35 Burst results for "Rcmp"

Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

Native America Calling

01:29 min | 6 months ago

Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

"The royal canadian mounted police has confirmed. They have been investigating allegations of sexual abuse at a former residential school in manitoba as dan carpenter chuck reports. The investigation has been ongoing for more than a decade. The large-scale criminal investigation was launched in two thousand eleven into allegations of sexual abuse at the ford alexander. Residential school officers traveled to ottawa to review archives of the school and to the manitoba archives. For historical information they ended up interviewing more than seven hundred people across america in the search for potential victims or witnesses since then rcmp officers have compiled a total of seventy five victim and witness statements. Here's dan vandal. The federal minister of northern affairs. The i think the fact that there's an ongoing investigation is Is something that that is is is justified. And we know that there were crimes committed the ford alexander residential school operated from nineteen zero five to one thousand nine hundred seventy it was built on the ford alexander reserve which is now the sad king i nation last week. The first nation began searching the former school site for any unmarked graves. Police say they will not be. Providing any further information about their investigation meanwhile rcmp in saskatchewan of opened an investigation into a death that is alleged to have taken place at a children's home which was not recognized as a residential school but which housed former matey and first nation students for national native news. I'm dan carpenter took

Rcmp Dan Carpenter Chuck Manitoba Alexander Dan Vandal Ford Ottawa America Saskatchewan Dan Carpenter
"rcmp" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

01:53 min | 8 months ago

"rcmp" Discussed on The Big Story

"Jordan heath. rowling's this is the big story. Brent jolly is the president of the canadian association of journalists one of those organizations leading this charge hebron jordan. How's it going. It's going really well. What's going on right now. Near port renfrew in british columbia. Yeah so what's been going on is there's an old growth forest in the in the ferry creek watershed And there's a logging or forestry company called he'll jones that's looking to do logging in the area So the supreme court granted them in order. Which sort of allows the rcmp. Brought.

Brent jolly hebron jordan british one Jordan heath. rowling canadian columbia court jones
Canadian police discriminated against mother of slain Indigenous man, watchdog says

Native America Calling

01:40 min | 10 months ago

Canadian police discriminated against mother of slain Indigenous man, watchdog says

"Independent watchdog for the royal canadian mounted police found that the force racially discriminated against the mother of an indigenous man who was killed in two thousand sixteen has down carpenter reports. The twenty two year old was killed by a white farmer in saskatchewan. The incident took place during the summer of two thousand sixteen colton. Bucci was shot and killed when an suv. He was writing in traveled onto the property of gerald stanley. Near biggar saskatchewan stanley was charged with second degree murder. He was acquitted by a jury in two thousand and eighteen. He had testified that he fired warning shots and that his gun just went off an independent review found. Rcmp officers acted hurtful e when they informed bush's mother debbie battiste of his death when she had broke down in tears. They told her to get it together and questioned whether she had been drinking. They smelled her breath in searched her home. The complaints commission said on a second occasion they inappropriately visited bush's wake to update his mother. On the case. Perry belgarde the national chief of the assembly of first nations says the ruling by the complaints commission brought a sense of vindication for debbie baptiste. But she did say she experienced racism and discrimination. In nobody would believer the rcmp dismissed it but this independent oversight body proved it. They treated her with racism and discrimination and she persevered through that and now that we know that the big question is how do we fix. It has implemented almost all of the recommendations that stemmed from the reviews. Prime minister justin trudeau said the way the bucci family was treated was unacceptable. And the lawyer for the mother. Debbie baptiste says. Systemic racism underlines the entire case for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Gerald Stanley Saskatchewan Stanley Royal Canadian Mounted Police Debbie Battiste Bucci Rcmp Colton Perry Belgarde Saskatchewan Complaints Commission Bush Debbie Baptiste Assembly Of First Nations Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Dan Carpenter
Men have vanished on Vancouver Island. What happened to them?

The Big Story

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Men have vanished on Vancouver Island. What happened to them?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Laura palmer is a veteran reporter and broadcaster rate. Now she is the host of island crime which launches season two on the frequency. Podcast network on monday. Hello laura hey jordan. Why don't we start before we get to the general topic violent crime and and how you ended up in this business in the first place who are the gone boys so In in this series. I focus on half a dozen stories. there are more but I'm i'm focusing on these guys. For a few reasons. They are men between the ages of fourteen to fifty who have disappeared in recent years from vancouver island and when i say disappeared i mean. They're just gone. They all have a few things in common. And one of the main things is that they have some measure of disability or trauma in their lives and they all are known to be not if not exactly loners guys who spend a lot of time alone and spend a lot of that time walking or biking along the highway on vancouver island and so while there are a number of other men currently missing on vancouver island. These are the men that i focused on in the series men. Who have those things in common. Why did you tell the stories of those men in particular. So i learned. Crime is something. I started last year and in the first season of violent crime i was telling the story of a young indigenous women who had gone missing from the community of nanaimo in two thousand in two and in my research on her story i joined a number of different groups here on the island of that are focused on crime and missing people and that sort of thing and once i was part of these communities. I noticed number of people asking the question. Why isn't anyone talking about the missing men. Where are the missing men. And this was something. I saw popping up in virtually every group i was part of and so of course i was curious about those stories and when i started digging around i found that sure enough there were these cases out there that had received really very little attention there. Was you know one or two stories that had been written about these cases. But you know with some of these men. There hadn't even been a single story done and some of these guys aren't even Featured on the rcmp's website. So i felt like there hasn't been much attention. Paid and i guess the other thing i would say on. This point is You know i. I was a journalist in vancouver in the late. Nineteen ninety s when women were going missing from vancouver's downtown eastside. And i remember a similar kind of thing happening where people from the downtown eastside community family and friends of these women. Were you know trying to get people to pay attention and what was happening. Was the you know the police the authorities were saying. Look these women. are you know leading lifestyles. That are chaotic. And there's nothing unusual about them being missing being off the grid and so police the public the media were all kind of not

Vancouver Island Jordan Heath Rawlings Laura Palmer Laura Jordan Nanaimo Vancouver Rcmp
"rcmp" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Animal attack on pne, Makino solace and moving a muscle men. A monastery. Emotional mental, the RCMP. Okay, see you. Oh, why don't you tell me before that Marshall Marshall Marshall? Intense. So anyways, uh, e, uh, you know, saying, Hey, Z e. That pull those bullet holes were better my side one a certain issues soon, his muscles loveless keep know better. Mr A Square falls easy by lack Is me cardio to be in their mother touches and healthy habits. Orlando Condo, calm Third Uncle me to say that American commits a giant city in target. Let's salute the total says Mr Maximum. Clearly, that forest are carrying mosquitoes Susan must carry to our final roster at the mustard are miscarriages. He wanted to protect heaven. Mr Keeper does lose Dia's limpy Emma's last and a separate from the data. Campinas Caritas canasta. This place together was so Require that Quintus could Mr Services the controversy is in contact. Com ADR I've up in trickle, Miss Madea Cream, a sinister seem liquid and a simple Lauren's Gonna Seamus and targeting took home diagonal. A bull's eye view here. The Greater Orlando Honda. Nissan. Mazda is nobody's passport. Minos Money home, Siddiqui and, Well, you see a young couple days Most Sanders Center Figaro's Rykiel. I gotta call Jennifer to value. You won't forgive me and to all a regular mommy only associate Make it Go vandalism.

Marshall Marshall Marshall Mr Maximum Campinas Caritas canasta Mr Keeper Mr Services Orlando Condo RCMP Miss Madea Cream Jennifer Makino Minos Money Mazda vandalism Siddiqui Nissan Honda Susan Lauren Emma Dia
Lobster Fishing Dispute, Oregon Forest Rights and Tribal Early Voting Sites

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Lobster Fishing Dispute, Oregon Forest Rights and Tribal Early Voting Sites

"This. Is National Native News I'm Meghan Camera Imprint Tony Gonzales. Confrontations continue between indigenous and non-indigenous lobster fishermen in Nova Scotia. Canada senior police officer is defending the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Response Dan Carpet Chuck has more the MP Commissioner Brenda. Lucky says, the RCMP is fully committed to keeping the peace keeping people safe and enforcing the law. She also confirmed that additional officers have been dispatched to Nova. Scotia there have been violent confrontations, property destroyed vandalism and lobster plant burned to the ground that after indigenous fishermen. Out of season claiming it was their treaty right to fish whenever and wherever they want a right that was upheld by Canada's highest court twenty years ago that first nations had a right to fish to earn a moderate livelihood but not indigenous fishermen auto ought to stop the indigenous harvesting saying that court ruling also said the government could continue to regulate the fishery an emergency session in the. Canadian parliament earlier this week failed to find a solution to the issue of just what is a moderate livelihood the chief this having Equity First Nation Mike sack says the dispute has caused his band more than one and a half million dollars and is fishermen are being shut out of the market. Nobody will deal with us like we reach out to so many trying to move lobster. Anyone could buy with a buyer's licence and nobody will take him so. We have a at least one and a half million dollar hit through our community are we can't sell our lobster Everyone in the area has been told that they will not take care if they take lobster. They'll be they'll boycott or blackness to sack says, it will take time to rebuild relationships in the industry with people in companies who are now afraid of retaliation if they deal with the indigenous fishermen sack says, he wants those responsible to be held accountable. He's also filed an application for a court injunction aimed at any harassment of indigenous fishermen with fleet is based for National Native News I'm Dan. Carpenter. A, native American tribe in Oregon has become the first in the US to receive full authority to manage its forests Kale CC's Brian. Bull reports the Bureau of Indian Affairs approved the Co Quell Tribes Indian Trust. Asset Management Plan Tuesday this grant autonomy over its ten thousand acres of trust forest land and resources a first for any of the country's five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribes. Mark Johnston is executive director for the Co Quell Indian tribe we're. Just really excited about the opportunity to be I. WE respect the burden at that creates going I because you better do it right? You mess it up for those folks that come behind you. We know we're not going to be the only tribe that considers because of the value promise hopping perspective sovereignty or self-governance as a longstanding goal for tribes and timber is an important resource for the CO Quayle Johnston says annual revenue support, key programs including tribal healthcare and. Education for National Native News I'm Brian Bowl a federal judge ruled Thursday that he will not force the Pima County recorder to establish an early voting site in southern Arizona tribes reservation next week, and Gibson with Arizona public media has more the past Gliac he tribes sued Pima County. Recorder, F.. N.. Rodriguez. In an effort to reinstate in early voting site, her office closed in two thousand, Eighteen Jonathan D. as part of the tribes legal team, he says though this. Isn't. The result they wanted he knows tribal leaders will continue to advocate for voting opportunities in the reservation members of the we often tribe testified. I really highlighted the burdens and the obstacles that tribal members face in accessing early voting without honor closer to the reservation during the hearing the tribe argued that with lower car ownership distrust of voting by mail in higher rates of underlying conditions, and early in person voting site in the reservation would benefit its residents. For National Native News I'm Emma Gibson. I'm Megan Camera.

