17 Burst results for "Raymond Benson"

"raymond benson" Discussed on The Dork Forest

The Dork Forest

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on The Dork Forest

"I think it's a great story. Okay. And they sort of picked so they discontinued this idea to do more Bond novels after Colonel Sanders released until 1981 when John Gardner picked up the series. Okay. And then he sort of brought bond into the 80s. Which king's name is did not like John Gardner's novels, though I like them. There's a couple I really like. It's my goal in life to have read all the Bond novels. I stated this I think at the beginning of the year that this is one of my goals. And it turns out there's 36, I think all told with everybody right in them, and I've read 19. And the 90s ones I think are gonna be tough. All right, yeah. Plowing through different yeah. I read one of them and it was an American writing is a Raymond Benson. And I liked it, I was listening to the audiobook of this one. And I liked it, but I didn't think he got bombed entirely right. He makes him a bit too much of a womanizer. Like within the first chapter he is like asking this Greek military woman to join him in the shower, which James Bond would never do at least not the bond of the books. Right. Would you ever want to write a Bond book? Yes, yes I would, and I actually wrote a parody. Okay. A few years back, I haven't here because I thought it was relevant. Oh yeah. There it is. Off license to kill that's hilarity. Hilarious. Yes. When I moved to London in 2003 to do some recording. And I absolutely fell in love with London. And then I spent the next ten years there, just doing what I came there. And I was making music at the time. And actually, I brought on her majesty's Secret Service over with me on the flight there in September. And I had this copy from the 80s. I remember my grandmother had gotten me. And I loved the book and then I'm reading it on the plane and then a page one 60, I turn it, all right, look at the opposite page and it's page one 70, like ten pages have dropped out of my book. And I was like, oh no, it's like one of the first things I did when I moved to this new country was I went to a water stones and not a real gate and sat in a chair and read like the ten missing pages. And then I used to be quite a big drinker as the plot of this book is the main characters James vagabond. There you go. Star agent at the British trunk in Secret Service. Nice. Thank you. That is awesome. So and that fall in London was very, much like an alcohol fest. You know, it's a different culture over there. The pup is just sort of central to everything. Well, I think it's just alcoholics. If you want to find them, you can go to any country. And I tell you about the culture that's in Wisconsin. You could find Jennifer culture in Wisconsin. It turns out there's what is sober people, not living that culture. But if you want to. Oh, you could buy there. Yeah. But so you ended up drinking your way through London for several months..

John Gardner Raymond Benson Colonel Sanders London James Bond king James vagabond Secret Service British trunk in Secret Servic Wisconsin Jennifer
"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"Know kubrick was the guy for me. He's a great director. Oh man he was. He was one of my favorites of all time. Yeah he was he. He did a lot of great films during the sixties and seventies classics. And certainly two thousand. One it's just. As soon as i saw in college. They released it in the seventy s. When i was in college and the mid to late seventies and i went to this theater and so they had it in seventy millimeter. Which was stated your. At that time. I went to see at once and i go. I gotta seat again this way. And i've seen it and then i was just totally engrossed in the movie and like the making of two thousand and one. I had to find out how they did it. I loved it. I mean they did. Some of the special effects in an abandoned corset factory. I love stuff like that. But it's a great movie. And i found out what everything was shot. And how they put everything together and how the actress came on the project and everything and it's the movie still holds up incredibly. Well you know it's yeah there's no moonbase in two thousand one but but still it's really more of a first contact story told in a way that we've never seen before a very sort of some people interpreted it to be very religious film. Kind of just depends on how you look at it. You know you interpret aliens or are they got or what you know you know it. Just it he left it up to the audience to decide you know what is movie about. Oh yeah and then. That's the brilliant. I mean people have different Ways of of seeing it absolutely. That's actually interesting because if you look. At hearth saint clark's novels a lot of his seat themes almost border on religious terms. It's really interesting so he was able to do that in such a way. In in couch in science fiction that really made it so different and provocative. I really liked the way he wrote. And you know they're both gone unfortunately and But the movie still holds up. And i would love to see them re release it on the big screen again and really do it up again. It certainly deserves. They did in two thousand one. I know i know that. Yeah they even had birthday parties. I think in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine for how so in her von illinois made a big deal. Ask her banda. Excuse me but you know it was great and oh twenty ten just forgot it just. I felt bad for for peter. Hi to get kind of caught back. 'cause that was just not the right way to go and have it doesn't need a sequel. It doesn't doesn't. They've got a lot of things. Wrong what do you. What do you have anything on your table that you're working out. That hasn't been that hasn't been maybe officially announce jet just finished dark side of the morgue. Which is the second rock and roll. Hit waiting to hear if You're solid to was gonna fly which which i'll jump on immediately probably that happens And if it doesn't then I'll just probably come up with something new. What were you writers. Do you know we think of fiendish plots. I heard you were also either adapting some screenplays. Is that director. Well i already have I have two original novels One that's called evil hours and one is called face blind and i've already adapted them to screenplay and they're one of them at least is getting some some buzz. Oh good but you know. I'll jinx it if i talk about it. Sure sure You know hopefully something will happen in that regard. Well cool well. Hey i really want to thank you for taking the time to talk to me. Thank raymond benson and just a couple of elle's that really important visit his website. Raymond benson dot com in addition cinema. Retro dot com. That great magazine. We were talking about during the course of the interview. And don't forget to take. The audience survey sci-fi talk dot com. Click on the link link there or also on my podcast page. If the podcast description just click on as well. Thanks so much for listening. This is tony. Tomato take care. Hey this is raymond. Benson i wrote metal gear solid the novel and the rock and roll thriller a hard day's death and you're listening to sifi talk..

