18 Burst results for "Rebecca Hamilton"

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:09 min | 7 months ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind of result it is Friday. Today, everybody the second day of October. 2020 good is always to have you along. To be clear nothing about this recovery because the economy is big picture recovering nothing about it has been easy for tens of millions of people. But the Shall we say, relatively smooth trend line to a better place is getting a good deal. Bumpier. Yes, we learned this morning. The economy added 661,000 new jobs last month and the unemployment rate Fell. The 7.9% also, yes. Though the rate of improvement of basically everything is slowed, and so we are, as I said, kinda at the place. Where the easy parts over and the hard part starts. Marketplaces. Suburban ashore gets us going with that. You can actually thank Rebecca Hamilton. For some of those 661,000 jobs that were created last month we have been hiring. Hamilton is CEO of WS Badger, which makes organic skin care products and sunscreens in New Hampshire. The future is very uncertain, but sales continue to be very strong for us. Now. 661,000 net jobs created obscures the fact that 345,000 jobs were lost permanently. Zack Medford is a bar owner in Raleigh, North Carolina. It's really tough to be in a bar in right now we close our doors on March 17th and we have been able to open them sense, he says. More and more bars are shutting down for good. Across the U. S job Hiring is slowing down and layoffs and bankruptcies are very much still with us. Seth Carpenter is chief U. S economist atyou BS businesses that initially hung on for a while, are now realising that they either have to downsize or maybe even habitually. Not just small businesses, either. United and American Airlines are laying off 32,000 people, and that's just too cos. Carpenter says state and local governments are also starting to let people go, especially in education. Jason Furman is professor of economic policy at Harvard. He has another concern. Millions of people have left the labor Force 4.4 million to be exact have at this point in the pandemic, just given up looking for work. This is bad. Because that exodus that form of hopelessness is really hard to undo. After the great recession to get people back into the labor force, who had given up and left Because of the great recession, that process wasn't even complete. At the beginning of 2020 more than a decade into the economic recovery. So, yeah, we are going to be digging out from this for a while in New York. I'm sorry. Been ashore for marketplace. All right. So let's talk about how deep that hole is that we're digging out of also a bunch of other stuff that happened in this economy the past five days. Heather Long is at the Washington Post. She covers the economy there. David Gora is at MSNBC. Hey, you two A kind guy. Heather, Let me start with you and some reporting you did this week at a couple of stories, one of which was about the unevenness of this economy, and I want youto Sort of test my premise that the easy part is kind of over now. It very much as and what we found is this is not just a big blow to a lot of the economy. This is the most unequal recession that we've seen in modern U. S history and what I mean by that is in the spring, low wage workers lost their jobs and eight times the magnitude of high wage workers. And here we are six months later, we just got the September jobs report and basically you can summon up like this. The recession is pretty much over for those The top while for the working class. It's still a depression like blow, particularly black men and women aren't barely a third of their jobs have come back. David grow three words permanent job losses there on the rise. 343 145,000, sir, Priest said his piece and you know when this recession began, there was a lot of optimism and hope that folks were being laid off temporarily. We're gonna get those jobs back. This is a a sobering number within the sobering number. Today is the moments we had this kind of easier glide up. We're not seeing that again. It's a result of what happened today. But you know, there are a lot of factors at play here, some of which were already factors before this recession took hold automation for one thing, and now you have companies that are wrestling with what the economy is going to look like. When we are able to go out there to take trips again. I'll go to the movies and what that's going to look like something that the Fed Chair J. Powell has said. Since early days is a lot of these jobs are going to come back. They're just people who are comfortable going to the movies the way they were going on trips the way they were. There is still a lot to be ironed out a lot that's gonna shake out here in the months to come where we are in his pal likes to say it the land of lasting damage to this economy, Heather. Not that I've been stalking you this week. But you you you had a tweet in which you asked, and I think this is close to what it was. But correct me if I'm wrong, you basically said Talking about stimulus and congressmen, and what's going on with those negotiations would do seem to have just a glimmer of life this Friday afternoon, But you said, I don't understand how Congress doesn't see how desperately needed more assistance is and I guess, answer your own question. Why don't they see it? It's pretty crazy that we don't have another stimulus package. The economy is clearly stalling. The recovery is stalling. We still have nearly 11 million people out of work and bombs. This has been a huge blow to mother's almost 900,000. Women just left the workforce. They left their jobs. They stopped searching because they are trying to deal with taking care of kids at home. Right now, all schools are mostly shut. They're just so many red flags still and it's bizarre to me that that Congress and particularly the White House, you would think President Trump would want to boost the economy before the election. So, David, we have to talk about the president. His diagnosis of of Ah, late last night my time we small hours on the East Coast..

Heather Long David Gora Rebecca Hamilton Seth Carpenter Los Angeles Congress American Airlines Jason Furman New York Washington Post New Hampshire Zack Medford Raleigh North Carolina East Coast MSNBC Fed Harvard
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:31 min | 7 months ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today, everybody the second day of October. 2020 good is always to have you along. To be clear nothing about this recovery because the economy is big picture recovering nothing about it has been easy for tens of millions of people. But the Shall we say, relatively smooth trend line to a better place is getting a good deal. Bumpier. Yes, we learned this morning. The economy added 661,000 new jobs last month and the unemployment rate Fell. The 7.9% also, yes. Though the rate of improvement of basically everything is slowed, and so we are, as I said, kind of the place. Where the easy parts over and the hard part starts. Marketplaces. Suburban ashore gets us going with that. You can actually think Rebecca Hamilton for some of those 661,000 jobs that were created last month we have been hiring. Hamilton is CEO of WS Badger, which makes organic skin care products and sun screens in New Hampshire. The future is very uncertain, but Sales continue to be very strong for us now. 661,000 net jobs created obscures the fact that 345,000 jobs were lost permanently. Zack Medford is a bar owner in Raleigh, North Carolina. It's really tough to be in a bar in right now we close our doors on March 17th and we have been able to open them sense, he says. More and more bars are shutting down for good. Across the U. S job Hiring is slowing down and layoffs and bankruptcies are very much still with us. Seth Carpenter is chief U. S economist atyou BS businesses that initially hung on for a while, are now realising that they either have to downsize or maybe even habitually. Not just small businesses, either. United and American Airlines are laying off 32,000 people, and that's just too cos. Carpenter says state and local governments are also starting to let people go, especially in education. Jason Furman is professor of economic policy at Harvard. He has another concern. Millions of people have left the labor force 4.4 million to be exact have at this point in the pandemic. Just given up looking for work. This is bad because that exodus that form of hopelessness is really hard to undo. After the great recession to get people back into the labor force, who had given up and left Because of the great recession, that process wasn't even complete. At the beginning of 2020 more than a decade into the economic recovery. So, yeah, we are going to be digging out from this for a while in New York. I'm sorry. Been ashore for marketplace. All right. So let's talk about how deep that hole is that we're digging out of also a bunch of other stuff that happened in this economy the past five days. Heather Long is at the Washington Post. She covers the economy there. David Gora is at MSNBC. Hey, you two Kai Kai. Heather, Let me start with you. And some reporting you did this week at a couple of stories, one of which was about the unevenness of this economy on I want youto Sort of test my premise that the easy part is kind of over now. It very much as and what we found is this is not just a big blow to a lot of the economy. This is the most unequal recession that we've seen in modern U. S history and what I mean by that is in the spring, low wage workers lost their jobs and eight times the magnitude of high wage workers. And here we are six months later, we just got the September jobs report and basically you can summon up like this. The recession is pretty much over for those The top while for the working class. It's still a depression like blow, particularly black men and women aren't barely a third of their jobs have come back. David Girl, three words permanent job losses there on the rise. Yeah. 343 145,000, sir, Priest said his piece and you know when this recession began, there was a lot of optimism and hope that folks were being laid off temporarily. We're gonna get those jobs back. This is a a sobering number within the sobering number today, So we had this kind of easier glide up. We're not seeing that again. It's results what happened today? But you know, there are a lot of factors at play here, some of which were already factors before this recession took hold. Automation for one thing, and now you have companies that are wrestling with what the economy is gonna look like When we are able to go out there take trips again. I'll go to the movies and what that's going to look like something that the Fed Chair J. Powell has said. Since the early days is a lot of these jobs are going to come back. They're just people who are comfortable going to the movies the way they were going on trips the way they were. There is still a lot to be ironed out a lot that's gonna shake out here in the months to come where we are in his pal likes to say it the land of lasting damage to this economy, Heather. Not that I've been stalking you this week. But you you you had a tweet in which you asked, and I think this is close to what it was. But correct me if I'm wrong, you basically said Talking about stimulus and congressmen, and what's going on with those negotiations would do seem to have just a glimmer of life this Friday afternoon, But you said, I don't understand how Congress doesn't see how desperately needed more assistance is and I guess, answer your own question. Why don't they see it? It's pretty crazy that we don't have another stimulus package. The economy is clearly stalling. The recovery is stalling. We still have nearly 11 million people out of work and bombs. This has been a huge blow to mother's almost 900,000. Women just left the workforce. They left their jobs. They stopped searching because they are trying to deal with taking care of kids at home. Right now, all schools are mostly shut. They're just so many red flags so and it's bizarre to me that that Congress and particularly the White House, you would think President Trump would want to boost the economy before the election. So, David, we have to talk about the president. His diagnosis of of late last night my time we small hours, he's coast. So, look, It just seems to me that this just adds another layer of uncertainty to an already desperately uncertain economy. I think that it does. We certainly saw that in the kind of market movement that we saw overnight in those early morning hours. A lot of investors wondering what this is going to be when it comes to the market. I think a big question is what it means for the president's engagement with the economy that we've been talking about with the administration's engagement with that, and Mark Meadows was out today and Not wearing a mask as he fielded questions from reporters on the heels of this, But he said the first thing the president about was the status of those stimulus negotiations, and the House speaker does think that things have changed. As a result of this, the administration will take this more seriously because of what's happened to the president. And his wife, but we are in strange terrain here. I think some would say maybe predictable terrain. But remember, Heather and I, at the Fed Reserve Holodeck at one of these press conferences early on in the same chair was asked. Have you been tested for for the Corona virus, and this is definitely the game that's been played across Washington today. You know who was near him? Who has this? And I think that it does change the tenor of the way that policymakers we're talking to one another. And for those who are optimists think that this might have an effect on those conversations that continue on Capitol Hill. Heather, Do you buy that? Do you think this changes the conversation about a stimulus package? Definitely know if we were at 30% last night. We're probably at 60% today on DH. That is ah, pretty big game changer thanks to the White House. All right, so super quicker on the way out here, something we talked about on the broadcast earlier this week. The idea that the the bridge to the other side of this thing is now on individual Americans as Congress debates and as the White House negotiates Um, I'm going to sound like a downer again. It gets worse from here right until there's actually money flowing, Heather. It definitely does. But if we do get that stimulus Ah, I hopefully I'll try to be on the hopeful note. I think people have been incredibly creative in this economy. I think about a woman. I spoke to his cleaner. She's dropped her prices. She's got more pp to try to get more clients back. So people and I'm hopeful if we can get some money flowing, and we can get some civility. From the government. Still a big question. Mark David last word to you up to Mister Pessimist. I'm trying to be optimistic..

