18 Burst results for "Rebecca Coakley"

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

08:31 min | 5 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"A big part of what's lean gander is doing this week is being a spokesperson. Getting the biden. Message out about what they need and what they plan to do. The president-elect as talked about appealing to governors to try to enforce mask mandates it. Do you think those would make a difference because there are places like new york. Where you and i both live where those are in place and yet we've got big outbreaks in different communities. Well i think the key is that one how enforceable is a mandate to who is issuing the mandate. Is it somebody that these communities respect. Believe trust and i think that makes a national mandate both enforcement issues as well as the trust shoes very challenging. I do think you know a mandate coming from a governor. For example governor of south dakota that would be taken very differently would be received very differently by people in south dakota. Then if the president were issuing that same mandate should we have a national testing plan or has the boat sailed on that already so the current administration has actively discouraged. Testing has said oh. We're testing too much. That is definitely not what you're going to hear under the new administration if anything you're going to see a massive ramping up of testing and really trying especially in communities of color that have been really hard hit to make sure we have much better equity in access. But who's who's responsible for that. Is that this sort of patchwork we've got now of some state some cities. Some urgent cares or is it the federal government saying okay. We're doing widespread testing. Yeah this is the place where you're going to see. The federal government really stepping in one of the places where they could have a real impact is invoking the defense production act that would mean the federal government could compel manufacturers to crank up production. President trump has done this to a limited degree but the biden team wants to use the law. More broadly both with respect to personal protective equipment as well as scaling up production of test kits. So i i really do think we need a national plan here and that will include testing <hes>. Not just people who have symptoms but people who have no symptoms expanding testing and encouraging mask. Mandates are things president-elect biden could do once. He takes office in january. That's two months from now. Normally an incoming administration would be getting information from the outgoing one. But selene says that's not happening. How much does president. Trump's refusal to concede and this sort of official transition being stuck in limbo. How much does that get in your way. Well that's a huge problem. We know historically that transitions are real period of vulnerability for the country in terms of national security. And that's whether that's a a foreign threat a terrorist threat or a threat like the corona virus and so that really could very well translate into americans dying unnecessarily to give you some examples of the kind of information we want and we can't get company gloves. do we have. How many syringes. Where are we in negotiating contracts with pharmaceutical companies with the logistics of delivery. Where are we in terms of developing databases to track who's gotten vaccinated who needs to be vaccinated. I mean those are things that are in a wait and boring nuts and bolts kind of stuff. But that's the stuff that you need to be able to plan a big response like this in terms of scaling affects nations even if the to really promising looking ones pfizer moderna if they are skilled up <hes> distribution. Is this huge challenge. How are you all thinking about vaccine distribution and getting it into the communities that that need it most so why you have to scale up. The this is where really moving forward with. The transition is really going to be important because we need to have a better understanding. What's happening on the inside with the pharmaceutical company capacity. And then once you've manufactured these doses how how do you distribute them in wear and some of that will depend on the characteristics of the vaccines. So you know the the pfizer vaccine needs to be deep-frozen minus seventy celsius. Well most family doctors. I don't know that any family doctors have the capacity to store a vaccine at that temperature. <hes> a lot of community hospitals will not have that kind of capacity either. And so what you're really looking at is having probably big academic hospital centers major health systems. Maybe pharmaceutical retail chains having central depots. Where they can do that kind of storage. But that means it's going to be harder to deliver that vaccine in particular to rural areas. So my guess is you're going to see the pfizer vaccine really targeted to urban areas. That have the capacity to deal with what we call that cold chain of freezing whereas the modern vaccine which is <hes>. Which has less stringent temperature requirements in his relatively stable for a month at higher temperatures. You're going to see them journal. Vaccine probably prioritized for rural areas. And as you know a couple other vaccines emerged from the pipeline. You'll see further and further sort of targeting based on how easy it is to get those vaccines to those parts of the country. How effective those particular vaccines are for. Certain patient populations you know he might have pfizer here new york city and you might have maduna in rural wyoming listening to you. Describe the kind of logistics around that. I keep thinking about communities that have been particularly hard hit when we are talking about black and brown communities indigenous communities <hes>. Ease there. I guess a painful chance that given the kind of medical infrastructure that some of these vaccines require that they're going to be doubly hit in the vaccine rollout process. Yeah this is something that we're really attentive to an it is a tricky one because there are issues a vaccine skepticism and hesitancy in some of these communities for good reason. And if you say we're going to prioritize communities of color for vaccination there will be a contingent of people who will say. Oh so we're going to be guinea pigs for this new vaccine so you have to address those very real concerns even while you are trying to prioritize because the fact is these are communities whether it's the navajo in the southwest or the south bronx here in new york city is their communities have been hit really hard and continue even now to be. Hit harder <hes>. So we really do need to prioritize them if we're going to maximize the impact of the vaccines. We've been talking about trust. And i have to ask you about one of your colleagues on the advisory board <hes>. Zeke emanuel who quite famously wrote an essay. saying he'd like to die at seventy five and that made a lot of people in the disability community really angry. How do you get their trust. I noticed the president-elect mentioned them specifically in his speech how do you their trust with him as a part of this group. Well i don't really want to speak to to zeke in particular but in terms of the disability community ron clean and i actually co hosted a podcast together. He had to step away for biden campaign. Were going to be the chief of staff. He's going to be the chief of staff for for <hes>. President-elect biden and ron and i interviewed early on during the pandemic rebecca coakley. Who's with the center for american progress. Who is a disability rights. Activist really did listen to her concerns. Were really very much attentive to the needs of that community as well so we are taking notes. We are reaching out to people from the disability community to better understand what policies they need.

Dr selene gowned ebola Us biden Selene bellevue hospital hemorrhaging Selena new york west africa advisory board
Inside Biden's COVID-19 Team

Slate's If Then

08:31 min | 5 months ago

Inside Biden's COVID-19 Team

"A big part of what's lean gander is doing this week is being a spokesperson. Getting the biden. Message out about what they need and what they plan to do. The president-elect as talked about appealing to governors to try to enforce mask mandates it. Do you think those would make a difference because there are places like new york. Where you and i both live where those are in place and yet we've got big outbreaks in different communities. Well i think the key is that one how enforceable is a mandate to who is issuing the mandate. Is it somebody that these communities respect. Believe trust and i think that makes a national mandate both enforcement issues as well as the trust shoes very challenging. I do think you know a mandate coming from a governor. For example governor of south dakota that would be taken very differently would be received very differently by people in south dakota. Then if the president were issuing that same mandate should we have a national testing plan or has the boat sailed on that already so the current administration has actively discouraged. Testing has said oh. We're testing too much. That is definitely not what you're going to hear under the new administration if anything you're going to see a massive ramping up of testing and really trying especially in communities of color that have been really hard hit to make sure we have much better equity in access. But who's who's responsible for that. Is that this sort of patchwork we've got now of some state some cities. Some urgent cares or is it the federal government saying okay. We're doing widespread testing. Yeah this is the place where you're going to see. The federal government really stepping in one of the places where they could have a real impact is invoking the defense production act that would mean the federal government could compel manufacturers to crank up production. President trump has done this to a limited degree but the biden team wants to use the law. More broadly both with respect to personal protective equipment as well as scaling up production of test kits. So i i really do think we need a national plan here and that will include testing Not just people who have symptoms but people who have no symptoms expanding testing and encouraging mask. Mandates are things president-elect biden could do once. He takes office in january. That's two months from now. Normally an incoming administration would be getting information from the outgoing one. But selene says that's not happening. How much does president. Trump's refusal to concede and this sort of official transition being stuck in limbo. How much does that get in your way. Well that's a huge problem. We know historically that transitions are real period of vulnerability for the country in terms of national security. And that's whether that's a a foreign threat a terrorist threat or a threat like the corona virus and so that really could very well translate into americans dying unnecessarily to give you some examples of the kind of information we want and we can't get company gloves. do we have. How many syringes. Where are we in negotiating contracts with pharmaceutical companies with the logistics of delivery. Where are we in terms of developing databases to track who's gotten vaccinated who needs to be vaccinated. I mean those are things that are in a wait and boring nuts and bolts kind of stuff. But that's the stuff that you need to be able to plan a big response like this in terms of scaling affects nations even if the to really promising looking ones pfizer moderna if they are skilled up distribution. Is this huge challenge. How are you all thinking about vaccine distribution and getting it into the communities that that need it most so why you have to scale up. The this is where really moving forward with. The transition is really going to be important because we need to have a better understanding. What's happening on the inside with the pharmaceutical company capacity. And then once you've manufactured these doses how how do you distribute them in wear and some of that will depend on the characteristics of the vaccines. So you know the the pfizer vaccine needs to be deep-frozen minus seventy celsius. Well most family doctors. I don't know that any family doctors have the capacity to store a vaccine at that temperature. a lot of community hospitals will not have that kind of capacity either. And so what you're really looking at is having probably big academic hospital centers major health systems. Maybe pharmaceutical retail chains having central depots. Where they can do that kind of storage. But that means it's going to be harder to deliver that vaccine in particular to rural areas. So my guess is you're going to see the pfizer vaccine really targeted to urban areas. That have the capacity to deal with what we call that cold chain of freezing whereas the modern vaccine which is Which has less stringent temperature requirements in his relatively stable for a month at higher temperatures. You're going to see them journal. Vaccine probably prioritized for rural areas. And as you know a couple other vaccines emerged from the pipeline. You'll see further and further sort of targeting based on how easy it is to get those vaccines to those parts of the country. How effective those particular vaccines are for. Certain patient populations you know he might have pfizer here new york city and you might have maduna in rural wyoming listening to you. Describe the kind of logistics around that. I keep thinking about communities that have been particularly hard hit when we are talking about black and brown communities indigenous communities Ease there. I guess a painful chance that given the kind of medical infrastructure that some of these vaccines require that they're going to be doubly hit in the vaccine rollout process. Yeah this is something that we're really attentive to an it is a tricky one because there are issues a vaccine skepticism and hesitancy in some of these communities for good reason. And if you say we're going to prioritize communities of color for vaccination there will be a contingent of people who will say. Oh so we're going to be guinea pigs for this new vaccine so you have to address those very real concerns even while you are trying to prioritize because the fact is these are communities whether it's the navajo in the southwest or the south bronx here in new york city is their communities have been hit really hard and continue even now to be. Hit harder So we really do need to prioritize them if we're going to maximize the impact of the vaccines. We've been talking about trust. And i have to ask you about one of your colleagues on the advisory board Zeke emanuel who quite famously wrote an essay. saying he'd like to die at seventy five and that made a lot of people in the disability community really angry. How do you get their trust. I noticed the president-elect mentioned them specifically in his speech how do you their trust with him as a part of this group. Well i don't really want to speak to to zeke in particular but in terms of the disability community ron clean and i actually co hosted a podcast together. He had to step away for biden campaign. Were going to be the chief of staff. He's going to be the chief of staff for for President-elect biden and ron and i interviewed early on during the pandemic rebecca coakley. Who's with the center for american progress. Who is a disability rights. Activist really did listen to her concerns. Were really very much attentive to the needs of that community as well so we are taking notes. We are reaching out to people from the disability community to better understand what policies they need.