kubrick Benson raymond benson sixties raymond mid to late seventies one both Raymond benson seventy millimeter one thousand first contact two original novels saint clark peter One second rock seventy s. twenty face blind
"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"In the theater when they first came out. Yeah me too. He's always going be bond to me. Well there's something about cold finger. Coach i think is always be to me. Quintessential pod movie. Yeah it probably will be you know it. It kind of nailed the formula. Did it ever. And they've kind of just been repeating it ever since however it's not my favorite bond movie. I mean it's one of them but I actually prefer Dr no and from russia with love really before that. Oh cool just because they were a little harder i mean they were a little rough around the edges. They weren't they were a little. There were finding their way still. And i just thought they were more true to the books not as fantastic. You know Not as not as out there you know not not not. The tongue was into the cheek is much. That's true that's true now. I liked it. And actually i thought the second the second one from russia with love the that one was great. Because i mean that's the orient express that was a lot of espionage. Takeover plot. Good cold war thriller absolutely. Yes it is. Yeah yeah and then of course. Yeah yeah i mean she was like one of the first really out there bonville but she wasn't that far out which which made her made her believable and she was very perfect for the part. Yeah really was Whose wife she was who she married to hurt. Vile no kidding. That's the original threepenny opera. And wow look talent breakfast. Yeah i do have. A fondness appears prisident. high thought. Well i thought he was a good bond. Yeah he was. It's to be honest. I'm not a popular choice. The only bond. I had a problem with roger moore. I'll tell you the truth. I need to but that's you know i think it was just the direction that the films went in that period. They they made them comedies instead of thrillers. And you know rogers personality and the style with which he plays the character just kind of fit in with that set way of presenting bond. And so you know for a little over ten years. Yeah we had the bond comedies people would ask. We would talk for among friends. Or whatever and i would say. He's he's doing the saint as james bond. I'm sorry that's the way. I used to look at the rest. I think he brought something really interesting to the part. And i'm very happy with the way things are right now and looking forward to the new film in november. I think that's gonna be really good too so they seem to bring in. Martin campbell's the reboot guy and they got him directing the first one and i think they're going to bring good directors that are really going to keep to series going in the right direction. Now so. I think that's one of the things that you do. And i love this magazine. It's right for cinema retro. You contribute to them to me as far as movies about sixty s. I've never seen any magazine. Covers it as well as they do. Oh thank you Yeah cinema retro a lot of fun to work for It is a magazine published three times a year out of britain. And it focuses. Mostly on movies of the sixties. And seventies not exclusively. But that's kind of where our audience is aimed as the baby boomers Because you know we all kind of think. The best movies were made in the sixties in the seventies. There were some classics the classics made during that time. It's hard to argue. That really. And i have a a regular column. That appears in every issue where i picked my favorite movies of of a particular year. Craig i love. Then i also now and then all interview somebody or write an article too so i think my last interview was with john phillip law. Who just real recently. I heard yes. I'm sorry to hear that. Yeah he was probably his last interview. We didn't know it at the time. Sure very in depth interview about his work with you know. Ray harry housing and he was sindbad and one of the harry. How he certainly was the blind guy. Ain't blind angel and barbarella was He got his start. Basically and the russians are coming. The russians are coming movie. Yeah yeah so he. He was hot stuff. In the late sixties early seventies puck and lift actor and then he You know he went to europe and started making movies in europe where he remained very popular in europe. So you know he. He was always working now a very cool. I mean yeah. I've always liked same bad. Actually i thought he did a fine job. Yeah my favorite sindbad movie to ray area. The golden voyage the golden voyage. Yeah that's one of mine original one. I kinda liked a lot to you. Know it just had a lot of the cyclops and all that stuff the dragon. I mean those were cool things and all the things that are being done right now are of like the children of harry housing with with digital animation. They wouldn't they wouldn't be doing it if people wouldn't accept it if it weren't for what ray did. Yeah it's really amazing. How he how he really really did something. That really changed the industry and now. Cgi changed again. But that's salako more with the metal gear solid author raymond benson. In just a moment. There is a great magazine. And i just got the latest issue. I love when they do sci-fi things and they just did a feature on a movie called journey to the far side of the sun. Right with with roy innis. Which remember that movie. I i saw a two and it's a very under appreciated film. You know really is. I really liked it and i'm glad they did something on it. And whenever they do anything related they really do. They really do it well. So it's really cool well being type person Saw af is Top ten list. That came out last week. Yes i did. Yeah sor- fine the list. I always pay attention to are the top box office of time. And i look at that list and i see this sci fi movies that are on there and you know it time always seems to really be the ultimate judge of things. So that's what. I look at the way i look at box office. Hit does not always translate into good movie. That's true that's true But i think you know if i are doing pretty good job of picking the good movies please. That two thousand and one was number one. It's kind of hard to beat that one. it really is. It really is hard to beat. It's my favorite movie of all time. Hey i have. Actually i have. It's always a toss up between that and citizen kane. Well citizen kane up there but yeah two thousand and one really changed my life when i was thirteen when it first came out. Yeah you know if you saw it. In the theater god yes. It was just a life changing experience. it really was. It was incredible. You know you had not seen anything like it before and probably didn't say anything like it again for ten years nine years later that star wars came out Nothing in between was even close. You.