Nova Scotia Quayle Johnston Canada Jonathan D. Co Quell Tribes Indian Trust Emma Gibson Pima County Mike Sack Tony Gonzales Royal Canadian Mounted Police Rcmp Arizona Commissioner Brenda Nova Megan Camera Bureau Of Indian Affairs Officer Oregon Vandalism Harassment
The Lummi Nation is withdrawing from a COVID-19 vaccine trial conducted by AstraZeneca

Native America Calling

03:50 min | 1 year ago

The Lummi Nation is withdrawing from a COVID-19 vaccine trial conducted by AstraZeneca

"This is national native news make an camera in for Antonio Gonzalez, a Montana County has agreed to open a satellite voting office on the black feet nation in settlement of a lawsuit by the tribe Mt. PR's Aaron Bolton reports Jacqueline de Leon is a staff attorney for the colorado-based native American Rights Fund, which helped the bike, the nation file, a case in federal court last week after the. Tribe requested that Array County. Opened a satellite voting office on the reservation. The tribe argued failure to do so would violate federal and State Law de Leone says the county has now read to open a satellite office in heartbeat on. October, nineteenth settling the case we were worried and have been worried that the move to vote by mail was going to disenfranchise native Americans because we know that. Vote by mail in Indian country. We know that lots of people don't get residential mail delivery under a county election officials declined to comment on the case. Di Leone says the native American. Rights Fund also helped the Fort Pack and Northern Cheyenne Tribes Negotiate with Roosevelt Big Horn, and Rosebud. Counties. She says that all three counties were offering in person voter services off reservation according to de. Leon all three counties have now agreed to open satellite offices on the reservations for national native news I'm Erin Bolton. A first nations leader in Atlantic Canada is calling on the prime minister to help settle a lobster dispute as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports confrontations in the Nova Scotia, lobster fishery have become increasingly more violent. Now, indigenous leaders are asking for more protection from police against targeted attacks by nonindigenous lobster fishers police say there were about two hundred people present during violent clashes near lobster pounds one van was set on fire. The dispute began after indigenous lobster fishers say they exercise their? Treaty rights to fish outside the federally regulated fishing season. The chief of this epoch attack first nation Mike sack says they have a right to fish for a moderate livelihood where and when they want and that's based on a Supreme Court ruling from twenty years ago sack says during the confrontation police were on site but did nothing to intervene I've also sent a letter off to a prime minister and hoping that him from they're not sure where to go with IT A. Number of community members throughout Nova Scotia Canada are willing to come in and protect our equal. Or we're not looking to add any fuel to the fire. So we're open the RCMP can just help come in. Charge what was wrong doing the chief says his council has also decided to take legal action against those who are interfering with his bands lobster fishery. In Ottawa Indigenous Services Minister Mark Miller called the violence unacceptable. He says, it's important to get both sides to the table to talk about exactly what is a moderate livelihood for the Magma for National Native News I'm Dan Carpenter Chuck. The LemMe Indian Business Council said this week that the LEMme nation is withdrawing from covid nineteen vaccine trial conducted by Astra Zeneca leader said, there were ongoing communication challenges with officials at the pharmaceutical company which had put its trial on hold following adverse reactions among some volunteers. The Lemme end the Navajo nation faced some backlash from tribal members participating in the trial according to Indian country today that's because of a fraud history of medical procedures and outside research conducted on Indigenous People Lemme nation medical director Dr Dakota Lane said Native Americans face greater risk from covid nineteen but are rarely included and testing vaccines and medications, which is a disadvantage to determining whether they're effective in native populations. LemMe Business Council. Chairman Lawrence Solomon said they would explore whether future trials are safe and appropriate for tribal members for national. Native, News. I'm Megan Camera.

American Rights Fund Jacqueline De Leon Di Leone Dan Carpenter Chuck Array County Prime Minister Mike Sack Antonio Gonzalez LEM Lemme Indian Business Council State Law De Leone Montana County Aaron Bolton Ottawa Indigenous Services Mark Miller Megan Camera Rcmp MT
Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

"Alan Adam is no longer facing criminal charges. The elbert first nations leader was charged in March after RCMP officers violently arrested him. When news of the incident became public a few weeks ago, many people including the prime minister were shocked by what the police had done. A DASH CAM video recorded by the RCMP shows an officer tackling chief Adam. He punches him and puts him in a chokehold leaving his face bloodied. Today chief Adam was cleared of any wrongdoing. The officers are under investigation by Alberta's police

Alan Adam Rcmp Officer Prime Minister Alberta
Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

"The death toll rises in a weekend shooting in Canada the royal Canadian Mounted Police say the suspect was shot and later died on Sunday authorities did not provide further details or give a motive for the killings prime minister Justin Trudeau says investigators are still working on the case there is still a tremendous investigation going on by the RCMP right now there are many many different sites many different questions that a lot of people have the dead included elementary school teacher to health care workers a family of three a veteran and a

Canada Royal Canadian Mounted Police Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Rcmp School Teacher
Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

Doug Stephan

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Canada mass shooting victims ID'd as death toll rises

"The death toll rises in a weekend shooting in Canada the royal Canadian Mounted Police say the suspect was shot and later died on Sunday authorities did not provide further details or give a motive for the killings prime minister Justin Trudeau says investigators are still working on the case there is still a tremendous investigation going on by the RCMP right now there are many many different sites many different questions that a lot of people have the dead included elementary school teacher to health care workers a family of three a veteran and a

Canada Royal Canadian Mounted Police Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Rcmp School Teacher
"rcmp" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Six six ninety right I he is Carlene I'm Gerry McNamara although in some other news out there the R. C. M. P. in Canada described the mass killings carried out by a gunman in Nova Scotia this weekend as tragic and incomprehensible police said at least sixteen people are dead including a twenty three year veteran of the RCMP the suspected shooter is also dead this coming from CBC in Canada Nova Scotia RCMP responded to numerous nine one one calls about a gun related incident late Saturday night in the small community of port of peak in Nova Scotia police said at a news conference late Sunday afternoon that they found several casualties inside and outside a residence but no suspect police secure the area and began to search that led to multiple sites in the area including structures on fire they eventually pursued the suspect across several Nova Scotia communities the province's police watchdog the serious incident response team name the village of I don't even know how to pronounce it to her sure but I caught day as a site of a serious criminal event crimes were scattered over at least fifty kilometers people said the suspect used his gun during the rampage but may have used other methods methods as well RCMP commissioner Brenda lucki said late Sunday night the death toll had risen to at least seventeen that includes the gunmen the only named victim so far as CM RCMP a veteran constable Heidi Stevenson who police said was killed Sunday morning responding to the incident the mother the married mother of two had been with the force for twenty three years police said the male a male RCMP officer was among those injured but did not release his name he said civilian casualties appeared to be at least partially random Gabriel workmen fifty one years of age is suspected to be the lone person involved in the rampage Gaber workman is listed as a denture wrist in the dark by the courting to the denture society of Nova Scotia website of suspect photo issued by the RCMP matches video footage of a man being interviewed about dentures by CTV Atlantic back in twenty fourteen wow so there is where we know the the the the chase eventually made its way to one of Nova Scotia's biggest highways and ended near gas station about thirty five kilometers from Halifax for police officer shot workmen the news release Sunday night said that he had died at the scene there were at least a half dozen these vehicles at the gas station now the suspect was wearing all or part of their RCMP officers uniform huh and for part of the incident was driving a mock up made to look like an RCMP vehicle planning that certainly speak to would not be in a random act right well it takes a lot of planning I don't know how long it would take to modify that vehicle but died and and then on top of that to get I don't know if it was part of the uniform they didn't really did they say it was part of uniform or are just basic made they say like you know they they are they gonna former made it look like way either way either one could have been manufactured maybe but the the whole idea that is with a ton of planning the R. C. M. time the RCMP said the killings appear to be in part very random in nature and that some of the victims appeared to have no relationship with him at all but but they don't know an exact death toll because there were so many crime scenes the RCMP said they didn't know what the final death toll will be it's unclear how many people were injured except at least there were two and the details the the circumstances around workman's death are still incomplete there was that report though that that he was such a shot fox news calling it the deadliest attack of its kind inside that car inside Canada while in history wow mmhm well just just but you know just completely and totally you know bizarre yeah in our area we had a Dallas area rapid transit bus that was that was hijacked and the first thing when that was breaking we were I was thinking well why would someone hi Jack a Dallas area rapid transit rapid transit bus and it turns out that the suspect they said who was shot and killed two officers by the way were wounded and expected to be okay one of Dallas police officer in the other was a or or Dallas area police officer the other a Dallas area rapid transit officer that was wounded the suspect was shot and killed turns out the suspect was also suspected in the slaying of his girlfriend so it seems the the hijacking was a desperation essentially to try and flee one RCMP commissioner said they believe there was an initial motivation that then turned into random that's right we don't know for sure yeah and we're gonna do a lot of work and finding out the motivational lot of background lot of profiling type events analog crime scene processing mmhm said she doesn't believe that terrorism was a factor here in in in this particular shooting at will we'll keep you updated on it and was always our thoughts go out to all of our Canadian friends up there and we know we have a lot of listeners from Canada yeah and we've always appreciated their input to the show and we know it's a it's a it's a time a shocking cannon just lecture with thinking of you mmhm in other news an organized protest group rather than a gather in northern San Diego county on Sunday to demonstrate what they call local government over reach and responding to the cove in nineteen pandemic the protest held about twenty five miles north of San Diego he must in a week after the city council closed the coastal rail trail and the pedestrian portion of south highway one on one to ensure compliance with the order for social distancing city officials said understanding that are recreating it is important for the mental Jimmy recreation I got a response wrong is important for mental as well as physical health the city encourages residents to run or walk within their own neighborhoods but to do so safely with the amounts of the current orders look that's one of the things that really came out this weekend people are saying wait a minute doesn't make any sense to keep people from being outside we understand congregating and everything else but Hey if people are outside odds are they're not going to spread the virus right well and and and again we have to honestly we have to reset this whole thing of people being able to to go out and do things be outdoors first of all for moral purposes if nothing else so that people don't go stir crazy beyond that there's a benefit to it there's a great benefit to and the benefit outweighs what from what we know right now outweighs the risk and that's what you're looking for people need to be need to remain as healthy as possible part of that includes exercise being able to get outside then I you know watching the protests over the weekend we said this a few weeks ago people are going to get it's gonna get beyond stir crazy it's going to be about limiting their behavior the government's not gonna be able to limit their behavior for long well we said there will be because this is something that is in pain national locked down it's always done by governors or mayors or judges depending on you know where you live in the United States and there was going to be over reach and we said expected there was going to be over reach involved here and expect that politics is not going to die we hear this all the time what we need to all get together now all you do is see Nancy Pelosi I'm you know on with Chris Wallace yesterday you knew that wasn't going to be the the you know the the the case for saying that that you know good trump and others initiating and when she was asked about will you you're telling people it was OK to visit the China districts you know China town in in San Francisco you said it was okay well no I was just talking about trying to stop racism because of of the things that were said that that led to the targeting of Asian and that's ridiculous yeah I was a little out right lied by Nancy Pelosi the other thing is when she said I give Donald Trump and apps mmhm well if you talk to the governor of your own state you know we sure were saying the same thing about New York we've done this without any federal cooperation Cuomo has come on said every time they needed help or need to talk to trump or whatever he or pens were there and they came through for them but I mean without cooperation I mean it's just it's about any federal crime operation yeah if if you want to sit there and say okay let's judge trump from an aide to we see you can have a discussion on it yes we can always do that right away it's not over yet so let's be careful it's not great before the testing is done right but it but just sit there and say and after he doesn't cooperate at all with that well that's ridiculous but democratic governors had said how cooperative the federal government and specifically trump has banned cried so I mean the politics being played with that we know said look we said it wasn't going to end we said it was scorched earth a couple of months ago will continue to be scorched earth no matter what happened it would continue to be scorched earth and you know you may sit there and say well politics should be played will of course is played yep every day of course played every day yep and the fact of the matter is is that you know the governors of the two biggest blue states don't want to be governors during a massive massive recession they want to they want people to go back to work they also want people to be safe they have the same interests that the federal government or by the way anybody else in their right mind should have and they don't have to lie can you imagine if if Gavin Newsom and said that then she wants Nancy get away with it Chris Wallace lying about what the press saying the president actually said something about people targeting Asian Americans stopped her right there Chris that's a flat out lie and ask her for the quote when did he say that you have a responsibility to stop the line if she wants to say her great of his of of his performance is an F. that's one thing the flat out lie and say that the president's strides something that encouraged people to go out and target Asian Americans ages fall and a flat out lie stating that she wasn't at all encouraging people to go out right it was simply about racism was another flat out lie and everybody knows it that that's the the the tough thing that they have you know we're trying to convince people may have convinced a significant number of people that trump didn't act in time it's some of the same people that were saying that trump is a racist for banning travel from China and from Europe yes you know it's it's just I it isn't saying that we we allow that kind of behavior and that we have to have these discussions and they're allowed to happen you know it's it's not Chris Wallace didn't have control of his own show on Sunday morning and he should have if you want to get in we do have a line open would love to hear from you eight six six ninety eight right out.