Biden Federal Government South Dakota Pfizer Selene Donald Trump New York New York City Zeke Emanuel Wyoming Guinea Bronx Ron Clean Rebecca Coakley Center For American Progress RON
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

08:02 min | 8 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

"Well, come thank you for tuning in. Welcome to the what's the matter with me podcast? My name is John. I'm forty one years old husband father of two small business owner radio DJ podcast or I have multiple sclerosis. So I made this podcast. To share with them going through what's the matter with me is in MS podcast also, it's about other things. Of now, the medical professional, you should don't take this for medical advice. If you need medical advice, ask your health care provider. Okay, the article. Is from the near Times Dateline July twenty six, two, thousand, twenty. Were twenty percent of America and were still invisible. Disabled Americans are asking for true inclusion by Judith Human and John Moda. Mace human is a disability rights advocate Mr Whoa Dach-, a civil rights lawyer. On July Twenty Sixth Nineteen Ninety President George Bush the Americans with disabilities act into law like the Civil Rights Act of nineteen, sixty four, the ADA was watershed they just leash in. The. Culmination of decades. Long campaign organize protests in activism. A to with victory in the struggle for equality for group of people that had been systematically denied basic rights and access to public spaces and services on the thirtieth anniversary of the law, it's only natural to want to celebrate and we should. Yet, just as many of the injustices that the Civil Rights Act aimed to eliminate are still very much with us and still being resisted the full promise of the Americans with disabilities, act has yet to be realized. We're not yet where we need to be. Historically. Disabled people have been hidden away. Disabled people can make non disabled people feel vulnerable. This situation is thrown into sharper relief. When we compare our visibility to die of identity groups. If you're unconvinced tried this experiment randomly look at any fifty print advertisements? You will no doubt find racial and ethnic diversity. You'll see women and men have different sexual orientations. He will see gender fluidity and people of all ages what you won't see. Where you'll see very little of our representations of disabled. Persons. This is just one expression impelled. The story of our lives are excluded from general public discourse even though it's calming for disability to overlap with identities across this spectrum of minority groups. Fighting Discrimination on the basis of disability continues to take a backseat in our national consciousness. There is a discussion about Ada accommodations. And skipping down, she continues requirements like. Playgrounds and movie theaters accessible providing sign language interpreters, a new emergency rooms or accessible websites for registering for community programs have been life changing but only when people with disabilities routinely work in play alongside their fellow citizens will deeper change occur the individuals with Disabilities Education Act and its predecessors have required inclusive education since the nineteen seventies and we've seen firsthand how attitude no barriers long common in this country are disappearing in those students who have been educated with disabled peers having disabled persons in decision making in product development design governments in the digital world is also critical and Aba generation and APP turn. Coined by Rebecca Coakley for disabled persons born after the Aba will lead the way. This generation is the active aware and taking steps to call out and challenge able ISM when they encounter it which is so rat have to break lists I be here that is so rad. Big Big. UPS to begins. But this generation cannot bring about change alone. Nor should they when President Bush declared on the White House lawn that thirty years ago let this shameful walls of exclusion. Finally come tumbling down. He was calling on us as a nation to recognize our responsibility to end discrimination. If the moral arc of the universe is to continue to bend toward just this, we must embrace this ability as a critical part of diversity be and truly welcome one in other IM- both leather hands spirit as equal members of society. Mr. Wo die cheese of former DOJ lawyer and the chief author of the regulations of both baby a an section five, zero, four of the rehabilitation act of nineteen seventy-three and anti discrimination law. That was a precursor to the. Aba. In international disability rights activists, she was the leader of the five zero, four state in the in San. Francisco in Nineteen Seventy, seven at twenty, five days the longest nonviolent occupation of the federal building. In American history may Siemens role in that produce has been documented in the recently released film? CREPE camp. In her memoir being humane. So awesome. Awesome. What, these people said really impacting me I'm really move me and so I wanted to talk about this. I'm trained as an artist. You know I went to.

President Bush America Mr Whoa Dach Aba Francisco Nineteen Seventy business owner ADA Siemens DOJ Judith Human San President Rebecca Coakley John Moda White House product development
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 9 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Couldn't vote will be back with more on voting rights for people with disabilities in just moments, stick with us. Policy. 8778 Mighty or tweeted that the takeaway dominoes get this year thing or just he's moving in. And we're back, and we've been talking about voting rights and access for people with disabilities in the United States. I'm joined by Rebecca Coakley, the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress. Rebecca tell us about what are called incompetency laws and how those affect the right to vote for some people with disabilities, so incompetency laws very across the nation and their laws that are put in place there also typically called guardianship. Laws. And these are laws that are specifically target largely people with mental illness people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and are typically put into place as somebody transitions from Special education to whatever comes next. Parents are largely encouraged to apply for guardianship for their loved one under the premise that, should they not, they'll have no say in any of the decision making. As it relates to that person, their education or their care. However, this is simply not the case. But one of the things that we have seen as a result of this is tens of thousands of disenfranchised voters around the country, depending on what the state's given definition is, I think probably one of the best sighted. By the disability community but least known by mainstream society is Britney Spears. Britney Spears is not able to vote in this current election, and she's not able to vote because Whitney's father and her business manager have her under guardianship plan. And so because Brittany is under guardianship, she is not able to cast a vote in this election. Rebecca, How have these incompetency laws been justified? They've really been justified because our nation's still largely operates off of a framework of paternalism when it comes to people with disabilities, Theeighty a is 30 years old. And while it is middle age, you can say In some ways, it is sort of having a mid life crisis at the moment. What we've seen as it relates The guardianship statutes is that people really apply for these for their loved ones out of thinking. Well, if I don't do this, who's going to have a say In the person that I loves health care who's gonna have a say in their financial obligations or you know what if they are the target of fraudsters, and so I think there's a really opportunity here to broaden the conversation and You know, share with folks that are listening that this isn't the only option. I think it's also important to note that the number one reason that people with disabilities challenge their status, they challenged their quote unquote guardians. In court is to vote. We hear that time and time again from people with intellectual, developmental disabilities and people with mental illness who want to be able to vote but find that they're not eligible to vote under their state statute. How has Corona virus affected access for people with disabilities so far? Well, we know that roughly 1/3 of the individuals that have died of Corona virus our people in nursing home settings. And while society likes to put out the notion that it's on ly seniors and nursing homes, The reality is that there's a large number of people with disabilities, including Children with disabilities and nursing homes around this country. Also, people with underlying conditions count as people with disabilities under the A. D. A. We know that these folks often are also individuals of color, so we're also talking about issues of systemic racism in the medical field when it comes to this And so when we're seeing who's dying, it's largely people of color with disabilities. Like I mentioned we have a very important election coming up. What should we expect at the Poles come November for compliance with disability regulations so that people with disabilities can actually exercise their right to vote. Well, frankly, I'm not holding my breath. One of the biggest challenges with the data that we continue to see out of the CEO is that that number that 60% of polling places are still inaccessible in one way, shape or form has held steady over the last three presidential cycles. I think, given the circumstances of the Corona virus, the best case scenario Is a mix of universal vote by mail so everyone would receive a ballot as well as limited and person options, because let's be really even felt by mail is not accessible for awful. And so we still need in person options. And so I think the best case scenario is a blending of early voting and making national voting day. Ah holiday, but That must be done with early voting, or we'll actually see it disproportionate.