europe november raymond benson james bond last week Martin campbell thirteen first roy innis rogers roger moore two sixties first one Craig seventies one john phillip Vile two thousand and one
"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"Hi all this is rock. The s o'bannon Creative alienated nation and farscape. And you are listening to sifi talk. That sounds like a cool idea for a movie actually. I think that would really be happy. Yeah well that would be cool. I'd say that again louder. For the producers. You're listening now. I understand you also tied in song references and things like to. I guess they tapped hers and things like that instead of a table of contents. There's a track lifting. Oh there you go. Yeah so each chapters. The name song performed by a particular artist cool and instead of acknowledgment. There's liner notes there. You go and you know it's and it's you know the whole series. It's called a rock and roll hit. So it's a spike berringer rock and roll hit. The next one will be another rock and roll hip. If i do any short stories they'll be rock and roll hit singles. There you go now is where did you kind of he come from where to spike based on anybody or the oil you well he's kind of a conglomerate of a lot of people that i kind of know and a lot of him is me. I don't look like him. I kinda describe him as a big bear of a guy with long greyish hair. He's in his fifties and so he's kinda big and he's the kind of guy you'd see it us. You know at an old like a jethro tull concert you know somebody from the classic rock era. Who's still into it and you know gets right up in front and yells and drink beer and has a big gut and has facial hair but is a nice guy you know. He's he's he's a cool guys into the scene and you know he's like friends dad. Who was a big like rock and roll back in the day. You mentioned jess rotel and ian anderson cave the books and kudos and i've always thought of him kind of like a thinking man's rockstar. So he's he's one of the most intelligent people i know. Yeah definitely He did he He gave me a blurb on the back of the book which is very nice of him. He's an extremely clever to his. We really break down some of the songs and some of the things he's done. I mean he's just really. Like i said i thinking man's garage star and i think that's why a whole new generation has been turned down to death row hotel so it's going they are still going. I know it's amazing. It's really amazing. And he'll do his solo stuff occasionally to yup well. This is a great idea. So that that's terrific. Next one would be another hit. So you have a definite idea of how many you would do or is it. I don't have an idea of how many there will be. I guess we'll see how they go I i would be happy if it just became a long running series Definitely there'll be three But beyond that it kind of depends on how well they do so once again. The title is a hard day's death and you can find that on amazon dot com or anywhere you go though even access it from my side. Because i'm more than i have an eminent associated with amazon. So people can find it that way to you know this year is it's hard. It's amazing to believe to wrap my mind around this. The one hundredth anniversary of the birth of ian fleming creator of james. And i mean obviously you were involved in there actually releasing your bond books as the called the union trilogy coming up in october just two just in time for the movie. What a coincidence. Yeah absolutely. I mean kind of relate to us what that experience was like for you and writing. I mean that's the envy of all characters to write for his double o seven. Well it was kind of a dream job that i didn't even think i was allowed to dream. You know I was working as i mentioned. I was working in the computer gaming industry in the early nineties and Back in the eighties bad way back in the eighties i had written a copy table book called the james bond bedside companion yes and that had been very well received that kind of established as a as a you know bond authority whatever that is and i got involved with bond fan clubs and speaking engagements and things like that. Look while i was doing that book i was writing. I did go to england. And i met members of the family and his business people We stayed in touch. They liked the book. And i did a little odd jobs for them over the years. And then when. John gardner the the author who was before me decided to retire from the gig. They just called me out of the blue and asked if i wanted to give it a Well yeah so. I kinda fell on the floor and got back out and said yeah. Sure i'll give it a shot. And what i had to do. Basically was come up with an outline. I on spec for first novel and let them see it and approve it and they'd also show it to the british publisher and once everybody kind of agreed that it was okay then. I would write the first four chapters on spec and they all took a look at that and finally they all said okay. Let's do it. And i got the contract dry one and then i did that. One that was called zero ten. I remember that in nineteen ninety seven s and once that was out then they signed me up to do more so in total i did six original books and three movie novelization and three short stories cool so over seven years i was the bond author. That's something that's something to be part of that. Universe in any way is is really. It's really cool. Well it's great. You know i'm you know. I ended up just being a footnote whole legacy but it was. It was a great thing to be part of. I i must admit. I mean as somebody who knows bond I mean i mean what did you think of mr craig. I thought i mean the whole franchise not only at the box. The last movie would pearston. Well the whole franchise to me. Just seem to get a hold jumpstart with yeah. Yeah i think that was. The intention was to reboot it kind of like the way the batman series. Exactly again exactly. Yeah i thought casino royale was fantastic. I'd say it was the best bond film since the sixties time between really good ones and boy he really nailed the character and made him his own also made him very familiar to saw more like the original book. Yes exactly yeah. They went back to fleming as as a source. And and i think that was the right thing to do. If you're going to boot something you go back to the source material and try to make him. But it's one of those incredible things were casting is the stories there and then the casting is right in the in the mode of that too. I also thought you know they've actually tried to do that. A couple of times series. You know back when george lazenby did on her majesty's secret service that's right very faithful to the book yes it was actually and at the time it was kind of a flop but now it's considered one of the best bond films ever. Yes it is I think the two timothy dalton films. Actually i thought were very good. I liked him a lot to yeah. He was very He's very much tried to do. The fleming bond yes. I thought he succeeded very well for just for some reason. Those two films were not very popular. Yeah i know but Yeah crag kind of put a suit It was shot in the arm. Is it fair to ask you. If you have a favorite bond actor that played. oh. I don't mind saying sean connery's because you know usually the first one you see always your favorite people a lot younger than me. Maybe saw roger moore i on the big screen l. Always say roger moore was their favorite bonfire on the you know i saw. I grew up with connery. i saw the.

John gardner england george lazenby october ian anderson cave two films jess rotel first four chapters three first novel early nineties six original books eighties amazon fifties two each chapters timothy dalton mr craig three movie
"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"In this edition of sci-fi talk has prolific author raymond benson who is really has quite a trifecta so far this year he already has out metal gear solid based on the popular video game in addition and original novel hard day's debt in coming out this fall. We'll be the union trilogy. Which is a re release of his works as the official james bond author in the union trilogy before we go to raymond benson. Just want to remind you please. The audience survey at sci-fi talk dot com. Click on the button to complete the survey for my podcast page in podcast description. You can complete the survey there if you include your email address. I'll be happy to send you a dvd as a token to five appreciation. Thanks so much. Now let's go to my conversation with raymond benson author of metal gear solid. It's great to talk to you and be on the show. I really have enjoyed your work in the past. And i'm really happy that you're involved with not the novel that you did a novelization for metal gear solid. I think the challenge of that is huge. Essentially you're taking a video game and making it into a novelization form. How did that project come together. And how did you attack. well All thanks for having me on the show secondly to answer your question I was I was approached by Hideo kojima enough who designed the original game He apparently had a short list of authors. That he wanted to do it. And i guess he was a pan of my bond work because it had been published in japan and he He konami and delray. The publishers us had an agreement together to do the books so They asked me. If i'd be interested and i thought about i sure why not you know. I was somewhat a fan of the game My son played it all the time. You know i would watch him play. It and i was interested in a video game designer. Well a computer game designer back in the late eighties and early nineties. So you know it wasn't a completely foreign medium for me Now i had already written some movie novelization. In fact i am i. I'm a one of the founding members of the international association of media tie in writers which is an organization of writers who do a lot of novelization b. movies or tv or games. or whatever. And so i you know there is a there is a a forum to it. There is an art to doing it and It's it's not an easy thing to describe. I mean i would just say that A lot of its intuition. A lot of it is taking the source material laying out in front of you and breaking it down into what would basically be chapters of the books and the gone from there. Now you use to the this is based on the nineteen ninety eight storyline of the game. That came out at that. Time right the first game. Okay so So that must have been easy. At least you're not you know trying to tie everything together. Up to this point i would. That would take more than one novel. Obviously all right yeah. Yeah the planet that there hopefully will be a series of novels. We're talking about doing the second one. Now which is called sons of liberty. What amazes me is that nobody has done this as a film yet. Well i think they're probably talking about it. I don't know. I don't know what konami is plans. Are they kind of keep it close to the vest. But i'm sure that they're they're probably thinking along those lines you happy with the way things turned out after it was all done. Yeah you know it's it was fun The characters are interesting. And engaging it's you know it's very I mean it has a very much a sort of japanese mangled kind of sensibility to it. the characters are kind of fantastic with lots of Sort of extra extra abilities. And you know i just had fun with it. And i you know as long as konami and the publishers were pleased. And i'm pleased. He were intended to try to steer which stay away from that. You pretty much decided to embrace that part of what they came was. Yeah yeah absolutely and and you know. I was pretty had to be pretty faithful to the game. I couldn't go often to into uncharted territory or anything. Any new stuff that i added to the book was had to be approved of course by kojima sons. So everything in it is has gotten the seal of approval by by the man themselves. So it's it's official with the canon the canon piece go well they may convey saints cannon his cannon so there you go that's awesome so so this time you are planning the second one. Have you gotten the green light for that yet. Well we're they're they're sort of negotiating with the and And i guess you know. I'm keeping my fingers crossed and sounds like it's going to happen but you know i can't really say for sure. Does anything can happen. But i'm pretty sure it will. Will you be doing all the series or are they going to bring you know okay. I don't know it's just doing them one at a time so you have a hard day's death i. There is something appealing to me about. Kind of like a rock and roll investigator kinda p. I kinda liked it. Yeah well that that's a much more closer to the to my heart. It's a much more. I mean it is a it's mine. It's an original sure novel. Yes spike barringer the rock and roll. Detective is he is a guy who runs a security firm in new york city for Rock and roll and the like. But he's also a private eye. And i've skewed the rock and roll world to be a very dangerous place. So there's lots of murders and kidnappings in black mailings and illegal downloading and spike has to sort all of that out doesn't sound too far from the truth and you know he. They're the real rockstars you know. We'll make cameo appearances all through the books. And i've already written the second one cool. It'll it'll come out next spring. It's called dark side of the morgue nice and you have Have david bowie and john lennon making an appearance. Somehow whether in david boy definitely makes it appear as john can't make right around but he's definitely referenced..