Heather Long Seth Carpenter White House president Mark David Congress Rebecca Hamilton Kai Kai American Airlines Jason Furman New York Washington Post Fed David Gora New Hampshire Raleigh MSNBC North Carolina
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:50 min | 7 months ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On it is Friday. Today, everybody the second day of October. 2020 good is always to have you along. To be clear nothing about this recovery because the economy is big picture recovering nothing about it has been easy for tens of millions of people. But the Shall we say, relatively smooth trend line to a better place is getting a good deal. Bumpier. Yes, we learned this morning. The economy added 661,000 new jobs last month and the unemployment rate Fell. The 7.9% also, yes. Though the rate of improvement of basically everything is slowed, and so we are, as I said, kinda at the place. Where the easy parts over and the hard part starts. Marketplaces. Suburban ashore gets us going with that. You can actually think Rebecca Hamilton for some of those 661,000 jobs that were created last month we have been hiring. Hamilton is CEO of WS Badger, which makes organic skin care products and sunscreens in New Hampshire. The future is very uncertain, but sales continue to be very strong for us. Now. 661,000 net jobs created obscures the fact that 345,000 jobs were lost permanently. Zack Medford is a bar owner in Raleigh, North Carolina. It's really tough to be in a bar in right now we close our doors on March 17th and we have been able to open them sense, he says. More and more bars are shutting down for good. Across the U. S job Hiring is slowing down and layoffs and bankruptcies are very much still with us. Seth Carpenter is chief U. S economist atyou BS. Businesses that initially hung on for a while, are now realising that they have to downsize or maybe even capitulate. Not just small businesses, either. United and American Airlines are laying off 32,000 people, and that's just too cos. Carpenter says state and local governments are also starting to let people go, especially in education. Jason Furman is professor of economic policy at Harvard. He has another concern. Millions of people have left the labor Force 4.4 million to be exact have at this point in the pandemic, just given up looking for work. This is bad. Because that exodus that form of hopelessness is really hard to undo. After the great recession to get people back into the labor force, who had given up and left Because of the great recession, that process wasn't even complete. At the beginning of 2020 more than a decade into the economic recovery. So, yeah, we are going to be digging out from this for a while in New York. I'm sorry. Ven ashore for marketplace. All right. So let's talk about how deep that hole is that we're digging out of also a bunch of other stuff that happened in this economy the past five days. Heather Long is at the Washington Post. She covers the economy there. David Gora is at MSNBC. Hey, you two Chi Chi chi heather, let me start with you and some reporting you do this week at a couple of stories, one of which was about the unevenness of this economy, and I want youto Sort of test my premise that the easy part is kind of over now. It very much as and what we found is this is not just a big blow to a lot of the economy. This is the most unequal recession that we've seen in modern U. S history. And what I mean by that is in the spring, low wage workers lost their jobs and eight times the magnitude of high wage workers. And here we are six months later, we just got the September jobs report. And basically, you can summon up like this. The recession is pretty much over for those at the top while for the working class. It's still a depression like blow, particularly black men and women aren't barely a third of their jobs have come back. David Girl. Three words permanent job losses there on the rise. Yeah, 343 145,000, sir, Priest said his piece and you know when this recession began, there was a lot of optimism and hope that folks were being laid off temporarily. We're gonna get those jobs back. This is a a sobering number within the sobering number. Today is your pension had this kind of easier glide up. We're not seeing that again. It's a result of what happened today. But you know, there are a lot of factors at play here, some of which were already factors before this recession took hold automation for one thing, and now you have companies that are wrestling with what the economy is going to look like. When we are able to go out there to take trips again. I'll go to the movies and what that's going to look like something that the Fed Chair J. Powell has said. Since early days is a lot of these jobs are going to come back. They're just people who are comfortable going to the movies the way that they were going on trips the way they were. There is still a lot to be ironed out. A lot of it's going to shake out here in the months to come where we are in his pal likes to say it the land of lasting damage to this economy, Heather. Not that I've been stalking you this week. But you you you had a tweet in which you asked, and I think this is close to what it was. But correct me if I'm wrong, you basically said Talking about stimulus and congressmen, and what's going on with those negotiations would do seem to have just a glimmer of life this Friday afternoon, But you said, I don't understand how Congress doesn't see how desperately needed more assistance is and I guess, answer your own question. Why don't they see it? It's pretty crazy that we don't have another stimulus package. The economy is clearly stalling. The recovery is stalling. We still have nearly 11 million people out of work and bombs. This has been a huge blow to mother's almost 900,000. Women just left the workforce. They left their jobs. They stopped searching because they are trying to deal with taking care of kids at home. Right now, all schools are mostly shut. They're just so many red flags so and it's bizarre to me that that Congress and particularly the White House, you would think President Trump would want to boost the economy before the election. So, David, we have to talk about the president. His diagnosis of of Ah, late last night. My time we small hours on he's coast. So, look, It just seems to me that this just adds another layer of uncertainty to an already desperately uncertain economy. I think that it does. We certainly saw that in the kind of market movement that we saw overnight in those early morning hours. A lot of investors wondering what this is going to meet. When it comes to the market. I think a big question is what it means for the president's engagement with the economy that we've been talking about with this administration's engagement with that, and Mark Meadows was out today and Not wearing a mask as he fielded questions from reporters on the heels of this, But he said the first thing the president asked about was the status of those stimulus negotiations. And the House speaker does think that things have changed. As a result of this, the administration will take this more seriously because of what's.