Rebecca Coakley Britney Spears Brittany United States Disability Justice Initiative Center for American Progress Special education director CEO Theeighty Whitney business manager
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:10 min | 9 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Couldn't vote. I'll be back with more on voting rights for people with disabilities in just a moment. Stick with US policy. 8778 Mighty or tweeted at the takeaway. Gemma knows this year thing or just he's moving those trays. And we're back, and we've been talking about voting rights and access for people with disabilities in the United States. I'm joined by Rebecca Coakley, the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress. Rebecca tell us about what are called incompetency laws and how those affect the right to vote for some people with disabilities. So incompetency laws very across the nation and their laws that are put in place. There are also two pretty called guardianship laws. And these are laws that are specifically target largely people with mental illness people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and are typically put into place as somebody transitions from Special education to whatever comes next. Parents are largely encouraged to apply for guardianship for their loved one under the premise that, should they not, they'll have no say in any of the decision making. As it relates to that person, their education or their care. However, this is simply not the case. But one of the things that we have seen as a result of this is tens of thousands of disenfranchised voters around the country, depending on what the state's given definition is, I think probably one of the best sighted. By the disability community but least known by mainstream society is Britney Spears. Britney Spears is not able to vote in this current election, and she's not able to vote because Whitney's father and her business manager have her under guardianship plan. And so because Brittany is under guardianship, she is not able to cast a vote in this election. Rebecca, How have these incompetency laws been justified? They've really been justified because our nation's still largely operates off of a framework of paternalism when it comes to people with disabilities, Theeighty a is 30 years old. And while it is middle age, you can say In some ways, it is sort of having a mid life crisis at the moment. But what we've seen as it relates the guardianship statutes is that people really apply for these for their loved ones out of thinking. Well, if I don't do this, who's going to have a say In the person that I loves health care who's gonna have a say in their financial obligations or you know what if they are the target of fraudsters, and so I think there's a really opportunity here to broaden the conversation and You know, share with folks that are listening that this isn't the only option. I think it's also important to note that the number one reason that people with the abilities challenge their status, they challenged their quote unquote guardians. In court is to vote. We hear that time and time again from people with intellectual, developmental disabilities and people with mental illness who want to be able to vote but find that they're not eligible to vote under their state statute. How has Corona virus affected access for people with disabilities so far? Well, we know that roughly 1/3 of the individuals that have died of Corona virus our people in nursing home settings. And while society likes to put out the notion that it's only seniors and nursing homes The reality is that there's a large number of people with disabilities, including Children with disabilities and nursing homes around this country. Also, people with underlying conditions count as people with disabilities under the A. D. A. We know that these folks often are also individuals of color, so we're also talking about issues of systemic racism in the medical field when it comes to this And so when we're seeing who's dying, it's largely people of color with disabilities. Like I mentioned We have a very important election coming up. What should we expect at the Poles come November for Compliance with disability regulations so that people with disabilities can actually exercise their right to vote. Well, frankly, I'm not holding my breath. One of the biggest challenges.

Rebecca Coakley Britney Spears United States Brittany Gemma Disability Justice Initiative Special education Theeighty Center for American Progress director Whitney business manager
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:09 min | 9 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Vietnam era, people with both physical and mental trauma as a result of of their time military service, so disability was not just white dudes in wheelchairs. Even though that's what we see on our parking sides disability was mental health disability was chronic. was and is chronic illness. You known if you think about it today. If they hadn't have been that flexible in terms of the actual definition of. It wouldn't unqoute clued kids in flint who are drinking water. After all this time, it wouldn't include students in Compton California. Who Sued to be able to receive special education services citing that poverty in effect had made them disable, and it wouldn't include people today who are living with a long term impact of the corona virus. Let's talk a little bit about where we are. In terms of access to voting we are in a contentious an election season, probably one of the most significant elections that many of us have witness in our lifetime will be happening in November, so tell us before the Ada what did voting rights an access? Look like for people with disabilities. It was very much a hodgepodge I remember going to vote with my father, who was a wheelchair user when I was a small child and I remember as having to sit in our car and wait for someone I act to run in actually to the polling place, which was at a church, and let's remember that churches are actually exempted from the ADA which is really problematic when it comes to voting, because churches are one of the most popular voting sites so I remember running into this church and asking them to bring out a ballot, my dad. Dad, who was sitting in his van, because there was no curb cut for him to bring his wheelchair up. There were three steps outside of the church. There was no ramp down to where people were actually voting inside the church, and so quite literally poll worker just came out and handed my dad his ballot, and like South there while my dad voted, and that's actually a very common story for a lot of people with disabilities or you know it was. We've heard stories of people with disabilities who arrived at polls and been told that. They assumed they meaning the poll. Workers assumed that disabled people couldn't vote Rebecca. Tell us about what are called incompetency laws, and how those affect the right to vote for some people with disabilities. So incompetency laws vary across the nation and their laws that are put in place. They're also called guardianship laws, and these are laws that are specifically target largely people with mental illness, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and are typically put into place as somebody transitions from special education to whatever comes next parents are largely encouraged to apply for guardianship for their loved one under the premise that should they not have no say in any of the decision. Decision making as it relates to that person, their education or their care. However, this is simply not the case, but of the things that we have seen as a result of this is tens of thousands of disenfranchised voters around the country, depending on what estates given definition is I think probably one of the best cited by the disability community, but least known by mainstream society is Britney Spears. Britney Spears not able to vote in this current election. And, she's not able to vote because Brittany's father and her business manager have her under guardianship plan, and so because Brittany is under guardianship. She is not able to cast a vote in this election. Rebecca! How have these incompetency laws been justified? They've really been justified. Because our nation's still largely operates off of a framework of paternalism when it comes to people with disabilities, the ADA is thirty years old, and while it is Middle Age, you can say in some ways. It is sort of having a midlife crisis at the moment, but what we've seen as it relates to the guardianship statutes. Is that people really apply for these for their loved ones out of thinking well, if I don't do this, who's going to have a say in the person that I love healthcare? Who's going to have a say in their? Their financial obligations, or you know what if they are the target of fraudsters, and so I think there's a real opportunity here to broaden the conversation, and and you know share with folks that are listening that this isn't the only option I think. It's also important to note that the number one reason that people with disabilities challenge their status. They challenged their quote. Unquote Guardians in court is to vote. We hear that time and time again from people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and people with mental illness who want to be able to vote but find that they're not eligible to vote under their state statute. HOW HAS CORONA? Virus affected access for people with disabilities so far while we know that roughly one third of the individuals that have died of coronavirus are people in Nursing Home Settings, and while society likes to put out the notion that it's only seniors in nursing homes. The reality is that there's a large number of people with disabilities including children with disabilities in nursing homes around this country also people with underlying conditions count as people with disabilities under the. The Ada. We know that these folks often are also individuals of color, so we're also talking about issues of systemic racism in the medical field when it comes to this, and so when we're seeing WHO's dying. It's largely people of color with disabilities like I mentioned. We have a very important election coming up. What should we expect at? The polls? Come November for compliance with disability regulations, so that people with disabilities can actually exercise their right to vote well. Frankly, I'm. I'm not holding my breath. One of the biggest challenges with the data that we continue to see the Gao Oh. Is that that number that sixty percent of polling places are still inaccessible in one way shape or form has held steady over the last three presidential cycles. I think given the circumstances of the corona virus. The best case scenario is a mix of universal vote by mail, so everyone would receive a ballot as well as limited in person options because let's. Let's be real. Even vote by mail is not accessible for all people, and so we still need 'em person options, and so I think that the best case scenario is a blending of early voting and making national voting day a holiday, but that must be done with early voting, or we'll actually see a disproportionate impact on disabled senior and low income voters. Rebecca Coakley is the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress Rebecca thanks so much. Thank you so much for having me. Have you or someone? You know been affected by the Americans with Disabilities Act what is it meant for you and your life? Leave us a message at eight, seven, seven, eight, six, nine, eight to five three. And that's all for us today. It's always great to have you with us. You can give us a call about any story. At eight seven seven eight might take go get some rest. We'll see you tomorrow same time same place. I'm Tanzania. This is the takeaway and I'll talk to you then..

Ada Rebecca Coakley Britney Spears Compton California Dad flint Brittany Vietnam Tanzania Disability Justice Initiative Gao business manager director
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:06 min | 10 months ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Awfully long time ago when north Korea's Kim Jong moon was meeting with president trump and south Korean president one is the results of that flurry of friendliness was North Korea and South Korea agreed to set up what they called a joint liaison office just on the north Korean side of the border and north Korean and south Korean officials moved in and they worked side by side it's kind of symbolic but it was also a notable symbol of cooperation and that is the building that North Korea blew up yesterday literally demolished with explosives and they didn't send tiny off they still make shift structure this was a cool story glass fronted cleaning building renovated two years ago at which south Korean taxpayers money and north Korean state TV is now airing video footage from multiple angles all of the moment they destroyed this building we should say that with the sars related nobody inside the state facility had been closed in January because of the corona virus outbreak so no reports of any casualties but certainly a dramatic gesture by the north Koreans to point out that displeasure at the state of relations with the south they are blaming that on an argument that's been going on for a few weeks about defective people who leave North Korea moved to South Korea and then fly balloons back across the border carrying critical material material criticizing the north Korean leadership the solidifying because North Korea is furious about them to clean the defective human scum but the defects have been doing this for years and so there is some skepticism among north Korean analysts about why they suddenly picking a fight about the defect is about the balloons and the suspicion among many experts on those gray areas that North Korea is facing an economic crisis with sanctions still in place about its nuclear weapons and also who that is potentially a serious coronavirus not breaking so the suggestion in the suspicion from some quarters is this is North Korea trying to distract attention domestically from some pretty serious crises king salmon no one from fox news eighteen minutes after seven o'clock now the Lincoln project that's a political action committee that's formed by current and former Republicans who oppose president trump they released an ad yesterday which are questions trump's health from this thing is just ugly it's called hash tag trump is not well when it begins with a voice over that says something's wrong with Donald Trump shows scenes that include trump's struggling to bring a glass of water to his mouth and walked down a ramp and of him going up the stairs to Air Force One with toilet paper under issue then the voiceover calls him shaky and weak and says White House reporters should be covering his quote secretive midnight run to Walter Reed Medical Center referring to the president's abrupt visit last fall for what he later said was doing part of an annual physical early the ad concludes it says it's time to quote we talk about this trump is not well well this that's not sitting well at all with at least one disability activist even as others say that trump's health fair game because he mocked a disabled reporter any calls presumptive democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sleepy Joe and suggesting that the Joe Biden is well the slip and he's lost a few miles off his fastball now Rebecca Coakley who's the director of the disability justice initiative at the liberal center for American progress wrote in a Washington post op ed yesterday that when people who aren't doctors diagnosed trump with health problems at her it's people who are disabled and she wrote every single professional with a disability I know has been questioned privately and publicly about whether or not their condition in quotation marks hinders their ability to do their job and she stated that someone's ability to quote used a ramp or drink from a glass of water has no bearing on whether someone can fulfill the essential functions of the job and she said the focus should instead be on trump's policies and actions as a president that will notice yeah the cheers up heading up the liberal center for American progress so let me tell you something this is any indication of what's to come man is going to be one ugly ugly campaign but don't let anybody kid yeah negative ads do work twenty minutes after seven o'clock was that the roadways the U. S. food and drug administration is bringing us Jon Hamm what's report so it actually clear by Smithfield Avenue in ninety five north bound traffic getting through without much delay looking good on the southbound side from Lonsdale Avenue through the one forty six merchant still quiet one ninety five west in from the trail on Broadway we through southern New England traffic I'm John handling most of us like to be out in the sun the FDA recommends using a sunscreen with an SPF fifteen or higher also look for broad spectrum on the lake the number SPF plus broad spectrum equal healthy fun in the sun a.