"rcmp" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Has the buyers dot com at work more and more testing I'm Paul Stevens fox news president trump saying the U. S. has passed a major corona virus testing milestone America continues to make steady progress in our war against the virus as of today we've tested four point one eight million Americans that's a record anywhere in the world Mr trump Sunday night at the White House the U. S. recording over forty thousand covert nineteen deaths and just over seven hundred fifty nine thousand confirmed cases so far meantime governors across the country forming regional coalitions deciding when to re open their economies amid the corona virus outbreak some protests though in the Midwest Michigan democratic governor Gretchen Whitmer for Michigan right now has the third highest number of deaths from cold at nineteen and yet were the tenth largest state we are have a disproportionate problem in the state of Michigan and so we can take the same kinds of actions other states have but it doesn't rise to the challenge were confronted and that's precisely why we have to take a more aggressive stance it's working governor Whitmer on NBC's meet the press Canadian police saying seventeen people including a lone gunman are dead after a shooting rampage across the province of Nova Scotia that started Saturday night the suspect engaging in a twelve hour rampage one police officer among the victims another officer was hurt no motive yet for the attack Canada's worst mass murder in the nation's history police say the suspect apparently dressed up as an RCMP officer and randomly targeted individuals a massive storm being predicted for parts of Alabama into the morning hours Henschel is gonna be kind of confined near the Gulf coast where the still warm moist air and better instability it's existing overnight castanet now's there at the national storm prediction center America is listening to fox news right now there is a lot to consider when selling a home home equity is high housing inventory is down and interest rates are at an all time low but will the uncertainty of current world news drag down the whole market you need answers and that's why you should call the area's real estate authorities Serra and Debbie Reynolds the Reynolds team with Keller Williams realty just one five minute.

Henschel RCMP Midwest Michigan president Paul Stevens Keller Williams realty Debbie Reynolds Serra Gulf coast trump Alabama murder Canada officer Nova Scotia NBC Michigan Gretchen Whitmer
"rcmp" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Was made to look like an RCMP police cruiser police say the shooter was identified as Gabriel Wortman he was also killed governor Pritzker says there's nothing magic about the April thirtieth date to pasta Lee and the states stay at home order he says the magic number is really when the number of coronavirus cases peak telling WGN's Pete McMurray his team is evaluating lots possibility looking at the entire state in regions in cities and counties to try to determine which areas are the real hot spots which areas you know are are not as big a concern the governor is also teaming up with other midwestern governors to look at how to reopen the economy safely during Sunday's press briefing Illinois health director Dr Ngozi ZK said that while the vast majority of people who contract covert nineteen virus do recover it's important stay vigilant in protecting those most vulnerable I don't want to just be the agents of doom and gloom people do recover from this disease but we still have to have a special eye for the people who will have a harder courses U. K. reporting Sunday that there were one thousand one hundred ninety seven new cases of covert nineteen and thirty three new deaths since Saturday afternoon president trump beginning his coronavirus task force briefing on Sunday with an update on ongoing negotiations with Democrats for the next phase of relief spending president says a deal could be reached as soon as Monday we're continuing to negotiate with the Democrats to get our great workers and small businesses all over the country taking care of corona virus has exposed some issues and the nation's food chain and dairy supply chains we get that story from ABC's Brian Clark food banks in the US have seen long lines and heavy use but at the same time dairy farmers have had to throw away their products why it all comes down to supply chain that's Dr Barbara Jones director of the southwest regional dairy center at Tarleton university in Texas she tells a story full video diary how those supply chains have been affected by that are directed for the small part that we tell people they can not all the time with them one day be changed over to you gallon jug Brian Clark ABC news university of illinois' allowed medical students to graduate early as the need for health care workers has increased amid corona virus outbreak graduating students also had to find out where they were accepted for the residences online which is referred to as match day one two hundred people upset over the shelter at home orders in Indiana testing outside the state mansion of governor Holcomb this weekend Holcomb said a stay at home order that expires Monday will be extended to may first while he works on a plan to re open businesses because of the corona virus there was no gathering Sunday to mark twenty five years since the Oklahoma City bombing when a truck bomb blew up the mirror federal building killing a hundred and sixty eight instead the Oklahoma City national memorial museum posted a video in at the current Oklahoma City mayor David Holt stood near the memorial to the victims and spoke about how that sacred place symbolizes what happens when hate leads people down what he calls a dark past this sacred places a sober.

RCMP
"rcmp" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"rcmp" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Verbal as we go through the rest of tonight under mainly clear skies with lows in the mid thirties sunshine to start on Monday but increasing clouds in the afternoon and breezy west southwest winds gusting up to thirty miles per hour bush highs into the lower sixties a cold front moving into the region during the evening hours brings a chance for scattered showers behind the front the winds turn out of the northwest to continued to be breezy once again with temperatures falling into the mid to upper thirties Tuesday will continue C. breezy northwest winds gusting up to thirty miles per hour and despite the sunshine we expect temperatures only make it to around fifty inland mid forties at the lake increasing clouds on Wednesday the winds again breezy but this time out of the southwest once more another has high is moving into the mid to upper sixties a Jefferson hit miss showers arrive during the evening hours a better chance for scattered showers this year for mainly cloudy Thursday when highs are expected in the upper fifties inland we look for lower fifties lakeside mainly cloudy on Friday partly sunny at times in a stray shower or two can't be ruled out look for lakeside temperatures near fifty but upper fifties are expected once more inland on Saturday mostly cloudy breezy with north northeast winds looks like a chance for some hit miss showers the start of the weekend highs in the mid fifties inland right around fifty however and lake front from the WGN weather center I'm meteorologist Mike Jansen the mother of two who is also a twenty three year veteran of the police force in Nova Scotia is among those killed in a shooting massacre on Sunday Canadian police say fifty one year old man opened fire at multiple locations police superintendent Chris leathers says at least ten people were killed but there might be more and the motive for the violence is so far unknown here's two men wearing if not all of them a portion of a police uniform and that we believe that he was struck while he was driving a one point a markup or a vehicle that was made to look like an RCMP police cruiser police say the shooter was identified as Gabriel Wortman he was also killed governor Pritzker says there's nothing.

Jefferson Mike Jansen Nova Scotia Chris leathers Gabriel Wortman governor Pritzker bush WGN superintendent RCMP
Canadian police say at least 10 people are dead after a shooting rampage across Nova Scotia

Snap Judgment

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Canadian police say at least 10 people are dead after a shooting rampage across Nova Scotia

"At least ten people are dead in a mass shooting in Nova Scotia Canada today including a royal Canadian Mounted Police officer Emma Jacobs reports the rampage took place over twelve hours and across several communities chief superintendent Chris leather with the RCMP said police first responded to nine one one call Saturday night the national research for the suspect led to multiple sites in the area including structures that were on fire the search continued overnight and into the morning he said the gunmen who dressed as an RCMP officer it was dead after an hours long manhunt crossing several jurisdictions his victims included Heidi Stevenson a veteran police officer police identified the gunman as fifty one year old Gabriel

Nova Scotia Canada Emma Jacobs Chris Leather Rcmp Officer Heidi Stevenson Gabriel Superintendent
Several dead in Nova Scotia shooting rampage

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Several dead in Nova Scotia shooting rampage

"At least ten people including a police officer have been killed in a shooting rampage on Canada's east coast province of Nova Scotia as a carpenter reports authorities say the gunman is also among the dead police say the gunman's twelve hour rampage began Saturday evening in the community of port of peak Nova Scotia twenty three year old Heidi Stevenson a member of the RCMP was killed when she responded to an active shooter incident another officer was wounded when police arrived they found several casualties inside and outside the home witnesses in the area also said they have seen at least three houses on fire police identified the gunman as fifty one year old Gabriel Wortman saying he was armed and dangerous and that he was driving an RCMP vehicle and dressed as an

Officer Canada Nova Scotia Heidi Stevenson Rcmp Gabriel Wortman
"rcmp" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"XFL all day is their season canceled I don't I don't I don't know exactly what they're doing the other big one locally this weekend the RCMP Grand Prix yeah no fans in attendance does spectator right their cries been this last press update he's concerned with people gathering around the area so he's gonna have an ordinance to kind of let the boys gonna get people all around I'm not let them gather around an invalid scores coming up next week yeah no fantasy in there either no no fans and and I think I know we have the mayor on we have mehr caster on last night I asked her about WrestleMania and I know they're kind of holding off on making a decision there but that's the beginning April I'll be again I've said this a couple times I'd be surprised if WrestleMania happened here in the Tampa Bay area eight it's just the way this has been trending and you know we we told you last week we've been telling you for a while now there are going to be domino's are going to start to fall when it comes to this corona virus outbreak and now we're really starting to send the everything is it not of apples to apples comparison blight the last time this happened I think was nine eleven yeah a lot of people are comparing it beats out easily a much different situation I just like the the general feeling of the law as we know with the United States yes just stopping on track and this is it like this is all anybody is talking about this is all the media is covering this is all and it's not just you know what you see on TV what you hear on the radio this is what people are talking about in their everyday lives because it's really starting to impact people in a number of different ways we've got so much more to get to we have some audio from the president I want to get to today we have some audio from Dr Anthony found sheet that I wanna make sure we get to today Morgan's got a list of stories I've got tons of stuff Felix has been covering state local news related to corona virus all throughout the day and will open up the phone lines two and get a sense as to how your being impacted or you already being impacted one way or another has the corona virus outbreak has it changed your life in any way at the moment eight hundred nine six nine ninety three fifty two the number eight hundred nine six nine ninety three fifty two and I'll be real honest with you I have no interest in taking calls from people who think this is like no big deal and it's a giant overreaction and all that kind of stuff so that's like your whole thing don't bother I I really do that we're not going there tonight but if you for whatever reason whether through your job or through a variety of different ways have had something now that's been interrupted because of corona virus we would like to hear.