Seth Carpenter Heather Long president Congress Rebecca Hamilton American Airlines Jason Furman New York Washington Post David Gora New Hampshire Zack Medford Raleigh North Carolina Fed MSNBC Harvard David Girl
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:15 min | 7 months ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KCRW

"Friday. Today, everybody the second day of October. 2020 good is always have your law. To be clear nothing about this recovery because the economy is big picture recovering nothing about it has been easy for tens of millions of people. But the Shall we say, relatively smooth trend line to a better place is getting a good deal. Bumpier. Yes, we learned this morning. The economy added 661,000 new jobs last month and the unemployment rate Fell. The 7.9% also, yes. Though the rate of improvement of basically everything is slowed, and so we are, as I said, kinda at the place. Where the easy parts over and the hard part starts. Marketplaces. Suburban ashore gets us going with that. You can actually thank Rebecca Hamilton. For some of those 661,000 jobs that were created last month we have been hiring. Hamilton is CEO of WS Badger, which makes organic skin care products and sun screens in New Hampshire. The future is very uncertain, but Sales continue to be very strong for us now. 661,000 net jobs created obscures the fact that 345,000 jobs were lost permanently. Zack Medford is a bar owner in Raleigh, North Carolina. It's really tough to be in a bar in right now we close our doors on March 17th and we have been able to open them sense, he says. More and more bars are shutting down for good. Across the U. S job Hiring is slowing down and layoffs and bankruptcies are very much still with us. Seth Carpenter is chief U. S economist atyou BS businesses that initially hung on for a while, are now realising that they either have to downsize or maybe even habitually. Not just small businesses, either. United and American Airlines are laying off 32,000 people, and that's just too cos. Carpenter says state and local governments are also starting to let people go, especially in education. Jason Furman is professor of economic policy at Harvard. He has another concern. Millions of people have left the labor Force 4.4 million to be exact have at this point in the pandemic, just given up looking for work. This is bad because that exodus that form of hopelessness Is really hard to undo. After the great recession to get people back into the labor force, who had given up and left Because of the great recession, that process wasn't even complete. At the beginning of 2020 more than a decade into the economic recovery. So, yeah, we are going to be digging out from this for a while in New York. I'm sorry. Been ashore for marketplace. All right. So let's talk about how deep that hole is that we're digging out of also a bunch of other stuff that happened in this economy the past five days. Heather Long is at the Washington Post. She covers the economy there. David Gora is at MSNBC. Hey, you two A kind guy. Heather, Let me start with you and some reporting you did this week at a couple of stories, one of which was about the unevenness of this economy, and I want youto Sort of test my premise that the easy part is kind of over now. It very much as and what we found is this is at not just a big blow to a lot of the economy. This is the most unequal recession that we've seen in modern U. S history. And what I mean by that is in the spring, low wage workers lost their jobs and eight times the magnitude of high wage workers. And here we are six months later, we just got the September jobs report. And basically, you can summon up like this. The recession is pretty much over for those at the top while for the working class. It's still a depression like blow, particularly black men and women are barely a third of their jobs have come back. David Girl. Three words permanent job losses there on the rise. Yeah, 343 145,000, sir, Priest said his piece and you know when this recession began, there was a lot of optimism and hope that folks were being laid off temporarily. We're gonna get those jobs back. This is a sobering number within the sobering number. Today is the moment we had this kind of easier glide up. We're not seeing that again. It's results what happened today? But you know, there are a lot of factors at play here, some of which were already factors before this recession took hold automation for one thing, and now you have companies that are wrestling with what the economy is going to look like. When we are able to go out there to take trips again. I'll go to the movies and what that's going to look like something that the Fed Chair J. Powell has said. Since early days is a lot of these jobs are going to come back. They're just people who are comfortable going to the movies the way they were going on trips the way they were. There is still a lot to be ironed out a lot that's going to shake out here in the months to come where we are in his pal likes to say it the land of lasting damage to this economy, Heather Not that I've been stalking you this week. But you you you had a tweet in which you asked, and I think this is close to what it was. But correct me if I'm wrong, you basically said Talking about stimulus and congressmen, and what's going on with those negotiations would do seem to have just a glimmer of life this Friday afternoon, But you said, I don't understand how Congress doesn't see how desperately needed more assistance is and I guess, answer your own question. Why don't they see it? It's pretty crazy that we don't have another stimulus package. The economy is clearly stalling. The recovery is stalling. We still have nearly 11 million people out of work and bombs. This has been a huge blow to mother's almost 900,000. Women just left the workforce. They left their jobs. They stopped searching because they are trying to deal with taking care of kids at home. Right now, all schools are mostly shut. They're just so many red flags still and it's bizarre to me that that Congress and particularly the White House, you would think President Trump would want to boost the economy before the election. So, David, we have to talk about the president. His diagnosis of of late last night my time we small hours, he's coast. So, look, It just seems to me that this just adds another layer of uncertainty to an already desperately uncertain economy. I think that it does. We certainly saw that in the kind of market movement that we saw overnight in those early morning hours. A lot of investors wondering what this is going to meet. When it comes to the market. I think a big question is what it means for the president's engagement with the economy that we've been talking about with this administration's engagement with that, and Mark Meadows was out today and Not wearing a mask as he fielded questions from reporters on the heels of this, But he said the first thing the president asked about was the status of those stimulus negotiations. And the House speaker does think that things have changed. As a result of this, the administration will take this more seriously because of what's happened to the president and his wife. But we are in strange terrain here. I think some would say, maybe predictable train. But remember, Heather and I At the Federalreserve Holodeck one of these press conferences early on, there was ask, Have you been tested for for the Corona virus, And this is definitely the game that's been played across Washington today. You know who was near him? Who has this? And I think that it does change the tenor of the way that policymakers we're talking to one another..

