34 Burst results for "Rcmp"

Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

"Alan Adam is no longer facing criminal charges. The elbert first nations leader was charged in March after RCMP officers violently arrested him. When news of the incident became public a few weeks ago, many people including the prime minister were shocked by what the police had done. A DASH CAM video recorded by the RCMP shows an officer tackling chief Adam. He punches him and puts him in a chokehold leaving his face bloodied. Today chief Adam was cleared of any wrongdoing. The officers are under investigation by Alberta's police

Alan Adam Rcmp Officer Prime Minister Alberta
Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

"The death toll rises in a weekend shooting in Canada the royal Canadian Mounted Police say the suspect was shot and later died on Sunday authorities did not provide further details or give a motive for the killings prime minister Justin Trudeau says investigators are still working on the case there is still a tremendous investigation going on by the RCMP right now there are many many different sites many different questions that a lot of people have the dead included elementary school teacher to health care workers a family of three a veteran and a

Canada Royal Canadian Mounted Police Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Rcmp School Teacher
Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

Doug Stephan

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

"The death toll rises in a weekend shooting in Canada the royal Canadian Mounted Police say the suspect was shot and later died on Sunday authorities did not provide further details or give a motive for the killings prime minister Justin Trudeau says investigators are still working on the case there is still a tremendous investigation going on by the RCMP right now there are many many different sites many different questions that a lot of people have the dead included elementary school teacher to health care workers a family of three a veteran and a

Canada Royal Canadian Mounted Police Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Rcmp School Teacher
"rcmp" Discussed on The Current

The Current

14:33 min | 5 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on The Current

"Presumably is the fact that the shooter was driving a car that looked an awful lot like RCMP vehicle. And we're now learning was actually wearing. Rcmp uniform. What would that do in terms of As I say complicating the response. Yeah we don't seem to get information on that if you follow the Nova Scotia. Rcmp twitter feed until mid morning until about nine a m And so so it seems that the is probably not sure exactly what happened but it would mean the initial response The local population would likely be confused. I mean clearly was trying to it. Seems from the reports that we have from some of the witnesses that he was trying to go up to people's houses and knock on their door But if they didn't respond then he would leave again even though he could've blown open the lock for instance with one of his firearms so it seems he was deliberately trying to prey on people with the uniform and try to get a reaction out of them. This might also explain why on the initial response And a sworn member Bush shot and killed because perhaps they might have been confused by the uniform even though they didn't necessarily recognize the individual how does civilian get a hold of RCMP uniform. Oh it's relatively easy. Go down to your local military surplus store and just pick up a uniform Now members are supposed to destroy these When they leave the force but there's no Inventory system that I know of that actually insures that people destroy the uniform and so I think one of things they'll be looking at is should people be handing in their uniform for instance instead of Relying on members themselves to To destroy it but yeah I mean if you if you look line go to your military surplus store You'll be able to pick up your local uniform. I think people would probably be fairly alarmed by that. If they don't know that you could just go down to the surplus store th that it's that easy to get a hold of RCMP and actually not at not a replica but actual RCMP uniform. Yeah and it seems to this. Individual of course specialized in trying to acquire authentic Rcmp Mcgeer everything from cars to is too so he would've gone out of his way to likely get a uniform that was the real thing And clearly had intended into instrumentalise that uniform For the sake of impersonating a police officer in getting a a reaction out of people and possibly as you point out Having causing consumer confusion in the process for the RCMP. Themselves trying to Trying to ascertain that that the uniform as being impersonated In the course of a pursue it and it allowed him to probably do a lot more harm Given that some of the individuals on the road were likely duped by him. Donning the uniform as well. What is this tragedy? Tell you about the level of policing rural Canadians receive There are significant number. Rcmp members who die in rural communities. Twenty seventeen the Nova Scotia lost a member in Amherst that These challenging areas to police in addition we all know without the RCMP has institutional culture problems that then bring on recruitment problems which means often detachments short-staffed especially on weekends. We know from two thousand nineteen auditor. General's report that the RCN PS had challenges with the rollout of the carbines eight. So the long The long guns That they would need to have in their vehicles They've had John's with the rollout in terms of the body armor Four four members And so one of the things that investigation will be looking at is Was the local member Trained and equipped the way. They should have been more than twenty seventeen. In New Brunswick provincial court found the RCMP. Guilty under liable under the Canada Labor Code With regards to their shooting shooting in Moncton We know there's problems with regards to the maintenance of those rifles with regards to certification on the carbines And even if you have The the Carbine The member might have not signed him out because it's ultimately up to the member to decide whether they're going to sign up for that evening when they go on their shift or not it requires extra people were some of the members. Say you know. It's probably not going to be necessary on Saturday night. The worst him to have is that domestic dispute that might have to deal with So all of those. I think we'll be part of the investigation. That's why Chief Superintendent Leather said that this is going to be a long investigation trying to establish all those details at the time line of what transpired Christian. Good to speak with you about this. There are a lot of questions still to be asking questions coming from those who were directly affected by that W Atkinson. Thank you my pleasure Chris Christie practice a professor at Royal Military College and the School of Policy Studies at Queen's University we did invite the Commissioner of the RCMP. Brenda look to join us on the program and she was not available this morning the. Cbc News is coming up. And then we'll be talking about tracking down silence spreaders people who have Cova nineteen but no symptoms to real mystery and not knowing how many of those silence spreaders are out. There leaves us vulnerable to not actually knowing how widespread nineteen actually is in our communities. We will talk more about that coming up. This is the current. My Name's Matt Galloway to take to the news and a heads lives in Ottawa. She hails from Anti Jewish and yesterday in tribute to her Home Province. She played fiddle and posted it up to the ultimate online. Nova Scotia. Kitchen PARTY. Have Listen Good Morning I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current still to come. Hashtag CORONA speak a guy to the slang of this pandemic but I know fever no coughing and yet big threat to public back in February Craig Lee was on a cruise and it was there on that cruise that the retired teacher contracted the corona virus. I was thirty days quarantined in Japan. I arrived back in Canada on the fifth. And I've been here for two weeks on just fine. Never had any symptoms by temperatures normal. My kitchen and my blood was fine. I exercise I slept well. Good appetite and I had no symptoms at all none whatsoever Craig. Lee might have never known that he was infected. If it weren't for the fact that the cruise passengers all underwent testing new. Evidence is suggesting that there may be more people than we realise who are a symptomatic. The so called silent spreaders of the corona virus. You'll recall perhaps that story the captain of that. Us Navy aircraft carrier he was fired after urging more be done about the covert nineteen outbreak on his ship. Tests of nearly all the sailors on that vessel have now been done and the results are fascinating. Sixty percent of those who tested positive had thus far show no symptoms whatsoever. Aclu perhaps as to just how stealthily the virus can move. Dr Williams is a professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Longtime Advisor to the US Centers for Disease Control. Dr Good Morning. Good to be with great to have you. This is as I say a fascinating topic. What exactly do we mean by? Silence spread or silent transmission of something like Corona virus will exactly as you were saying not everyone who acquires the corona virus. Get Sick and they can be carriers if you will of the corona virus even though they have no symptoms whatsoever and can nonetheless be capable of spreading it to others who may then themselves become sick so they are indeed silence spreaders in the community. It's a very clever way. This virus has developed for getting around and being so contagious. One of the reasons why people are talking about this as I mentioned this story of the. Us aircraft carrier where they tested all the sailors. Sixty percent of them were With the virus were as symptomatic. Did that figure. Surprise me that sixty percent of the people who had Covert nineteen would have no symptoms whatsoever. It struck me as astounding. As a matter of fact we anticipated that some of course would be without symptoms but sixty percent. Now let's pause for a moment because this is a young very healthy population and perhaps that's larger than it would be among people who have gray hair but nonetheless the less it's striking and it speaks to what may be happening in our community. Those young people who seem to be unaffected or relatively sold by the corona virus. They could actually be the disseminators throughout the community just to be clear the fact that they are young and healthy and fit that means that the virus would affect them in a different way. Well it's been a striking feature of the corona virus that children and young adults are much less effected. They're much less likely to become sick than older person. And we thought for some reason the virus just ignored them or never was able to establish infection. But what we're learning is that the infection does take place but they are. Their immune system is sufficiently strong. That it kind of keeps the virus in check and they don't get sick but while they have the virus they can give it to others. The aircraft carrier is one of the stories against sixty percent as symptomatic there. Iceland has found something like fifty percents of those who are infected with cove. Nineteen are a symptomatic. Dr Anthony Fauci in the United States says that between twenty five and fifty percent of cases could be symptomatic. Do we have any idea how many people could be silently carrying this virus not yet we have small indication with a little study here and there but as we develop these antibodies studies. Those are studies of proteins in blood. That can tell us whether we've been infected in the past. Those studies are going to be rolling out over the next couple of months at a across the country and that will give us a better idea of WHO's been infected but who's never had symptom we. We'll see the modeling that comes out and you'll hear on a daily basis whether it's In individual states or cities or provinces here in Canada or right across the country the number of cases. This is We have five hundred cases today. We have one thousand cases today. Do we have based on that. We have any idea how many cases of covert nineteen there are just across around the world. We know how many people are getting sick. That's been well established in fact seriously sick enough to be admitted to the hospital. Those people are being counted. Well and that's what we usually seeing the figures but people who have minimum symptoms or no symptoms. We don't know you know Matt. This is the reason that wearing masks is so important to protect ourselves as well as to make sure that we who may have the infection and not know it. Don't give it to someone else. And that's the very basis of the recommendation that everyone who goes out should be masked now. What do we know about how somebody who is a symptomatic who has a cove in Nineteen? But no symptoms. How do they spread the virus? Spread through breathing. Because this is a virus that gets back up in your throat and down into your bronchial tubes and as you exhale microscopically. The virus is in the air that we exhale. And if you're standing within three to six feet of me inhaling you may inhale some of what I've exhaled along with the virus and thus I who was infected can inadvertently infect you even if you're not coughing even if you're not sneezing just by breathing just by breathing. Coughing and sneezing. Those are symptoms obviously will project the virus and even longer distances and may bring up more virus but even breathing is sufficient for the virus to get from me to you..