RCMP
Protesters block trains, as police arrest 33 people opposing Canada gas pipeline. South Dakota rejects tribal IDs for voter registration. Tribal leaders, and New Mexico government officials celebrate Native American Day

Native America Calling

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Protesters block trains, as police arrest 33 people opposing Canada gas pipeline. South Dakota rejects tribal IDs for voter registration. Tribal leaders, and New Mexico government officials celebrate Native American Day

"Demonstrations were held across Canada over the weekend as tensions rise over a gas asked pipeline in British Columbia. Dan Carpenter has more in Toronto. It in Belleville Ontario protesters forced suspension of passenger rail service. They were in support of the. What suet in first nation after six members were arrested in northern British Columbia Royal Canadian Mounted Police moved in to enforce an injunction against the nation's hereditary chiefs and their supporters that what suet opposed to the six point six billion dollar coastal gasoline slink pipeline the hereditary chiefs say? The project has no authority without their consent and the Ontario protesters came out to back them. The RCMP is in the midst of an invasion of. What's who attend territory? They've been dragging plan defenders from their own territory which legally they don't have jurisdiction over meanwhile L. in British Columbia police continue to make arrests during the weekend. Tensions remain high and more arrests are expected as protesters continue trying to block the pipeline as contractors. Was it to get back to the site of the pipeline area to restart their work. At the end of December. The Provincial Supreme Court issued the injunction against the nation that was blocking the access to the project and empowered police to enforce it for National Native News. I'm Dan Carpenter in the South Dakota Legislature House. Republicans are rejecting adding an amendment that would add tribal. Id's as a valid identification to register to vote lease drooping A.. Reports current state law allows those they driver's license licensed to register to vote. Or someone can register to county. Auditor's office and sign an affidavit house. Democrats brought an amendment to include tribal. Id's but it got rejected acted democratic. State Representative Sean Bordeaux is a member of the Rosebud tribe. He says he's struggling with the pushback against tribal. ID's so it's like they want to try. Try to impact in effect the voting by trying to get natives not to vote very frustrating to see that happen and a little bit of a pain in a heart to see that folks take a direct attack at some of the most vulnerable people who often don't have the vehicles or the means to get to where they need to the Go-to vote Republicans point to concerns about consistency between tribes. There are nine different. Reservations within the state's borders representative Tamra Saint. John is a Republican who voted against adding tribal. Id's to register to vote. She's a member of the tribe. She says she's studying a native American. Voting Voting Rights Act that's being debated in Washington State for National Native News. I'm Lisa group injure. NPR tribal leaders members of the native community lawmakers and state officials official celebrated American Indian Day Friday at the state capital in Santa Fe. They focused on environmental protection sacred sites in young people New Mexico Governor Michelle L.. Luhan Grisham share that the state has common goals with tribes on the Environment The environment and your sacred lands and this is a remarkable commitment that the state is showing credible leadership Lieutenant Governor Carlton Bowel Coty Zuni Pueblo Says Choco Canyon and northwestern Stern New Mexico is of concern a sacred area linking them culturally and part of their way of life a lot of the songs that we have a lot of the person we have some of those in bygone gone languages some some of those songs that impairs have don't exist in some form or fashion other than our way of life and we believe that it is that connection andries discovery to these connection to these previous places that allow US vows to revive our people spiritual strength a number of tribal leaders are or seeking greater protection of Chaka Canyon from

British Columbia Royal Canadia Rosebud Tribe Washington State Dan Carpenter National Native News John British Columbia Rcmp Sean Bordeaux Belleville Ontario State Representative Canada Toronto Governor Michelle L South Dakota Legislature House Santa Fe Ontario Provincial Supreme Court
"rcmp" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on WTVN

"O. D. I. lakes the trio rode on horseback for seven hours into this remote hunting camp and the just the region is described as some people are some of the most remote and desolate British Columbia and that's saying something well they arrived at about nine PM the guy set up their tech crawled into their tent and they were get ready to go to sleep and everyone was exhausted friend said that Raymond was telling others he wasn't feeling well twenty six is another case of somebody not feeling well yep at six AM the owners awoke and found Raymond gone done during the middle of nowhere and they count the horses all the horses are there no supplies were gone and they couldn't find any tracks leaving the camp the search for six hours until one of the hunter said he we gotta go get RCMP so he rode out a day later they came back with two RCMP police officers and two dogs and handlers and a search and rescue are expert the RCMP interview the other hunters they stated that the night before Raymond there she seem to be suffering from confusion and something affected his ability this is the words the process things normally the canines could never pick up the scent and tractors never found his tracks leaving the area now the many hunters I've documented in my other books have also reported being ill after being separated from the party and vanished so the point is separation here they all went to their individual tests a one week search they never found Raymond he had no medical issues he was of German heritage and that point of separation.

British Columbia Raymond RCMP seven hours six hours one week
"rcmp" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Right there and could not be found how could five people vanish on the same and thousands and thousands of like that then nothing's been found nothing nothing in there all men now that no one could do to deduce that there were no women hikers but it's still stranger was all men so if you go just west of there like ten miles west there's a location called Lynn canyon just north of north Vancouver where two women disappeared within a mile of each other and were never found that's why one was twenty nine year old Wendy Riley and she was very few favorite Riley and they've lived in Vancouver at one point they were now living in Santa Rosa they were on a vacation a link the six week vacation went to their own Taylor twaddle and then they were stopping in Vancouver for a trip when you drop your husband in downtown Vancouver to meet with some friends and she was going to meet back up with him later that night at a party well when she didn't meet up with the party David got concert started calling her phone she never picked up he called the RCMP that first night and the founder Kerr located in the link canyon parking lot inside the car the founder purse with all the credit cards money in all of her belongings nice stop there for a second so I know because I've I've hiked with a lot of friends before and women don't normally like to carry a purse when they're going on a hike right exactly that makes sense to me they would put it in her car so the RCMP put several search and rescue teams.

Lynn canyon Vancouver Wendy Riley Santa Rosa David RCMP Kerr Taylor founder twenty nine year six week
"rcmp" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If indeed they well at all there's a good chance at this point they might also be dead well police were zeroing in on a community that they thought might be it their chance of finding them and they called and drones and helicopters and boats in the military but it sounds like they might be scaling back now I mean there are they are they giving up yeah I mean the problem is is that these young men had quite a head start and usually they were only believed to be missing and even thought to be potential victims after their vehicle was found burned out in BC so this was was to Canada right yeah we have a story so then another vehicle that they'd been driving was last seen on July twenty second so the man hunt they already had a few days on everybody and they were last seen in this community in northern Manitoba that police the RCMP port extensive resources as you say but they were not able to be located and some other reported sightings there was that a report that maybe some men matching that description had been seen as a very isolated down in that community way up north at the end those have not been able to be substantiated the latest tip is that they've been seen an area called Kapuskasing in on Ontario but again that still unsubstantiated at this time the probably each time the communities mentioned or something I mean people must must freak out it's pretty terrifying very terrifying I mean I follow their path along the northern highways as thirty seven and seventy three extremely remote desolate area as the people literally told me they were sleeping with their guns are sleeping with knives and that's the same thing we were seeing in Manitoba it's extremely scary these communities really rely on a lot of trial you know it's kind of everybody looking out for each other against these other things that might be fat so to think of people who may be you know intentionally causing violence in those communities is extremely extremely scary for people how brutal is this part of Canada I mean you mention it's possible they they could be dead I mean could could have just died because of the elements yeah I mean it's very very beautiful very very beautiful country but it's very remote Manitoba has at something called the last gig with his swamplands that the bugs are not pleasant so they certainly are an extremely challenging physical territory at the moment Jennifer is a feature writer with the globe and mail in Canada joining.

BC Canada Manitoba Kapuskasing Ontario Jennifer writer RCMP twenty second
"rcmp" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on AP News

"The trump administration his Pentagon money to pay for some one hundred miles of replacement areas along the border with Mexico Jack Quinn as detailed as a print court announced the White House can go forward with plans to use military funds for the wall and it will lift a freeze on two point five billion dollars that was put in place by a lower court in may this ruling means the trump administration can tap the funds and begin work on for contracts that it's already awarded for of the court's liberal justices were against the start of construction set to begin to replace existing sections of Berrier in Arizona California and New Mexico with more robust fencing Jackie Quinn Washington the administration is also signed an agreement with water Amala that would require migrants including Salvadorans and Honduran to cross into Guatemala on their way to the U. S. to apply for protections there instead of at the US border with Mexico from telling reporters in the oval office is a landmark agreement will put the coyotes in the smugglers at a business is a bad people is a very very bad sick deranged people who make a lot of money off other people's misery is going to provide safety for legitimate asylum seekers and stop asylum fraud and abuse is Amnesty International condemned the agreement call is saying any attempts to force families and individuals playing their home countries to seek safety in Guatemala are outrageous anti trust regulators with the justice department in five state attorneys general have signed off on T. mobile twenty six point five billion dollar takeover of sprint the deal includes setting up dish network as a rival to Verizon eighteen tea and the combined company critics are worried about the merger which sets a trio of large companies controlling the cellular market this is a P. radio news police in Canada intensify their search in Manitoba for two suspects in the slayings of an American woman her Australian boyfriend and another man RCMP corporal Julie at farmers.

dish network RCMP Verizon fraud US Pentagon trump corporal Julie Manitoba Canada Jack Quinn Mexico Guatemala Salvadorans Jackie Quinn Washington New Mexico Arizona California Berrier White House
Canadian police confirm sightings of murder suspects

