5 Burst results for "Rcm Alternatives"

"rcm alternatives" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"rcm alternatives" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Have you along everybody. This post pandemic economy in just a bit, but there is it seems a glimmer of diplomatic hope today about Ukraine. Some movement of Russian troops away from not toward the Ukrainian border. German Chancellor Olaf scholz was in Moscow today and said to moderately promising things, President Biden offered marks this afternoon that while Sirius were not all doom and gloom, and with diplomatic hope, often comes economic relief. And there were some of that today too, stocks were already up on the day they stayed there. Bond yields often gauge of geopolitical agita, stabilized. And oil backed down off the 7 year highs, it has been bouncing around of late. But both crude benchmarks that would be West Texas intermediate, of course, and Brent crude still closed above $91 barrel, and we told you yesterday about how supply could be affected by whatever happens in Ukraine, which has analysts it should be said talking about $100 a barrel oil for the first time in years. The thing is, that equation, the price equation is supply and demand. So, marketplace is Andy Euler gets us going. Allow me to nerd out on an economic term real quick. Elasticity of demand. Now, historically, the amount of gas Americans buy has been pretty inelastic, meaning it doesn't change that much when prices go up. Troy Vincent works that the data and analytics company DTN, he says, gasoline's historic inelasticity relied on a couple of things Americans have always done. Drive to the store to get groceries and drive to work. In the coming months, we might see that that higher price for gasoline that people respond to that by doing more of what they did during COVID, which was get things delivered to home and also commute less to work if they have that flexibility. That's here in the U.S., but oil is a giant global commodity. Greg pretty and independent energy consultant says worldwide population growth and developing countries buying more cars will lead to more overall demand for oil and its refined products. In fact, he thinks we'll get back to pre-pandemic levels pretty soon. Demand was rising each year before that. So we're kind of back on that growth track. On the consumer vehicle side, though, higher fuel costs might have prompted some people to change their behavior, says Kelly Sanders at the University of Southern California. Some of it's probably price provoked. But I think there's also a lot of, you know, there's a transition happening and people are starting to get on the bandwagon. Electric vehicles are still a small part of the market. 10% of the new car sold worldwide last year were electrics, as the international energy agency. That is up from two and a half percent in 2019. Now, if that trend were to continue, the elasticity of demand for gas might start to change. In Austin, I made Euler from marketplace. If you're keeping track, we've made it all about four and a half minutes into the program today without talking about inflation. So maybe that's long enough, huh? 'cause we got the latest reading on wholesale inflation this morning, the producer price index it's called PPI and the vernacular. Up a full percent January from December up nearly 10% from a year ago. One key component of that whole thing, lumber. And if you think for a second about what lumber is used for, it'll make sense. Marketplace is Justin Ho has that one. First, there is a whole lot of demand for lumber. Thanks to the booming housing market and new construction. Mark vitner, senior economist at Wells Fargo. The number of apartments that are under construction today is the highest it's been since 1974. And vitner says the bulk of single-family home construction is happening in the south, as a result, that allows for more construction to take place during the winter months. And I think that's putting a little bit more seasonal pressure on lumber prices. But lumber supply has been dealing with plenty of issues too. For one, there's a shortage of workers available to move lumber. The whole transportation sector between rail and trucking has slowed down. That's Brian Leonard, a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives. The spike in lumber prices in January doesn't reflect any disruptions from the trucker protest at the Canadian border. But Canada is a major supplier of lumber to the U.S., and British Columbia was hit with torrential rains late last year, which washed out lumber transportation routes. It just devastated some rail lines and some highways. So it's just been a logistics nightmare times two. And then there's omicron. Greg kuta is CEO of westline capital strategies. He says lumber mills in Canada and the U.S. have had a lot of employees calling out sick lately. Instead of having call offs of 15%, you have call offs of 25, 30%. So instead of running two ships, you're running a shift and a half to one shift. Kuta says all that lumber will eventually move through the supply chain bottlenecks, especially since producers have an incentive to sell as much as they can. Whether it's Canadian U.S., European, you're going to bring supply from all over to take advantage of these returns. And as that happens, he says lumber prices could come down. I'm Justin Ho from marketplace. Wall Street today we already touched on invasion and inflation don't seem to be bothering traders..