raymond benson john lennon david bowie japan james bond first game second one this year late eighties more than one novel new york next spring japanese early nineties nineteen ninety eight storylin one secondly this fall cannon john ca
"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

"Movies see what that would be like on on the big screen, you know by some of the ram events and some and some of the other authors of took over the bond-rating. Yeah, you know Raymond Benson Francis, he wrote six months Bond novels. I think he's second in terms of sheer number plus he wrote three novelizations and we we're going to have them on our show. We we've met him a few times. He lives like twenty five miles from me by miles from Tom twenty miles from me. Yeah. He's he's in a suburb of Chicago. Okay, what's next for? In the world of bond what other projects have you got on the cards? You know, I don't know. I I've got other things going on and we we talked about vigilante Cinema and I'm I'm actually writing a book on that for a publisher while it's there should be I got to deliver in December. So at least two months so that's going on. I wrote a chapter somebody else's book which is about French Connection and Dirty Harry which is a spin-off just I'm interested in those and and that. In cinema generally I've written some stuff about horror for a site called her homeroom and I've written about photography Lorraine Journal called Revenant. I looked at a very young Welsh folk our connection between me and Timothy Dalton has I have a Welsh background and he was born in North Wales in in Colwyn Bay. So it's a sort have another link to him there. I think that might be on me emotionally wage. I don't I don't know because like I said did this and sort of did it for fun? And then I'll talk to you guys and this is amazing. So I do think about writing about the bras in the films in a similar sort of way. It would have to be slightly. You know, it'd be a log Aren't you work as a small movies? But I think applying similar ideas would be good. I think I have as you mentioned earlier felt this sort of shifted against them, which is really interesting cuz they were hugely popular and even I'm not a fan of Die Another Day, but even I will admit that that movie made a lot of money and you have to see it within the box of this context and you have to go. Well, you don't need phone to million dollars or whatever unless you're getting something right, but I don't think brosens have a bad. I think Brosnan strike the stories weren't great to work with. Yes, and I think I think Brussels doing his best and I think GoldenEye is his his best movie and he's most sort of assured in that I think maybe I'll do that. But you know, I'll just keep talking to people because it's fair wage really interesting cuz I'm a I'm a big fan of Brosnan. I didn't notice at all of us off. At the cinema back in ninety-five. I went five times in the first week to see gold nine big nostalgic sort of yellow sign. Everybody has a bond that I can relate to he would be mine. Although I do think Sean Connery is the best bond that is my opinion, but there's a subjective element to all of this and there's a personal element to all of these things. We can all that in in this rather fabulous franchise and have our bit. So, all right, Carrie if people want to get a.

Timothy Dalton Tom Brosnan Bond Raymond Benson Francis Sean Connery Lorraine Journal publisher Colwyn Bay Carrie Brussels North Wales Chicago
"raymond benson" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

Relentless Geekery

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Relentless Geekery

"Be hall. I guess so. That's I. Thank you for sharing that I. I love that. You know what's funny is they're not only about that. There's all kinds of good humor. There's all kinds of you know bragging and bluff, Guy, stuff and everything like that, and so I just there a page Turner there one of those things that you just you started and how many times I stayed up til one two, three four in the morning because I just I devour it. You know what I mean I just can't wait to to finish the book and really, and then of course I regret it then it's like I waited a year enough stunning hours I can't believe I did. Gina will read a book, but show have like five six book. She's reading all at once and you'll just read a chapter or two in each one. She doesn't want them to end. Yeah, but you've got this many more books that you want to read that you don't want to end either so just keep going exactly exactly well. Let me tell you about decides. Ian Stuff is an author. That I've discovered in recent years that I absolutely truly love and I really hope I get to meet this guy someday I was hopefully going to meet map a festival this year, but that's been canceled so his name is Jeff. Strand! And he writes mostly comedy, horror and I kinda describe it as an adult goosebumps book out of the truck and he. I ran into his first book as an audio book that I was reviewing I get free audio books to review. Okay, so that's the fair trade and I loved it. I just totally fell in love with like you said I devoured it I couldn't quit listening, so it looked him up, and I flipped out about being a little bit about him first of all, he was born two days before I was, so we were that close in age. and. He grew up here in Kent. Roosevelt went to Kent Roosevelt School and I mean that's eight miles away from where I live, so we grew up in the same area and I'm like well there again like we talked earlier, there's a sign there is something there. Yeah, and I've been devouring his library of books and I. There's been a couple of Mike okay. That was alright, but most of the time I read it and it's like. Oh, my Gosh! I loved it was great. They're fast and fun. They're there little bit of horror. It's kind of like watching a Cormac be movie late night at times you got that almost tongue-in-cheek laughing about the special effects. Did Weren one of the latest ones was. This story of this father daughter that lived in a cabin in the woods, and all the animals started turning zombies. So I'm careless them. It was the b-movie them fighting off his ambi- creatures defending invasion exactly. I mean. You know he's not trying to write the next. Grapes or roots, thing or gone with the wind. He writes good fiction. That's fun and easy read and I love all of them so. Thank you, what a treasure to get a recommendation like that! You know what I'd read not Strand out time to go stopping time to go check very good. Quick and easy, so you can get it done in between. Things is like a pallet cleanser. One book he wrote was the haunted forest tour, and it was all of a sudden in this one area of the country. This huge forest sprang up, but all these monsters were in it while the monsters stayed in there, and what the government did. They put a tram through there as a tour like a Disneyland. And of course. goes bad in the monster. Start Writing Never Jurassic Park. Fine exactly. So. Actually inspired me to write a short fan fiction story and he actually said Yeah, go ahead. Put it up, so I have a short fan. Fiction based on one of his blood for you. That's wonderful. Oh. Yeah, it's always fun I love reading that. What? What are you reading right now? What are the books on your? Let's see I just finished other Daniel Suarez I I had a I ordered his very good I. Recommend last time and I just so let's see I. finished are killed. Killed decision now I've read change agent and I have influx on order sale I think I'll have read five out of his six and I. It's kind of funny I guess that I had fallen behind after demon and freedom, and he continues to produce books. I'm very happy when Oh yeah now there's a whole free city I Let's see I have certain things like I by the trilogy, and then I don't read them all in a row I tend to maybe a little bit like. A put things in between other things like discovered. The discworld books are a good pallet cleanser. They're a good thing were to read them too many in a row that particular sense of humor, it presses the button too many times, and you're not getting this onen. Fix that. You want from humor from etcetera etcetera so even king books like. One at a time and I really. There's been a couple authors so. In Fleming died, no more James. Bond's coming. Will actually there are? There's multiple people that have picked up the mantle become the next James Bond author and I had a chance to get to know Raymond Benson just a little bit in Chicago. He wrote the James Bond Companion, and because that was so good, they said. Would you like to write more new James Bond's and he said why. Yes, thank you so. Out of a trilogy of is called the Union trilogy. That was you know a smersh like organization. You'll often. Bond working for on M. I five has had similar orga terrorist organizations, or whatever that they have to contend with, and this was a good group. A had villain exotic locales. I can't believe these haven't been made into movies because you could tell. The BRINSON has kind of that wonderful cinematic graphic sense of this would make a good seen. This would make a good starter movie where Oh he's. Skis off a mountain and then out comes jet, pack or whatever. So I devoured. Those I really has a couple of others, and there's also a couple of other authors. It's kind of funny by breaking it up. I'm really talking currently about thrillers and stuff, so maybe because we're in the doldrums, I'm reading more exciting things than thoughtful things, but I will say this I. Don't know when the next this series is actually ended, but I can't recommend them enough. The Iron druid books by Kevin hearn. They something that I love. There's if you've read a lot. Over the course of time you know all these various different mythologies and folklore's and references to the various different archetypes. If you will, and he's really good at integrating those that you're like well, what if you know Loki from norse mythology actually had to contend with another trickster, God like the Coyote and what would happen and what who would win the world's oldest vampire, or this other mythological ARP dyke, and he they're..