KDWN Programming

01:53 min | 2 years ago

Canadian police confirm sightings of murder suspects

"Canadian police say there been two sightings of suspects in the slaying of an American woman her Australian boyfriend and another man in the area of Manitoba royal Canadian Mounted Police said authorities of corroborated the sightings of nineteen year old camera Klatt and eighteen year old Brian Smith gal ski here's a royal Canadian Mounted Police the search for camera cloud and briars McGill ski continues we can now confirm that there have been two established and corroborated sightings of the suspects in the Gillam area the sightings were prior to the discovery of the burnt out vehicle there have also been no reported stolen vehicles that could be attributed to the suspects at this point in the investigation we believe they are still in the area Manisha RCMP has deployed a significant amount of resources to the Gillam area including our emergency response team since negotiation team we stock services and air services assets the RCMP major crime unit is involved as well as your CV is north district and RCMP resources from other provinces our officers have conducted a detailed and thorough searches of potential areas of interest and the surgeons continue over the last forty eight hours we have received over eighty tips and we continue to ask the public to remain vigilant for camera cloud and briars McGill ski if they are spotted do not call nine one one or your local police immediately this is very challenging terrain this is a large area it's very there's wasn't dense bush Forrest swampy areas so it is very challenging miss McGill skis father said this week he expects the nationwide manhunt to end in the death of his son who he said was on a suicide

Manitoba Royal Canadian Mounte Manisha Rcmp Brian Smith Canadian Mounted Police Gillam Bush Forrest Mcgill Forty Eight Hours Eighteen Year Nineteen Year
Teens named as suspects in Canada murders

America's Morning News

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Teens named as suspects in Canada murders

"Hello this is our case out of Canada from well left from from missing two murder suspects Canadian police say two young man's thought missing or now suspect in the murders of an Australian and his American girl friend as well as another man found dead in northern British Columbia the royal mounted police said on Tuesday they were searching for the teens whose burning car had been discovered not far away they found a body investigators have also been able to confirm that camera cloud and briars Miguel ski have left British Columbia and have been spotted in northern Saskatchewan we believe that they're likely continuing to travel so we don't have a possible destination we can now confirm that they were last seen driving a gray two thousand eleven Toyota Rav four given these latest developments Kaman Briar are no longer considered missing the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Makowski as suspects in the dis lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and China these were asking for the public if you spot prior or cam consider them dangerous do not approach take no action and call immediately nine one one in order to assist our efforts to locate these two men we're releasing new images taken recently camera cloud is described as six foot four similarly a hundred and sixty nine pounds with dark hair and facial hair he has brown eyes briars Miguel ski is described as six foot four three hundred and sixty nine pounds with

Canada British Columbia Saskatchewan Kaman Briar Rcmp Makowski China Facial Hair Miguel Ski Murder Toyota Dis Lake Fowler Sixty Nine Pounds Six Foot
2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

AP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

"Canadian police are looking for two young men first thought missing but now suspects in the killing of a young American woman and Australian boyfriend and another man in northern British Columbia royal Canadian Mountbatten Jenelle show at the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Miguel ski as suspects in the Dease lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and trying to

Rcmp British Columbia Mountbatten Jenelle Dease Lake Fowler
2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

Orlando's Evening News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

2 teens are now suspects in double homicide

"Two teens who Canadian police and nationally believed were missing in British Columbia are now the prime suspects in the murder of a couple royal Canadian Mounted Police say nineteen year old chemical it in eighteen year old Briar Shklovsky are believed to still be traveling Kaman Briar are no longer considered missing the RCMP are now considering camel cloud and briars Miguel ski as suspects in the dis lake suspicious death and the double homicide of looks Fowler and tiny piece they were found shot dead on the highway last week police say those young men were last spotted in northern

British Columbia Murder Briar Shklovsky Kaman Briar Rcmp Dis Lake Fowler Eighteen Year Nineteen Year
"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

15:30 min | 2 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Front Burner

"Is unheard up affecting change requires people to shake it up listen to chosen family where ever you get your podcast what signer you by the way i'm an area of course i love that hey i'm jamie west so for the last four years based reporter ben mccoo has been locked in this battle drc mp wanted him to handover communications he had with the suspected isis fighter he used to living calgary and then refused to do this the fight to ben and vice all the way to the supreme court of canada and on thursday they lost their final appeal which was essentially a last ditch attempt vice has now made the decision to hand the materials over to the rcmp ben mccoo is on the podcast today and we're gonna talk about this case and issues it raises around press freedom in canada this is an issue that hits really close to home for me this is front burner ben thank you so much for joining today very much revenue so this latest ruling in and final appeal the decision came down on thursday ben mccoo has lost his last ditch attempt in ontario courses they rcmp has valid reasons demanding information and i know that it after a four year fight over this case and what went through your head when you found out the names you know is it was i think for me this is such a personally trying thing that's that's lasted for four years the personal price it's taken on myself my family my my personal relationships and an end just knowing that it's over it was sort of this extremely overwhelming release a of emotion it's almost like morning clearly we we didn't win so it was sort of this this defeatist feeling where i tried everything i could and it wasn't good enough and and that's that's a lot and i wanna unpack that with you a little bit more later on a conversation i know this is had a tremendous impact on you personally up but first this particular case the ruling came down on thursday vices arguing that it was unreasonable for you to give up any materials because you're sources likely debt correct correct in vice and myself so we had my person representation and vice a representative itself as well and we both were a line that you know this this person has been killed in a cia drone strike twenty fifteen this is this is confirmed firms buddy you us military who is you know through my reporting in my experiences around the world is very good at killing terrorists and they said we just target is no longer alive and we thought that was extremely reliable evidence but turns her smart not spin right right i i know the judge ruled said the rcmp a hasn't been able to confirmed the veracity of these statements by by the u s and i wanna talk to you today about how you got to this ruling which is really a series the challenges and appeals that wound its way up to the supreme court but just so that people can understand let's talk about the source who who is most likely dead you publish three stories about farro mohammed shared in in two thousand fourteen and tell me about a shared in and why you thought it was important to tell this story rewind is back in twenty fourteen in i myself as a twenty six year old from canada and i started seeing that these individuals about my age were advertising there exploits fighting for a terrorist organizations in iraq and syria and they were advertising it in such a way that was completely you know it revolution of what a terrorist does online in in media you know before it was bin laden he had you know chord with a with an old school microphone and he was talking about how you're gonna target america and he would have to take the tape and mail it to aljazeera heavy homeless on my message is about the captives that you have taken from us you'll friend in the white house has been following in the footsteps of his predescessor in many important issues and instead we had this real time social media of terrorist activities and it was all online in there were all reachable so i i thought to myself i mean this is wild that this is happening in its shows the changing media landscape but also these guys my age you know why they going over there and why they're doing this and i really wanna know why and what i did was i found myself getting into personal contact with these individuals and it led me to one whose name fairmont mature down he went by various aliases he appeared in a famous isis video where he appeared burning earning his passport is canadian passport saying no joining the cal fade i'm part of this this new things to canada and all of the american league are coming in we will destroy you busy life and i threw a source i was able to make contact with him.

four years twenty six year four year
Understanding 'Gender Impact' in Canadian Construction Work

The Big Story

06:45 min | 2 years ago

Understanding 'Gender Impact' in Canadian Construction Work

"Might not say what is a gender lens have to do with building this new highway or this new pipeline or something. Well, there are gender impacts. When you bring construction workers into a rural area, there are social impacts that was last year and Buenos Aires, and you may remember some of the immediate reaction. We don't think that you need to have some kind of gender-based analysis when two thousand people come to create jobs to work to support hotels and restaurants as small businesses and families. It's unbelievable to watch. This prime minister refused to acknowledge that his arrogant and self righteous comments are an insult to tens of thousands of Canadians who work in construction in our communities across the country. Here's what that all comes down to whether or not you support pipelines and dams whether you think Justin Trudeau is a modern progressive example for the rest of us or a fake feminist who doesn't understand the real world. These construction projects which employ thousands of out of area workers for months at a time to have an impact on the communities that host, and yes, some of that is a positive contribution to the economy and local infrastructure, and yes, some of that is negative and when it gets bad it can get really bad. There are a couple of ways that we can measure these impacts one is with numbers, and that's being done. The other is the old fashioned way. You send a reporter he talks to everyone. And he tells us what he found today, we have both of those things. So we're going to try to answer the question. What are the real costs of Canada's worker camps? Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Kyle Edwards is a reporter from mcclain's who spent time at a massive worker camp enforce Saint John and British Columbia. Tell me why you went to fort Saint John. Well, it started in. I think it was August twenty eighteen there was this story out in Manitoba. After kind of this arm's length and agency provincial agency in Manitoba had released. A report they're called the clean environment commission, and they had released a report that had gained a lot of media. Attention, basically detailed allegations of sexual abuse. Dating back to the nineteen sixties at a work camp up in northern town called Gillam, which is just east of a city called Thompson Manitoba, right? And the it was involving several first nations communities one in particular was the FOX like creation, and there were members they kind of detailed these horrible issue. These horrible stories of sexual abuse at the hands of. Manitoba hydro workers one person in particular had said that the RCMP organized gangs back in the nineteen sixties. And so it was this very explosive report. I guess I guess you call it. And it it gained a lot of media attention in in Manitoba last year. And so we were talking about it at McLeans. And we want us to do a story we actually discussed the idea of doing a story on industrial camps last year around the time the report came out, and so that was kind of the time that was kind of when I started thinking about it. And I put in some f allies and started asking people if this was an issue that they're really concerned about and that took me to fourteen John which is where it's a city that is known for having a very large transient population. Which is which basically means there are workers that go there for work. What do we know about what happens these camps, or I guess what's kind of the? The popular stereotype around them. Because the the reports detailing what allegedly happened in Manitoba is not kind of the only one of its kind. Yes. So in thousand seventeen a report from this organization called or this consulting group called the Firelight group. They released a report that basically raised a bunch of warnings about when there's a particular camp near in an area by other communities. There's a increase in issues like sex trafficking in the sex trade. There's an increase RCMP data and the report showed that there was a thirty eight percent increase in reported sexual assaults in Saint James fourteenth, James BC in two thousand and eleven and there were other issues like an increase in S T is in a particular area as well as other concerns regarding rampant drug. Use in alcohol use in in in a lot of these camps. And this is has been really as I kind of looked into it a little bit more. This was something that a lot of people have a lot of scholars and academics. Researchers had they've kind of looked into this issue for many many years. Yeah. And and it just seemed like it was nothing new and a lot of people kind of knew that there were a lot of social impacts to industrial camps. So that's really kind of drove the story. So you went to Ford Saint John to essentially see what the situation was like on the ground, and and what kind of social construct springs up around these camps. Exactly enforcing John. There's a huge strain on. So there they call them. They call it the shadow population. A lot of people that's a term a lot of people use the province of British Columbia is not really sure how many people are going to northeastern BC for work who live. Who live elsewhere who reside permanently? Elsewhere, right, and one of the challenges with that is s- things like health services and social services, the those those sort of things are funded by the province based on the resident population, and without taking into consideration, the thousands and thousands of people that most nearly double the actual population. When I got there. A lot of women spoke about a lot of indigenous woman, I spoke to you spoke spoke a lot about racism and sexual harassment and use and it was kind of alarming. Really? So can you tell me about some of the people you met in fort Saint John and some of the stories you heard so I