president north Korea Kim Jong
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

"Selene Gander and I'm Ron claim. And this is epidemic. Today is Friday April twenty fourth as America approaches. Its fifty thousand th death dacoven. We're GONNA talk about one group. That's been particularly hard. Hit by the corona people living with disabilities many services that they rely on home health workers pharmacies. Even things like grocery delivery have been stretched to the breaking point by covert. Today we're GONNA hear about how Americans with disabilities are finding creative solutions to this problem. And how they are fighting for their rights during this pandemic. We're going to speak with Senator Maggie. Hassen from New Hampshire. Senator Hasson has direct experience caring for a loved one with a disability. We'll hear how that perspective shapes the policies she's fighting for in the Senate through legislation like the cares act. Ross also going to hear from Rebecca Coakley. She's a disability rights activist with the Center for American progress. She's GonNa give us her take on. How the corona virus and the government's response to this are impacting the disability community. Okay let's start with our interview with Senator Maggie Hassen so today we're pleased to welcome to the PODCAST senator. Mackey hasn't from New Hampshire. After serving as governor of New Hampshire for four years Senator Nelson was elected to the US Senate in two thousand sixteen. Senator has an is married and has two adult children. Senator has in. Would you mind just sharing a little bit about your son? Ben will sure thanks for having me on one of the reasons I N in public service to begin with is because of the experience of raising our son. Ben Ben is now a thirty one year old young man who is very funny and very smart but happens to have very severe cerebral palsy. So then doesn't walk and he can't speak or use his fingers to operate a keyboard. He has a lot of complex medical. Needs that come with the level of cerebral palsy. He has and so he is the center of our household and he is a very funny and high-energy young man but right now in particular. We are being extra extra careful in our household to try to make sure that all of us who interact with banks are just being as careful as possible. Why were you especially concerned that you may have been exposed yourself? Plus all I was on the hill you through January February and March and it became very clear both from the rate of cases were being diagnosed to detect it in DC and also the fact that it is one of my colleagues in the Senate tested positive that I was likely exposed to the virus. And since this virus can be contagious. Even when the carrier of it doesn't have symptoms of the only way we could really try to assure that I wouldn't bring.

senator Ben Ben Senator Maggie Hassen Senator Maggie Senator Hasson US Senate New Hampshire Senator Nelson Rebecca Coakley Selene Gander America Center for American progress Mackey Ron Ross
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Back on the zero hour in lockdown I'm Richard RGS cow and we now continue our conversation with disability rights advocate Rebecca Coakley the reality is for a lot of aging folks that the idea of aging and disability is uncomfortable and the media really puts that idea out there and for a lot of disabled folks frankly the idea of aging is unfamiliar to us right most you know we come from a community where very few disabled people H. most disabled people die off way earlier than non all right I mean my my my uncle jokes when I ask him what the polio conventions are at like he always has this joke is like asking about the polio conventions my my uncle Jimmy how's the polio convention you like it's a real bad scene and I'm like oh that's such a bad joke yeah dark humor becomes a big part of the scenario well to me look you know I it's a complex issue I do want to stay on ableism because I I go back to able is my man I found the intersection for example and you know we're back I've had long term hearing loss decades and I find myself sometimes when it comes up saying you know it's not at all people it's going up at all always as if like I'm embarrassed about teenagers so there you know the the intersection of the two gets very complex as you get older but but I'm going back to that to refer to definition of ableism I mean in my own when I was in the corporate world for example one of my I think my last corporate job it was an expectation that you joined the executive team for breakfast at seven AM which for me meant leaving the house leaving the house at six AM it was a ritual there was no business reason for there were times that that was an extreme hardship for me and I but you were expected to do it you were not it was a ritual enactment of the physical ability that if you did not perform as they they separated you and you paid a price you are not part of the inner circle and I am I imagine for disabled people across the country that's been replicated every day so right now the whole we're all most of us if we're fortunate enough to be working are working from home from home we are facing shortages are both in the treatment of the pandemic and then for early other shortages as well how is what you read about the disability community is faring under this pressure both in terms of resources available to it and in terms of being part of the conversation about how we need to be proceeding now and going forward I think it's really rough for a lot of folks you know we've been doing a lot we have their number of regular sort of Twitter chats in the disability community and we've seen participation in those ramp up particularly in the last two weeks as people have been looking for a community of people of good looking for supports you know in terms and terms of like a broader conversation I think there's been a lot of frustration and a real challenge because we've seen three packages go through Congress and that eleven provided or including any of the priorities that people with disabilities really wanted to see prioritized and so I think that that's really hard when trying to think through like what are the what are the things we need to negotiate around for our survival right now what are the things that we need to make our lives easier what do we need to do in order to make it make it easier for disabled people to be able to shelter in place with what we need I mean you were talking about trying to get in to see upon monologist we're hearing from people with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis right now that are unable to access their medications because the president just flagrantly throughout an anecdote that he thought that lupus and RA meds could be used as a potential treatment without any scientific basis and now we have people who depend on those medications for survival being told that their selfish and requesting a refill or they're selfish and trying to get a surplus of medication so they don't have to go outside again and stand in line at a pharmacy possibly making themselves vulnerable to the virus possibly carrying the virus and it just doesn't make a heck of a lot of sense right now yeah and so you have that sort of personal anguish you have that and stressed you have that policy anguish you O. why do you suppose it is that some fundamental issues for the disability community haven't been addressed yet in Congress which is not a priority is something that the Republicans which is gonna block is it's something is just not injecting enough in conversation what do you see as the as the barrier I think there's a couple things one I mean you're dressed very well earlier part of its ableism mmhm I also think that part of it with this Congress is seeing any sort of ramping up of the social safety net has a hand out there's a real attitude that people who are poor or in need are that way because they're lazy I mean it it's very much like Reaganomics on steroids right now anybody who needs anything could be handling it themselves but they're not because they're lazy or they're not working hard enough or they're not release that they don't really need that and we know that that's not the case but that that's the reality that we're dealing with in this particular administration yeah I think sadly that's true and I would add what your thoughts that I think there's this belief that I disabled person is not as productive a worker I cannot produce as much in the way of profit so why divert public resources to somebody that's not gonna make us as much money maybe I'm cynical but I feel like that's driving a lot of this too well I definitely think that that's right it's been interesting to me and this time doing as much press as we're doing on this particular issue and doing it remotely so you're not in studio with people most people can't tell strictly from scratch that I'm a little person and I had done a radio interview a few weeks ago and the reporter asked me afterwards like so what got you into representing the disability community on these issues what got you into disability work canals like well I'm disabled and he was like are you really well like yeah I'm a little person he's like I I would have known and I was like no because we talked on zoom and you just see me from the shoulders up but I like seriously like I'm I'm a person with a disability and there was just this idea that it was really interesting because as he treated me early on as if I was needed thirty canonized because of the work was like oh it's great that you're helping those poor unfortunate disabled people right and I was like you don't even realize like these are much yes this is the community I was raised in these are the the mentors I have in the nineties I have like this is me my husband my kids it was really just interesting watching like the tonal shift was like no wait so like you do this for a living and it's your job and like wow I didn't realize that like and and that disabled people did this and I was like what we can't sit around and wait for it for non disabled people to care about our survival we're having to fight for our own people anyways so yeah it's it's very strange times right now okay yeah I know it really is and again we're talking with Rebecca Coakley director of the disability justice initiative at the center for American progress and Rebecca I I you know I keep coming back to throughout this pandemic and this group survey the course of it and certainly in the context of disability rights the the the idea of the other with the capital right and the idea that you know disabled people or the other sick people or the other poor people or the other and you know one of the things I've been pondering is in this America in this moment in this crisis unless you're one of a couple hundred powerful people I feel like we are all the other and I I would be treated that way and I am wondering Hey what do you have any thoughts about that and B. whether the disability community with all that the disability community has learned experience suffered has struggled with a with the all the collected with the experience of the disability community whether perhaps in this historical moment I disable people of this country have something to teach the nation as a whole you know I think there's something that I keep thinking about in terms of the other end is a week ago report came out saying that there were a hundred and forty seven nursing homes in the country with massive outbreaks across twenty seven states and then an update to the story came out two days ago that said that number was had moved from one hundred and forty seven to two to four hundred as I find myself thinking about that and and the reason I keep thinking about that in the context of othering it is Ron claim it was president Obama's call expert I'd talked about on one of the earliest news reports I saw about the outbreak in nursing homes Washington state the fact that countries that focus more on having a chain of disabled people at home with them we're seeing a lower curve in the infection and that countries that focused on countries that had like a nursing home industrial complex we're seeing a steeper curves and I think there's no better example of othering them that like the actual ramifications for pushing all the disabled people out of society into a place where they can supposedly be kept safe but they're out of our vision we don't have to hear them we don't have to see that and we don't have to smell them I live with them and actually seeing the ramifications of that in terms of this pandemic spread and within the disability community we've been talking a lot about both like what does this mean for disabled people in those nursing homes and long term care facilities what does it mean for disabled people and prison and people in prison in general and what does it mean for the immigrants at the border camps I mean I think those are all those are all places where we're seeing the rampant spread of the pandemic and they are directly the product America's tendency towards other wing marginalized folks yeah I think that's exactly right and that's you know that's not only a social costs that we're paying collectively but in the end I'm a personal believer then I'll give you the last word but my personal belief is that if any one of us is an individual fails to see the full humanity any other individual under any circumstances including disability then in the end it is our own humanity that we're sacrificing by doing that so I would just conclude that I'll give you the last word by saying all for everyone's individual betterment even if they think they are fully able which he may or may not be I am for our collective good this is a conversation I very much want to keep happening but I'll give you the last thing the last thing that I would say if somebody asked me recently where I saw hope like where was where did I feel hopeful I'm reminded of what one of our elders Susan Daniels who was a resident long term residents in New Orleans before she moved to DC and she ended up being a political appointee at the Social Security Administration for a long time before she passed away several years ago and they said after after Katrina about like the next time there's a big storm I think it must have been super storm sandy and they're like Susan well it gives you hope but surely you have hope you're an optimistic person I remember Susan saying I have but I also have the burden of history and I hadn't thought about that quote of hers for a long time actually until recently until about the last month or so and really thinking that like we can hope that the that Congress gets their act together and figures it out we can hope that the department of defense starts using the defense the defense production act and we start seeing Ford Motor Company like mass producing ventilators and PP we can hope that you know this I'm not a conspiracy theorist but watching though the wildfire spreading of these pandemics.