James Bond Strand Gina Turner Kent Ian Stuff Kevin hearn Daniel Suarez government Roosevelt Kent Roosevelt School Jurassic Park Cormac Jeff Mike Raymond Benson Fleming Chicago
"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

"That's a great way putting it. It's yeah I I don't think I have A. Style I'm not Robert Richardson. Who say every see this hard top light burning down on somebody over exposing twelve stops right Bob Richardson and he made a career with that needs great cinematographer. Maybe, maybe I wouldn't use that theme every time, but I I wouldn't I would use it I. use it once we're fit, but okay. So as as you as we can roll out of this little bit. What are you doing these right? What are you working on? Have you dreamed of doing another bond movie? Can I always right now? Of course I'm locked at home in the pandemic, trying to do a couple of picture books, coffee table books which I'm not as motivated as I should be to finish them, but I'm working on in one is I'm quite excited about. It's a book of the polaroid exposure tests from all the movies done and TV shows. Commercials and music videos from starting waiting for Guffman actually starting earlier, a couple of music videos in Italy have all my black and white. Polaroid's. Check kept for years and I scan the mall and I'm putting them into a coffee table book to I can't sell because I have rights to the images. But I can make him and give them to friends. Nobile Suny for that. And then I'm doing another trying to put another coffee table book based on my family history and the matchbooks collected through the years since the since the forties other than that. Yeah, I mean do another bond movie I would always hope that. Get. That they would ask me to come back and do another one, but as Barbara, says the director, the DP is chosen by the director run unless they have a big objection, they're to go through. The director wants right unless another director that I know or that WanNa be calls me. It's not going to happen, and it's okay I did my history I'm only the second American who was a DP on a bonlieu. I was GONNA ask you. About the yeah Bob Ellsworth was the first he did tomorrow. Never dies, or whatever it's called, so so Bob Elza who's a hero of mine I think he's one of the best American cinematographers ever and still today so I'm number two and I'm very proud of that, and there's only been now one one American director. I guess Cary Fukunaga is the first American director Yup. Right there aren't very many even on the continuation authoring process for the book for the in Fleming, publications people. Raymond Benson who lives about thirty miles from US was the first American author to be authorized by the inflaming public people can do the continuation novels, and so yeah, so it's nice to be one of the first few. Because! Mark Mark Ask for me and I interviewed I tend to be with with Barbara Michael here in La and they okay me, and they felt I was up to the task. They wouldn't let mark bring the production designer that we wanted to bring on. He had the we had on stay and on on stranger than fiction. Kevin, Thompson. WHO's a brilliant? Brilliant production designer. They felt that he didn't have enough experience with. Multiple big sets worldwide handling enough things in different places, and it was probably true. He didn't have as big experiences Dennis Gassner had who had done golden compass, and a lot of big all over the place things and I I have no qualms Denison, a phenomenal job in love is a great Guy Kevin I. Think could have done a great job to, but yes, so they're not too. Many Americans have been, and it's a very British yes. Okay so now you mentioned Barbara, said that director brings the the Yes, and you mentioned the.

director Barbara Michael US Bob Richardson Robert Richardson Polaroid Bob Elza Raymond Benson Nobile Suny Cary Fukunaga Dennis Gassner Bob Ellsworth Guffman Kevin I. Mark Mark La Italy Denison Fleming Thompson
"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

"It's great, so check some of his other movies out to finding Neverland Monster's ball. Stay in a whole bunch of others that he did stays. It stays a really interesting movie, fantastic cinematography and quantum in the podcast again Roberto reveals a few very fun facts, so take a listen when you get a chance. If you love Sunsets, you've got to see the opening to his movie rattlesnake. Best Sunset I've ever seen in my life and it was a real. It was a real video. All? Right, WE'RE GONNA go to another little clip here. This is Raymond Benson Happy Anniversary to the spy movie navigator. Cheers guys all right Raymond. Benson Raymond is a great guy to. He was the first American author to be authorized by the Ian Fleming publications right the continuation James Bond novels, so that's pretty big. He wrote six continuation novels plus three novelization of three Pierce Brosnan bond films, which were not novels before the film's. So. That's a lot of great work by Raymond Benson and his bond novels include zero minus ten the facts of death, high time to kill double shot, never dream of dying and the man with the red. Tattoo and he wrote the novelization 's from the Pierce Brosnan movies. Tomorrow never dies. The world is not enough in die another day. We're GONNA have a podcast with Raymond as a special guest. Upcoming very soon, he actually started with James. Bond bedside companion first published in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four very cool book I haven't. It only goes up to the living daylights, but it's packed with great information, and it's available now in e books. Only we met with ray and a couple of already, and he has a great music. Background is well. You can find them on facebook. Sometimes with a little piano concerts during those pandemic stuff. It's a nice little bit of entertainment, so thank. Even though he's not doing the anymore of the continuation novels for James, Bond. He still is writing, so he still is putting out books, which which are really good. Yeah, he's got a lot of great books out now. That are not bond books, but fabulous. Great writer terrific, so we've been having fun making context traveling to spy movie locations researching recording podcasts and doing videos as well. It's been a pleasure to meet some folks in person like remembered. In that time, we met Caroline Munro. Naomi in the spy who loved me and she was gracious with their time. We met with her in at Duke's bar in London. was. Meeting with her..