Manitoba Fort Saint John Rcmp John Reporter Buenos Aires Justin Trudeau Thompson Manitoba Prime Minister Ford Saint John Gillam Saint John Canada British Columbia Harassment Firelight Group Kyle Edwards
How secretive technology could be tracking your phone

The Big Story

08:53 min | 3 years ago

How secretive technology could be tracking your phone

"You've been lucky enough to find yourself. Wait. I can't tell you where while the police were investigating. I can't tell you that either using a piece of equipment that some forces may or may not possess. And no, they won't tell you that at a certain time. Then congratulations. You may now exist as a random bunch of numbers in a collection of evidence that the police are storing they won't tell you where until they eventually figure out what to do with it. And they might not tell you what they decide to do with it. Either good news, though, it's only a number not a name and some meta data. But there's no way they can identify you based on that. Right. Jordan Heathrow wings. And this is the big story. And are you being paranoid? If they really are watching. Yes. This is one of those episodes. Kate Allen is the Toronto Star science and technology reporter, what's the latest way. Thority if my city are watching. Well, the police service told us a few days ago that they have purchased a Stig Stingray or an emcee catcher, which is a type of cell phone surveillance technology that sweeps up data on also phones within its range. It's usually used on a criminal suspect. But sweeps up everybody within a trench. Oh, good. How does it work? So we don't really know because police have been extremely not forthcoming about how they work. And in fact, have in trials in cases where these things were used. They've applied to. Not disclose any anything about how they work or even the the manufacturer model of these devices. But roughly they sort of force your cell phone all cell phones, within range of the device to identify themselves to device, so they capture a bunch of different types of data. One of the one of the types of data is MC number which is just like a fifteen digit serial code associate with your sim card, and then a couple other types of you know, like a serial number. So she with the actual piece of equipment that you carry and things like that and cops where are using these things. That's a great question. We don't know the answer to that fully either. Why not well the police have been pretty tight lipped about it. I they would say that they're trying to protect investigative techniques. And so I mean, there's nothing compelling them to tell to reports to the public or to journalists they're using them. And so they it hasn't really come to light except for in a few core cases. And when journalists have done some. Digging. So what happens is that a kiss? We'll get into court and the evidence will be presented. And then you find out like, oh, this is how they gathered that vary. Rarely yes. And where have we found that they are being used the first we knew was that the RCMP own some of these devices and so a couple years ago after some court cases were a little bit of info came too late. The empty set down with some journalists and said, yes, we own ten of these devices we've been using them for more than a decade at that point. So we know the CPA uses them other forces have said that the the RCMP has operated those devices on their behalf. So we we actually put in some freedom of information requests with the Toronto police a few years ago, and it came back to us that the Trump service had used the devices on five separate occasions. And in the cases, where they would tell us you tells the AP had always operated it for them. Okay. But we know there. Being used in a few cities. Yes. Yes. So I can give you a couple of other cities so Calgary. Police service says that they own Stingray. Winnipeg please services they own a singer and Vancouver. Police have said that their law enforcement partners have operated it operated on for them. What kinds of data can this capture? The police are pretty clear that the devices that they owned do not capture private communications. So they're not capturing your text messages or phone calls or emails anything like that. It also is not capturing your name or your telephone number. What it is capturing is an identifier associated with their cellphone. So the main one they're looking for is this I m s I number which is just as I said, it's a it's a number associated with your sim card identifies you to the network as you what do they do with that? How does this help? Actually, this a better question. How does this help in an investigation? We don't know all of the uses thing and all of the times they've used it. So as I said only some cases have come to light. And in the one that I know best which was a major drugs and guns case in Toronto in two thousand fourteen the police use because they're trying to do is figure out. So so, you know, drug dealers and gun runners and people like that often change their cell phones. So the police like them and use them because they can operate this thing at a location where suspect is and gather also gather all of the cell phone data in within range of that location. Public him pro everybody everybody within range of the device, including hopefully suspect, and then they followed us to another location. Do it again. And then you know, let's say to another time and other times they're finding the one number that is comment all of those locations, which they will then assume as the suspects empty number and then they get a warrant to connect. That number to that person's name, and the reason that they are doing this is because I mean, at least in the cases, I'm aware of these are usually big cases that involve wiretapping. So they are trying to make sure they know all of the cell phones and land lines that these their targets are using. So that they are wiretapping all of the numbers of their suspects. What happens to the rest of the data that they get? Well, they're using this machine from I'm assuming some of these are used in crowded public places. Yes, that's a really good question. The RCMP has said that when they capture all of us unique identifiers from all of your cell phones in a given location. They only so there's a person who's operating the device and they only pass on the suspects data to investigators. How do they know which one is the suspect by process of elimination their their funding the one number that's comment already the patients that they track the suspect to. And that's the number that they want. So now with the hundreds and sometimes thousands of other numbers that they capture of innocent bystanders who they're not looking for the have said that they keep that information sort of fire walled off from investigators. They securite in a location that you know, it's it's just away from the rest of the. Nothing bad will ever. Yeah. And they have they have said that they will destroy the the this data after any court cases finished after any appeals periods of finished. This is an interim policy developed by the so it's not a finalized policy. It's also not a law. It's a policies rate. It's something they've decided to do what they what they decided. How did you guys find out then that the Toronto police were using these devices so back in I believe it was twenty fifteen I was working on this topic with some of my colleagues, and we asked the Toronto police service do you own and do you use Stingray? And a spokesperson told us we do not own and do not use one of these devices. Then we put in a series of freedom of information requests with the Toronto police asking essentially for you know, anytime they had use it and a full two years later. We got information back that they had actually used. And it on five separate occasions. Okay. To them. They wouldn't tell us about because they were either before the courts are still under investigation. And the other one's range from like, a Bank robbery was missing persons. When was this big, drugs and guns case? But you know, so therefore was not true that the Trump had never used one of these devices. What was true is that they had always used the RCMP's devices in their investigation. Okay. So that was a year ago. So we reported that they said they never used it. They actually had in five separate occasions and just this past week when I was reading about the topic again, I thought okay? Well, we haven't really asked Toronto police in a little while if they if they own a device or asked him again, and they told me actually they had recently acquired one of these devices for

Toronto Rcmp Toronto Star Science Kate Allen Calgary Winnipeg Robbery AP Donald Trump Reporter Vancouver Fifteen Digit Two Years
"rcmp" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"This morning has just been arrested in Canada, but RCMP found him in a hospital, and he tried to run from them. But they were able to get him into custody obtain the weapon and he's now detained in candidate officers spotted year Jordan eaten using hospital phone detective, Ed Troyer says the Pierce county sheriff's office is working to bring eaten back Snohomish county is suing the makers of Oxycontin over the opioid crisis the safety and liveability of our community has been compromised, and it's time that we all do something about it after a show of support from the county council Snohomish county prosecutor Adam Cornell announcing he's suing Purdue as well as opioid distributor, McKesson pharmaceutical and other local providers for the damage the opioid crisis has done in his county, these drugmakers and the other defendants named in the lawsuit have simply acted for too long without. Regard for the people in our community. Cornell says the suit may eventually be joined with others across the country. But for now, he's focused on his own effort have radios. Hannah's Scott reports Pearson column counties as well as the cities of Everett in Tacoma have also sued the maker investigators believe drug dealing was involved in a triple homicide in port Angeles last month and over the weekend. The cloud county sheriff's office picked up the second suspect. They were searching for you believe based on the information that we have now that we have all suspects in custody, the woman, and man he was arrested last week are believed to be the shooters in the deaths of Daryl Iverson, his son, Jordan and sons girlfriend Tiffany made. This is the final week of the highway ninety nine closure, but before crews opened the new ninety nine tunnel. Next weekend Cairo sevens. Michael spears reports. The battery tunnel will close forever, and that work is going to impact traffic wash said this week. It also plans to begin removing parking spaces and the lot to the east of Alaskan way between the pike street hill climb in. Pine streets use that area for those parking spots won't come back until the viaduct demolition is complete. There will also be tilde work this week along the waterfront, which means people should be prepared for detours as well as parking and traffic restrictions there to the tunnel..

Adam Cornell RCMP Snohomish county Pierce county Jordan McKesson pharmaceutical Ed Troyer Purdue Daryl Iverson Michael spears Canada prosecutor port Angeles Everett Hannah Tacoma Tiffany Scott
"rcmp" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on This is Why