Rebecca Coakley Richard RGS
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

"A slight vocal glitches I am still struggling with health problems at a certain level of disability which will be the starting point for this week's are rather this hour's conversation our guest in this hour is disability rights advocate Rebecca Coakley R. I. she has always had a lot to say about the fabric of society and the rights of disabled persons within Iraq so for those of us who find ourselves at special risk and special vulnerability this is a perilous moment it can be a frightening moment it can be a moment where we feel isolated from society as a larger than life a deliberately used the pronoun we in this case because of my present situation I am old school I don't like to talk about it that much but I make an effort to do so so that we can have a conversation as we will in the upcoming our hello everybody this is Richard R. J. S. gal from the zero hour you know there are a lot of myths out there about social security and they're out there for a reason to make you think it's a good idea to slash the benefits you've already earned here's the truth social security has its own special source of revenue politicians who say it's a driving up the deficit our life social security can't drive up the deficit because it doesn't contribute to the deficit in fact it's forbidden by law from contributing to the overall deficit and.

Iraq Rebecca Coakley R. Richard R. J. S.
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WCPT 820

"And we're back on the zero hour this is Richard R. J. at scale we now continue our conversation with disability activist Rebecca Coakley I want to pick up on that the genetic question a little bit because I've thought about this a lot in terms of my own situation and I was telling you earlier before we started recording that our last conversation made me think a lot about my own situation because in today's disability nomenclature environment I was born in nineteen fifty three so I was born here I'm a time traveler right I just by being a lack of the what was in many ways very different than I would now be described as a member of the neuro diverse community okay I I cognitively different okay I have very severe eighty D. if you wanna call to her I also have the hearing disabilities between not hearing while and and the concentration issues I was always a hearing disability probably start around age ten when I had some problems but all of it was like in Richard is he we cannot say well you know Richard not all here in our that was all these great well you know how Richard is he's my aunt used to do it just for that for those of us in a radio will cap it was kinda like Richard in L. yes somewhere bye all right so I had to go through even not only my education but the first twenty years my career at least twenty the twenty years I spent in the corporate world at working with a disability I didn't wasn't entirely sure I have figured out the eighty D. thing but was entirely sure what the implications of that for war and I certainly did not now I have rights associated with that so I flame down a lot of jobs I doubt it didn't work out that kind of thing but the genetic question if my it's deception if I could have no hi would they have chosen to genetically have and I'm not going to be hearing some of the cognitive stuff with the and along we can severe depression hospitalized for thirty eight who but they have chosen to alter it because even if it meant keeping the depression which is a very rough well if you haven't done it I wouldn't have wanted them to I wouldn't want to be in upper parts I would not want my brain to work in a different way that works even though it's a struggle today even though there are difficult days especially with the concentrations it normal normally is okay but I had to learn to accept medication I had to learn to accept I don't do some things as well as I do other things but I do something to shoot for a while and I would not have wanted them to change I would not want to be more like other people you would choose I would not have wanted your parents changing either so it's a stupid question maybe by what did we learn to accept ourselves that is such a great question I think about it I frequently just in terms of yeah I mean that conversation both as a parent as a person with a disability we were very clear with our kids but they will have a bad work days like I've had like I've had a bad word there's been days I've walked down the street and then scream that like **** **** **** Hayes a circus in town things like that and that sucks and and I think one of things that I've taken from friends in my life you know this one in this case particularly senator Tammy Duckworth who frequently says it's important to acknowledge the stock and she's like and like their days that it really sucks and then there are days when people have that whole conversation about not letting your disability define you many things that she says and I firmly agree with is my disability as the reason I am who I am mmhm I worked at the White House for president Obama as in charge of diversity recruitment for political appointments because I'm a little person because of the experiences that I had tied to my dwarfism because of the network that I developed as a result of my too often because of the career path I chose which in large part had to do with the fact that I'm a little person and I would never change that and it's never been about overcoming to me by any means it's it's always been about succeeding with my son I it's it that intricate part of who I am as a part of my culture is a part of the decisions I make on a daily basis and I would never wanna demean or belittle as lesser or less important than lately as here are and I think that's one reason why I'm feeling warm more strongly about the and thank you for that why at why Rebekah completely more more strongly about disability rights because when I was a child I I would look at my parents and had a video camera they there might have been a video like that I was bullied because I did not behave or think or act like other and I don't I'm not gay and I ask anybody to bring out the violence right you know that that's not what this is about but I never occurred to me that I ate that I had something and be like it was something I could lean into an embrace and I don't want other kids to live that way and my first twenty years of work I didn't try lean into it to the extent that I was aware of it which was marked I tried to overcome I was taught that would have a disadvantage you have fist on table I won't do it because it's after the idea but I'm talking about it either you you pass through force of will you overcome well that was like there is a lot of stupidity and they had a fight there was like a world of stupid and advised because the fact is I was trying to do the things that I was not suited for and I was not doing things for which I was exceptionally soon you know and when I left the world I started writing and because what I did before and I said Blondie had been invented and everyone's while my wife would say and she's fantastic about the whole transitioning from station be like looking for a job or something you know so the legitimate question and I was K. but that's I should have been writing actually been talking that should have been you know working with other people so I guess only now hello as a you know as I approach and the other the back forties of ram I would say at am I even becoming aware that that embracing it is an option well I think we're seeing things change I mean it it continues to I worked on presidential campaigns every cycle going back to John Kerry's race and watching over time in political spaces the increased inclusion of people with disabilities and disability rights issues in two presidential campaigns and platforms you know and going from for me thinking about you know I mean even started before that even starting with like George H. W. bush and his ardent passion for the ADA mmhm and Attorney General Dick Thornburgh working together to get the law passed with you know the millions of activists and advocates that we're working on that and him actually talking about the ADA in his inaugural address and his pledge in its commitment to signing and Americans with disabilities rights act moving into you know the Clinton administration and I'm hiring people with disabilities and the White House to you know George H. W. bush signing the new freedom initiative and supporting the office of disability employment policy on continuing to hire people with disabilities and political appointments to the Obama years and and what we were able to do actually coming out ahead of time with the disability policy agenda and you know president Obama came out with his disability policy agenda in December of two thousand seven so less than a year from the general election fast forward to today not to ignore that the tremendous work that the Hillary Clinton campaign did but if we were to skip ahead now to this cycle at the same point in time in December of twenty nineteen the same point in time between then and this upcoming election and the a bomb at release of his planet and that thousand eight election we have nine candidates come out with the stability policy groups all of which contain very common core elements full funding for special education elimination of the sub minimum wage and elimination of asset limits the need for a robust high quality long term services and supports agenda with them Medicare for all or whatever their particular healthcare reform was and then sort of varying from there and I mean they go from one candidate talking about it back in oh eight two everybody talked to there being questions about some minimum wage they're being questions about special education funding in the debate two email I mean last night senator Warren at CNN's town hall managed to weave disability into question to for questions only one of which actually pertain to disability you no one was talking about issues within families around being part of the sandwich generation another question talked about bipartisan faith and like what are the issues that people can work together on and she talked about a over the counter cost reduction bill for hearing aids that is not normal I keep pinching myself because just the the amount of advancement that we've made this cycle to get to where we are today with candidates bringing on disability policy committees hiring disabled people to do advance on their campaigns which to me is just mind blowing people to judge one of his senior advance leads use a wheelchair and so they can't plan any event in the non accessible location because that doesn't work family and I never would have thought we'd see the day having worked on campaigns for years where we could get into the advanced faith and what that would mean to have somebody like him only for a day in that particular role on that campaign redefining what accessible inclusive events looks like and it really does show to me on those days when I feel like oh my god we're not making any progress or oh gosh like what a trump do this morning that we are gaining ground and that we are seeing chefs being made in real tangible ways that are mainstreaming disability in a way that's not just palatable for us as a community and it's not pandering to us but it's being done in a seamless way and non tokenistic way and talking about policy delivered in talking about campaign logistics it's just done as a reality it's so good to hear you say that A. N. and I guess as a final far from me and then I'll I'll let you conclude but you know this this issue of bipartisanship is interesting to me because you know what if I'm honest I probably don't have the reputation as the most bipartisan guy me there in the world and when it comes to economic issues for example I have issued opinions that are considered quite strong even among Democrats okay but I do think that when it comes to disability understanding disability issues were a constant disability disability is that civil rights issue I do think that I don't bipartisan trains partisanship I'm glad you mentioned George H. W. bush I mean I'll just tell a quick story and that they're not in awe leave it to you to conclude but adults who would support group that prefers its members don't publicly identify themselves as members of the support group but for people who have trouble with me a drugs or alcohol which is common comorbidity with animals I have I went to one meeting where there was a right winger in.

