fact president trump said that the US is prepared to retaliate if Arron strikes back but he also downplayed remarks that he made earlier this week about potentially targeting cultural sites they're allowed to kill our people they're allowed to maim our people they're allowed to blow up everything that we have and there's nothing to stop them and we are according to various laws are supposed to be very careful with their cultural heritage and you know what if that's what the law is I will I like to obey the law now president trump says that just there he said that he likes to obey the law but he has also been very clear on in what he has said in the past saying that when a Ron responds that the that the United States will respond in greater force before he said they would use a disproportionate response which is a significant work that is NPR's Franco or down yes on reports tonight that a U. S. air base in western Iraq the onus on air base is under attack an attack that Iran has claimed responsibility for calling it the fierce revenge by the revolutionary guard Franco thank you thank you much for having me Iraq's prime minister says his country wants US troops to leave he told his cabinet today there's no other way to defuse tensions in the region what's more he says Iraq has the forces to fight ISIS which is the primary reason why the US is in Iraq these days for some thoughts on that I spoke earlier with retired lieutenant general Sean McFarland he commanded US forces fighting ISIS in twenty fifteen and twenty sixteen I think that is a a wildly optimistic statement by the prime minister remember part of the reason that ISIS got its feet under it was in the absence of the US forces and the Iraqi security forces have improved I just don't think that they're quite ready to take the fight on their own right now and hold ISIS in advance can you give us some examples or consequences if the US fight against ISIS is disrupted over this situation well obviously the training advising you know the thing to remember is one of the most effective forces against isis was the counterterrorism service the CTS they were the shock troops they were the forces that lead virtually every operation against ISIS without that relationship with us their rank user taking a huge gamble as far as our ability to continue to fight a terrorist threats like ISIS the other example I would say is that the US is able to marshal international coalition members and apply pressure to ISIS across Iraq and Syria and around the world really yeah I mean there's really no place ISIS can run and hide from the long arm of the U. S. led coalition without the United States being able to provide the framework for that coalition and what its ability to operate in Iraq the Iraqis are going to be at a huge disadvantage vis a vis any the successor organization that might replace ISIS or whether ISIS itself comes back I want to ask you about the killing of the Iranian general Qassem Soleimani when you were heading anti ISIS efforts was there serious talk of doing something like this taking this kind of action not really at the time we kinda had our hands full with isis and we weren't really looking to pick a fight with Sula money and to be honest at the at that time the PMR for the house to Xabi were engaged in the fight against ISIS you're talking about a running back to malicious I am at that point they were serving some useful purpose so we didn't really seriously consider anything of that nature however we know that the reverse is not true that the Iranian backed militias were constantly casting and a wary eye toward us and we're not really excited about the fact that we were present in Iraq in any significant numbers and I used to call it the the sole Amani moratorium that allowed us to operate in Iraq that eventually Slimani was say okay thanks for all of your help America and your allies now get the hell out which I think is what happened you spent a large part of your career at a rock all the way back to the Gulf War the US has had troops there for seventeen years I'm with the threat of US troops being kicked out after all these years has the US finally eventually lost Iraq well I think that to the extent that we've lost a rack a lot of that occurred when we pulled out in two thousand ten and eleven that was what really gave a ran the opportunity to gain a great deal of influence in Iraqi government and security forces I think a lot of them was recovered by us coming in and helping in the fight against ISIS and I think the Abadi government and the current government were we're good partners with us and I think things were on a pretty good path until ran began ratcheting up the pressure and then we got into this situation that we're in now so I think we haven't lost Iraq but certainly things are not as good as they were when the wolf was growling at the door and terms of our relations with Iraq general Sean McFarland thank you for your time you're very welcome thanks sorry that's retired lieutenant general Sean McFarland he commanded the fight against ISIS in Iraq and Syria from twenty fifteen to twenty sixteen is now a senior fellow at Harvard university's Belfer center embers are raining down on Australia more than two dozen people have died in fires that have already been burning for months nearly two thousand homes have been damaged or destroyed and the burning debris means thousands more are in danger of catching fire and here's Rebecca Herschel reports if you were trying to create a wildfire nightmare on earth you'd probably start with something like the situation in Australia so what we're seeing in Australia right now we're covering a lot of area with a lot of flame Daniel Gorham studies how homes catch fire for the insurance institute for business and home safety big fires have big plumes and these big plumes actually suck in air horizontally just like a campfire would put a big fire drills and air very quickly horizontally and then it goes off into the plume vertically it's enough to sweep tons of fiery debris thousands of feet up into the atmosphere so when you see a big smoky cloud above a fire imagine it's full of flaming junk embers so embers range in size from small little particles breaking off from a burning blade of grass to pine cones any cases where we have really large fires members in the size of your hands are large and that are easily lifted up and in those cases travel miles ahead miles ahead of the actual flames so homes far away from the fire itself are being pelted with flaming bark and leaves which honestly people who study wildfires used to think was kind of a side show the real danger to your house they thought was from the heat and intensity of a wall of flames arriving in your yard but that was wrong Ian we're is an architect he's also one of the authors of Australia's national building standards for fire so we understand that money to sit upon the lost through invisible or for brains when he says ninety percent of homes are lost to amber's he's referring to a very specific study from twenty ten by Australia's national research agency before that research in the U. S. had shown that members were responsible for a lot probably the majority of homes that were destroyed in California fires but the twenty ten study in Australia found that members appeared to be basically the way that homes there were catching fire but how to fix the problem for that we are in his building code colleagues in Australia looked back to research from the US and what we've learned actually form you'll National Institute of standards and technology I've done some great research on exactly what would the dimension of the gaps at which point we start to lose houses and they found that anything greater than than three millimeters would enable him because that would be sufficiently large to actually not a wall cavities and furniture and so on so in the most recent set of building standards which were adopted in Australia just last year new homes that are being built in fire prone areas are required to plug up gaps in window casings indoor jams in refunds but we're says sealing the gaps isn't enough Australia's building standards are not sufficient to protect against the kind of massive endless fires it's experiencing now one of the big problems he says goes back to something Australians share with many Americans a desire to live in the woods or as he puts it retreat to the bush and we like to do in the highlands swimmer in the bush and now we realize will you know how we would proceed building codes in both Australia and the U. S. generally only apply to new buildings and retrofitting is very expensive so all those older flammable homes in the bush are sitting ducks Rebecca her sure NPR news.