"Deeper lack at the problems within the RCMP organization. Global news did an investigative report led by Jane Gerster. My name is ginger stir. And I may national features reporter with global news. And I am currently investigating the p. So let's go back to the nineteen eighties. Because it was around that time that we heard about the first big sexual harassment case in the force, right? Yeah. That's when Alice clerk made the decision that she was gonna sue the fourth. Alice Clark is a British Columbia woman. She always wanted to be mounted. She's one of those people kinda grew up thinking I wanna wear the red Serge. And when she was growing up you couldn't be amount. He as a woman, so realistically, it was a totally farfetched remain until all of a sudden they started letting members in and then a couple years after that Alice became a Mountie. And then she basically realized that the force was pretty awful to win. So on the more minor, and she, you know, people would leave plastic breasts center desk, they would make comments her supervisor would call all of her colleagues by name. But then he'd say, hey, Deary. How's it going and sort of pattern the shoulder? You know, people saying, oh, yeah. You are prettier. Oh, you need to go home and have a baby or a woman's places at home, or, you know, get out of here and let a real man take this on. So that's kind of the verbal the verbal issues that she experienced within it also just groove. She was sort of left left hanging in certain in certain cases of she, you know, go out, and, you know, be responding to call or be trying to track down a suspect and she'd radio in for backup. And you know, she sort of details in it's quite heartbreaking. The no one came. You know, when she talks about how you know, sometimes she would she would radio in an for help. And the no one would come and she'd go back and she'd get yelled at for not ready. Doing in for help. And at a certain point, you know, she says the radio operators just stopped telling people that she needed help because they knew nobody would come. And that's you know, that's basically what she describes going on and on. And when she finally when she finally left, she was just heartbroken when she talks about giving in her red Serge, which was the piece of the Mountie the conic Mountie uniform that she just really really adored. When did it really become apparent to the public that the RCMP truly had a culture problem? Depends on who you ask. I mean, if we're looking from a sexual harassment perspective that really started to come out in two thousand eleven with women like Janet merlot, and Catherine Galliford, I don't, you know, I think from a sexual harassment perspective that started to become something that was hard for people to ignore only really in the last five five or so years, and then in terms of you know, broader cultural issues, I think that really came to the fore in two thousand seven with David Brown's investigation into the pension fund scandal because he actually came out and said, you know, our humanity is horribly broken. Coming up later in this episode the ways in which trying to do the right thing when it didn't seem to benefit before publicly. Really wrecked. His career to the extent that has wife says he just couldn't he just couldn't cope anymore, and then he killed himself. You're listening to this is why a national radio show and global news podcast. Download and subscribe now. Nc thousand sixteen RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson offered an apology to the thousands of women who suffered sexual harassment while on the job. Heartbroken this allusion. Other state, and we're forcing find ways on their own to cope with his infused condition since they did not see an organization that was willing to change. Still courageously tried to make themselves heard by management. Only to find the tonight movement and opportunity or adversely punished within the RCN for their efforts on behalf of every year superbugs or management every I stand before you today solely offered sincere apology, but sexual harassment is just part of the problem. It was exposed the RCMP has a culture of workplace bullying and covering up scandal that ultimately led to the death of sergeant Pierre LeMay Trie his suicide prompted an inquiry that revealed a new level of corruption in the force. It was during the wildfires of two thousand and three in the interior when things really heated up on a personal level between Pierre LeMay Trie, and is immediate supervisor staff sergeant grant learned both were media spokespersons a reporter had complained to the true that she felt learned was sexually harassing her. The major wrote a report the next day. He was relocated to another detachment Sheila maitre testify that a sudden transfer in two thousand and three really bothered. Her husband four years later Lemaigre was called a handle media, and the can't ski affair where he was handed talking points that the next day he realized were inaccurate and insisted to superiors that they be corrected that poor sergeant was told to not tell the truth in order to protect the RCMP this organization, unfortunately has no morals or ethics testifying via Skype was a toy a Montague who was the communication strategist during all of this. She testified he LeMay Tra was ordered to not correct. He was helpless. So distraught said crying, she recalled the matrix sink. You can't hang out like this. And she said, they knowingly did she described it as the biggest institutional betrayal. Enter fifteen years. There's no doubt his suicide was because of this on the bay the Bill Bentley was found not guilty of perjury for his role and Robert Caskey's airport death, peer LeMay, tree was hanging himself in the basement of his home his wife, retired RCMP member with significant disabilities to previous horse riding accident found him she tried using scissors to cut them down. But wasn't strong enough. So you started sawing at the rope. It was so slow and tried to hold them. When the last thread, let go he landed in my arms, his head hit the floor with a thumb is something always remember. She was crying. She said this tetrahedral news. Here's global news. Reporter Jayne Gerster. Yes. That's a pretty it's heartbreaking story as well. Sound like a broken record there? But you know, if you I've been through the letter that he that he wrote applying for veterans affairs pension, you know, south through the testimony of his his widow and kinda gone through as many of the documents in watches, many of the clips as I can. And you know, he by you know, by the accounts of those who worked with him, and by by the letters he wrote, which is such a principle person who really joined the force again like Alice Clark, because it was a lifelong dream, and he wanted to do the right thing, and you wanted to help people, and he talks about, you know, the ways in which trying to do the right thing when it didn't seem to benefit the force publicly. Really wrecked. His career to the extent that has wife says he just couldn't he just couldn't cope anymore and then. Killed himself. And you've had a conversation with a former RCMP member Lawrence Chung, and he also discussed with you a lot of the frustrations that he felt related to the force that drove him away as well. Yeah. So it's really interesting about Lawrence shown to me is you know, he describes himself as not the Mountie that you would ever see very much an under the radar guy who's not walking around and red surge and who's not on your TV. I'm not a high profile Mountie. I wasn't her sexually harassed or anything. I don't have a civil suit or anything like that. I'm not on the news. I was just an operational. Sergeant trying to do my job in the RCMP and holding people accountable for their time in actions. Basically, I was prevented from doing that job. He says he just he learned through the force that kind of one incident, and this is kind of how he describes it can really follow you around that again like doing the the right thing as purely Maitree talks about can really have a negative impact on your career and for him. You know, he went public about allegations. That were brought to him about hot tub with witnesses drinking witnesses and a major kidnapping case is the general public in the tax payers. I really should have concerns because the RCMP is their priority. There is to look after themselves members or their to do as little work as possible and get as much. Overtime as they can. You got members who go shopping on company time during on duty. I've seen this or long-term off-duty sick involved in grievances frivolous, coda conduct's harassment's civil suits class action lawsuits. This is all costing the taxpayers money. And he he's two struggling still even now in it's really apparent from the conversations we've had with with how you're trained in the forest to do the right thing to speak up when you see something bad happening. He you know, he just kinda had his hands up. Like, that's what I did. You know, how am I here? He wants to get twenty five years in he'll to quit twenty one. So we think Lawrence's case is really indicative of some of the internal struggles. And this is happening to me is probably happening to other people across the country as well too. Now, there have been commissions in an attempt to change the force. But how those commissions panned out? Well, they've been very expensive, and they have been long lasting and they've covered a wide variety of issues not all explicitly saying front. You know, what's talk about how the man the CPS run. Although alternately they all touch on on that. I think really how those commissions have gone depends on who you ask some of them have just people have been furious. With kind of the end result. Some have been furious with the process and said it hasn't even gotten into Canada the root of the issues, and I think at the end of the day the underlying concern or the repeating concern for a lot of Mounties that they don't seem to go anywhere. I mean, I I spoke with Janet Merlo who is one of the two women who are part of the kind of the head of the Merlo Davidson hundred million dollars sexual harassment settlement from two thousand sixteen that's still sort of being dealt with you know, and she was so frustrated because you know, she knows so many people who have participated in so many of these commissions enquiries think she was mentioning one of her friends have been almost a dozen and her she herself had spoken before the Senate and spoken before parliament spoken before numerous core. Arts, and she's just kind of sitting here now going, you know, when are they going to do like, we have all these roadmaps from these commissions? They offer up really good road mats and things to consider that that many feel just sort of been left there collecting dust. In two thousand one. There was a ten million dollar. Federal APEC inquiry, then in two thousand six the auditor general's probe into the pension fund scandal that cost two hundred fifty thousand dollars. Also in two thousand six was the O'Connor commission that came with a price tag of fifteen point two million dollars. Then there was the five point three million dollar braid would inquiry the thirty one point nine five million dollar air. India inquiry and the nine point eight million dollar missing women inquiry. The two hundred fourteen thousand dollar Sheila Fraser workplace review came in two thousand seventeen the CRC harassment report in twenty seventeen as well that cost six hundred thousand dollars just to name a few of the inquiry commission reports from the past few years.

RCMP harassment Alice Clark reporter LeMay Tra Lawrence Chung supervisor Jane Gerster Pierre LeMay Trie RCN Sheila Fraser Columbia APEC Pierre LeMay Sheila maitre Commissioner Bob Paulson Bill Bentley Janet Merlo Merlo Davidson Senate
"rcmp" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on This is Why

"It almost makes me cry. It's such a shame that they've taken such an iconic police force and turned it into this narcissistic harassing bullying abuse of power organization that actually hinders all the good officers on the front lines from being able to do the best of their jobs. Can the RCMP survive an internal culture fraught with problems? I'm Nikki right Meyer. And this is why. The number of sexual harassment allegations being leveled against the RCMP is soaring in west of problems, including frontline members complaining of being over tasked underpaid and under resource recruitment retention issues. And a four spread too thin from small town policing to counter terrorism with an escalating number of female Mounties claiming harassment, discrimination and sexual abuse. And so we are taking steps immediately. This winter to put in place, a new civilian management advisory. The information is contained in an internal Email of pained by global news Donnie over called the two prior lawsuits focused on gender discrimination, and it resulted in a one hundred million dollar settlement in two thousand sixteen. This is new legal action that goes beyond sexism, CENA matter if you man or woman bosses at the RCMP fostered a climate enabling bullying and harassment both the government of Canada and the RCMP are determined together. To maintain a modern healthy safe and truly respectful work environment for all members and employee's every time there was an inquiry. It's yet another nail in the coffin of the same p there's almost need to start over to recognize that this was a police force of its time period. And you know, you can remember it in a museum that poor sergeant was told to not tell the truth in order to protect the RCMP this organization, unfortunately has no morals or ethics. I don't think critical outrage from the public is going to necessarily make a difference. Unfortunately, because they'll ride it out the Disney is Asian of the CMPS always going to to win. Can you believe more than two hundred and twenty million dollars has been spent in the last two decades on trying to mend a culture of dysfunction within the RCMP? Now that covers everything from sexual harassment lawsuits. Two human rights, complaints federal inquiries into nepotism workplace. Bullying just to mention a few places where that money went. Rob Gordon is a professor of criminology at Simon Fraser university. The mount is one single organization say they have a variety of functions encounter is very large organizations. In my view in the view of many others to lodge and their problems. Come from the fact that they are too much to spread out trying to be too many things to many people, and they're not able to accomplish what they should be country, which is a specialty federal policing. As a consequence of that dispositive f- at resources. There's about twenty eight thousand active personnel in the RCMP, they serve in more than one hundred and fifty municipalities six hundred first nations communities three territories and provinces and a force that size and that spread out requires uniformity. Basically have a clear message when you stopped. Conform leaves? No other middle ground. You joining this organization. Right from the very beginning from day one. We will train new to be all CNPF's. And that means that that's what you're gonna be doesn't matter. What you've been before what you intend to be later. You've signed up for the paint. We will create a new human being it's almost robotic. And that creates frustrations for people who go in a more critical suddenly want to be mounted that can make a difference. But when they get in they realized that in fact is a very rigid organization, the tolerates David's, and it will punish in different ways. Those who stray from the straight narrow. Deeper

RCMP harassment Nikki CNPF Donnie Simon Fraser university Meyer professor of criminology Rob Gordon David Canada one hundred million dollar twenty million dollars two decades
"rcmp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Either really dangerous or really interesting and the authorities should know. And maybe I should tell somebody that this is what's happened. So like a like a like a naive person. You know, he he picks up the phone, and he he calls the newspaper and says. Listen, I've had this weird incident. But nobody will talk to him. Nobody was there to talk to him. So when he finally did speak to somebody at the one of the local newspapers here, they obviously the reporter with a with a photographer and that picture that you referred to at the beginning of the show when you talked about the man with the shirt open that was dead in his pajamas lying on his bed. And the photograph was taken the day after this occurred. And here we are saying to ourselves years later, we regret, and we hate, and and, you know, all this media circus in media attention, but unfortunately, dad's notion that he needed to tell somebody something got got us into this hot water in the first place. Chris you've collected the paper trail from multiple angles share with me the story of. Police or law enforcement involvement when they come to talk to him about it. And then the military, well, certainly the Royal Canadian Mounted police where among the first to take an interest in this. He had actually encountered a ours GOP officer what he stumbled out of the Bush. He he was trying to get back to his hotel room. And he, you know, he managed to get out to the road and cabbage RCMP officer, Rhode told the RCMP officers story, and you can just well imagine what the RCMP officers thought of him that here's this fellow with no-shirt on very very busy. He had had vomited repeatedly because of the the the the chemical gas, and he was shaking is is red. So the RCMP officers seal that he was drunk consistently spent much time talking with Mr. Golic himself. But you know, I probably shouldn't get too close to you. Because who knows what the heck I have got from this encounter. So that began the series of investigations, but you know, when he got back to the city RCMP officers of the sued after that, so Royal Canadian Air force officers came by and they also began the investigation later on tonight States Air Force. This was a case investigated by two countries..