RCMP Nova Scotia Matt Galloway United States Craig Lee Canada twitter RCN professor Bush Moncton Cbc News Japan New Brunswick Chris Christie Dr Anthony Fauci Amherst Chief Superintendent Leather Dr Good
Canadian police say at least 10 people are dead after a shooting rampage across Nova Scotia

Snap Judgment

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Canadian police say at least 10 people are dead after a shooting rampage across Nova Scotia

"At least ten people are dead in a mass shooting in Nova Scotia Canada today including a royal Canadian Mounted Police officer Emma Jacobs reports the rampage took place over twelve hours and across several communities chief superintendent Chris leather with the RCMP said police first responded to nine one one call Saturday night the national research for the suspect led to multiple sites in the area including structures that were on fire the search continued overnight and into the morning he said the gunmen who dressed as an RCMP officer it was dead after an hours long manhunt crossing several jurisdictions his victims included Heidi Stevenson a veteran police officer police identified the gunman as fifty one year old Gabriel

Nova Scotia Canada Emma Jacobs Chris Leather Rcmp Officer Heidi Stevenson Gabriel Superintendent
Several dead in Nova Scotia shooting rampage

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Several dead in Nova Scotia shooting rampage

"At least ten people including a police officer have been killed in a shooting rampage on Canada's east coast province of Nova Scotia as a carpenter reports authorities say the gunman is also among the dead police say the gunman's twelve hour rampage began Saturday evening in the community of port of peak Nova Scotia twenty three year old Heidi Stevenson a member of the RCMP was killed when she responded to an active shooter incident another officer was wounded when police arrived they found several casualties inside and outside the home witnesses in the area also said they have seen at least three houses on fire police identified the gunman as fifty one year old Gabriel Wortman saying he was armed and dangerous and that he was driving an RCMP vehicle and dressed as an

Officer Canada Nova Scotia Heidi Stevenson Rcmp Gabriel Wortman
"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

"The <Music> government <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Good to talk <Speech_Female> to you a little <Speech_Music_Female> bit about the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> RCMP here <Speech_Music_Female> There <Speech_Music_Female> have been <SpeakerChange> all these arrests <Speech_Music_Female> that we've been <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> seeing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> there are concerns <Speech_Female> that the standoff <Speech_Female> could undermine <Speech_Female> this already fraught relationship <Speech_Female> between the police <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and indigenous communities <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and to the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> officers on the ground not <Speech_Music_Female> mindful <SpeakerChange> of that <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I think it depends <Speech_Female> on which person <Speech_Female> definitely <Speech_Female> some who <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> appear that their patience <Speech_Female> is running a bit thin <Speech_Female> and quite growing crate <Speech_Female> frustrated with <Speech_Female> the actions that they're <Speech_Female> trying to control of people <Speech_Female> on the territory <Speech_Female> and others <Speech_Female> who were sort of trying to <Speech_Female> maintain this dialogue <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Female> With the chiefs <Speech_Music_Male> here. We're <Speech_Music_Male> willing to speak with me <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> officers. <Speech_Female> Who are who are great <Speech_Female> and calm and composed <Speech_Female> others who are <Speech_Female> growing? <Speech_Female> You can see their <Speech_Female> frustration at times. <Speech_Female> And then I'm I'm <Speech_Female> just the tension is <Speech_Female> just something <Speech_Female> that's difficult to <Speech_Female> describe but it certainly <Speech_Female> at play <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Is there <Speech_Female> a fear that this could really <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> escalate <Speech_Female> here that this could <Speech_Female> end in didn't <Speech_Female> violence <Speech_Female> I think that's <Speech_Female> been a fear all along <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I think that's <Speech_Female> evident in how many <Speech_Female> times people <Speech_Female> describing what's going <Speech_Female> on there. The company <Speech_Female> The our senior. Can <Speech_Female> you govern like <Speech_Female> governments from <Speech_Female> from BC <Speech_Female> the federal government. <Speech_Female> What's ten talking <Speech_Female> about? How <Speech_Female> we we will remain peaceful? <Speech_Female> We want <Speech_Female> a peaceful resolution. <Speech_Female> And when you hear that word <Speech_Female> peaceful being <Speech_Female> used aspirational <Speech_Female> so many <Speech_Female> times it really <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sinks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in that there <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is a very real risk <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of things <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not going peacefully peacefully <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Shantelle. Thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> much. <SpeakerChange> Thank you <Music>

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:33 min | 7 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