Barkley New York
Climate Change Is Ravaging the Arctic, Report Finds

WNYC Programming

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Climate Change Is Ravaging the Arctic, Report Finds

"Air and water in the arctic continues warm faster than the rest of the world that's according to the latest arctic report card NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports it was a second year the Bering Sea was nearly ice free since the nineteen eighties the arctic has been warming about twice as fast as the global average that means people who live and work in the arctic or seeing the effects of climate change and fast forward this year's report join dozens of scientific papers that found see and ice temperatures in around Alaska have risen dramatically in the last few years permafrost and ice sheets are melting rapidly belching carbon into the atmosphere and causing sea levels to rise this is the first year that a chapter by indigenous community leaders in Alaska was included in the report the essay focused on how loss of sea ice and snow is cutting thousands of people are from food including fish seals and walrus Rebecca her sure and

Arctic NPR Rebecca Herschel Bering Sea Alaska
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"General Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it. meeting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that with the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a planned summer also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek the answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs this even center for climate change law at Columbia University all these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Baltimore boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Columbia University Colorado San Miguel Antonio Guterres Oakland Rhode Island Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

"Secretary general Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it limiting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society are we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a planned summer also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek to answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs the Sabin center for climate change law at Columbia University all these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Baltimore boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Columbia University Colorado San Miguel Antonio Guterres Oakland Rhode Island Sabin center Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Secretary general Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it limiting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a planned summer also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek to answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs the Sabin center for climate change law at Columbia University all of these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the case is filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Oakland boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Colorado San Miguel Baltimore Antonio Guterres Rhode Island Columbia University Sabin center Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"General Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it. meeting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society all we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a plan some are also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek the answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs this even center for climate change law at Columbia University all of these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Oakland boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Colorado San Miguel Baltimore Antonio Guterres Rhode Island Columbia University Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KCRW