Heather Long president Congress Rebecca Hamilton Seth Carpenter American Airlines Jason Furman New York Washington Post New Hampshire David Gora Raleigh Zack Medford Fed North Carolina MSNBC Harvard depression
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"From Washington DC? I'm Kimberly Adams in for Kai Ryssdal. It's Tuesday November twelfth. Both good to have you with us. Let's start today. Exploring feelings specifically how small business owners are feeling about the economy. They had a more positive. Take on the future Chur in October compared to September. That's according to a monthly survey from the National Federation of Independent Business responded said they are making capital investments and raising raising employee. Pay or at least planning to but their number one challenge finding qualified people to hire marketplace's Sabrina Benesch or has more on. That things are looking up at clean choice energy that we're hearing really optimistic about Where every now and the next eighteen months or more more Kate Kohler is chief staff at clean choice? It offers renewable energy sources. The company has thirty percent more employees than it did last year but she still has a dozen in positions to fill it is really the stiff competition and the candidates were interviewing or intervene at other firms is well nearly a quarter of businesses in the survey said. Their top concern was finding qualified. People either to grow the business or even just to maintain it. According to Joe Galvin Chief Research Officer for Advisory Advisory Firm Vestige. Chances Are you're higher replace. Some of you left your organization to go somewhere else to attract people clean choice. Energy is focusing on its green ethos off Every organization able to offer thirty percent of small firms said Dave increased compensation to attract workers Rebecca Hamilton co-ceo of WS Badger. It makes organic skincare products. She says the companies increased pay and benefits. We have an in house daycare center so we have flexible. WHOA hours? You know the onsite gym say Yoga classes on say Akito the NF Ibiza. Small businesses are paying for higher compensation with higher sales in savings things. Joseph Bruce Willis chief economist with consulting firm. RSM isn't sure sustainable. They're willing to offer more compensation but attended today. Were likely not to because of they slowing economy and a contraction and probably Bernie trains in other words. Small businesses can afford to fight over talent as long as consumers. Keep buying in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for marketplace. By the way the fastest growing segment of workers by age is people over fifty fifty five. We want to hear from those of you in that age group. Who Work Part Time? So if that's you please get in touch at marketplace dot. Org and Google is making another big move in the healthcare business. The company has been running a behind the scenes partnership with the giant hospital chain ascension. The Wall Street Journal was the first with the story which both Google and ascension have since confirmed the initiative project. Nightingale gives Google access to patient data from ascensions hundred fifty hospitals goals and more than fifty senior living facilities and it helps ascension manage. It's patient data. So what's for consumers marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer takes a look. Here's the promise from Google in ascension with all your healthcare data in one place. It's easier to analyse they can look at all the medications you take to find. I'm dangerous interactions. VN Ho is a health economist. At Rice University they can find patterns detect things before they go wrong and give advice vice to healthcare providers on how to improve care or maybe Google highlights lab test results complaints about symptoms and medications. That didn't work and recommends a test. That shows early stage cancer. I were rheingold heads. The National Association of consumer advocates the overall goal is a good one but he also worries about data breaches. And what if Your Insurance Company finds out your tag does cancer risk person then have higher insurance costs because we've now identified them as somebody who was at a greater risk Google and ascension declined our interview requests but in a statement ascension says its partnership with Google is aimed at improving improving care and reducing costs but joy prince who worked on health information technology policy in the Obama Administration warns that generally healthcare cost are like whack a mole. You cut one cost and another pops up. You're reducing the cost of a test. Well then you're increasing the frequency of another another test put says healthcare in the. US IS A business businesses. WanNa protect their profits and no amount of data will change that in Washington. I'm Nancy Marshall. Genzer answer for marketplace and president trump was in New York City today. Speaking at the Economic Club of New York he talks trade criticized the Fed as per usual not much there for the markets but speaking of the Fed Chair Powell testified to Congress tomorrow and traders are getting ready for that. We'll have the details when we do. The numbers numbers.

The big problem for small business? Finding qualified people to hire

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:13 min | 1 year ago

The big problem for small business? Finding qualified people to hire

"Start today. Exploring feelings specifically how small business owners are feeling about the economy. They had a more positive. Take on the future Chur in October compared to September. That's according to a monthly survey from the National Federation of Independent Business responded said they are making capital investments and raising raising employee. Pay or at least planning to but their number one challenge finding qualified people to hire marketplace's Sabrina Benesch or has more on. That things are looking up at clean choice energy that we're hearing really optimistic about Where every now and the next eighteen months or more more Kate Kohler is chief staff at clean choice? It offers renewable energy sources. The company has thirty percent more employees than it did last year but she still has a dozen in positions to fill it is really the stiff competition and the candidates were interviewing or intervene at other firms is well nearly a quarter of businesses in the survey said. Their top concern was finding qualified. People either to grow the business or even just to maintain it. According to Joe Galvin Chief Research Officer for Advisory Advisory Firm Vestige. Chances Are you're higher replace. Some of you left your organization to go somewhere else to attract people clean choice. Energy is focusing on its green ethos off Every organization able to offer thirty percent of small firms said Dave increased compensation to attract workers Rebecca Hamilton co-ceo of WS Badger. It makes organic skincare products. She says the companies increased pay and benefits. We have an in house daycare center so we have flexible. WHOA hours? You know the onsite gym say Yoga classes on say Akito the NF Ibiza. Small businesses are paying for higher compensation with higher sales in savings things. Joseph Bruce Willis chief economist with consulting firm. RSM isn't sure sustainable. They're willing to offer more compensation but attended today. Were likely not to because of they slowing economy and a contraction and probably Bernie trains in other words. Small businesses can afford to fight over talent as long as consumers. Keep buying in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for

Joe Galvin Chief Research Offi Kate Kohler Sabrina Benesch National Federation Of Indepen Chief Economist Joseph Bruce Willis Ibiza Bernie Rebecca Hamilton New York Dave Co-Ceo Thirty Percent Eighteen Months
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"That were calculated to destroy the groups, and there was horrific testimony regarding children infants even being thrown into FIS the mess raves of of women. Torture, and and just a litany of -struction your I'm taking back to those horrific times. I mean, you worked and lived in Sudan in years as a journalist. Do you have one person or family that you know, that suffered under Bashir, and that made a particular impression on you? Gosh. So many. I think I think one that that I will never be able to forget what was interviewing a woman in a camp who she had just made it across the border, and Chad, and and she had her young young baby in her arms and she had recently given birth. She had other children that were running around. And just this overwhelming sense of having no idea what the future would look like she was a sort of Blad, I guess grateful that her children had survived when for so many of her neighbors that was not the case, but even having survived that there was a sense of total loss with respect to what the future would look like you're so the world Chen hold his breath for extradition, where do the cases against Bashir and his co-defendants actually stand in the Hague the ICC arrest warrants still outstanding. And until. Some state actually execute Ciara's forint and Bishop goes to the Hague then win going to see a trial now while we're focused on the arrest warrants by the ICC for the crimes in the four. I think it's also worth pointing out that this is the same man or al-bashir who presided over the second Sudanese civil war in south Sudan that led to the deaths of some two million people. So while the ice t t has only looking at crimes committed in the four his responsibility for atrocities within Sudan extends beyond our four into what is now south Sudan into the mountains and other areas, Rebecca Hamilton, formerly with the international criminal court now at American University in Washington, thank you. Thank you so much the ousters this month of Omar Bashir in Sudan and Abdelaziz Bouteflika ALgeria. They've got some similarities both men lost power after massive street. Protests reminiscent of the Arab spring of two thousand. Eleven but change of power raises hopes as serious reform in both countries. And that prospect is reverberating across the region. Magdi Abdelhadi is an independent Middle East analyst he's based in London. Let's turn I is Suzanne Magdi. We just heard how the country is now in the hands of strongmen cut really from the same cloth as the ousted Omar al-bashir. What do you think of the prospects for real change? Well, I think it's a difficult question to answer because the people protest on the streets have categorically rejected while the military of it the two years transition period on these seem to have learned from earlier protests in neighboring Egypt where there are very very many parallels. With what happened there in two thousand eleven the military stepped in toll the people we're gonna look off to the country where organiz elections and liquid Egypt is now, I think the Sudanese protests. Have been very aware of that. Some of the slogans actually were to defect that we not want a repeat of Egypt and very similar slogans were raised in Algiers. Where also the protesters that managed to bring to so far a peaceful end the reign of former president of that is is beautifully..

south Sudan Omar Bashir Omar al-bashir Egypt ICC Magdi Abdelhadi Suzanne Magdi Algiers Ciara Chad president Blad Abdelaziz Bouteflika Rebecca Hamilton Washington Chen American University London Bishop
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman under ousted President, Omar al-bashir. The Sudanese government was responsible for Tross cities in Dr for the consequences are still felt today for the people have for its was and continues to be totally devastated communities were destroyed and many have to this day not been able to pretend to land. But we'll Bashir be held accountable. Also, Mexico's southern border with Guatemala migrants continued across on their way to the US, plus Switzerland decides coffee is not vital to human survival. Although plenty of Swiss disagree. Oh, it's really sad. Because it has emotional gets a binding people together. That's why we feel that we won't have coffee. Always all that and more today on the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world. Good to have you here today. Momentous times across North Africa this past week for the first time in years civilians, are feeling hope in Sudan and Algieria after they helped to oust dictators who'd been in power. For decades, though, big questions remain about what happens next in both countries. I to Sudan President Omar al-bashir has gone, and we learned today the shears defense minister who took the helm as the leader of the transitional government, Sudan, he's also stepping down other military. So sits in the former government officiel remain in power, though. And they say they will not allow Omar al-bashir to be extradited to the Hague. The Hague is home to the ICC the international criminal court where Bashir faces charges of crimes against humanity. Rebecca Hamilton used to work for the ICC. And now teaches law at American University in Washington, thanks for being back back. What charges does Bashir face in the Hague? Exactly. And what do they relate to he faces very serious charges of genocide? Of all crimes crimes against humanity for atrocities committed by the Sudanese government and their proxy militia force, which we know as the Jesuit enough for starting in two thousand and three the genocide charges in particular say that president Bashir is responsible for overseeing the apparatus of the state that was designed to destroy at least three particular ethnic groups within doff war, the four visit Gallois and the messily people, and it did this by killing them by causing serious physical and mental harm, including mass rapes and by inflicting conditions of life..