"I suppose the question I have here though is how many more options the whatsoever tin hereditary chiefs have here. Seems like this is getting very close to the end of the line here. UNICEF start but in is near the end of the line now yeah absolutely I mean so it just passed into Stoughton is where coastal gasoline is. rain on construction schedule. Want to get in there to build up this this encampment area for for pipeline construction to happen this summer and so once they get free access to moved through that road. You know they're going to start doing the work that scheduled right now Abbott at the same time you know it's it's a big territory and the what's out today With those arrests that happened with free to Houston being arrested among others. They said you know we asked. We may be arrested but this is not over. It's hard to know what they plan to do. Okay and tell me you're free to Houston is oh so Frida is significant in all of this is sort of the longtime I spokes person at the student checkpoint site and now the healing center. We're not protest camp our home under coming to invade my home today and that gets my door and she is one of actually the named defendants in the initial court application that coastal gasoline put into the courts for this injunction so she and Smuggled Gum who's a hereditary chief within the nation were actually the two named defendants That that it went to court on this case and so people were glued to this livestream. That people were putting out on facebook today and sort of this connection kept cutting in and out. It's a remote area and they're using satellite and trying to livestream what was happening. You could see a group of women they were standing under this arch arch with fire and drumming and singing. All the awhile. Police were moving in on them so we heard that. RTP had serve helicopter members in behind the checkpoints and then they had rcmp on the bridge. Moving they're boxed in and these women just stood there drumming and singing and one by one. We're being taken away by police. And at the end as the arrests were being made Freda was was the last person standing there and when the by the time the police were approaching her. She wasn't drumming anymore. She was just standing there dancing and singing at the top of her lungs and was sort of quietly. Quietly led away by police singing as she went. Amen- you could see you're walking into the distance and in the back their red dresses lined up along this road which was a symbol for missing murdered indigenous women and girls so the symbolism of all of this was quite powerful for people who were watching and sympathetic of people who aren't probably like great finally But for those who are engaged in these actions you're across the country that was hugely symbolic and there was a gate at At UNICEF that's her leads in and it was some wooden structure and they're also images of a police cutting cutting through it and so from their side they'd necessarily see what they were cutting through but For moonstone and looking outward. Where'd you could see that? They had put a sign up. That said reconciliation. That was just sawed right down the middle as they took took apart gate so the symbolism right now of what is happening happening was was really poignant in watching that livestream and witnessing what was happening as as free to was the last person led away at least as far as I've seen so far by police and taken into custody and are we hearing anything from governments here the BC provincial government and end the federal government. Not A lot. I mean all leading up to this the government Your did attempt some deescalation stuff to NBC. And the chiefs and three intermediary with Nathan Cullen in the mix for bit and then those talks failed to come to any peaceful resolution and after that I am not aware of any further dialogue. They're having the province John Horrigan holding his first news conference of the New Year. There are agreements from the peace country to Kim with indigenous communities that want to see economic activity activity of prosperity. Take place all the permits are in place for this project to proceed. We'll be proceeding and the Fed seemed to be pointing back to the provincial government. Saying this is all within provincial jurisdiction. So this isn't about us and this is for BC to sort out. Okay and you mentioned Nathan. Cullen this is the former and EP. MP and what is the company thing about all of this I mean for coastal gas length. They they've maintained a long that they want to see a peaceful resolution and they also. I can't delay you know getting in that area and doing construction work. They have construction timelines to me. They have commitments to this pipeline built They have expressed disappointment -pointment at some points along throughout this process and the last number of weeks kept insisting that they were offering to meet with the hereditary chiefs and that that invitation has been rejected to time and time again by the hereditary chiefs. Who've said they have no interest in meeting with a proponent and they would only like to sit down and speak with decision makers at the federal and provincial?.

Nathan Cullen Houston BC UNICEF chiefs Abbott facebook Stoughton Freda Fed Frida John Horrigan NBC Kim
"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

07:03 min | 7 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

"Too I JUST WANNA step back here and distill the story with you for a moment. You and I've talked about this on the podcast before but but for those who are just coming to this or may need a refresher at the heart of this conflict is not just a pipeline. Right as you mentioned before it's about laws and about ownership of land. Tell me more about what this is all about. Yeah absolutely so I mean I think it's overly simplistic a stick to describe it as an anti pipeline protest camps and you know then other people who are pro pipeline. They were talking about a situation where there are many truths happening at the same aim time so yes it is true that the BC's Supreme Court in order granting an injunction for coastal gas link. It is true that the courts say under a case law or the common law system. You people who are impeding access to at this approved and permited pipeline project cannot keep walking them or and and Put in enforcement orders for the CPI two to empower them to arrest people if they didn't abide by that So December thirty first in two thousand nineteen was when the court the final ruling on this case or at least at the Supreme Court level when we arrested a year ago that was under an inch junction. So December thirty first comes now it is what is described as an interlocutory Tori injunction which just means it stands okay and so December thirty first rolls around in Stoughton is still very much built up. There's a new camp that's been built up at the forty four kilometer mark mark and then there's all anticipation of of enforcement actions and so the pipeline company. Said you know wants to get in there and and do its job in his standing. By this this court decision and It does have agreements with twenty first nations along the route of this pipeline elected. Chief Dan George Burns Lake first. Nation nations signed a benefit agreement with coastal gasoline. Twenty fourteen. But he's working towards equity ownership of the pipeline won't need any money from Ottawa anymore. We can run our our own businesses by ourselves under our own condition. So I think it's going to help a lot of first nations get out of poverty in the North End. That's where you see this tension between Green The colonial sort of system of governance imposed on indigenous people versus You know systems of government that have existed before Canada was was the thing so with the whatsoever and specifically they are still under the Indian act system and so their nation as they would find themselves has been broken up into six Indian enact bands all with their own chief counsel systems and five of those six bands did sign agreements with coastal gas link Which means they receive direct financial initial payments for it and they receive contracting opportunities but at the same time the whatsoever and hereditary chiefs are like no no no like you don't have authority Indian Act Band Council to make these types of decisions off reserve right and so because the pipeline doesn't go through any reserve land it's in the traditional territory royal the wet Soican nation which you know they do have weight when they say that they do have a Supreme Court of Canada decision behind them? We're talking about the Delta Mook Decision Right Dell Komo Kyya so and that's really seeing like the the lack of resolution from a from a Supreme Court of Canada decision from nineteen ninety-seven where the that gets an hereditary. Choose and so tim. Hereditary chiefs cl- together went to the court demanding sort of a ruling on their rights and title. And the court did. Confirm saying you know. Nobody ever signed a treaty with you. You've never seated or surrendered title your rights entitled to Your Land With Your traditional little territory and then up at the court couldn't say okay so now we say you have rights entitled to the slander particularly title. They punted it back to the whatsoever nation and and the governments in Canada. The Canadian governments to say you guys need to go in and figure this out and that still hasn't happened and I think that's really at the root of what we're seeing. Is this unfinished business of Nation Building and government to government relationships at a time when we're hearing so much talk about the United Nations Declaration on the rights of indigenous in his people Supporting first nations to be self determining So so for a lot of people who are taking action especially in first nations across the country. I think that's really where they're seeing this fight and at the same time there are people who are saying get this thing built their jobs on the line there billions of dollars on the line here with this project objects that went through the process and got all of the permits and approvals that it needed to do its work right. It's an untenable situation then true on both sides and also you know You mentioned the the UN Declaration on rights of Indigenous People. Were also talking about reconciliation a lot in in this country as well which is a question that has come up consistently through this controversy more troops Warren Beatty troops organs reconciliation and is at the center of these protests. That we're seeing around the entire country right now. Tell me a little bit about what we've been seeing the last couple of days. Ace Yeah we've been seeing Actions pop up all over the place for civil disobedience sit ins protests. I know here in uncover the you know the port Vancouver entrances were blocked Vancouver. Police release them numbers. They said there've been with thirty. Three arrests brass The delta porter was blocked railed blockades have been showing up. There's a sit in with indigenous youth who'd occupying at the front of the legislature and they. There are demanding that the CPI leave the area. And and I think at the same time maybe part of that unrest is that there isn't any clear clear resolution to this dispute as it stands you know with people dug in positions in in government in in the courts in all these things all these truths that are happening at the same time have created this scenario where we hear a lot of talk about people wanting a peaceful resolution to this but increasingly or you're continuously not really seeing how that may be possible if this project continues along that route and oh it. totten remained adamant in their position. Asian those arrested on Thursday and their supporters say despite the police action. They're not going anywhere because there are no way back. You can rest us. You can try to move us from the territory you can remove us from the territory violently.