"General Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it limiting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society how we go foods use lands full all transports and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a planned summer also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek to answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs the C. been center for climate change law at Columbia University all these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Baltimore boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Columbia University Colorado San Miguel Antonio Guterres Oakland Rhode Island Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Secretary general Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it limiting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a planned summer also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seeking answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs the Sabin center for climate change law at Columbia University all of these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the cases filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the cases allege oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Oakland boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Colorado San Miguel Baltimore Antonio Guterres Rhode Island Columbia University Sabin center Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Secretary general Antonio Guterres opened the meeting by challenging countries to make bold plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions immediately we can do it. limiting warming to one point five degrees is still possible. but if you require fundamental transformations in all aspects of society are we go foods use lands full all transport and followed economies all of that to put the brakes on greenhouse gas emissions and beyond debating a plan some are also beginning to wrestle with the big question who is responsible for the effects of global warming NPR's Rebecca Herschel reports that a growing number of lawsuits seek the answer that question there are about a dozen significant lawsuits against oil companies in the US right now Michael Berger runs this even center for climate change law at Columbia University all of these lawsuits have been filed in the last couple of years there is the one filed by the state of Rhode Island against twenty one companies including Exxon B. P. shell and chevron there the case is filed by the cities of San Francisco Oakland and Baltimore and by San Miguel and boulder counties in Colorado and in each case the city or state or county is suing one or more fossil fuel companies over the impacts of climate change it's a wide range of impacts many of the lawsuits to focus on sea level rise and coastal storms but it also includes drought wildfire flooding in Colorado the lawsuits allege that the oil companies should help pay for the cost of dealing with all of that now and in the future because the case is a ledge oil companies have known for a long time that burning fossil fuels causes global warming in an email to NPR a spokesperson for the main oil industry trade group wrote in part that the industry is quote actively addressing the complex global challenge of climate change through robust investment in technology innovation.

Oakland boulder San Francisco Exxon B. P. Colorado San Miguel Baltimore Antonio Guterres Rhode Island Columbia University Michael Berger US Rebecca Herschel NPR
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Washington. melting icing greenling could send more water into the oceans than previously predicted and peers Rebecca Herschel reports on with the latest study reveals Greenland's ice sheet is nothing faster and faster as the earth heats up that means the surface of the ice sheet has a lot of water on it in the summer and that water freezes into huge slabs of ice in the winter the slabs are hard and impermeable like a skating rink more than a meter thick and miles long in some places new research published today in the journal nature finds that those ice labs are causing extra water to flow off the ice sheet and into the ocean that's because when not water flows on to snow the snow can absorb some of it but when not water flows into ice slabs it can't be absorbed scientists estimate I slabs of cost about twenty five percent more run off from Greenland since two thousand one contributing to sea level rise Rebecca Herscher NPR news the fed says it plans to cut its key interest rate by a quarter of a point it comes as a central bank aims to keep the economy from faltering growth in the US fell to two percent in the most recent quarter the ongoing trade war with China and a slowing global economy of me the economic outlook more uncertain this is NPR news. the US census bureau says it's still needs more people to conduct next year's national head count NPR's Hansi low long says the bureau is having trouble finding enough job applicants who can pass background checks the census bureau is running about three months behind in having all of its.

Washington. Rebecca Herschel Greenland fed US China NPR skating Rebecca Herscher twenty five percent three months two percent
As its ice slabs expand, Greenland contributes more to sea level rise

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

As its ice slabs expand, Greenland contributes more to sea level rise

"Melting icing greenling could send more water into the oceans than previously predicted and peers Rebecca Herschel reports on with the latest study reveals Greenland's ice sheet is nothing faster and faster as the earth heats up that means the surface of the ice sheet has a lot of water on it in the summer and that water freezes into huge slabs of ice in the winter the slabs are hard and impermeable like a skating rink more than a meter thick and miles long in some places new research published today in the journal nature finds that those ice labs are causing extra water to flow off the ice sheet and into the ocean that's because when not water flows on to snow the snow can absorb some of it but when not water flows anti slabs it can't be absorbed scientists estimate I slabs of cost about twenty five percent more run off from Greenland since two thousand one contributing to sea level rise Rebecca Herscher