president Bashir President Omar al-bashir Sudanese government Sudan Marco werman ICC President Tross Mexico Guatemala Rebecca Hamilton North Africa US American University Switzerland Washington Algieria Gallois
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"But it was actually the military coup led by our album sheer nineteen ninety nine that took how from that democratically elected president. I think one of the challenges felicia's too. The stand is that this is not just about who is the individual Hodges, Dan Sudan's real challenge. At what the protest is plotting for is for a states that will actually represent all the citizens of Sudan. And that is the goal here. True, democracy, where doesn't matter whether you come from four over nine or the mountains, if you Sudanese state should represent and that is going to be a long struggle Bentsen played the replacement of Moraga she Rebecca Hamilton teaches law at American University. She's been following Sudan closely since two thousand ten these events have riveted Sudanese people living outside the country. Hay Abu Shayba among them. She's a sixteen year old Sudanese American who live near San Francisco, and she's been captivated by what's been happening in Sudan, these past few months, we managed to catch up with her at school in between classes and got her reaction to today's news. It was shock triumph. Enjoy like. All at once. This is something that like, I don't think I personally have never liked thought was going to happen. Somehow like we keep saying the chance of fear tic- see just fall, that's all the soda. This actually happens. You you have the sense of patriotism and nationalism. And you just you just joy, it's so surreal you just in the moment. You just can't like go of it. So since Trump did you feel that you were kind of even from a distance part of the protests in Khartoum of you, maybe even been doing your own protests at home. Yeah. Of course, no Alex going to the bay area SF conflicts ago, having our speeches having our meetings in our local organization building those things that we do keeping my friends that aren't Sudanese knowing updated about this MRI feel like I have done as much as I can my part who were you able to who are you able to share this excitement with non-sudanese. You said I mean, what do they make of it? I started talking about it when I came back Sudan from my trip in December. Right. It wasn't as big as. It is now so it was a couple of video there a couple of messages there. But the bigger it got the more. I would walk into my government class tell my teacher until my friends from then on they became hooked themselves. And they keep up with themselves Votto websites go to count. So me telling my friends raises more awareness to what's happening. And what about other students Americans said there in the bay area got a small network when you talk about the future now, Sudan, what is it that you and younger Sudanese are hoping comes out of the end of this long chapter of Omar al-bashir ACN, we all want a democracy all want we want. We want our home. We want our country back. I feel like like many of us like me we feel like we don't belong even though in America. We have a house played a whole Sudan we've been away from it for so long. And I think the solution makes us feel more. Like, no, this is our home and him getting arrested in him being president anymore. Makes you feel like there could be hope that we can go back to our home country in live in our grandchildren were. Live their children live there. Do you plan to go back to Dan anytime soon? I mean, what did this moment today? This historic moment mean for like your own future changed completely. I remember for college. I wanted to go to Sudan aside Candido Dubai and said, he political science international relations. But after what happened I'm most likely will go to sedan study political science international relations there in if democracy does occur. Try to hold office myself, try to involve involvement politics in Sudan. Because I never thought this would happen two years ago or even five months ago. So it happening that just makes me feel like a guy can go back to my country, and I can do something. I remember the minute happened. Call my friend in Fremont booking ticket right going in June. Right. Yeah. Well, so the news today, basically has changed your life. Yeah. Basically. So when you went back to Khartoum in December were you taking part in the protests, virtually I couldn't because my parents were scared..

Dan Sudan America Sudan Khartoum Omar al-bashir ACN president Rebecca Hamilton Candido Dubai Hay Abu Shayba felicia Moraga American University Hodges Bentsen Trump Fremont Alex San Francisco sixteen year five months
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on PRI's The World

"We didn't work this hard for the military gifts to come and occupy us for another two years. Ogden an architect and activist in Khartoum the Sudanese capital. And as tigr mentioned the protesters are not done there. Incense that the Sudanese military's effectively taking over the revolution. They started and putting itself in charge. Rebecca Hamilton has kept her I firmly on Sudan since two thousand ten as journalist and also as a lawyer at the international criminal court. She now teaches law at American University. What is your understanding back of what led the Sudanese military to stage a coup and remove Omar al-bashir and arrest him. The result resulted extraordinarily courageous protest by the Sudanese people. The latest iteration of these protests began back in December. And they have continued despite people being detained tortured and just faced a whole are on the consequences for continuing their protests, but ultimately the protests become overwhelming, and it seems that sheer soul the writing on the wool referred for those protests were not stopped by the Sudanese military. What is it tell us about? But shears relationship to the military. Well, it's really interesting because the sheer has always had an extremely close relationship to military, and that is one of the things that has enabled him to stay in pal for this long. But I think the military sore with just the strength of the protests and the breadth of the protest is the other thing this is not just from an narrow section of the Sudanese population. It was really from across the whole country. Soul that the protesters which is not going to accept but she is staying in pal. And I think that is why they have moved to take control. It should be notion though, that they taking control full themselves. This is not a transition to democracy and the man who is currently in charge the previous vice president now controlled the Sudanese government awhile. They aloof he himself has a lot of blood on his hands at his infect sanctioned by the US or atrocities in duffel. Current events on pause for a moment. Go back and talk about Amar other share the man what's thumbnail sketch on Bashir and his impact on Sudan. What we've witnessed this morning is in the fifth military who've been suit niece history since it gained independence from Britain back in nineteen fifty six, and but here who was in charge of the full military could back in nineteen eighty nine has managed to survive retain control of this country for thirty years, and he's already been able to do this by being very sophisticated political off writer for the longest time. He was able to use the wealth of the state to develop a patronage system to manage to keep potential rivals. Happy enough, but it two thousand eleven when south Sudan voted to come running dependent nation what they took within was the vast oil revenues that Sudan had been using. She himself had been using to help keep himself pallor, and since then we've seen a decline in the Sudanese economy. And but she you're losing the ability to maintain the patronage system that had helped insane pow civil so he survived his relationship with Osama bin Laden he survived the heat. He got for Darfur. But it was the economy. It sounds like what you're saying. That was his undoing. I think it's coupling of the economy with just the sheer courage of the protesters in addition to obviously being able to to develop this patronage system, the mechanism that he had was not a military, but the gruesome feud security services in Sudan that are no inflow just detaining people for any sign of opposition against the government for any sign of protest routinely torturing distance. So Sudan is at a strange impasse on the one hand, Omar al-bashir is out. But the defense ministers declared a three-month state of emergency and impose a curfew. What does this mean for the arrival of democracy, which is what brought the protesters into the streets in the first place to protest is not satisfied by developments. Obviously, they're incredible step on everyone is by that. But this is not what people are being protesting full. They are looking for transition to shoot democracy and new etry rule is not that history. Here does not give us a lot of encouragement when we look at the past military coups in was that in nineteen ninety-five transitional military government that would once in Sudanese history data allow Jenna critic elections. And so in nineteen ninety six we had a democratically elected president..