Supreme Court Indigenous People Canada Actions United Nations Dan George Warren Beatty Nation Building UN Tori totten BC Ottawa Vancouver North End chief counsel Stoughton Indian Act Band Council Burns Lake Dell
"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:46 min | 7 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Shantelle thank you so much for joining me today. Hi thanks for having me so I know that you just got back from the frontlines of this dispute and can you take me there. What's the scene been Lancaster? RCMP moves into enforce this injunction and clear the road road where protesters have set up camp blockades On the ground has been very chaotic where it's shifting very dynamic situation with a lot of police resources on site and then of course what tillerson hereditary chiefs and supporters who had had been dug in at a number of different sites along this forest service road that's subject to this Supreme Court injunction real heart in our minds. I've been looking at the images and videos that have come out of the standoff in the last several days. They're they're really really quite powerful. And can you describe some of them for me. Yeah there's been a lot of Chaos and and tense hence Tense moments out on that territory of police have moved into sort of a very deliberate Sort of climate or by kilometer can't can't buy camp enforcement actions and You know some of those images are people being arrested in the pitch black after the first wave of arrests happened at around four o'clock in the morning on Thursday as Victorian RPM the real issue December thirty first nineteen their images of of like big lines of of members of the RCMP's holding back people on the edge of the new police line to a Tuten. Elders are upset. They're not allowed to go into territory the consider. There's I never ever thought that we as we're told on people would ever be faced with such a crisis Sousse as we're facing today. Is this Canada or is it Syria. There've been videos of these tense confrontations between the whatsoever and supporters and police as things sort of shift and change hour by hour One of the moments that you know really I think aggravated things things for for the RCMP. Was Whim at this. One point on the the Forest Service Road Matola sports had toured without anybody noticing dissing parked all of their vehicles in this really chaotic scene. That you couldn't get across you couldn't drive made the road impassable and the police were trying to get out on the only road out of that area and came upon this scene of Mesli parked cars. They couldn't drive through and you know they there's a video of the rcmp a member of the the approaching. And saying you know if you don't get out of the way you're going to face arrest cultural processes owners okay right now. You're breaching the junction. We're helping understanding defending them. Well I just asked for station before you now you said you don't WanNa talk so I'm explaining to you that right now with his top and trying to give him a copy if the injunctions person standing there staring back at the police saying I don't know I need to copy the injunction sort of frustrated exchange where police walked away got back in their vehicles in you know in that particular moment. The police ended up getting Blocked from passing this road for hours so so lots of really tense exchanges Moments of enforcement. But then you know the weird contrast is that They're all this downtime where people are coaching. Their supporters have just been held at different for an exclusion zones by police and just Gathering and visiting with each other. And there's lots of hugs and laughter and singing and prayer and so. There's just like this very chaotic scene with these moments that seem so such a stark contrast to the the weight of. What's going on up here breath? What's up tell me a little bit about what it's like there? What the environment is like the Marines Forest Service road is just that it's Forest Service Road That sort of It's exits off highway. Sixteen which a lot of Canadians would know as the highway of tears And then it sort of curves off the highway sixteen and sort of snakes around alongside the Murray River and people refer to this The different sites where people have sort of set up permanent occupation sites or recent occupation sites as by kilometer postings. So you know there was one at the twenty seven kilometer mark. There was one at the thirty nine kilometer Lamad or market the forty four kilometer mark and Last in that line is at the sixty six kilometer mark and that's the longest standing of these Reoccupation sites the STOUGHTON wooden site. Our there is a land based healing center and so That is the last place where our CPA on Monday went in and started making arrests so they could clear the way so coastal gasoline and it's contractors can get back to work on pipeline construction. What is the significance of unison? Unison has been around for a really long time out on the territory. So it's It's at a strategic place where the unit Stoughton who are as a group within the WET SOICAN nation strategically set up a checkpoint dating back to two two thousand nine so over a decade now they started operating a checkpoint on this at bridge that crosses the Maurice River and Saying nobody can pass through this checkpoint. If you don't have the consent of the hereditary chiefs so it's really an assertion of what Sautin law which of course still exists and has existed assisted pre Canada and sort of is rubbing up against Canadian law. And so people there started this checkpoint it was to It was sort of created in anticipation one of lot of proposed pipeline activity through that area. And over the years. It's really been built up as a permanent Living site where we're now. There's a land-based land-based hewing center uses space to make our people. Strong at the residential schools were used to take the Indian child. We want to use this facility to the Indian back in our children meeting our culture that people are coming and going all the time. It's not necessarily rooted in in controlling that checkpoint but more so about this permanent presence on the land that's began by trying.

RCMP Forest Service Road Matola Stoughton Unison Canada Shantelle Supreme Court Tuten Mesli Maurice River Murray River Sautin Syria
Protesters block trains, as police arrest 33 people opposing Canada gas pipeline. South Dakota rejects tribal IDs for voter registration. Tribal leaders, and New Mexico government officials celebrate Native American Day

Native America Calling

03:49 min | 7 months ago

Protesters block trains, as police arrest 33 people opposing Canada gas pipeline. South Dakota rejects tribal IDs for voter registration. Tribal leaders, and New Mexico government officials celebrate Native American Day

"Demonstrations were held across Canada over the weekend as tensions rise over a gas asked pipeline in British Columbia. Dan Carpenter has more in Toronto. It in Belleville Ontario protesters forced suspension of passenger rail service. They were in support of the. What suet in first nation after six members were arrested in northern British Columbia Royal Canadian Mounted Police moved in to enforce an injunction against the nation's hereditary chiefs and their supporters that what suet opposed to the six point six billion dollar coastal gasoline slink pipeline the hereditary chiefs say? The project has no authority without their consent and the Ontario protesters came out to back them. The RCMP is in the midst of an invasion of. What's who attend territory? They've been dragging plan defenders from their own territory which legally they don't have jurisdiction over meanwhile L. in British Columbia police continue to make arrests during the weekend. Tensions remain high and more arrests are expected as protesters continue trying to block the pipeline as contractors. Was it to get back to the site of the pipeline area to restart their work. At the end of December. The Provincial Supreme Court issued the injunction against the nation that was blocking the access to the project and empowered police to enforce it for National Native News. I'm Dan Carpenter in the South Dakota Legislature House. Republicans are rejecting adding an amendment that would add tribal. Id's as a valid identification to register to vote lease drooping A.. Reports current state law allows those they driver's license licensed to register to vote. Or someone can register to county. Auditor's office and sign an affidavit house. Democrats brought an amendment to include tribal. Id's but it got rejected acted democratic. State Representative Sean Bordeaux is a member of the Rosebud tribe. He says he's struggling with the pushback against tribal. ID's so it's like they want to try. Try to impact in effect the voting by trying to get natives not to vote very frustrating to see that happen and a little bit of a pain in a heart to see that folks take a direct attack at some of the most vulnerable people who often don't have the vehicles or the means to get to where they need to the Go-to vote Republicans point to concerns about consistency between tribes. There are nine different. Reservations within the state's borders representative Tamra Saint. John is a Republican who voted against adding tribal. Id's to register to vote. She's a member of the tribe. She says she's studying a native American. Voting Voting Rights Act that's being debated in Washington State for National Native News. I'm Lisa group injure. NPR tribal leaders members of the native community lawmakers and state officials official celebrated American Indian Day Friday at the state capital in Santa Fe. They focused on environmental protection sacred sites in young people New Mexico Governor Michelle L.. Luhan Grisham share that the state has common goals with tribes on the Environment The environment and your sacred lands and this is a remarkable commitment that the state is showing credible leadership Lieutenant Governor Carlton Bowel Coty Zuni Pueblo Says Choco Canyon and northwestern Stern New Mexico is of concern a sacred area linking them culturally and part of their way of life a lot of the songs that we have a lot of the person we have some of those in bygone gone languages some some of those songs that impairs have don't exist in some form or fashion other than our way of life and we believe that it is that connection andries discovery to these connection to these previous places that allow US vows to revive our people spiritual strength a number of tribal leaders are or seeking greater protection of Chaka Canyon from

British Columbia Royal Canadia Rosebud Tribe Washington State Dan Carpenter National Native News John British Columbia Rcmp Sean Bordeaux Belleville Ontario State Representative Canada Toronto Governor Michelle L South Dakota Legislature House Santa Fe Ontario Provincial Supreme Court
"rcmp" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on AP News

"The trump administration his Pentagon money to pay for some one hundred miles of replacement areas along the border with Mexico Jack Quinn as detailed as a print court announced the White House can go forward with plans to use military funds for the wall and it will lift a freeze on two point five billion dollars that was put in place by a lower court in may this ruling means the trump administration can tap the funds and begin work on for contracts that it's already awarded for of the court's liberal justices were against the start of construction set to begin to replace existing sections of Berrier in Arizona California and New Mexico with more robust fencing Jackie Quinn Washington the administration is also signed an agreement with water Amala that would require migrants including Salvadorans and Honduran to cross into Guatemala on their way to the U. S. to apply for protections there instead of at the US border with Mexico from telling reporters in the oval office is a landmark agreement will put the coyotes in the smugglers at a business is a bad people is a very very bad sick deranged people who make a lot of money off other people's misery is going to provide safety for legitimate asylum seekers and stop asylum fraud and abuse is Amnesty International condemned the agreement call is saying any attempts to force families and individuals playing their home countries to seek safety in Guatemala are outrageous anti trust regulators with the justice department in five state attorneys general have signed off on T. mobile twenty six point five billion dollar takeover of sprint the deal includes setting up dish network as a rival to Verizon eighteen tea and the combined company critics are worried about the merger which sets a trio of large companies controlling the cellular market this is a P. radio news police in Canada intensify their search in Manitoba for two suspects in the slayings of an American woman her Australian boyfriend and another man RCMP corporal Julie at farmers.