Rebecca Herschel Greenland Rebecca Herscher Skating Twenty Five Percent
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news I know well king and I'm Rachel Martin this morning we've been reporting on where hurricane Dorian has banned the devastation that it has caused and where it's going but for the next few minutes we're gonna take a step back and talk about the future of storms like this the fact is climate change is making slow rainy hurricanes like Dorian more likely and global warming is also affecting many coastal cities in other ways higher sees more rain even when there is a hurricane and cities like Charleston South Carolina are now taking new precautions ahead of big storms and here's Rebecca Herschel reports hurricane Dorian **** Charleston with enough wind and rain to downed trees and cancel school and flood a bunch of streets but the city's chief resilience officer mark Wilbert knew exactly which streets it would be that pressure right there see the water coming up before the storm even finished its business Wilbur took me out in his big official S. U. V. to show me where the water was this road right here typically so so I can take it as this room for it's really bad right here he has a nap in his head of all the roads that flight on a routine basis when there isn't a hurricane this is the place within the city that drains last like many cities in Dorian's path Charleston is low and wet the sea level here is rising quickly and normal rain storms are dumping more rain than they used to because of climate change and not means all it takes is a thunderstorm or high tide and major roads are under water all of these cities along the coast this is what this is their new normal that's forced Charles then another low lying coastal cities to start investing millions of dollars in flood control so what we're coming up on here is what's known as our battery wall of sea wall this wall is really old it's from the eighteen hundreds and a lot of it is too low to hold back today's tight which means water in the park water in people's homes water in the bike lanes so the city is planning to build it higher we're. ending for two to three feet of sea level rise the local government has also started putting special valves on to storm dreams to prevent sea water from flowing into neighborhoods and installing massive pump stations to push water out of the drains into the harbor all of those things helped Charleston stay relatively dry during Dorian still the city would not have fared well if this week's hurricane had hit square on captain chips your sin has been with the police department for more than forty years on Thursday afternoon he was in Charleston merging to command center we begin Dawson proverbial bowl which also houses were extremely lucky I mean my my stomach really gets in a non every hurricane season Sears and says he lived through the last major storm to hit the city hard hurricane Hugo in the late eighties it was devastating and it would be worse this time with higher sea levels he does say that dealing with the routine flooding in town made his officers more ready for this week's flooding I think we get a little bit.

Rachel Martin NPR forty years three feet
"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca herschel" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jeanine Herbst slow moving hurricane Dorian powerful category five storm with maximum sustained winds of one hundred eighty five miles an hour is slamming the Bahamas flooding Abaco island prime minister Hubert minutes area of our bedroom bags of it is already under water you cannot does the difference as to the beginning of the street who is this grand ocean begins the storm is expected to do a slow dance of the east coast of the U. S. bring the possibility of hurricane force winds heavy rain and storm surges hurricane warning is up for parts of the Florida coast and mandatory evacuation orders are out for parts of Florida today and parts of South Carolina starting tomorrow at noon meanwhile in peers Rebecca Herschel reports warmer than normal ocean water has made this storm much more powerful the water in the Atlantic where Dorian formed is about to degrees hotter than the past average for this time of year that may not sound like a lot but even a small increase in ocean temperature can add a lot of power to restore the water vapor is sucked up into the storm creating enormous vertical clouds that feed the cyclone the bigger and more powerful the storm gets the more destructive it's wind speeds as a result warmer oceans can create a double whammy a storm with both structure crushing wins and catastrophic regime this year's warm water is nothing new last year hurricane Michael roared to life over hot water in the Gulf of Mexico and killed dozens of people when it hit the Florida panhandle we're back Herscher NPR news he is chief brexit negotiator has repeated.

NPR Washington Jeanine Herbst prime minister Florida South Carolina Rebecca Herschel Dorian Mexico Bahamas Abaco island hurricane Michael