Sudan Sudanese military Osama bin Laden Sudanese government Bashir Omar al-bashir Khartoum tigr Ogden American University Rebecca Hamilton vice president US president Jenna Amar Darfur Britain writer
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on KCRW

"The capital cartoon. But those celebrations came to a halt quickly because Sudanese military also announced that it would be charged for up to two years. That is not what the protesters were looking for when they fought for regime change, Taghrid Abdeen is one of those activists she's been protesting since December and explains how today really went the past few days have been pretty hectic work has come to a complete standstill basic things like groceries and bang transactions. Everything has stopped because everybody is at the sit in. But since last December, we've been protesting people have been on the streets demonstrating against the regime until what was the plan and game, the military headquarters sit in there was a very distinct energy to the protests, and there was hope so much hope, but everything took a very strange turn today. After a statement that. Was issued by the military. So no, it is not perceived as a good thing replacing one strongman with another people are extremely frustrated and outraged at what is perceived as a hijacking of our revolution. Protests will continue the people have stated very clearly that they would not accept this the thority and a lot of people are just brushing themselves off and continuing in defiance until the second attempts at a reiki is removed. Also by hope that we are successful as demonstrations continue and the military acknowledges that the people are not interested in Kuzmic cage. We want real change towards a democratic system. We didn't with this hard for the military gifts to come. And occupy for another two years that was tug read Ogden an architect and activist in Khartoum, the Sudanese capital and as tug. Green mentioned the protesters are not done there. Incense that the Sudanese military's effectively taking over the revolution. They started and putting itself in charge. Rebecca Hamilton has kept her I firmly on Sudan since two thousand ten as a journalist and also as a lawyer at the international criminal court. She now teaches law at American University. What is your understanding? Beck of what led the Sudanese military to stage a coup and remove Omar al-bashir and arrest him his has happened as a result of extraordinarily courageous purchased by these people the latest iteration of these protests again back in December, and they have continued despite people being detained tortured and just faced a whole lot about the consequences full continuing protests, but ultimately the protest become overwhelming. And it seems that the sold the writing on the wall the fact that this protests were not stopped by the Sudanese military. What does that tell us about Bashir's relationship to the military? Well, it's really interesting because the sheer has always had an extremely close relationship to military, and that is one of the things that has enabled him to stay in pal for this loan. But I think the military sore with just the strength of the protests and the breadth of the protest is the other thing this is not just from an narrow section of the Sudanese population. It was really from across the whole country sold at the protest is just not going to accept but she is staying in pal. And I think that is why they have moved to take shoal. It should be notion that they are taking control full, then sells this is not a transition to democracy. And the man who is currently in charge that previous vice president now controlled the Sudanese government. A why are they not aloof? He himself has a lot of blood on his hands as pets sanctioned by the US. Trustees in duffel, let's put the current events on pause for a moment. Go back and talk about Omar al-bashir. The man what's thumbnail sketch on Bashir and his impact on Sudan. What we've witnessed this morning is in the fifth military could in Sydney's history since it gained independence from Britain back in nineteen fifty six, and but sheer who was in charge of the full military could back in nineteen eighty nine has managed to survive retain control of this country said years, and he's only been able to do this lightning. Very sophisticated political off writer for the longest time. He was able to use the wealth of the state to develop a patronage system to manage to keep potential rivals. Happy enough, but it two thousand eleven when south Sudan voted to come independent nation what they took within was the vast oil revenues. That Sudan had been using that she himself had been using to help keep himself pallor, and since then we've seen a decline in the city's commie, and but she are losing the ability to maintain the patronage system that hit helped insane pal civil. So he survived his relationship with Osama bin Laden he survived the heat. He got for Darfur. But it was ultimately the economy. It sounds like what you're saying. That was his undoing. I think it's coupling of the economy. Wade Justice sheer courage of the protest is in addition to being able to to the delicate patronage system the mechanism that he had was not the military, but the crucial infused security services in Sudan that are no influx just to taint people for any sign of opposition against the government for any sign of protest routinely culturing distance so Sudan is that a strange impasse on the. Hand Omar al-bashir is out. But the defense ministers now declared a three-month state of emergency and impose a curfew. What does this mean for the arrival of democracy, which is what brought the protesters into the streets in the first place to protest is not satisfied by developments. Obviously an incredible step on everyone is hot by that. But this is not what people are being protesting for they looking for a transition to democracy and neutral is not that history. Here does not give us a lot of encouragement when we look at a pass military coups in was that in nineteen eighty five transitional military government that would once in Sydney's history data allow democratic elections. And so in nineteen ninety six we had a democratically elected president. But it was actually that military coup led by al-bashir nine hundred ninety nine that took how from that democratically elected president. I think one of the challenges felicitous to understand is that this is not just about who is the individual charges tudent Sudan's real challenge. And what the protest is plotting for is for a states that will actually present all the citizens of Sudan. And that is the goal here. True, democracy, where it doesn't matter whether you come from duffle older nine or the nigga mountains, if he was Sudanese state should represent and that is going to be a long struggle Bentsen plead replacement of Amara she. Rebecca Hamilton teaches law at American University. She's been falling Sudan closely since two thousand ten these events have riveted Sudanese people living outside the country. Hey, Abu Shayba among them. She's a sixteen year old Sudanese American who live near San Francisco, and she's been captivated by what's been happening in Sudan, these past few months, we managed to catch up with her at school in between classes and got her reaction to today's news. It was shock triumph. Enjoy like all at once. This is something that like, I don't think I personally have never liked thought was going to happen. Somehow like we keep saying the chance of Albuquerque tic- just fall. That's all. And so what had just actually happens? You just you have the sense of patriotism and nationalism. And you just you just joined it's so surreal you just in the moment. He just can't like go of it. So since tribes, did you feel that you were kind of even from a distance part of the protests in Khartoum have you may even been doing your own protests at home. Yeah. Of course, no Alex going to the bay area SF a ago, having our speeches having our meetings at our local organization building those things that we do keeping my friends that aren't Sudanese knowing and updated about this MRI feel like I have done as much as I can my part. So who were you able to who are you able to share this excitement with like non-sudanese, you said I mean, what do they make of it? I started talking about it when I came back from Sudan from Richardson, December wasn't as big as it is now so it was a couple of videos there couple of messages there. But the bigger got the more I would walk into my classroom like my teacher until my friends from then on they became hooked themselves. They keep up with themselves go to websites go to count. So me telling my friends raises more awareness to what's happening. And what about other students Americans said they're in the bay area got a small network when you talk about the future now in Sudan. What is it that you and younger Sudanese are hoping comes out of? The end of this long chapter of Omar al-bashir. We all want a democracy all want we want. We want our home. We want our country back. I feel like like many of us like me we feel like we don't belong even though in America. We haven't house flakes our whole Sudan we've been away from it for so long. And I think this Lucien makes us feel more. Like, no, this is our whole and him getting arrested him not president anymore. Makes it feel like there could be hope that we can go back to our home country in live, and our grandchildren were lived their children live there. Do you plan to go back to Sudan anytime soon? I mean, what did this moment today? This historic moment mean for like your own future changed my future completely. I remember for college. I wanted to go to Sudan aside, Canada, Dubai and said, he political science international relations. But after what happened I'm most likely will go to Dan studied, political science major national releases. They're in if democracy does occur. Try to hold office myself try to involve in politics in Sudan because I. Never thought this would happen two years ago or even five months ago. So it happening that just makes me feel like a guy can go back to my country. I can do something. I remember the minute happy at cut, my friend in Fremont. We're booking ticket. Right june. Right. Yeah. Wow. So the news today, basically has changed your life, basically. So when you went back to Khartoum in December were you taking part in the protests. Fortunately, I couldn't because my parents were scared. They feared for my safety. I remember who drives by protesters in UC protesters on your right? And then the army would semi automatic guns in like, trucks and stuff ready to beat them. So my mom was just like you're not going out there like don't go. But I try to because I can't but my family wouldn't just let me so that was really just upsetting. But yeah, have you spoken with your parents today? And did you tell them? Hey, you should have let me out in the streets. I could've made history. That's what I said you see like four months ago would have been out there. But there she was like, no your, safety and everything. Well, we're glad you're safe haven shave. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you have a good day guys. Hey, ibew, a Sudanese American teenager in California, reacting to the ouster of Omar al-bashir who was president of Sudan for twenty nine years. India's general election got under way today. First day of voting in a process that will stretch all the way to may twenty third. That's when the final results are expected prime minister Narendra Modi and his Hindu nationalist party. The BJP are hoping to win a second term in office. Their main opposition is coming from the congress party led by Rahul Gandhi to give you a sense of what's at stake. Have listen to this thorough little guide prepared by partners at the BBC ready? Here we go. Why is it a big deal huge action? A million polling stations around nine hundred million voters India's economy is ranked sixth biggest in the world and its democracy is the Globes largest this key things on votes minds, the economy still growing it has lost momentum. Many farmers have debt smoke bases. Struggling exports have dropped and unemployment has raised the BJP's from Saint John Rex cash to foam as an waivers of loans. Congress is offering a minimum income for the poll. Women more women than men for the first time some parties, offering education, free cooking gas cylinders and.