dish network RCMP Verizon fraud US Pentagon trump corporal Julie Manitoba Canada Jack Quinn Mexico Guatemala Salvadorans Jackie Quinn Washington New Mexico Arizona California Berrier White House
Canadian police confirm sightings of murder suspects

KDWN Programming

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Canadian police confirm sightings of murder suspects

"Canadian police say there been two sightings of suspects in the slaying of an American woman her Australian boyfriend and another man in the area of Manitoba royal Canadian Mounted Police said authorities of corroborated the sightings of nineteen year old camera Klatt and eighteen year old Brian Smith gal ski here's a royal Canadian Mounted Police the search for camera cloud and briars McGill ski continues we can now confirm that there have been two established and corroborated sightings of the suspects in the Gillam area the sightings were prior to the discovery of the burnt out vehicle there have also been no reported stolen vehicles that could be attributed to the suspects at this point in the investigation we believe they are still in the area Manisha RCMP has deployed a significant amount of resources to the Gillam area including our emergency response team since negotiation team we stock services and air services assets the RCMP major crime unit is involved as well as your CV is north district and RCMP resources from other provinces our officers have conducted a detailed and thorough searches of potential areas of interest and the surgeons continue over the last forty eight hours we have received over eighty tips and we continue to ask the public to remain vigilant for camera cloud and briars McGill ski if they are spotted do not call nine one one or your local police immediately this is very challenging terrain this is a large area it's very there's wasn't dense bush Forrest swampy areas so it is very challenging miss McGill skis father said this week he expects the nationwide manhunt to end in the death of his son who he said was on a suicide

Manitoba Royal Canadian Mounte Manisha Rcmp Brian Smith Canadian Mounted Police Gillam Bush Forrest Mcgill Forty Eight Hours Eighteen Year Nineteen Year
Teens named as suspects in Canada murders

America's Morning News

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Teens named as suspects in Canada murders

"Hello this is our case out of Canada from well left from from missing two murder suspects Canadian police say two young man's thought missing or now suspect in the murders of an Australian and his American girl friend as well as another man found dead in northern British Columbia the royal mounted police said on Tuesday they were searching for the teens whose burning car had been discovered not far away they found a body investigators have also been able to confirm that camera cloud and briars Miguel ski have left British Columbia and have been spotted in northern Saskatchewan we believe that they're likely continuing to travel so we don't have a possible destination we can now confirm that they were last seen driving a gray two thousand eleven Toyota Rav four given these latest developments Kaman Briar are no longer considered missing the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Makowski as suspects in the dis lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and China these were asking for the public if you spot prior or cam consider them dangerous do not approach take no action and call immediately nine one one in order to assist our efforts to locate these two men we're releasing new images taken recently camera cloud is described as six foot four similarly a hundred and sixty nine pounds with dark hair and facial hair he has brown eyes briars Miguel ski is described as six foot four three hundred and sixty nine pounds with

Canada British Columbia Saskatchewan Kaman Briar Rcmp Makowski China Facial Hair Miguel Ski Murder Toyota Dis Lake Fowler Sixty Nine Pounds Six Foot
2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

AP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

"Canadian police are looking for two young men first thought missing but now suspects in the killing of a young American woman and Australian boyfriend and another man in northern British Columbia royal Canadian Mountbatten Jenelle show at the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Miguel ski as suspects in the Dease lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and trying to

Rcmp British Columbia Mountbatten Jenelle Dease Lake Fowler
2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

Orlando's Evening News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

"Two teens who Canadian police and nationally believed were missing in British Columbia are now the prime suspects in the murder of a couple royal Canadian Mounted Police say nineteen year old chemical it in eighteen year old Briar Shklovsky are believed to still be traveling Kaman Briar are no longer considered missing the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Miguel ski as suspects in the dis lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and tiny piece they were found shot dead on the highway last week police say those young men were last spotted in northern

British Columbia Murder Briar Shklovsky Kaman Briar Rcmp Dis Lake Fowler Eighteen Year Nineteen Year
Understanding 'Gender Impact' in Canadian Construction Work

The Big Story

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Understanding 'Gender Impact' in Canadian Construction Work

"Might not say what is a gender lens have to do with building this new highway or this new pipeline or something. Well, there are gender impacts. When you bring construction workers into a rural area, there are social impacts that was last year and Buenos Aires, and you may remember some of the immediate reaction. We don't think that you need to have some kind of gender-based analysis when two thousand people come to create jobs to work to support hotels and restaurants as small businesses and families. It's unbelievable to watch. This prime minister refused to acknowledge that his arrogant and self righteous comments are an insult to tens of thousands of Canadians who work in construction in our communities across the country. Here's what that all comes down to whether or not you support pipelines and dams whether you think Justin Trudeau is a modern progressive example for the rest of us or a fake feminist who doesn't understand the real world. These construction projects which employ thousands of out of area workers for months at a time to have an impact on the communities that host, and yes, some of that is a positive contribution to the economy and local infrastructure, and yes, some of that is negative and when it gets bad it can get really bad. There are a couple of ways that we can measure these impacts one is with numbers, and that's being done. The other is the old fashioned way. You send a reporter he talks to everyone. And he tells us what he found today, we have both of those things. So we're going to try to answer the question. What are the real costs of Canada's worker camps? Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Kyle Edwards is a reporter from mcclain's who spent time at a massive worker camp enforce Saint John and British Columbia. Tell me why you went to fort Saint John. Well, it started in. I think it was August twenty eighteen there was this story out in Manitoba. After kind of this arm's length and agency provincial agency in Manitoba had released. A report they're called the clean environment commission, and they had released a report that had gained a lot of media. Attention, basically detailed allegations of sexual abuse. Dating back to the nineteen sixties at a work camp up in northern town called Gillam, which is just east of a city called Thompson Manitoba, right? And the it was involving several first nations communities one in particular was the FOX like creation, and there were members they kind of detailed these horrible issue. These horrible stories of sexual abuse at the hands of. Manitoba hydro workers one person in particular had said that the RCMP organized gangs back in the nineteen sixties. And so it was this very explosive report. I guess I guess you call it. And it it gained a lot of media attention in in Manitoba last year. And so we were talking about it at McLeans. And we want us to do a story we actually discussed the idea of doing a story on industrial camps last year around the time the report came out, and so that was kind of the time that was kind of when I started thinking about it. And I put in some f allies and started asking people if this was an issue that they're really concerned about and that took me to fourteen John which is where it's a city that is known for having a very large transient population. Which is which basically means there are workers that go there for work. What do we know about what happens these camps, or I guess what's kind of the? The popular stereotype around them. Because the the reports detailing what allegedly happened in Manitoba is not kind of the only one of its kind. Yes. So in thousand seventeen a report from this organization called or this consulting group called the Firelight group. They released a report that basically raised a bunch of warnings about when there's a particular camp near in an area by other communities. There's a increase in issues like sex trafficking in the sex trade. There's an increase RCMP data and the report showed that there was a thirty eight percent increase in reported sexual assaults in Saint James fourteenth, James BC in two thousand and eleven and there were other issues like an increase in S T is in a particular area as well as other concerns regarding rampant drug. Use in alcohol use in in in a lot of these camps. And this is has been really as I kind of looked into it a little bit more. This was something that a lot of people have a lot of scholars and academics. Researchers had they've kind of looked into this issue for many many years. Yeah. And and it just seemed like it was nothing new and a lot of people kind of knew that there were a lot of social impacts to industrial camps. So that's really kind of drove the story. So you went to Ford Saint John to essentially see what the situation was like on the ground, and and what kind of social construct springs up around these camps. Exactly enforcing John. There's a huge strain on. So there they call them. They call it the shadow population. A lot of people that's a term a lot of people use the province of British Columbia is not really sure how many people are going to northeastern BC for work who live. Who live elsewhere who reside permanently? Elsewhere, right, and one of the challenges with that is s- things like health services and social services, the those those sort of things are funded by the province based on the resident population, and without taking into consideration, the thousands and thousands of people that most nearly double the actual population. When I got there. A lot of women spoke about a lot of indigenous woman, I spoke to you spoke spoke a lot about racism and sexual harassment and use and it was kind of alarming. Really? So can you tell me about some of the people you met in fort Saint John and some of the stories you heard so I