Benson Raymond James Bond Raymond Benson Pierce Brosnan Naomi ray Caroline Munro Roberto facebook Ian Fleming writer London. Duke
"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on Cracking the Code of Spy Movies!

"Right Fukunaga's the first American to direct the bond film for Eon. That's pretty amazing, yeah, it really is. Because no, originally, they want to keep it in in UK director. Yeah, we know Raymond Benson. Who was the first continuation author for the Fleming people? He was the first American to write the continuation right so now he directed beasts of no nation as well as the first season of HBO's True Detective He did Maniac, which is TV series. The movies son Sonoma's. And Jane Eyre and other projects, yeah, those are all been serious, not comedic works so incomes Waller Bridge to his directing life, so he didn't have a background of a lot of movies that did so, and it's odd to that. Terence Young, who directed the first bond movie Dr No. He had a lot of film directing experience including working with cubby. Broccoli at Warwick films. Red Beret that lady storm over the Nile, including a another film in Nineteen fifty eight called no time to die nothing to do with this one, but in nineteen fifty seven, he also directed action of the Tiger in which connery had a small part and young. Helped recruit connery or the role of bond for Dr. Size got cool. That is so now sin nombre was his first full length movie. He directed, and he's got a lot of praise for new. He won a bunch of best foreign language film awards at various things. It wasn't academy award, but it was. It was from other things like Sundance and stuff that he he won now the interesting thing to me from that when I look at that movie, and then I think about no time to die. It's GonNa. Be Interesting to see how he handled it because. I was really concerned and I still am. That when I heard that he was directing, so I hadn't seen his movies initially when when they first said he was going to do this, I'd seen season. One a true detective. explained that in a minute I didn't seem Jane Eyre and nor will i. that's just not my type of movie. Right no fence I, just not my my cup of tea, but then I heard him. There's a quote that's actually posted. An I'm DB so. So I. Don't know where came from it. Just it's a tribute to him. When I see an image in my head. That compels me where there's this mystery about what's going to happen next or could happen next I'll be intrigued. There are so many scripts that you read, and you know exactly what's going to happen and there are too many where you can't tell within the first twenty pages where it's going. That's good.

Jane Eyre Dr No connery Raymond Benson Eon Fukunaga Terence Young HBO Nile Waller Bridge UK director Sonoma Dr. Size
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome back you would listen to me talk to her best selling author Raymond Benson who has written forty some books and my next guest sitting right here dusty saying comes and gives me a book called little miracles a memoir and you go trick read this book this guy's written a hundred Bucks who is this guy does the hi welcome to our I'm good I'm good it's Gerald Hausman he is really today's Mark Twain he is a storyteller a man of the southwest he has just a fabulous way of story putting words on paper inspiring you it's very positive he's an interesting guy this is a publication of stay thirsty press which is an imprint of stay thirsty publishing which is a division of city thirsty media Inc all of that is the outgrowth of of of and I hate to always make you talk about it when you're around that of of of a manifestation of a tragedy true true so our son Ryan passed away and twenty for he had bipolar disorders fifteen years now in August the heart August and he had a philosophy to stay thirsty for things to the creative mind yeah and about a year and a half after he passed away his friends came over and they said we want to talk about Ryan I thought how interesting they were on the mid twenties and growing out of that we started what was an online magazine and its worldwide in the publishing business and so on but at the time of Ryan's passing at the cemetery my wife turned to me and she said you know we need to start a foundation so that other kids don't have to be Ryan and other parents don't have to be assigned us and we did and the foundation I was fifteen years old and in Ryan's memory and Ryan was he was one of those very high function people who had bipolar disorder he was our artist and writer and musician session and then growing out of his art work it was my wife's idea again we started an art exhibition which we did in his home town our hometown this is the this is the third you coming up right the third the art exhibition is called insights as his insights three we'll take me back to you enjoy your herb are you the foundation is doing well it's raising money you're having benefits you're doing reach you are you know helping find not if not a queue were for bipolar disorder at least to the paving the road toward in let me set the stage yeah so they're about forty four million people in the United States who have a mental disorder of those about sixteen percent have bi polar disorder so about seven million people wow but it's more than just a seven million people because it can be a son or a daughter or a cousin or a father mother grandparent aunt or uncle and it spread throughout the whole family to rescind the famed Hamleys racks of course so the choice and I just came back we were at our we do a a meeting at Harvard every two years with their key scientists and they share with us the unpublished work of the science that they're doing now it's really like science fiction to ordinary I Tuesday when choice and I walk in the room the sound you hear is the I. Q. dropping by half for for for for the over self effacing does that we talked about things like artificial intelligence we talked about where you can go from skin cells to make neurons in a dish that would be the same as the neurons in someone's head wow we we talked about ways that we can find diagnostic tests so that people will know earlier they met there may not be a cure but at least they'll have a better idea yeah that was one of the things as we've talked in you and I and and your wife towards of talked a good deal over the years about this and and the cure ET in in some cases it's just such a mysterious I think he there AT billion neurons and trillions of connections so science is good at identifying one variable at a time yeah so it takes a long time but now that we have better machinery tools and techniques so for instance there's some guys at Harvard and they're able to using artificial intelligence in big data they can predict suicidality three months to thirty six months in advance oh my god what they do is they create an algorithm they expose it to the five million electronic medical health records at mass General Hospital they retrain the algorithm and eventually so what happens is you go to the doctor you see somebody at mass general your stomach ache ever headache and eventually there's a pattern of behavior and then maybe you go along and you try to hurt yourself right so now suddenly when you look at the millions of records you begin to see patterns and so if I'm the clinician and I'm gonna come see you this algorithm they will be running in the background and so before I walk in it'll say ask the patient a question because you might have flipped up on the algorithm that you have some ideal idea of meat may be committing suicide how how was Ryan diagnosed I mean what what you know it's a long time ago and and think of it this way in missives in a previous story so you have a child so when you take your child to the pediatrician and the doctor says I don't know what's wrong it's a hard day all of that so Ryan was born in seventy nine and he started to really have night terrors and other things in the in the nineteen eighties and really had his first episode in the early nineties this is before the internet no Google sh so we were living in Palm Beach and the our resource was the west Palm Beach library which has the size of sort of a postage stamp right and it was only through other personal connections that we were able to find doctors but in those days you students you couldn't even have bi polar disorder unless you were eighteen it was by definition an adult disorder so what happens is this now psychiatry hasn't changed much in over a hundred years yeah right it's by definition it's by differential diagnosis and what we're trying to do is move it to where it's like a blood test an empirical test because then there's no quick if you have diabetes you've got a right answer you've got it right with a mood disorder there's no tests so for us as parents the one thing that we never got was it you know an early test so after Ryan passed away and we were invited to come up to meet the people at mass general they said before this meeting was sixteen site is back in twenty oh five he said once you guys set the agenda and I look at my wife Mrs really but what did we always want for Ryan attached yeah and then I was watching Monty Python and the search for the holy grail and if you recall there's a scene where King Arthur comes along with his nights and there's a suspension bridge in there's a bridge keeper and the keeper says you have to answer three questions or I'll cast you into the chasm the first question is what is your quest so I said to Joyce there it is quest for the test race for the cure quest for the test wow and if you find an empirical test all of a sudden it opens the door to a lot of things general mechanism so what we couldn't do for Ryan we're trying to do for others yeah that's the bottom line insights begins how it was eighty eight the first one featured the work of Jonathan winters in addition to Ryan there were others but what was the seed of that the is saying this might be it was still an art show well this happened actually in Palm Beach without Ryan and another boy who passed away with bipolar disorder and there was a small one night exhibition for sort of friends family and other people and it was an opportunity to really sort of get a sense of what we had rains artwork I've got a tape told you this before is is stunning on them on the father so I know you're the father but I never I never even met him and I'm telling you it's stunning so what happened was again I blame my wife physicians why don't we go ahead and and do a national competition so insights to which was last year it was done through a company called juried arts services there were over three hundred and twenty five submissions we had an independent jury of art experts who made the decision on the art we had nothing to do with it and than we did at the William does although Lieberman a gallery thanks to William Lieberman yeah the first one and then we did another competition and that show is going to be October twenty fourth through twenty six here yes again thanks to William Lieberman at this one of the nice things about it is is there many nice things about it and and does he's going to be on all the way till the twenty after sort of talk about this is there's an opening night reception invitation only there is but then the exhibition will be open to the public free of charge on the next following days October twenty fifth and twenty six was that the case last yes no Mister I thought wow what a great innovation this is a fantastic because you want to eat it it's a nice way to raise funds but also to to expose and I have the catalog here ladies and gentleman and the work is is beyond the engaging it captures me in a way that any great art it's not somehow you couldn't look at this on one gonna to but that that guy had by that girl is a bi polar disorder you can't at all how did you who who did you make the call to how does the call for submissions go out once again jury our services as a actually in west Palm Beach they have eighty thousand artists on their mailing list they do this for the alternate art fair they do it for the Smithsonian they do it all over the country and than it was in a couple different publications and then people submit JPEG images shall we say then last year of the of the of their work and then it goes to them there's a separate module goes to the judges and then a separate module tabulated all the do you do or is it based simply on the work itself absolutely nothing to do with the story of the creator of the works all the judges see here the pictures wow and in order to I mean one of the the things we wanted to highlight was creativity in the bipolar brain yeah bi polar disorder is a serious illness of the brain some people have great creativity what it's saying it put some people into it Ryan was one of them I think into a kind of creative over drive yes where the great the.