Olaf scholz President Biden Andy Euler Troy Vincent Ukraine Kelly Sanders DTN West Texas Justin Ho Moscow Mark vitner vitner international energy agency University of Southern Califor U.S. Greg
"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The biggest drop in a week in a single week for stocks since the pandemic with the S&P down 5.7% in just the last 5 days This morning market participants are seeing more reasons to move away from riskier assets like stocks with the news the U.S. is telling families of its diplomats in Ukraine to leave that country in case of Russian hostilities Right now London's 100 share index down 1.9% Germany France and Amsterdam all down in a similar range Add to this a U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting on interest rates and inflation later this week Here's marketplace's nova sapho David ware money is flowing in and out of tells you a lot right now oil prices are around a 7 year high as Russia is threatening military invasion of Ukraine Russia is of course a major oil and gas supplier the U.S. and Europe have promised a strong response The question is what would it look like if Russia and fates what would that response be And what would it do if anything to global oil supplies We just don't know yet Meanwhile stocks are in a sell off especially tech stocks which reached very high prices during the pandemic so many investors see them as riskier now especially if the fed starts raising interest rates sooner and faster than Wall Street has been expecting The NASDAQ composite index which includes a lot of tech companies is down about 13% for the year That's in just three weeks It's only late January It's been a rough few weeks for tech stocks Yeah and recently when we've seen dips in prices investors look for bargains and there's a jump in buying the next day not so much in recent days Yeah not so much that pattern doesn't appear to be holding this time around at least not on a big scale They've also been some disappointing headlines with regards to recent corporate earnings reports Netflix last week of course as we reported surprised by projecting subscription growth will be slow a lot over the next few months That adds to the uncertainty suggesting the effects of pandemic are a stimulus are waning What might change the narrative is the fed We'll see what comes out of their policy meetings tomorrow on Wednesday All right nova thank you The key stock index on the Moscow exchange is down more than 4% right now that would be as if the Dow Jones Industrial Average were to drop 1400 points The Dow future is down 227 points or 7 tenths of a percent The S&P future is down 1.1% The NASDAQ future is down one and a half percent Not a how bugs a terrible storm in Western Canada last year and pandemic distortions are contributing to sky high lumber prices in the U.S. wood is up by almost a third since September affecting new home prices and the cost of fixing up older ones Here's marketplaces Justin hoe A lot of what's been going on with lumber prices has to do with the supply of Canadian lumber Mark Fleming is chief economist at first American Canadian pine is highly sought after for home building because of its strength And in November a major storm hit British Columbia Washing out the rail lines that lumber mills rely on Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives It stopped shipments by a good 20% and a 100% certain places Leonard says that complicated the supply chain problems the lumber industry had already been dealing with Less truckers less rail employees because of COVID showing up things like that So the whole system kind of broke down At almost the same time last year a 40 year ongoing trade dispute with Canada came to a head says Rachel Brewster a professor at duke law school The core of the dispute between the United States and Canada is whether or not Canada subsidizing their lumber industry And in November the commerce department doubled its tariff on Canadian softwood lumber imports to almost 18% Doubling the tariff rates I mean that is going to increase the price of lumber This is also happening while the Canadian lumber industry is dealing with another older problem A beetle infestation that's been devastating pine forests in Canada since the 1990s leaving behind millions of dead trees and the risk of wildfires Since economist Mark Fleming with first American Increased risk of wildfires increased devastation of wildfires in the 2017 and 2018 error has effectively created now a shortage of trees to be cut down in Canada and exported to the United States Fleming says this is different from the supply chain problems that have caused shortages of other home building materials during the pandemic How do you fix a supply shortage driven by a sheer lack of something like a tree which takes a long time to grow And in the meantime Fleming says demand for new homes will continue to.