Manitoba Fort Saint John Rcmp John Reporter Buenos Aires Justin Trudeau Thompson Manitoba Prime Minister Ford Saint John Gillam Saint John Canada British Columbia Harassment Firelight Group Kyle Edwards
How secretive technology could be tracking your phone

The Big Story

08:53 min | 1 year ago

How secretive technology could be tracking your phone

"You've been lucky enough to find yourself. Wait. I can't tell you where while the police were investigating. I can't tell you that either using a piece of equipment that some forces may or may not possess. And no, they won't tell you that at a certain time. Then congratulations. You may now exist as a random bunch of numbers in a collection of evidence that the police are storing they won't tell you where until they eventually figure out what to do with it. And they might not tell you what they decide to do with it. Either good news, though, it's only a number not a name and some meta data. But there's no way they can identify you based on that. Right. Jordan Heathrow wings. And this is the big story. And are you being paranoid? If they really are watching. Yes. This is one of those episodes. Kate Allen is the Toronto Star science and technology reporter, what's the latest way. Thority if my city are watching. Well, the police service told us a few days ago that they have purchased a Stig Stingray or an emcee catcher, which is a type of cell phone surveillance technology that sweeps up data on also phones within its range. It's usually used on a criminal suspect. But sweeps up everybody within a trench. Oh, good. How does it work? So we don't really know because police have been extremely not forthcoming about how they work. And in fact, have in trials in cases where these things were used. They've applied to. Not disclose any anything about how they work or even the the manufacturer model of these devices. But roughly they sort of force your cell phone all cell phones, within range of the device to identify themselves to device, so they capture a bunch of different types of data. One of the one of the types of data is MC number which is just like a fifteen digit serial code associate with your sim card, and then a couple other types of you know, like a serial number. So she with the actual piece of equipment that you carry and things like that and cops where are using these things. That's a great question. We don't know the answer to that fully either. Why not well the police have been pretty tight lipped about it. I they would say that they're trying to protect investigative techniques. And so I mean, there's nothing compelling them to tell to reports to the public or to journalists they're using them. And so they it hasn't really come to light except for in a few core cases. And when journalists have done some. Digging. So what happens is that a kiss? We'll get into court and the evidence will be presented. And then you find out like, oh, this is how they gathered that vary. Rarely yes. And where have we found that they are being used the first we knew was that the RCMP own some of these devices and so a couple years ago after some court cases were a little bit of info came too late. The empty set down with some journalists and said, yes, we own ten of these devices we've been using them for more than a decade at that point. So we know the CPA uses them other forces have said that the the RCMP has operated those devices on their behalf. So we we actually put in some freedom of information requests with the Toronto police a few years ago, and it came back to us that the Trump service had used the devices on five separate occasions. And in the cases, where they would tell us you tells the AP had always operated it for them. Okay. But we know there. Being used in a few cities. Yes. Yes. So I can give you a couple of other cities so Calgary. Police service says that they own Stingray. Winnipeg please services they own a singer and Vancouver. Police have said that their law enforcement partners have operated it operated on for them. What kinds of data can this capture? The police are pretty clear that the devices that they owned do not capture private communications. So they're not capturing your text messages or phone calls or emails anything like that. It also is not capturing your name or your telephone number. What it is capturing is an identifier associated with their cellphone. So the main one they're looking for is this I m s I number which is just as I said, it's a it's a number associated with your sim card identifies you to the network as you what do they do with that? How does this help? Actually, this a better question. How does this help in an investigation? We don't know all of the uses thing and all of the times they've used it. So as I said only some cases have come to light. And in the one that I know best which was a major drugs and guns case in Toronto in two thousand fourteen the police use because they're trying to do is figure out. So so, you know, drug dealers and gun runners and people like that often change their cell phones. So the police like them and use them because they can operate this thing at a location where suspect is and gather also gather all of the cell phone data in within range of that location. Public him pro everybody everybody within range of the device, including hopefully suspect, and then they followed us to another location. Do it again. And then you know, let's say to another time and other times they're finding the one number that is comment all of those locations, which they will then assume as the suspects empty number and then they get a warrant to connect. That number to that person's name, and the reason that they are doing this is because I mean, at least in the cases, I'm aware of these are usually big cases that involve wiretapping. So they are trying to make sure they know all of the cell phones and land lines that these their targets are using. So that they are wiretapping all of the numbers of their suspects. What happens to the rest of the data that they get? Well, they're using this machine from I'm assuming some of these are used in crowded public places. Yes, that's a really good question. The RCMP has said that when they capture all of us unique identifiers from all of your cell phones in a given location. They only so there's a person who's operating the device and they only pass on the suspects data to investigators. How do they know which one is the suspect by process of elimination their their funding the one number that's comment already the patients that they track the suspect to. And that's the number that they want. So now with the hundreds and sometimes thousands of other numbers that they capture of innocent bystanders who they're not looking for the have said that they keep that information sort of fire walled off from investigators. They securite in a location that you know, it's it's just away from the rest of the. Nothing bad will ever. Yeah. And they have they have said that they will destroy the the this data after any court cases finished after any appeals periods of finished. This is an interim policy developed by the so it's not a finalized policy. It's also not a law. It's a policies rate. It's something they've decided to do what they what they decided. How did you guys find out then that the Toronto police were using these devices so back in I believe it was twenty fifteen I was working on this topic with some of my colleagues, and we asked the Toronto police service do you own and do you use Stingray? And a spokesperson told us we do not own and do not use one of these devices. Then we put in a series of freedom of information requests with the Toronto police asking essentially for you know, anytime they had use it and a full two years later. We got information back that they had actually used. And it on five separate occasions. Okay. To them. They wouldn't tell us about because they were either before the courts are still under investigation. And the other one's range from like, a Bank robbery was missing persons. When was this big, drugs and guns case? But you know, so therefore was not true that the Trump had never used one of these devices. What was true is that they had always used the RCMP's devices in their investigation. Okay. So that was a year ago. So we reported that they said they never used it. They actually had in five separate occasions and just this past week when I was reading about the topic again, I thought okay? Well, we haven't really asked Toronto police in a little while if they if they own a device or asked him again, and they told me actually they had recently acquired one of these devices for

Toronto Rcmp Toronto Star Science Kate Allen Calgary Winnipeg Robbery AP Donald Trump Reporter Vancouver Fifteen Digit Two Years
A place where the travel ban doesnt matter