Richard R. J. Rebecca Coakley
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

11:38 min | 1 year ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

"You know and this is to the privilege point. I was making earlier certainly had a lot of preparation but I also have a lot of privilege ray. I Have Been Secure in my financial status for pretty much as long as I can remember. I've got an advanced degree and a great college education. I speak the king's English in a way that mainstream audiences find palatable. You know I am thin right like I am certainly a black woman and a brown skinned black woman at that but have the ability to navigate certain social spaces that are unfortunately and wrongly closed off to so many other black folks. I mean so I know the you know I certainly would like to believe that. I was saying something that people wanted to hear and that people needed to hear. But I also know that part of people's ability to hear it from me has to do with my privileges and I think that I've been trying consistently to do better and better to become a person who understands that and operates that with with operates with that understanding so there's sometimes yes. It's my voice that I need to share and sometimes it's actually about me moving myself out of the way and making sure that I'm making room and passing the Mike for Voices that other folks won't hear from unless I'm the one who invites them right. I think all the time about this concept of spending our privilege that my friend Rebecca Coakley who's a disability activist kind of introduced me to and Audrey Lord says it another way. This has been one of my favorite quotes. Since high school she says to absorb without use is the gravest error of privilege. I think he's an stake for us to think that it's only why people who have privilege are only men were privilege. Only straight people have privilege. Only people have privilege if we've got breath in our lungs than we have the privilege of life to be able to make room for somebody else and there is an opportunity that is constantly before me to think intentionally about how I turned the opportunities that are given to me into opportunities for other people money in other people's pocket. How do I make sure that they can build skill? How do I make sure that they can increase their network? How do I make sure that they gain access to the decision making tables and I have access to is not just about getting my seat at the table is about dragging in ten other people with me to take over the table and it's about building our own table right and I think that the ways really that my life change were not just more people knew my name or not just that I had more opportunities coming my way but that I really solidified my own understanding and my own personal value around way making for other people and so you know I constantly try to hold myself accountable to that? And you're one of those folks that we have these conversations all the time right because it's important to me that my network and my my friend group holds me accountable. Ed as well so I want to repeat that Audrey Law Lord yes she said to absorb without use is the gravest error of privilege to absorb without us the gravest error privilege and she said in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine during her college. Commencement address at Oberlin College. So think about who she's talking to right she's talking to a pretty white audience she's talking to an educationally privileged audience. She's talking to at least a subset of people who have wealth generational wealth. I mean these are folks that have privilege at in so many different ways than that so many different layers right people with religious privilege people with Able bodied and able minded privilege. They're just so many layers which with with which we need to think critically about the privilege that we hold and be really really intentional to spend it. I read that quote for the first time I senior year of high school and I had never ever let it go. I heard the phrase Spaniel privileged from you. Say You learned from WHO? I learned it from Rebecca Coakley. So she is. She works at the Center for American progress. She is a person who identifies as having a disability and is a disability rights activist. I've learned so much from her and black. Disabled women like Vanessa Thompson and when we first talking about I was like I'm gonNA use that. She was like us. It spread it far and wide. And you know what I'm far and wide to because I usually do my one of my second one talk about speaking truth to power and I think one of the biggest in easiest even will lease most accessible ways. We can use privileges by speaking truth especially for people who might not have the privilege we have in the moment. I heard venue privilege from you. I use that in rooms and I and I say this is a really good way to think about it about using our power because privileged. Sounds like accusatory? Sometimes but it's really nice. It is a thing like we're all privilege in certain ways but not all of us. But unless you are you might be privileged in one way you know. Even though you're marginalized in ten and those who have if who belong into more privileged roofs than not more marginalized ones. We should absolutely use our privilege in that way. It was a game changing concept to think about. Because we already know it as lift as you climb but To say spend it means you know what I understand. I have it. I need to give it to you. Because you don't have enough. Yes precisely and it can be a powerful tool right in undoing oppressive forces and to your point. This is the power of the multiplier effect. I heard it from Rebecca. I shared it. You heard it for me. You shared it then. I think we spend a lot of time on ownership of the wrong things now. Let me be very clear. Secure your bag mon. Your property bill generational wealth but also. How are we thinking about ownership in a communal way right? How are we thinking about the collectives of our block our street? Our neighborhood are people as in terms of what we collectively own. It is certainly intellectual property right. Black people own a lot. The intellectual property that has created and perpetuated dope culture in the United States for example. Our music it is our styles of dressing. It is the lack of resources that so many of us have experienced that led us to be more creative and we set trends nationwide worldwide. We own that collectively right and is important that we acknowledge where things come from. It's important that people know that Toronto was talking about me too far before Elissa Milano was right like that matters but it also matters how we own things collectively and I think the thing that I'm really obsessed with right now. Is this idea of collective ownership like what would it look like for us to buy back are black and it's not about making one person wealthy but it's about making sure that every person that lives in a house owns the House that they live in and that every person that lives in that house is coming to the community meetings to figure out everything from education to the library system to community security so that you were not dependent on a police system? That does not work for US right like. That's the kind of bold imaginative vision that I think we are capable of. But it's like we can get really caught up on like I said that I this is my. This is my quote and it matters. Swig knowledge where things come from but not to the point where we don't we're not intentional about empowering people with the tools that we've got and sharing them widely like. I always say the my purpose is to speak and teach truth that move people to Action. I don't care if you follow me on twitter. I don't care if you buy my book. I don't care if you follow me on instagram. What I care about is that you take the right mindset and the right skills to go and change the world however you can. And that's the multiplier effect dependent on and I think there's something really important there I recently read something about how they they're saying that the state of America is how it is because people cannot think collectively because they're still struggling to survive so when people are struggling to survive is hard to look at your next door neighbor and say how can I help you when you feel like. You're drowning celery. How how how can we start pulling some of the people out of the water who would rounding? And how can we start thinking as that collective? That's such a fantastic question. And I think the first thing is really to have a paradigm shift in the paradigm shift. I think happens in two ways. One is about getting rid of this idea of scarcity. Then there are western models and ways of being capitalism. The way that we work the number of days that we work. You know the sense of urgency. The sense of individualism. These are western ideals and they have led us these these elements of dominant culture have led us to think that there is a scarce amount of pie and that they're going to slice up the pie for everybody else and once you get your piece of Pie you've got to hold onto it for dear life and horrid eight instead of share it. The truth of the matter is we truly do in a material sense living in a world of live in a world of abundance so we can in so many ways bake more pie instead of fight each other over the pie that we're all trying to hoard and so I think the first thing we have to get of this scarcity mindset and move toward an abundant mindset individ- an abundance mindset rather individually and collectively. I also think especially for marginalized people across the world. We HAVE TO RECOGNIZE THAT. We are literally stronger together. I mean I never use the word minority because people of color the global majority. It is a Western idea that we measure everything up against whiteness. Even though whiteness is not the default around the world and so we have been set up to fight each other over scraps while folks who benefit from white supremacy feast in the other room and instead of fighting each other. And I'm not suggesting fighting the people in the other room. I'm suggesting that all of us take issue with the fact that there's glass in between us in the first place and take issue with the fact that we've been served served up something completely different right and so I think that if we recognize the power that we have in numbers and intellect and creativity and stop creating divisions among people where they don't exist right like this whole thing about black immigrant folks versus you know Black America folks like I just think I understand that. There are cultural differences. I also understand that. There are things that deserve to be addressed and need to be healed. Well what that doesn't mean that once those things are healed and the apologies are made and we're starting to listen to each other and understand each other better that we keep holding onto our piece of the Pie because we just want to hoard it. It means that we actually begin to figure out how we work together to make sure that the needs of all of us are addressed in a really sufficient intersectional way so I think that's the first thing and then I think the second thing is as we are building solutions. We need to be paying attention duly to people's immediate needs and people's long-term imagination. When I was a teacher I figured out very quickly that one of the greatest The the the greatest theft of oppression is that it robs you of your imagination. It is hard to imagine. What's possible what you can achieve? It's hard to think that something across the river is even accessible to you. Because you are focused like you said on survival. You are focused on making it to the next paycheck. You're focused on making sure that the bills get paid. You are focused on getting to whatever next step there is so that you can survive so that your family can survive and when you're caught up in that survival space you can't you don't have the.