Russia David ware Ukraine United States fed Mark Fleming Justin hoe first American Canadian pine Amsterdam RCM alternatives Germany France
"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In just the last 5 days This morning market participants are seeing more reasons to move away from riskier assets like stocks With the news the U.S. is telling families of its diplomats in Ukraine to leave that country in case of Russian hostilities Right now London's 100 share index is down 1% Germany and France are down one and a half percent and U.S. stock index futures turned down in the last two and a half hours add to this a U.S. Federal Reserve policy meeting on interest rates and inflation later this week Here's marketplaces novos safo David ware money is flowing in and out of tells you a lot right now oil prices are around a 7 year high as Russia is threatening military invasion of Ukraine Russia is of course a major oil and gas supplier the U.S. and Europe have promised a strong response The question is what would it look like if Russia Russia and faith what would that response be and what would it do if anything to global oil supplies we just don't know yet Meanwhile stocks are in a sell off especially tech stocks which reached very high prices during the pandemic so many investors see them as riskier now especially if the fed starts raising interest rates sooner and faster than Wall Street has been expecting The NASDAQ composite index which includes a lot of tech companies is down about 13% for the year That's in just three weeks It's only late January It's been a rough few weeks for tech stocks Yeah and recently when we've seen dips in prices investors look for bargains and there's a jump in buying the next day not so much in recent days Yeah not so much that pattern doesn't appear to be holding this time around at least not on a big scale They've also been some disappointing headlines with regards to recent corporate earnings reports Netflix last week of course reported as we reported surprised by projecting subscription growth will be slow a lot over the next few months That adds to the uncertainty suggesting the effects of pandemic are stimulus or waning What might change the narrative is the fed We'll see what comes out of their policy meetings tomorrow on Wednesday And Wednesday nova thanks Tao and S&P futures are down three 10% now for the NASDAQ down 5 10% Somebody's going into bonds with the ten year interest rate down at 1.73% Now to a story about how pandemic distortions and a terrible storm about two months ago in Western Canada is affecting the building of new houses and home renovations in the U.S. this week will get an update on new home sales covering December in the U.S. and the increased cost of building materials will be a factor Think lumber with prices up by almost a third since September marketplace is Justin Ho has that A lot of what's been going on with lumber prices has to do with the supply of Canadian lumber Mark Fleming is chief economist at first American Canadian pine is highly sought after for home building because of its strength And in November a major storm hit British Columbia Washing out the rail lines that lumber mills rely on Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst with RCM alternatives It stopped shipments by a good 20% And a 100% certain places Leonard says that complicated the supply chain problems the lumber industry had already been dealing with Less truckers less rail employees because the COVID showing up and things like that So the whole system kind of broke down At almost the same time last year a 40 year ongoing trade dispute with Canada came to a head says Rachel Brewster a professor at duke law school The core of the dispute between the United States and Canada is whether or not Canada subsidizing their lumber industry And in November the commerce department doubled its tariff on Canadian softwood lumber imports to almost 18% Doubling the tariff rates I mean that is going to increase the price of lumber This is also happening while the Canadian lumber industry is dealing with another older.

New Housing Construction Down 9%

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:30 min | 1 year ago

New Housing Construction Down 9%

"We've been talking for a while now about housing and it's boom low. Interest rates pandemic motivated moves limited supply and rising prices. And yet. today we learn new. Construction housing starts is the technical term. Were off more than nine percent last month. As marketplace's justin ho reports to get us going. There are a couple reasons why builders have been holding back securing the parts that go into building a home has been tricky recently. Thanks largely to the volatile price of lumber. I call hysterical market at this point brian. Leonard is a lumber analyst at rcm alternatives he says prices have been rising throughout the pandemic causing many builders to hold off on buying would but last month many realize they couldn't wait any longer lumber prices spiked even more and now supplies are thin. The vogel abilities in his basically. You know april through august in all of these guys. Don't have the word to start supplying some of these jobs. Something else in short supply. Labor says brian's her male with the associated general contractors of america. He says some construction workers worry about getting cove on the job site. They also might be receiving expanded. Unemployment insurance they met found work and other industries are members competing with energy sector. They're going to be competing with the mining sector. Several other ingredients that go into building. A new home have been stuck in the supply chain given the ongoing congestion at u s