The Big Story

09:30 min | 1 year ago

A place where the travel ban doesnt matter

"Details. Tell me what it's like inside the library. What does it look like it's very sort of warm and inviting it's very small library. There's a main kind of children's reading room that's very brightly decorated. There's a sort of more kind of work like space that has some tables and and chairs and then computers for people to use. There's sort of a stacks area in the back of the library. And then there's like a main hallway, and that's basically, it's you know, there's wood paneling as an American. I was quite amused at there's a moose head on the wall, very true to form it's sort of has this Victorian feel but also very homey at the same time. And then of course, sort of like pretty innocuous on the ground. There's like this piece of black. I'm not sure if it's like electrical tape or actually just painted on. But it's this like thin black line, that's sort of cuts diagonally across the library. And that demarcates the. The international border. And so, you know, it's sort of almost like an afterthought, it's not really a formal marking and not I think also kind of represents that's this library like once you're in. There these borders. Kind of don't really matter that much and people can freely cross, and they don't really have any issues with that. How does this place even exist in two thousand eighteen given are sort of strong, borders, leaders and immigration law? These days, it seems like a total relic of the past it it really does feel that way. It felt to me like it was in this very tenuous situation. And that that it was a very fragile place. And I think that was obvious and the libraries attitude towards the visits, and in some of the interactions that I learned of as I was reporting this story, especially between US immigration authorities, and the Iranians the sense, I get is that it really depends on the agent and. There isn't like a set policy. One pair of sisters. I spoke to and who are in the story came there last September in the September. And we're we're actually blocked from going, and they were told that the reunions aren't allowed anymore, and then when a staff member invited them in for a tour because at that time the opera house was was having tours later that staff member was was chastised by border patrol. You know, I I heard a lot of stories that are also in the in the piece itself about border patrol agents trying to limit the visits to like twenty minutes to to prevent them from happening in other ways telling people they shouldn't be meeting there. I think when you're there when the is actually arrived there, it's it's hard to say no to them because they're usually like very sympathetic people. Are you know, some elderly parents some, you know, the young students even some children's sometimes come like the nieces and nephews of the students and so. There doesn't seem to be an easy universal policy. You know, we we did hear from a library staff member that both US and Canadian authorities had threatened to shut the library down over the visits. I should say that the Canadian authorities deny that and the Americans declined to respond to to our request for comments. But I had heard from, you know, people connected to the library, former board members just people sort of in the community that there was a lot of pressure that the library was facing over these visits. And it's it's not exactly clear to me, why the Canadians told me I I talked to RCMP basically, they have no problem with the visits. They say they're they're legal, and they don't have any fear of legal crossings because the area's very heavily surveilled. There's a lot of cameras around. So they they have a pretty good sense of who's going in and who's coming out. And you know, I put a lot of questions to the American thirties. They didn't answer they sort of pointed me to a general law against illegal crossings. But you know, there's no point in my story or any of the Iranians that I spoke to that indicates that they intended to legally cross they really just wanted to be at this library temporarily and then go back to where they came from. So I think that as long as the library itself remains open to people from Canada coming in without going through a port of entry that it would be very difficult to completely bar the visits from happening, and there's still this sort of grey zone. And you know, now we're into the winter. We don't like these visits are slowing down naturally anyway. And so it will be interesting to see if this continues when the weather gets nicer, and it's sort of more of the tourist season, Vermont and Quebec. But it it it's impossible to be there. And not sense kind of overall this overriding tension and not see it in the context of. The the US tightening its immigration laws and tightening its immigration policies in general, especially towards obviously people from Iran that very much sort of permeates the atmosphere when you're there, and and when you kind of talked to people about this issue to me, this entire story is just like a picture of a moment in time that you'll never be able to to recreate because we're like this nexus of changing immigration, and yet there's still these places that are like remnants of the relationship that we used to have I I mean, you know, for me, it was this was the story was important because I think like when the history of this era is written like, you know, you'll have the speeches you'll have the policies you'll have the executive orders. But how is the travel ban changing people's lives like that to me is an important question. And also, it's something that's really faded from the headlines and people don't really talk about much anymore because there's just so much other stuff happening. But it was the first thing that Trump did as president, and it was like a week after he. Took office that this happened. And it it's important, and it's like reverberated in thousands and thousands of people's lives. And and I just really wanted to sort of tell that story. And I don't think there's really anyone even in the story who's who even directly criticizes, the Trump administration, or or has any sort of partisan words or anything like that. But I do think you sort of get a very tangible sense of of the lengths that people will go to see each other and sort of what obstacles have now been put in their way. I remember walking around that library and picking out kids books to read or VHS movies to rent or whatever. And and not giving thought to anything about the US Canada border other than it's neat that there's a line on the floor, you know, and as a kid you would jump from back and forth on I'm in America. I'm in Canada. And there was no. But there was no thought back then of this being a heavily regulated border. I really think you know, that that's something that I kind of had some inkling of when I reported the story, and even when I published it, but hadn't thought a lot about there's this historian on Twitter. This guy Jacob remiss, and he was saying, you know, how these sort of spaces these kind of spaces that you can't really categorize that easily. How they mean different things different people when the US sort of starts to close down. It's very contested tradition of openness, and and the and the Canadians. I I don't really know enough about it. But my son says that the border is not as big of an issue to them as it is to the United States, especially after nine eleven I think that was a real turning point from when I talked to people seem like that was when you you could go from just from what you experience in your childhood that just sort of crossing and kind of saying hi to the border agent, but not really having to go through a formal process to what it is now which is. Like every single person has to show their passport and has to subject themselves to question, the questioning and possible searches or whatever it might be. And and these these like little areas are very rare, and maybe fading. I mean one one criticism I got a lot of both during the story. And when it came out was well now that, you know, you're publishing this it's going to end, and you know, there's not much I can say to that. I can't predict the future, and it's really not my position. So sort of try to ensure that something continues or doesn't continue. But, but there was very much that that anxiety among people that like if anyone finds out about this like our lives could change, and we we we won't be able to have this anymore. So it all just kind of felt very precarious and varies sort of fragile scientific maximum of you can't observe something. Like that without changing totally. Thank you so much for taking the time today. I really appreciate it. Oh, it's my pleasure. Thank you so much. Gonna tour body immigration reporter for Reuters. That was the big story brought to you by Scotia. I trade you can visit Scotia I trade dot com to start direct investing today, and you can visit the big story podcast dot CA for more from us. You can visit frequency podcast network dot com for more from our brother and sister shows if you're looking for something to listen to over the holidays, give them a shot. And of course, we're on social media at big story podcast on Twitter on Facebook on Instagram. And we are as always everywhere you get your podcasts. And please give us a rating give us a review, but us know what you think, I'm Jordan. He threatens thanks for listening. We'll talk to you after the holidays have a happy one.

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14 dead after Canadian junior hockey team bus crash

Weekend Programming

01:54 min | 2 years ago

14 dead after Canadian junior hockey team bus crash

"Seven ten w o r and terry mccreary and here's what's happening german police say several people are dead and dozens injured after a vandross a crowd earlier today in the western city of muenster the van driver is among the dead mixed martial arts vans are angry for a multitude of reasons following ufc star conor mcgregor arrest in brooklyn it was a wild scene at the barclay center on thursday the outspoken irish pugilist allegedly threw a fit and attacked a bus full of fighters leading to mcgregor's arrest now zero dasu came down from toronto to watch the event and says the outspoken irishman is selfish fighters that aren't gonna be able to fight not going to get the money for their own kids and families back home because of this one guy who's ego is through the roof as a result three flights were cancelled moses say do like his friend nausea from toronto wants a refund if there was a lawsuit we'd be involved as well because we paid for tickets we traveled james flippin for seven ten w o r police in canada say fourteen people are dead and another fourteen injured after a bus carrying a junior hockey team collided with a truck on friday night on a rural highway into scotch you on the rcmp says the bus was carrying the humboldt broncos to a game when it crashed early onstage as members on the scene was totally deal with those obviously the casualties and most importantly the injured to the hospitals rcmp inspector ted monroe and nypd officer is recovering after a suspect bit off part of his left middle finger james flippin has that police say the biter was arrested for criminal mischief originally then take into the six nine precincts in canarsie where the officer was trying to put them into a holding cell while the suspect resisted causing the male officer to fall that's when his finger was bitten causing them.

Muenster Brooklyn Barclay Center Toronto Moses Canada Rcmp Humboldt Broncos Canarsie Officer Terry Mccreary UFC Conor Mcgregor James Flippin Ted Monroe Nypd Seven Ten W
14 dead after Canadian junior hockey team bus crash

In The House with Ken and Jared

02:02 min | 2 years ago

14 dead after Canadian junior hockey team bus crash

"Factors not available in all states in canada a deadly crash has killed at least fourteen people on board a bus that was headed to a junior league hockey playoff game abc's todd ant has details transport truck friday night on a rural highway in schedule on canadian police say there are fourteen injured three of those injuries are in critical condition rcmp inspector ted monroe investigations early stages numbers on the scene we're still trying to deal with those obviously the casualties and most importantly injured to the hospitals police say the bus was carrying the humboldt broncos to a game when it crashed todd ant abc news a utah dad is working on his laundry game and feeding routine after his wife gave birth to quintuplets utah couple kamien schuyler scott already had two children and tried to have another for five years with some help from fertility experts they found out last year they were expecting quintuplets jamie scott gave birth to three girls and two boys at a phoenix hospital in march dad's schuyler scott says he's ready to turn their home into a diaper changing factory i read that by the chinese quince heard potty trained will change about thirty five thousand diapers so i will help i'm going to get really good at that i've i've gotten really good at laundry dave schreiber abc news babies are said to be in good health they'll be out of the hospital in a few weeks this is abc news hi it's jamie progressive's sorry pitchy progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates pricing coverage match limited by state law burn fat orlando lose up to thirty to forty pounds or more but absolutely.