Raymond Benson fifteen years thirty six months sixteen percent hundred years three months twenty fifth two years
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Rick Kogan thank you Mister Roger banish a couple weeks ago on this program lovely lawyer was sitting here named Deborah DiMaggio when she was talking about her father's book memoirs slash biography and talking about how she discovered it and how she knew after his death that he really wanted it published and she found an expert to help with that his name was Raymond Benson and you heard him talk about what that was like tonight you're going to hear him talk about his fabulous career hello Raymond I promised you he'd be back did you of that he did a great job with that book in that book it's called Sarge must at what I found one of the things I found really amazing is that before you he decided to do it but then you you typed the entire book yeah that's right it was it was not digital file it was it was a manuscript that we needed to get digitizer a file so I'd retype the whole thing that was of the that I think is probably a wonderful way to sort of experience the writing style early and it you know and that helped me figure out what I needed to leave and what I what I had to take out your happy with that Booker yeah very much I think it's in my he was you and I both thought the th and think that he was a born writer absolutely it's his book it's no no no question I know I know you you were very self effacing and and humble about it do you think you're born writer you have some in the his latest rumors latest book is a novel called blues in the dark a really fascinating read that that wonderfully go takes me back in time and on the page opposite the title paid for does also by the author or some roughly forty some books that's right well I tell ya I never thought I'd be a writer when I was growing up you know I was hi I got in the theater I was in the movies I was in the plays I was in the music you're into gaming gaming well yeah let it was a little later today I'm you know I went to college and majored in theater as a we could at the university of Texas at Austin at that time you could specialize in disciplines so you could get actually get a degree in directing which is what I did let me look go back even further child of Odessa Texas of sort of famous desolation yes right and you went too long before it was the subject of buzz Bissinger is Friday night lights bestseller and TV series you went to the Permian high school in nineteen seventy three graduated in seventy three what was it you think of Texas especially in those kind of years as a very like man if you don't play football you were nothing you were does that have to Harvard for you was a kid to be sort of artistically expressive and in that area I was a well we had a really good drama department at the high school and we had a great teacher and you know the heart that that high school had money so even our even the drama department had money and so we we did good productions we had to do to theaters two stages it was nice and it was a pretty crowded drawing apartment as well as what your parents do my father was a geologist and he you know he worked and that that area is all you know the oil oil oil country so he he did that and my mom had you know various jobs and stuff but mostly she was a stay at home mom what were they were they the nurturing of your artistic they were very supportive they whatever I wanted to do they were behind it all the way and now I really grateful to them for that yeah and you which way would you do you go is is that one of the great things is your kid though you also are terribly influenced by Phil yes well that was all you could do I mean if you didn't play in the theater and that was the name of your local movie theater well we had about we had to downtown that we would go to but then around nineteen sixty eight they they built a brand new seventy millimeter screen where it where I saw two thousand one a space Odyssey when it first came out you know is it which was a big influence to but by saw Goldfinger with my dad on the big screen when I was nine and you know when your nine year you're open to a lot of stimuli let's put it in the did you hear what can reading were you doing as a kid well that was the thing I was a big reader I started reading and can you know before kindergarten yeah and when I was in first grade at the end of one semester they put me in second grade why because I was are you reading yeah yeah yeah yeah reader and what's for anything in particular and and I know with an early age yeah the time I was reading you know I'm sure I was reading like Tom swift and yeah that kind of stuff but when I was nine one once I saw Goldfinger I started reading reading and plumbing did you really all absolutely yeah you think that's a little early today it was a little early Fleming it was a little early and you know maybe I didn't get everything sure that I got the first story you know yeah and then I re read them couple years later and then a few years later the more meaning yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah the what drew you to cedar you thank well our one I thought I wanted to be an actor I mean it was seeing movies and and stuff and I did act a lot in high school sure and then when I got to analytics college but you switch you do you initially one went to college for acting and that's right at least one semester I became a directing major mainly because there was a professor there name Francis Hodge who was I had a text book that was widely used around the country and he was like he was like the John Houseman character of the paper chase sure everybody was in awe of him and scared of them but worshipped him as he was that brilliant and as a matter of fact next month next month in November there's gonna be a reunion of my people in the drama department paying homage to Dr hajj and I'm gonna be helping to run that thing else that you are when you got out of the you you you you were also writing plays at the time were you not well I just one yeah I was composing music I would collaborate with playwrights who were writing musicals and they and they had lyrics and I put music to their lyrics and tell me about your musical background well I took piano lessons when I was pretty young like seven or eight but only a couple of years because I didn't like it nobody at seven or eight yeah the likes of that hi I'm well I was really good at playing by ear and so I just kept playing I developed my own style but you know like I can still read a little music and I just kept playing and building on on what I had learned how are you I'm pretty good how bout you after that another part of of Raymond Benson creative output is his is his music so you graduate from college like a lot of kids from Texas and from Louisiana and from Montana and from Illinois you say I got to go to New York I did ice I stop for one year in Houston Texas at the alley theatre I was an apprentice there for for one year under princes director at sid and that was good experience and then I moved to New York alright let's talk about New York well we had to take in a minute we're gonna take a little commercial break but and we're gonna get into New York we're going to devote a lot of time to blues in the dark to later in this half hour but Raymond's career has been it's a long and winding road but it's also incredibly prolific too and and it's it's drawn you to different sorts of writing and I think I want to try to get into the creative brain of Raymond Benson and you must be quite a workaholic you dedicate the book to your family is any good author would that would be your your wife Randy and your son Max that's right and any as any writer knows the family has to put up with a great deal and they do so we'll take a commercial break and come back and we'll reinvention has arrived in New York and we'll see what the young Texan goes through in that big city black and white cats game Eugenia radio dot com.