Sudan Hand Omar al-bashir Sudanese military president Khartoum Sudanese government American University Bashir Rebecca Hamilton Sydney Kuzmic cage Taghrid Abdeen BJP Osama bin Laden Green Ogden Congress US India
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"F. l. LA all over Tampa Bay it's seven forty stinking. To how does this late but we got a guest here, now Rebecca, Hamilton who's running for circuit court. Judge group forty five. Is vanilla in Pasco county's sixth judicial circuit And. Running on Tuesday of course and early voting and I guess Aaron. You, got her on here because she's a WVU grad. Well that and basically anyone any candidate coming up here they're welcome to come onto the show and tell us what they. Have planned. And why we should? Potentially. Vote for them her Rebecca. You're an old. Mountaineer yes there are you from Beckley I am not I grew up. In southern California and I transferred, to WVU, an undergraduate that's weird Usually it works. The other way around right before from West Virginia end up in southern. California right This is great I'm we we don't have time to go into your background up. There but mentions you're well, aware of the buffalo creek disaster and Logan county back in seventy two and I. Many remember. That but sure you've? Been, involved with the criminal Justice and legal. Community in Pinellas county let's see since what twenty fourteen Well I I. Started practicing, in two thousand so over eighteen years I've been practicing and and Pinellas county summoned Casco but yes primarily in the areas of criminal defense started as a public defender in. Clearwater, for almost five years and then been in private, practice ever since doing criminal and and family now one thing we've, talked about here on the air a lot of times people see names on the ballot, for judge particularly for judge and they have, no idea what kind of. A judge they're voting for whether it's and we know supreme court justices whether they're liberal or. Conservative Or. Whatever, in the case of judges normally just a name. People look at it and they say who I like the name, Rebecca I'll vote for her or I like the name Sam or whatever it might be, and it would be better I would think, if they would have an Conservative or liberal by their name or they can put an l. or a c. by their name or. Something like that how would you consider yourself Well I can't give. My party affiliation because that violate rules that I believe the reason. That we, don't identify with party is because we are to rule without considering people politics in politics goes so much deeper, than political party politics involved you know treating people differently based on who they're affiliated with. Where they come from so Judges need to apply the the? Facts, to the law and and stick. With the law as it is applied to uphold the constitution and the laws. Of, the state regardless of their own personal political views or political views and stature empower those who come before them real quick how do you think your experience could help. You here if you are elected judge well my my courtroom experience. Is vast, I spent almost my first four and a half years practicing in court. Daily Managing a a heavy. Calendar I have over, one hundred cases at a time as a public, defender and I tried over forty cases you know half of those, jury trials and so and, ever since throughout my career. Been been mitigating, and, running my own, practice which which takes a. Lot of skill to run a business and practice law I manage a household and and so being able to manage a heavy docket it's critically important to understand the procedure and the, corn and the rules of evidence and like you said over eighteen, years of experience and Rebecca Hamilton again good. Luck in again the primaries coming up on August twenty eighth but early voting? Through? Sunday, and it's for circuit court judge. Group forty five six judicial circuit which is in Pasco county's that's a mouse Full Rebecca thanks for joining us on AM Tampa Bay go mountaineers thanks have great day. All right it's seven forty six on AM Tampa Bay and. Let's get to the newsroom now in Chris Drink Man. Hurricane lane is whipping the coast of Hawaii the category three storm is, moving dangerously close to the islands, and bringing, heavy rains parts of the big island have already seen nearly twenty inches of rain in a wa who and Maui, or under a hurricane warning the slow moving storm is expected dump as many. As thirty inches of rain on some parts of the islands with flooding and, landslides a net neutrality Bill is moving forward after it was approved by a key. Legislative committee this week, the bills author democratic Senator Scott Weiner says without, net neutrality protections service providers would be able to dictate the consumer's, usage because they could block, or slow down service this. Is the last, weekend, for early voting, before the primary the Pasco. Election supervisor says As he expects most voters will. Cast their, ballots by election day. Either in person or in the. Mail meanwhile. The Hillsborough. Elections, office says it'll. Have early. Voting sites at, USF for the, general election. In November after a judge threw out a state law, banning, early voting on college campuses on crank man. NewsRadio nine seventy WFL a now let's check sports run the six twenty WD as. Sportscenter on their and Jacobson the raise completed their first season sweep of an American League team, this season with a four to three. Win over the Kansas City Royals last night on a walk off Tampa Bay sweat the four-game series and finished seven no against the. Royals this season the raise will go with the bullpen day tonight against the Red Sox game is, at the trot, first pitch. At seven ten the buccaneers place running back Charles SIMS.

Rebecca Hamilton Tampa Bay Pasco county WVU Pinellas county California LA Logan county Beckley Kansas City Royals Aaron Pasco buffalo creek West Virginia Clearwater Red Sox USF NewsRadio
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"He was targeted by the fbi he doesn't just declassified the documents demonstrating this the president of the united states has plenary power to declassify anything he wants under fbi auspicies so that means tonight he could just get rid of the of the classification status for the fis awards on carter page he could just get rid of the classification status on all the information about the informant against his campaign and again i am not sure that we have to be very specific in our language when president trump says that he was spied on his campaign with spied on members of his campaign had an informant against them that's not quite the same thing as saying that trump himself was spied on or kushner spied on or bannon was spied on her any of the top members of his campaign at any point low level people who are openly discussing the possibility of working with russia it seems to me or the targets of the informants threes and i'm being careful here is just i want to go where the evidence leads the evidence ends up leading to spy gates twenty eighteen fine fine if that's where lead i'm happy to go there but so far i'm not seeing the evidence and i want to be very specific before we start slandering the entire fbi and suggesting the fbi was out trump in march twenty sixteen before he had even won the nomination is you know let's let's specific in our accusations okay i think that it's time for some things i like and then some things that i hate so may thing that i like today so i have been watching this stars series like it's an old star search two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen with rebecca hamilton who's become a relatively major shoes in life with jay jilin hall she's in a bunch of other stuff now as well and the the this mini series the white queen in the white queen is about the period in english history there's like fourteen seventies eighties the period in english history british history in which there i it's the war of the.

fbi president united states trump bannon russia rebecca hamilton jay jilin hall fis carter kushner
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"At home so it kind of it kind of ties into this topic where the world is kind of topsy turvy there's a lot of noise out there and if we can really be present you know physically and mentally i think ultimately it makes the work workplace you know you know more productive and i think you'll hear that from one of our speakers the local speaker rebecca hamilton from badger company and of course they make okay and a health products but she'll she'll be one of the speakers on march twenty eighth in addition to our national speaker bob mcdonald let me ask both you john broderick this baby more to you retired chief justice of the supreme court in hampshire but a great story on how you're trying one person one leader but without the team at dartmouth hitchcock and other folks that change direction it really change how we talk and think about mental health mental illness pajan maybe a thirty thousand foot question i i still don't think we have a handle on what to do now you have some solutions on how to react to someone who's having a mental health reality or challenge but it's a society we don't really were very far from open what i mean is i've talked to police officers and first responders that when a younger person or anyone might be having a mental health episode even if it's not a violent one we have so many hospitals so many beds at the state hospital in concord that oftentimes these people are brought to a regular hospital emergency room and sorta held in a waiting area until someone can see them and and his tom raffia said you know the neck up is where they may need some treatment and care but the doctors and the nurses in the as in the emergency room we're used to suturing and and and helping and fixing x rays in bones and injuries and accidents they're not not clinical psychiatrist or psychologist so we as a society seemed to have a long way to go here in terms of not just talking about it but caring and and helping people.