Hockey Todd Ant Humboldt Broncos Schuyler Scott Jamie Scott Phoenix Hospital Jamie Progressive Canada Rcmp Ted Monroe Utah Forty Pounds Five Years
"rcmp" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"A bus carrying a canadian junior hockey league team involved in a terrible accident on a highway in the canadian province of saskatchewan the royal canadian mounted police reporting fourteen people have been killed fourteen others hurt three of them critically inspector ted monroe the rcmp says the crash involved the bus at a large truck semi trailer unit collided with a passer bus carrying members of the humble broncos the collision occurred on highway thirty five approximately thirty kilometers north tis down no word yet on how many of the dead are players the humboldt broncos were on their way to will play off game the players on the team all in their late teens or early twenties an official with the catch you on junior hockey league says he's been told the bus with tboned in texas meanwhile texas national guard helicopter headed south as the deployment of the national guard begins and under the authority of governor abbot this deployment has begun with the movement of equipment and troops let's brigadier general tracy norris of the texas national guard says initially the two hundred fifty texas guardsmen will assist in border patrol efforts with planning and control planning and commanded control arizona will deploy one hundred fifty guardsmen next week the policy known as catch and release for illegal immigrants on the border is coming to an end in a statement the white house says the president has signed the orders to end the practice in which border crossers are given a summons to appear later in court most of which are ignored facebook continuing to apologize for the data privacy scandal chief operating officer sheryl sandberg telling fox's dana perino we now that facebook we did not do enough to protect people's data i'm really sorry for that mark is really sorry for that and now we're taking very strong action to.

fox sheryl sandberg chief operating officer texas tboned ted monroe hockey dana perino saskatchewan facebook president white house arizona tracy norris official humboldt broncos rcmp thirty kilometers
Bus carrying Humboldt Broncos of Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League involved in fatal collision

Red Eye Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

Bus carrying Humboldt Broncos of Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League involved in fatal collision

"The new york yankees take on the baltimore orioles chris pitches today at one time on brother station six forty the hurricane it's world health week so thank you for raising money to cure kids a parasites here's grace with an update house born in africa and i had parasites i was scared by the medicine we're asking you to provide that cost only forty four cents about four million children die every year from the effects of parasites we want to get to a million children cured said the phone number still works on the radio station website still works please keep calling eight five forty four five forty four eight we've now thanks canadian police say this hour that fourteen people are dead fourteen injured three of those injuries are critical right now after a bus carrying a junior hockey team collided with a transport truck friday night on a rural highway schedule on rcmp inspector ted monroe says the number of dead and injured will continue to be monitored rescue effort jemaine ongoing and that remains are primarily focused at this time the rcmp says the bus was carrying the humboldt broncos to a game when it crashed troops are being deployed to the mexico border despite resistance from some governors brigadier general tracy norris of the texas national guard announcing late friday that her troops are following the commander in chief orders as of deployment will include command and control coordination cells and operational planning as requested in support of the federal entities already on the border in arizona about one hundred and fifty national guard members will deploy to the border next week on wall street the dow fell five hundred seventy two points todd ant abc news w r m f hd two choice calvin here for alpha impact windows and doors and look we struggle when hurricanes are heading our way what we watch hurricanes hit another state in the union why are you wrestling with the plywood in the metal panels and then having to take them all down when you could call.

York Yankees Baltimore Rcmp Humboldt Broncos Tracy Norris Arizona Calvin Orioles Africa Ted Monroe Mexico Texas
Cabinet, Ted Monroe and Obama discussed on Frontlines of Freedom

Frontlines of Freedom

02:10 min | 2 years ago

Cabinet, Ted Monroe and Obama discussed on Frontlines of Freedom

"It's all right here from abc news i'm tanya market analysts say investors are more worried about a trade war then week job data and it showed on wall street with the dow falling more than seven hundred points at one stretch on friday global markets have been battered since the president i announced plans to hit china with fifty billion dollars in tariffs if they charge us we charge them the same thing that's the way it's gotta be this week china fired back threatening fifty billion dollars in tariffs on american products everything from soybeans two cars to airplanes it could cost thousands of american jobs american farmers could be hit especially hard abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl at least seventy democrats and three republicans have asked president trump to fire epa director scott pruitt following a number of ethics complaints at the white house says it's waiting for a complete ethics investigation report we get more from abc's mary bruce mired in controversy epa administrator scott pruitt sat down with president trump in the oval office but the white house refuses to say what comes next no one other than the president has the authority to hire and fire members of his cabinet said decision that he'll make new questions about why two of pruitt's top aides got hefty raises even after the white house refused to sign off approved when he spoke with president trump discussed as agencies recent steps to roll back obama era fuel efficiency standards for cars and also fought for his job canadian police say several people are dead after a bus carrying a junior hockey team collided with a transport truck friday night on a rural highway in saskatchewan the rcmp says the bus was carrying the humble broncos to a game when it crashed rcmp inspector ted monroe says that caused the crash being investigated investigations early onstage as members on the scene and we're still trying to deal with those obviously the casualties officials have not yet confirmed the number of dead and injured you're listening to abc news hey my name's brand he ever make a change and then wonder why didn't they do this a long time ago that's what's happening for thousands of people with regard to their healthcare they're joining medishare and then they're wondering why didn't they already do.

Cabinet Ted Monroe Barack Obama Administrator Director Jonathan Karl Broncos Rcmp Saskatchewan Donald Trump Mary Bruce White House Scott Pruitt EPA Chief White House Corresponden ABC China President Trump Fifty Billion Dollars
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"It was difficult to sit there and to see it just uh it was it was disheartening to sit there and watch and as hurtful as it was to me to see these individuals step in front of a room and be this be looked at judged and discriminated upon based on the color of their skin and then therefore challenged by the defence i imagine it was just as uncomfortable for them and i i appreciate their their courage and their bravery to stand up in that place knowing that they were going to be judged and challenged it was disheartening to me as i know it probably was for them to trial might have been different had there been indigenous members on the jury well you know what that's that's a question that i think we all should be asking and the truth is we'll never know what will never know i'll never know but let's look at a few aspects of it do you think that the indigenous people on the jury would have heard the evidence differently would have would have seen the the the codes bushy and his friends and what they said and how they would they did and how they responded to to police they would have understood those reactions in different ways and and nonindigenous jury would absolutely absolutely i agree without wholeheartedly they would have possibly understood the intergenerational effects of colonisation and the the dish trust that indigenous people have with the rcmp with the judicial system and understanding the trauma that these youth must have faced when they were arrested onsite detained and asked to give a statement i think that definitely would have had implications upon and indigenous.

rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"We lining profile got somebody most of those people who interact with any they if he moves that he has the mentally ill that didn't want my daughter guilty people experience they have it they have a concern about if he's he's mentally so that's what we align in for some out also he'd been known could aplly the authorities say that they they do know him he is known to police in 2015 the rcmp investigated mr sherry floor at quote espousing extremist ideology i he was not charged on saturday police say they found an isis flag on a car windshield so this is what we do now the police are saying know anything about his background where he came from when he came when he came from somalia and what family he has here he has no family hair members of key amendments on fellow fatah what we learn in from an order of those people who i mean what are we learning from the people who will familiar with him fulfill foty very difficult to get him uh in baghdad on if it wished and he had asked if you're saying that this this mr sharif issar was what you've been able to learn is that he had no family here he seemed to have no connections he's not known to anybody that just kind of they got understanding they think he had mental problems how would you describe perhaps how he was living what may have been his life before he made this violent move.

rcmp somalia fatah baghdad mr sharif issar mr sherry