Justin Ho Rcm Alternatives Brian Associated General Contractors Leonard
"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"rcm alternatives" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Con Riddle it is Tuesday. Today, the 18th Day of May good as always to have you along. Everybody. So, look, there are gonna be some hiccups in this economy as it comes out of the pandemic. The jobs report a couple of weeks ago was one of them. We were talking a million jobs. We got 266,000. And those hiccups can hit even sectors that have been humming right along. We've been talking for a while now about housing, and it's boom, low interest rates, pandemic motivated moves, limited supply and rising prices. And yet today we learned new construction. Housing starts is the technical term. We're off more than 9% last month as Marketplace's Justin, who reports to get us going, there are a couple reasons why builders have been holding back. Securing the parts that go into building a home has been tricky recently, thanks largely to the volatile price of lumber. Well, I call it hysterical market at this point, Brian Leonard is a lumber analyst that RCM alternatives, he says prices have been rising throughout the pandemic, causing many builders to hold off on buying wood. But last month, many realized they couldn't wait any longer. Lumber prices spiked even more, and now supplies are thin. The full blown building season is basically, you know, April through August and all sudden these guys don't have the wood to start supplying some of these jobs. Something else in short supply. Labor, says Brian's her mail with the Associated General Contractors of America. He says some construction workers worry about getting Cove it on the job site. They also might be receiving expanded unemployment insurance, they might have found work and other industries. Our members are gonna be competing with energy sector. They're gonna be competing with the mining sector. Several other ingredients that go into building a new home have been stuck in the supply chain given the ongoing congestion at U. S ports. Mike frightened Tony is chief economist, the Mortgage Bankers Association. Many builders having difficulty finding appliances to put into a new homes and The new owners have when they go out and buy those appliances. There are signs that housing construction could pick up again. For instance, building permits fell at a much slower rate than the drop in housing starts frightened, Tony says. That's a sign that homebuilders think building supplies and prices could start to stabilize. That's going to result in a lower overall price sometime down the road, And even though some construction projects are stalling, he says, demand for new homes is still strong. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? President Biden was in Dearborn, Michigan, today took a tour of the factory where Ford Building the electric version of the bestselling car or truck in America. The F 1 50 pickup. Look a little spinning it to the president did. This is a quote suckers quick, He apparently said is he zipped past reporters, which is all well and good. You like to see the president having a good time, but ive es are just one way of cutting carbon emissions both here and globally. The International Energy Agency released report Day listing all the things we will have to change to get to zero carbon emissions by 2050, which is the goal in the Paris climate accords. The agency says that by 2038 a half short years from right now, 60% of cars sold worldwide 60%. We're gonna have to be electric if we're going to get to where we need to be. Right now, By the way, 5% is where evey czar And that is far from the only thing that is going to have to happen is market places him at the fields. Reports getting to net zero carbon emissions by 2050 is going to require a lot of change really quickly. We don't have a day to lose. Rachel Kate is dean of the Fletcher School of International Affairs at Tufts University. She says one of the most significant steps the IAEA says the world needs to take basically immediately. No more oil and gas exploration. No new unabated. Coal plants should be approved for development, and that should be right now this year, no ifs, buts or wise. The idea also says countries need to phase out existing coal plants and that we will be relying much more quickly and much more completely on modern renewable energy. Primarily wind and solar. That's starting to happen already, says Steve Needle, at the American Council for an energy efficient economy, Wind and solar will often be the cheapest new source of electricity today. Ah, lot of the new construction is starting to go in that direction. But NATO says one of the challenges with relying more on renewable energy has always been finding ways to store it to use later. Think of Ah, early morning during the middle of a coal waves and the wind is calm and the sun Shining. That's when we need that storage. A lot of the technology. We need to start down the path I A has laid out to Net zero. Carbon emissions already exists. But Jason board off at the Columbia Climate School says there are still problems. We have yet to figure out how to solve if you're going to think about the things that are harder to de carbonized like airplanes and big ships and steel and cement. We don't have all of those tools that commercial scale yet. Which means board off, says companies and governments need to invest a lot more in developing new technology. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. One more electric vehicle tidbit before we go on just because Lamborghini announced today it's going to roll out of plug in hybrid by 2023. Lambo. Is there gonna be all electric by 2030? And you kind of wonder what they're going to sound like, though, right? Member all the chitchat about retail sales last week, the company's making all those sales have started reporting profits. Good would be a word you might use. Elsewhere in market based capitalism. Today, traders on Wall Street they were kind of a downer. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. There's a new survey out on household.

Steve Needle Brian Leonard Tony Samantha Fields Mike Brian America Today 2030 60% 2023 Columbia Climate School Tuesday Lamborghini NATO 2050 Jason 2038 266,000 Rachel Kate