rebecca hamilton badger company bob mcdonald hampshire dartmouth hitchcock state hospital concord john broderick thirty thousand foot
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Addiction crisis we have retired chief justice john broderick now with dartmouth hitchcock healthcare center medical center talking a lot about this and tom raphael the president ceo of northeast the death of who oftentimes quarterbacks important forums like this and tom let me start with you and then shifted john and go back and forth this is different i think because of the panel of speakers including john broddrick you're kind of plan that quarter you know you'll be speaking as well but you're really putting this together with john and dartmouth hitchcock but the speakers are very powerful presenters absolutely thank you and thank you for all you do for everybody in new hampshire jack so this this began as a partnership between dartmouth hitchcock in delta dental on something to do with population health and it quickly segue into the real costs of mental health in terms of the the employer base and what we've done and you mentioned it perfectly we have a national speakers such as bob mcdonald who is the secretary of department of veterans affairs and retired chairman and ceo of proctor and gamble so we have the national perspective we also have the governor coming and we have mardi bolden common coming who's the governor's recovery friendly workplace initiative head but we also have local speakers such as amanda group honi osma as well as rebecca hamilton who is the vp of research and development at badger company so what we've quintessential new hampshire we have the we do have the national landscape but then we're bringing in some local speakers as well really get at explore the challenges for employers for dressing behavioral health issues now tom one thing we talked about this and john broddrick because i want to come back with john in the next segment talk more about how he's been going around the state talking to schools and businesses on a really how we look at how we realize how we recognize a mental health discussions and and challenges and an illness but john is there is a cost of business as well as families but businesses people don't really realize that sometimes correct jacket it's very true it's very real interested in this problem if it isn't just about helping your employees are not to be about helping your bottom line and my i'm master mitch businesses lose upwards of two hundred billion dollars for the beach act every year because of laws from work turnover absenteeism and of.

secretary mardi bolden tom raphael badger company vp rebecca hamilton proctor chairman and ceo john broderick bob mcdonald new hampshire dartmouth hitchcock john broddrick john president ceo dartmouth hitchcock healthcare two hundred billion dollars
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Of business the mental health and addiction crisis we have retired chief justice john broderick now with the dartmouth hitchcock healthcare center medical center talking a lot about this and tom raphael the president ceo of northeast delta death who oftentimes quarterbacks important forest like this and tom let me start with you and then shift to john and go back and forth this is different i think because of the panel of speakers including john broddrick you're kind of plan that quarter you know you'll be speaking as well but you're really putting this together with john and dartmouth hitchcock but the speakers are very powerful presenters absolutely thank you and thank you for all you do for everybody in new hampshire jack so this this began as a partnership between dartmouth hitchcock in delta dental on something to do with population health and it quickly segue into the real costs of mental health and terms of the the employer base and what we've done and you mentioned it perfectly we have a national speakers such as bob mcdonnell who is the eighth secretary of department of veterans affairs and retired chairman and ceo of proctor and gamble so we have the national perspective we also have the governor coming and we have mardi bolden common coming who's the governor's recovery friendly workplace initiative head but we're also have local speakers such as amanda group honi osmar as well as rebecca hamilton who is the vp of research and development at badger company so what we've quintessential in the hampshire we have the we do have the national landscape but then we're bringing in some local speakers as well too really get at explore the challenges for employers for addressing behavioral health issues now tom one thing we talked about this and john broddrick because i want to come back with john in the next segment talk more about how he's been going around the state talking to schools and businesses on a really how we look at how we realize how we recognize a mental health discussions and challenges and an illness but john there's there is a cost business as well as families but businesses people don't really realize that sometimes correct jacket it's very true it's very real i mean they're interested in this problem if it isn't just about helping your employees are not to be about helping your bottom line and muschamp master mitch businesses lose upwards of two hundred billion dollars for the beach act every year because of days from work turnover and absenteeism and.

proctor muschamp mardi bolden tom raphael john badger company vp rebecca hamilton john broderick chairman and ceo secretary bob mcdonnell new hampshire dartmouth hitchcock john broddrick president ceo dartmouth hitchcock healthcare two hundred billion dollars
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Real cost of business the mental health and addiction crisis we have retired chief justice john broderick now with the dartmouth hitchcock healthcare center medical center talking a lot about this and tom raphael the president ceo of northeast delta death who oftentimes quarterbacks important forest like this and tom let me start with you and then shifted john and go back and forth this is different i think because of the panel of speakers including john broderick you're kind of plan that quarter you know you'll be speaking as well but you're really putting this together with john and dartmouth hitchcock but the speakers are very powerful presenters absolutely thank you and thank you for all you do for everybody in new hampshire jack so this this began as a partnership between dartmouth hitchcock in delta dental on something to do with population health and it quickly segue into the real costs of mental health in terms of the the employer base and what we've done and you mentioned it perfectly we have a national speakers such as bob mcdonald who is the eighth secretary of department of veterans affairs and retired chairman and ceo of proctor and gamble so we have the national perspective we also have the governor coming and we have mardi bolden common coming who's the governor's recovery friendly workplace initiative head but we also have local speakers such as amanda group honi osmar as well as rebecca hamilton who the vp of research and development at badger company so what we've quintessential new hampshire we have the we do have the national landscape but then we're bringing in some local speakers as well really get at explore the challenges for employers for addressing behavioral health issues now tom one thing we talked about this and john broaddrick because i want to come back with jordan in the next segment talk more about how he's been going around the state talking to schools and businesses on a really how we look at how we realize how we recognize a mental health discussions and and challenges and and and an illness but john there's there is a cost of business as well as families but businesses people don't really realize that sometimes correct jacket it's very true it sure real i mean they're interested in this problem if it isn't just about helping your employees are not to be about helping your bottom line and muschamp astra mitch businesses lose upwards of two hundred billion dollars for the beach actor every year because of laws from work turnover absenteeism and loss of productivity associated with.

proctor john broaddrick mardi bolden tom raphael muschamp jordan badger company vp rebecca hamilton john broderick chairman and ceo secretary bob mcdonald new hampshire dartmouth hitchcock john president ceo dartmouth hitchcock healthcare two hundred billion dollars
"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca hamilton" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"And one has a old ten year old girl and we were talking about the snow day on friday and there is speculation i guess among some that one of the reasons why they schools were also willing to cancel on friday even though we didn't get that much snow was one more day to keep sick kids out of school could you it of the kids missing class rudy heard of the ever catch up at their out for a week or two and maybe that'll stem the outbreak a number four on the list of ford to know how much olympics did you consume this weekend a good ties are this socalled always have on you know like an is always something new and it's it's something you can watch with your kids and look at this lose that's what these guys go flying down one kids one i want said what they're just leading to 80 it doesn't look that hard whose it's like he he thought that you didn't have to steer or anything like that there were you to sit up there and go on like well first of all they're gonna 80 miles an hour but he said yeah they would pass us on the freeway on that get away and it's like nearing also have on us anyway in some prayed exactly so not real successful for our madison curlers rebecca hamilton they're getting great buzz absolutely everybody seems to love them they they did come back and get a nice win but they did not advanced to the medal round in the mix pairs and other each part of the men's and women's teams and hopefully they get some redemption there but that's fun to track their story i don't see the murrial thing it all with him i feel a little bit of it i mean it was just something cue to have an hour right i mean if tap people talk about them so today primetime coverage of me think about this there are already into tuesday over there or just about actually what are they hit the going line right leverage asked about believes live tonight so we'll be getting tuesday stuff in prime time on today's tmj four a lot of snowboard halfpipe today men's and women's will be getting a look at those teams so awesome interesting names to follow course.

rudy ford tmj madison rebecca hamilton ten year