Rebecca Coakley America United States Pie Audrey Lord Oberlin College Mike Center for American progress twitter Toronto theft Vanessa Thompson Ed Elissa Milano
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Larry O'Connor on the next Day O'Connor show, shouldn't we have had transparency in the negotiations over the teachers union strike what's with that. Also, the state of the union seems to be a no-go what should the president do Larry O'Connor right after Jillian and John AM seven ninety KABC. Hey, welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show. Well, breaking news, Michael Cohen has postponed his congressional testimony. He says that he's doing so because of threats to his family from President Trump and Rudy Giuliani. He was supposed to speak to congress in a couple of weeks voluntary February seventh appearance it had been set for a month before Cohen is due to begin serving a three-year prison sentence for multiple crimes code. Of course, accused the president of essentially suborning perjury, or at least telling him to lie to the FBI about the president's relationship with stormy Daniels. According to Coen's advisor Lanny Davis Davis says ongoing threats to Cohen's family have necessitated that he not speak before the house oversight and reform committee, which is a weird sort of thing. Wouldn't you mansion he wants to speak more to the house government oversight committee considering that that would then create more of an impetus more of protection for him from the media Davis in his statement Wednesday said due to ongoing threats against his family from President Trump and Mr. Giuliani as recently as this weekend. As well. As Mr Collins continued cooperation with ongoing investigations by advice of counsel. mR, cones appearance will be postponed to a later date. I have a feeling that. What was going to happen is they clone is gonna show up on Capitol Hill. Democrats were going to ask him under penalty of perjury. Whether he had any documentary evidence that President Trump had so suborn perjury told him to lie to congress and then Cohen was stuck in a bind because either he was going to exonerate Trump. He's gonna say there are no such documents. Or he going to have to commit perjury, and he'd want to do that. According to Davis, Mr. Cohen wishes to thank chairman Elijah Cummings for allowing him to appear before the house over committee and looks forward to testifying at the appropriate time. This is a time where Mr. Khan had to put his family and their safety. I President Trump later told reporters I would say he's been threatened by the truth from said, he's only been threatened by the truth. And he doesn't want to do that probably for me or other clients has other clients. Also, I assume he doesn't want to tell the truth for me or other of his clients. Trump last week had urged the public to watch Cohen's father-in-law didn't feel Shusterman who's placed on probation in the mid nineteen ninety s after pleading guilty in a case in which he was charged with conspiring to defraud the IRS. I was never sure why exactly that was relevant. What is that his father in law have to do with him? Nonetheless, Michael Cohen, canceling his hearing is a bit of a hell that he doesn't have the goods on Trump. And quite the way that the media have been suggesting that he does. So that is just some of the breaking news surrounding Michael Cohen. Meanwhile in other breaking news, the Washington Post is very very angry. They're very angry at a new nominee name Naomi row. Now, you may have you may remember now me row we talked about her. She's the President Trump's nominee to replace Brad Kavanagh on the US circuit court of appeals for the DC circuit. You'll recall that just a couple of weeks ago. The media tried to dig up for college essays, and suggests that she was unfit for holding a federal judicial position specifically because she'd written critical critical things about multi-culturalism. Well, now, I love this Washington Post if you had dwarf tossing in the two thousand nine hundred political bingo, come on dare and claim your prize NAN. Here's the headline from the Washington Post magazine, how Trump judicial nominee reignited the debate over dwarf tossing. It says if you've never heard the terms worth tossing you're probably picturing some antiquated practice nestled between gladiator duels and damage show at BCS execution by wild beasts atop the Roman Coliseum. But it's not from ancient Rome. It's a modern form of entertainment which patrons throw little people paid performers generally onto mattresses or against velcro walls over the years. It his periodically source of both controversy and disgust and now thanks tonight. Wral it's in the news ones against what did she do? Now. Did they catch your tossing dwarfs again like leg last in Middle Earth? Did they catch her just like grabbing and tossing him over a gap? Nope. That's not what happened. Here's what happened. It turns out that row disagreed with some rulings. There was some rulings some legal rulings that band dwarf tossing Francis. Highest administrative court upheld a ban on tour crossing saying that it affronted human dignity. The UN human rights committee upheld the decision and the two thousand and two ruling on similar grounds. The Wackenheim cases where seriously, I'm not kidding. The case that brought all this to the forefront is something called the Wackenheim case. Nine hundred ninety one when the Paris suburb of more song will all I've no idea if that's rightly pronounced. But when I pronounced furniture, just remove all of the continents. It. Sounds like ooh, vans warped tossing at at discotheques manual Wackenheim. A little person sued because he wanted to continue making a living being tossed, which seems fine to me. Honestly like you want. Somebody to throw you against the wall to make a living like throw you on a mattress to make a living. I honestly don't see a huge difference between that and what stormy Daniels does for a living. It seems significantly less humiliating, frankly. Wackenheim now fifty one lives in Sotigui on the French German border and earns a living repairing computers is people really did not understand the show. There are people who founded little degrading. But for me, this has made all the more made it all the more Derek row disagreed with these international rulings. She wrote about the issue in journal articles and in the two thousand eleven post on the legal blog. Violet conspiracy argued that the case demonstrates how a substantive understanding of dignity can be used to coerce individuals by force. Upon them a particular understanding of dignity, irrespective of their individual choices in short row contended that the band denied little people legal agency and an opportunity to make money. She like, I just drew parallels to prostitution and pornography. So now, the Washington Post is very angry at her because the Washington Post says how could she say that little people have agency and have the ability to decide what is dignified for them. Rebecca Coakley director for disability policy at the liberal think tank center for American progress ends a little person wrote, quote, the fact that Trump is nominating. Route to any position let alone a judicial appointment to a bench that is often seen as the proving ground for the US supreme court literally puts the safety and security of people like me directly in the crosshairs. How Halley she's not urging the people like round up little people in throw them against velcro walls. She said that people should have the ability to freely do what their labor what they want. This is apparently very bad now. So again, our new cycle, get's dumber and dumber. As we talk about the most important things in life like the tossing of little people voluntarily. All right coming up here on the bench bureau show. We'll get to the increase radicalism. Inside the Democratic Party the Covington high latest Alexandro Cossio Cortez heads to Sundance.

President Trump Michael Cohen president Washington Post magazine perjury Lanny Davis Davis US Trump Rudy Giuliani Larry O'Connor Daniels Ben Shapiro Naomi row Mr Collins FBI Coen Roman Coliseum Derek row BCS
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"There was stupid looks on their faces. Petrified. Hey, it's man Cal. How would you have reacted? How would you tell your son? That's tomorrow's man Cal. Hey, welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show. Well, breaking news, Michael Cohen has postponed his congressional testimony. He says that he is doing so because of threats to his family from President Trump and Rudy Giuliani was supposed to speak to congress in a couple of weeks is voluntary February seventh appearance it been set for a month before Cohen is due to begin serving three year prison sentence for multiple crimes code of courses. Accused the president. Love essentially, suborning perjury, or at least telling him, the why the about the president's relationship with stormy Daniels. According to Collins advisor, Lanny Davis Davis says ongoing threats to Cohen's family have necessitated that he not speak before the house oversight and reform committee, which is a weird sort of thing. Wouldn't you imagine he wants to speak more to the house government oversight committee considering that that would then create more of an impetus more of protection for him from the media Davis in his statement Wednesday said due to ongoing threats against his family from President Trump and Mr. Giuliani as recently as this weekend. As was Mr Collins continued cooperation with ongoing investigations by advice of counsel. Mr Collins appearance will be postponed to a later date. I have a feeling that what was going to happen? Is that cones gonna show up on Capitol Hill? Democrats were going to ask him under penalty of perjury. Whether he had any documentary evidence that President Trump had suborned perjury told him to lie to congress and then Cohen was stuck in a bind because either he was going to exonerate Trump. He's gonna say there are no such documents. Or he's going to have to commit perjury. And he'd want to do that. According to Davis, Mr. Cohen wishes to thank chairman Elijah Cummings for allowing him to appear before the house committee and looks forward to testifying at the appropriate time. This is a time where Mr. Cohen had to put his family and their safety. I President Trump later told reporters I would say he's been threatened by the truth. Trump said he's only been threatened by the truth. And he doesn't want to do that probably for me or other clients has other clients. Also, I assume he doesn't want to tell the truth for me or other of his clients. The Trump last week had urged the public to watch Coen's father-in-law Shusterman who's placed on probation in the mid nineteen ninety s after pleading guilty in a case in which he was charged with conspiring to defraud the IRS. I was never sure why exactly that was relevant. What is it is father in law to do with him? Nonetheless, Michael Cohen, canceling his hearing is a bit of a tell that he doesn't have the goods on Trump. And quite the way that the media have been suggesting that he does. So that is just some of the breaking news surrounding Michael Cohen. Meanwhile in other breaking news, the Washington Post is very very angry very angry at a new nominee name Naomi row. Now, you may have you may remember now me row we talked about her. She's President Trump's nominee to replace Brad Kavanagh on the US circuit court of appeals for the DC circuit. You'll recall that just a couple of weeks ago. The media tried to dig up her college essays and suggest that she was unfit for holding a federal judicial position specifically because she'd written critical critical things about multi-culturalism. Well, now, I love this Washington Post if you had dwarf tossing in the two thousand nine hundred political bingo, come on down and claim your prize NAN. Here's the headline from the Washington Post magazine, how Trump judicial nominee reignited the debate over dwarf tossing it says if you've never heard the term dwarf, tossing you're probably picturing some antiquated practice nestled between gladiator duels, and Tim natio- at BCS execution by wild beasts atop the Roman Coliseum. But it's not from ancient Rome. It's a modern form of entertainment which patrons throw little people paid performers generally onto mattresses or against velcro walls over the years of his periodically been a source of both controversy and disgust. And now thanks to Niamey row. It's in the news once again, so what did she do? Now. Did they catch your wharfs again like leg last in Middle Earth? Did they catch her just like grabbing and tossing him over a gap? Nope. That's not what happened. Here's what happened. It turns out that row disagreed with some rulings. There are some ruling some legal rulings that band dwarf tossing Francis. Highest administrative court upheld a ban on war crossing saying affronted human dignity. The human rights committee upheld the decision and the two thousand two ruling on similar grounds. The Wackenheim cases where seriously, I'm not kidding. The case that brought all this to the forefront is something called the Wackenheim case. Nine hundred ninety one when the Paris suburb of more song. So I have no idea if that's rightly pronounced. But when I pronounced furniture, just remove all of the continents. It sounds like bans warp tossing at discotheques manual Wackenheim. A little person sued because he wanted to continue making a living being tossed, which seems fine to me. Honestly like you want somebody to throw you against a wall to make a living. Throw you on a mattress to make a living. I honestly don't see a huge difference between that and what stormy Daniels does for a living at teams significantly less humiliating, frankly Wackenheim now fifty one lives in Saudi on the French German border and earns a living repairing computers is people really did not understand the show. There are people who found in little degrading. But for me, this has made all the more made it all the more daring row disagreed with these international rulings. She wrote about the issue in journal articles and in a two thousand eleven post on the legal blog. Violet conspiracy argued that the case demonstrates how a substantive understanding of dignity can be used to coerce individuals by force. Upon them a particular understanding of dignity, irrespective of their individual choices in short row contended that the band's denied little people legal agency and an opportunity to make money. She just drew parallels to prostitution and pornography. So now, the Washington Post is very angry at her because the Washington Post says how could she say that little people have agency and have the ability to decide what is dignified for them. Rebecca Coakley director for disability policy at the liberal think tank center for American progress ends a little person wrote, quote, the fact that Trump is nominating. Route to any position let alone a judicial appointments to a bench that is often seen as the proving ground for the US supreme court literally puts the safety and security of people like me directly in the crosshairs. How how she's not urging the people like round up little people and throw them against velcro walls. She said that people should have the ability to freely do what their labor what they want. This is apparently very bad now. So again, our new cycle, get's dumber and dumber. As we talk about the most important things in life like the tossing of little people voluntarily. All right coming up here on the bench bureau show. We'll get to the increased radicalism inside the Democratic Party the Covington. High latest Alexandra.