RCMP officer Chris Royal Canadian Air force Royal Canadian reporter Rhode GOP Mr. Golic
"rcmp" Discussed on Commons

Commons

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"rcmp" Discussed on Commons

"House. So he came to my house late night wearing black leather gloves. And and I suspect that he was going to do something. I just felt that way. And he came to my house. He's banging on my door two three in the morning. And I said, you know, put your hands on my wind on the window of the door. So I could see you don't have anything. And I said you'll I know why you're here. 'cause I I know why you're could tell look different. And I said he he's coming to kill me. So and I said, and I had a hunting knife with me at the front door, and I turn around let me see if you have anything, and he wouldn't turn around. So I think he had a knife. They'd meet again another day in Joseph's living room. Gil was still wearing the black leather gloves and Joseph stood behind a counter clutching, a hunting knife has the discuss strategy, but they would soon stop talking. They both hired high profile lawyers and the former best friends were now working against each. Other. Joseph blamed Gil for getting him back into insider trading after he'd stopped Gill Josefa big liar who taken advantage of his whole life, eventually both of them decided to plead guilty. We're supposed to meet a police. Station, the RCMP to get fingerprinted, and he didn't show up on the night of October twenty six two thousand nine Gill corn bloom jumped off of a bridge and killed himself. His wife would tell reporters that this was the culmination of a lifelong battle with severe depression, and that he was a wonderful friend too many and the finest husband and father possible in total Joseph Gill were found to have made over ten million dollars while insider trading making it the biggest scheme uncovered in Canadian history. But fifteen years after it began their lives were destroyed. So no, I didn't think of these consequences whatsoever. So you think when we started again, the first deal is one hundred eighty dollars. We could just stop there not heard of us ever again. In fact, when we split the money, the first time half-and-half, you know, X millions each we could've stopped there. And know what a Herve us. We could have great life. So at that point. You're not thinking of consequences. But then at the end of the day, you look at it, you say, okay. Well, you know, my best friend is dead lost access. My children lost all the money. Lost career a loss. Hurt the family. The shame. Everything else. So there's so many consequences that never crossed our mind. When we started Joseph was sentenced to thirty nine months in prison. He's still the only person to ever serve time in a Canadian prison for insider trading. But why is that the case the cynical answer is I think it's easier for the regulators and candidate to get someone to plead and pay a fine. So that they can go towards their budget as opposed to take the chance of going to trial and being found not guilty and hurting their credibility before Joseph's conviction. Other people have been charged with criminal insider trading. But there wasn't enough evidence to prove it. And insider trading is happening in Canada Joseph says when he was doing it he could sometimes tell just looking at the markets that someone else was doing the same thing as him. So for example, when I was being interviewed by the regular as I said, well, there are deals that I knew about that. I didn't buy because it was so obvious. Someone else was inside trading on the I didn't want to buy it. Because I thought I would be swept up in someone else's crime. One case involved a large gold mining company that owns shares in the silver mining company. Joseph had insider information about how a deal was going to go down this particular deal was just so clear. Cut matching the deal flow. That might coke us was working directly on. And I told the regular as I look if you know, this is the deal that I didn't touch because of so obvious that these big underwriters are clearly whoever's involved in that bought deal was inside trading. But no one seemed to care any claims that while he was committing his crimes there were people who knew and didn't turn him in in fact. Sometimes they'd profit off of it. So one morning, I put a trade in with inside information on buying whatever X millions of dollars of stock..

Joseph Gill Gil Gill Josefa RCMP House. Joseph Canada twenty six two thousand nine G one hundred eighty dollars ten million dollars thirty nine months fifteen years
A place where the travel ban doesnt matter

The Big Story

09:30 min | 3 years ago

A place where the travel ban doesnt matter

"Details. Tell me what it's like inside the library. What does it look like it's very sort of warm and inviting it's very small library. There's a main kind of children's reading room that's very brightly decorated. There's a sort of more kind of work like space that has some tables and and chairs and then computers for people to use. There's sort of a stacks area in the back of the library. And then there's like a main hallway, and that's basically, it's you know, there's wood paneling as an American. I was quite amused at there's a moose head on the wall, very true to form it's sort of has this Victorian feel but also very homey at the same time. And then of course, sort of like pretty innocuous on the ground. There's like this piece of black. I'm not sure if it's like electrical tape or actually just painted on. But it's this like thin black line, that's sort of cuts diagonally across the library. And that demarcates the. The international border. And so, you know, it's sort of almost like an afterthought, it's not really a formal marking and not I think also kind of represents that's this library like once you're in. There these borders. Kind of don't really matter that much and people can freely cross, and they don't really have any issues with that. How does this place even exist in two thousand eighteen given are sort of strong, borders, leaders and immigration law? These days, it seems like a total relic of the past it it really does feel that way. It felt to me like it was in this very tenuous situation. And that that it was a very fragile place. And I think that was obvious and the libraries attitude towards the visits, and in some of the interactions that I learned of as I was reporting this story, especially between US immigration authorities, and the Iranians the sense, I get is that it really depends on the agent and. There isn't like a set policy. One pair of sisters. I spoke to and who are in the story came there last September in the September. And we're we're actually blocked from going, and they were told that the reunions aren't allowed anymore, and then when a staff member invited them in for a tour because at that time the opera house was was having tours later that staff member was was chastised by border patrol. You know, I I heard a lot of stories that are also in the in the piece itself about border patrol agents trying to limit the visits to like twenty minutes to to prevent them from happening in other ways telling people they shouldn't be meeting there. I think when you're there when the is actually arrived there, it's it's hard to say no to them because they're usually like very sympathetic people. Are you know, some elderly parents some, you know, the young students even some children's sometimes come like the nieces and nephews of the students and so. There doesn't seem to be an easy universal policy. You know, we we did hear from a library staff member that both US and Canadian authorities had threatened to shut the library down over the visits. I should say that the Canadian authorities deny that and the Americans declined to respond to to our request for comments. But I had heard from, you know, people connected to the library, former board members just people sort of in the community that there was a lot of pressure that the library was facing over these visits. And it's it's not exactly clear to me, why the Canadians told me I I talked to RCMP basically, they have no problem with the visits. They say they're they're legal, and they don't have any fear of legal crossings because the area's very heavily surveilled. There's a lot of cameras around. So they they have a pretty good sense of who's going in and who's coming out. And you know, I put a lot of questions to the American thirties. They didn't answer they sort of pointed me to a general law against illegal crossings. But you know, there's no point in my story or any of the Iranians that I spoke to that indicates that they intended to legally cross they really just wanted to be at this library temporarily and then go back to where they came from. So I think that as long as the library itself remains open to people from Canada coming in without going through a port of entry that it would be very difficult to completely bar the visits from happening, and there's still this sort of grey zone. And you know, now we're into the winter. We don't like these visits are slowing down naturally anyway. And so it will be interesting to see if this continues when the weather gets nicer, and it's sort of more of the tourist season, Vermont and Quebec. But it it it's impossible to be there. And not sense kind of overall this overriding tension and not see it in the context of. The the US tightening its immigration laws and tightening its immigration policies in general, especially towards obviously people from Iran that very much sort of permeates the atmosphere when you're there, and and when you kind of talked to people about this issue to me, this entire story is just like a picture of a moment in time that you'll never be able to to recreate because we're like this nexus of changing immigration, and yet there's still these places that are like remnants of the relationship that we used to have I I mean, you know, for me, it was this was the story was important because I think like when the history of this era is written like, you know, you'll have the speeches you'll have the policies you'll have the executive orders. But how is the travel ban changing people's lives like that to me is an important question. And also, it's something that's really faded from the headlines and people don't really talk about much anymore because there's just so much other stuff happening. But it was the first thing that Trump did as president, and it was like a week after he. Took office that this happened. And it it's important, and it's like reverberated in thousands and thousands of people's lives. And and I just really wanted to sort of tell that story. And I don't think there's really anyone even in the story who's who even directly criticizes, the Trump administration, or or has any sort of partisan words or anything like that. But I do think you sort of get a very tangible sense of of the lengths that people will go to see each other and sort of what obstacles have now been put in their way. I remember walking around that library and picking out kids books to read or VHS movies to rent or whatever. And and not giving thought to anything about the US Canada border other than it's neat that there's a line on the floor, you know, and as a kid you would jump from back and forth on I'm in America. I'm in Canada. And there was no. But there was no thought back then of this being a heavily regulated border. I really think you know, that that's something that I kind of had some inkling of when I reported the story, and even when I published it, but hadn't thought a lot about there's this historian on Twitter. This guy Jacob remiss, and he was saying, you know, how these sort of spaces these kind of spaces that you can't really categorize that easily. How they mean different things different people when the US sort of starts to close down. It's very contested tradition of openness, and and the and the Canadians. I I don't really know enough about it. But my son says that the border is not as big of an issue to them as it is to the United States, especially after nine eleven I think that was a real turning point from when I talked to people seem like that was when you you could go from just from what you experience in your childhood that just sort of crossing and kind of saying hi to the border agent, but not really having to go through a formal process to what it is now which is. Like every single person has to show their passport and has to subject themselves to question, the questioning and possible searches or whatever it might be. And and these these like little areas are very rare, and maybe fading. I mean one one criticism I got a lot of both during the story. And when it came out was well now that, you know, you're publishing this it's going to end, and you know, there's not much I can say to that. I can't predict the future, and it's really not my position. So sort of try to ensure that something continues or doesn't continue. But, but there was very much that that anxiety among people that like if anyone finds out about this like our lives could change, and we we we won't be able to have this anymore. So it all just kind of felt very precarious and varies sort of fragile scientific maximum of you can't observe something. Like that without changing totally. Thank you so much for taking the time today. I really appreciate it. Oh, it's my pleasure. Thank you so much. Gonna tour body immigration reporter for Reuters. That was the big story brought to you by Scotia. I trade you can visit Scotia I trade dot com to start direct investing today, and you can visit the big story podcast dot CA for more from us. You can visit frequency podcast network dot com for more from our brother and sister shows if you're looking for something to listen to over the holidays, give them a shot. And of course, we're on social media at big story podcast on Twitter on Facebook on Instagram. And we are as always everywhere you get your podcasts. And please give us a rating give us a review, but us know what you think, I'm Jordan. He threatens thanks for listening. We'll talk to you after the holidays have a happy one.

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