President Trump Michael Cohen Washington Post magazine president Trump perjury Lanny Davis Davis Mr Collins US Ben Shapiro Daniels Niamey row human rights committee Naomi row Rome Elijah Cummings Rudy Giuliani congress
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on Flash Forward

"Scientists seemed kind of hesitant to talk deeply about the ethics of human embryo editing. They seemed to think that actual crisper babies were still really far away far away enough that they didn't have to engage with these questions about the ethics of editing in embryos genes for awhile. Remember the conference that announced his workout was supposed to be about these ethics, obviously, they had their time line a little bit wrong. What this means is that a lot of the reporting and research on crisper hasn't really deeply grappled with the thorny questions of who gets to decide what kinds of genetic edits are acceptable. And what kinds are not? Recorded. Oh found hubris. Vacation did about the. Powerful possibilities. Crisper as. Trumper station is about the removal of suffering. Disease. So. Whatever years stuff like that. Deduct. It will be people that are this is Alice Wong, the founder and director of an organization called disability visibility. Sat there I accept is a time for user, I rely on personal assistance every aspect of by. Dealing tiffany's. Set up by Fleiss? Mass do. Refrigerator? People looked at the state. God this person is just. I like that. Pervasive attitudes. That are April for Alice. There is a huge difference between someone like Greta choosing to undergo a crisper derived therapy to stop her a yolks from scrambling and scientists deciding what kinds of bodies are and are not desirable at the embryo stage. Too much to do this. Bodies. Power to you. That's everybody's hopefully. For themselves. But I do that. A emptive to liberty alteration of sort of searching. Based on fear. Based on. Majete of disabled people of what? Visit with a disability is. Soon to be the difference to be explicit here. Some of the conversations around editing human embryo, DNA circle around the idea of elimination elimination of bad genes. And that is where Alice and other disability advocates get really nervous because elimination of bad genes is sort of another way of saying you jenex talked about grew for. Diseases especially through. Hubris germ energy. Forever. Changed be passed on to future generations. So that's actually. The floor of Jeddah. Certain experiences are seat. A desirable. Imaginable often when you hear people talk about using crisper to eliminate disability. You hear people talk about how the removal of certain genes can make children's lives easier. Wouldn't it be easier for a child to live without a disability? And perhaps that's true. But there are plenty of things that are easier to live with or without it is scientifically proven that the lives of white straight men are easier than the lives of pretty much everybody else. But to suggest that we should engineer babies to all be white straight men is clearly bad, right? I don't think I need to convince you on that one does abled people already have rich communities and even languages so when well-meaning scientists talk about editing them out of existence. They're talking about removing entire cultures and ways of seeing the world that contribute to a world where there are lots of perspectives, which is a good thing in an essay called pleased. Edit me out in the Washington Post. Rebecca, Coakley writes, quote, where is the line between what society perceives to be a horrible genetic mutation and someone's culture and quote. I have to decide what is suffering decides what fives. Bama ball. That's a juicer to be as disabled person. Like, you said earlier Alice is not a Luddite. She relies on technology..

Alice Wong Trumper station founder and director Washington Post Greta Jeddah tiffany Fleiss Alice Rebecca engineer Coakley
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"Of the podcast death sex and money and i just watched designer dna explained and it blew my mind i went into watching this thinking it was going to be very saifi and own my gosh look at what scientists are learning how to do with mice and bacteria and it's going to change the world and we're all going to be living in gatica and the movie gattaca does make an appearance in this short doc but what i was really blown away by was that like actually manipulating our dna is something that's already happening and it's not necessarily driven right now by special tools that are coming out it's actually by the choices that were making when we find out genetic information when we're pregnant which is something i have gone through and at the time i did not think of what i was happening to me as being a process of editing what was and wasn't going to be in the genetic pool for the future of human evolution when i got pregnant i was over thirty five and when you're over thirty five days you can get a test when you were ten weeks pregnant where they get a sense of the chromosomal dna of the fetus and they just take a blood test and they get fetal blood through you and in that way they can tell you if you are baby that you're growing has any chromosomal abnormalities and at the time that the blood test was offered to me it was very much like oh here's a way to find out if you're having a girl or a boy we're going to do this test at ten weeks and they sort of buried the lead that the other thing that we i could potentially find out is if there were chromosomal abnormalities like down syndrome or other conditions that are quite lethal that could lead to stillborn baby or a baby that would die within the first year of life and and it was like after i had that blood drawn that i realized oh like the consequences of getting this information could mean that i have to decide if this is a baby i wanna have or not an and it no point was like the conversation about you know this this could give you a options to think about about whether you want to terminate this pregnancy it was just like you're just going to get this information in watching this documentary made me realize like oh as we start to be able to learn more and more about the dna content of the very smallest embryos we can make choices about what we consider viable and what are people that we don't want to continue to exist if you are looking at genetic material when you're thinking of the kinds of babies you want to have if you're able to make choices about characteristics that are appealing or ones you want to eliminate you get into questions about disability and preventing disobey bility's pretty quickly they had a great woman talk about this in the documentary name's rebecca coakley and she is a an activist who has a kander pleasure or dwarfism and she talked about like the looming threat of what will it mean if people can choose to not have babies who have this genetic condition of dwarfism like what does it mean that that's a world that we could be headed into the idea that we're all sick that we're suffering that i suffer from dwarfism no i live with dwarfism i've lived with dwarfism for thirty nine years i'm proud to be secondgeneration raising third generation of people living with dwarfism i don't suffer i suffer from how society treats me the four i saw this like you know i i was aware i was just i was in college like early college when the genome was first sequenced in it felt like such a huge deal it was like the very end of the clinton presidency it was it was like the dawning of a new era and i remember it.

ten weeks thirty nine years thirty five days
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sexy coakley loved the books by george are martin but she did worry that seeing certain seen slightly painful like a cruel public joke played on tory lanez twer by an evil came he humiliates him by staging a vulgar play with an all too worth cast when i read that in the book i had never seen my own experience the life reflected so accurately so vividly so fists early after that episode rebecca coakley said her non sampled france called her to make sure she was okay there are like wow is that really what it's like knows like yeah there days it that's what it's like people seeming down on their knees and mock how i walk every says human society is of course packed with disabled people we know this david perry is also a disability activist and game of thrones fan with a phd in medieval history he says it makes sense to see a lot of people with disabilities in a show set before modern medicine what happened to your face guy scout the game of thrones still falls into some traps says perry liquid the princess who has greece scale a disease a little like leprosy her disability pumps up to pay those it isn't really about her right it's about all this poor physically disfigured girl who was so good impure and smart ono she's going to be killed now we have to be really upset that is the kind of writing that i kind of hate and terry takes issue with how quickly a sportsman who loses his hand learns to fight with the other one then there's the pair left character is disability gave him the civil powers some of us are concerned that this season helping magically cured there's a lot of talk will brammertz fly willie learn to shape shift is he going to be able to change his body so he's not paralysed anymore even given the game of thrones as a.

george martin rebecca coakley france david perry terry greece
"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"rebecca coakley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wish people could get the kylo care i get dreyer hobart was dropping in for coffee on her way to work she voted for president trump but now she has mixed feelings about the health care debate underway in washington he gets insurance through her employer so i pay leg hunger is unless forty dollars every two weeks on a check for me and my very kids have healthcare in his even that good healthcare she says her aunt's family got coverage thrill bomb care and it's worse in it's really hard for them to find dr that actually accept it but hobart doesn't like what she's hearing about the gop healthcare bill don't think that'll were here i think hopefully vaguely olovo at length canada is doing and even on cuba a single payer government run system like that isn't under serious consideration in washington right now but it's not clear what if anything jiang mcconnell and senate republicans will be able to agree on timur keith npr news covington kentucky you don't see many people with disabilities on television unless you're watching a certain popular hbo show that starts its seventh season on sunday game of thrones is filled with characters who have special abilities and disabilities here's npr's net it will be one main character is paralysed and others and ntt your new hot is nicer than the old one for awhile left her sight tainan fight mind ga we think characterists with skin diseases with intellectual disabilities then this a character so important to the story factor who place incomes comes first in the credits tyrian manistir i'm guilty of being a jewel your vote on jarov obeying a of beyond high hopes for that mine life disability rights activist rebecca coakley is also a little person she says game of thrones has been a total gamechanger in how nondisabled people talk to her about popular culture hey game of thrones and i'm like yeah game of thrones not the railing on women all the time but yeah little people who were not elving right on game of thrones has coakley has given averagesized viewers a new set of references for people who look like her turn lancaster is complicated and.

dreyer hobart trump washington cuba kentucky rebecca coakley lancaster president gop jiang mcconnell senate hbo npr tainan forty dollars two weeks