Rick Kogan Mister Roger Deborah DiMaggio one year nine year
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome back I have just about ten minutes left with the Denver DiMaggio she is an attorney but she is also one of three siblings involved in the. discovery of the and the publication of and finding the talented writer Raymond Benson to is a set of orchestrate edit massage. the book Sarge cases of a Chicago police detective sergeant nineteen sixty to nineteen eighty. perhaps the first of a number of books and maybe perhaps is certainly a the basis for a TV series a six part Netflix or six part Amazon prime or whatever they need to fill it's filled with pictures. Devers father John was a read a handsome guy he will put you in mind of a just physically at least of commander Paul Bauer who recently was shot and killed in the middle of the loop of all places. you have a quote in here from from Peter Nolan who's been a frequent guest on the show former newsman who's now in the process of writing a series of his own memoirs. he said Chicago cops or is special breed there're few that you feel lukewarm about there are few that you feel lukewarm about you either love them or hate them I think you wind up and tell me I'm wrong Raymond Benson I think you wind up loving it in an admiring John the money all absolutely I mean he just for one thing he said he comes off as a very warm guy no question in how sensitive yeah yeah yeah I mean he seems to to. look out for you know the underdog and you can tell there's not a corrupt bone in his body yeah that's true and he looks out for his partner's she seems to have a real. we're all in this together kind of feeling about this thing do you use the old W. did when your book party most of their book party for this yeah you invited all of his former parts yes and it is easy for any of the come to think this were any of them like jealous heh heh I I should write a book well actually feel said I wish my daughter would do that. act like she cared yeah which might help me get me Raymond Benson it is there a real brotherhood now if they're real we rate we raised him well. did you ever did you or your sister. your brother ever think of becoming a cop. now..

Raymond Benson attorney John Chicago DiMaggio Peter Nolan Denver Netflix Amazon Paul Bauer writer commander partner ten minutes
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Yeah it's it's grown. a lot when you're damned right to in the book to your dad and Raymond I I'd consider like I think of them as collaborators do you W. wrote he wrote and I just kind of human kind of manicured manicured and yeah I just kind of put in order and but I hope my writing is good enough examples of what a fine a writer John was he writes here said one and we're talking about being part of to having one foot in one year and one in the other some of the old timers he right seem to take pride in their ethnic insensitivity I hadn't realized it but when I became a policeman I found myself scorned because of my Italian name by a few officers who punctuated their conversations with references to what they called and then he goes on to name a number of racial nasty racial words these usually were the patrolman who became detective because of department friends in high ranking positions are politicians who took an interest for the sake of money your dad succeeded in many ways and in especially in the wake of the. during the the nonsense info in nineteen sixty eight democratic convention one died not sure of round hsing cops get a bummer rap than they did then because your dad was a handsome put together guy who presented himself well he basically started acting kind of like as a spokesman didn't he for the police department I think so yeah use his super smart did you see on TV yes did you say that's my dad. just took it in stride yeah in. sort of run of the mill you know one of the things that I mentioned the software that I. your your father bears a. striking almost spooky resemblance to the late commander Bauer who was killed by the year two ago yes did you do agree yes. I wanted to bring up her a big section of the book deals with what he called the three musketeers yes this was John and two of his cohorts Jimmy Nolan and Paul Paul repel Palmer. rebel rebel and they they and everybody in in the the department referred to them as the three musketeers because they were always together they were always going out almost kind of rogue yeah sometimes yeah yeah yeah and solved a lot of stuff you know did it make you know think curious Freeman eat in this book reading it I never toyed with the idea of becoming a police officer what for why I don't know because nineteen sixty eight and I was getting high in the Lincoln Park or something I don't know. did it he he he makes it. incredibly exciting it makes it tough for me he gives you the tough parts too but there's a he also the sort of romantic picture being a cop does any. I don't I'm not sure rheumatic is the right word but I would say real and gritty is is you know it it it it reads the way. a true crime say docking docu drama yeah would play out yeah as if as if it was scripted by Hollywood scriptwriters but the thing is is it's all true yeah he makes it exciting there's no way no doubt about that like a modern day cowboy yeah yeah yeah I'm binging rawhide so are you yeah the old rawhide yeah. I'm not yeah. it's old school you need to more cases you can't be binging rawhide about they've got to take another break and we'll close off by by asking these to find people in again the book is titled Sarge cases of Chicago police detective sergeant nineteen sixty to nineteen eighty there's an audio version two right yes who who does the auto version Kevin Pearce whose he he's pretty famous okay four hundred forty four hundred fifteen books well looks how does it sound. have you heard a you haven't heard I heard it when the audition we auditioned O. okay okay as a son he's phenomenal how does he do all these voices I want to do W. Wilson John John John will get you the audiobook dog get the audio book I'll get this on my own I'll get the sun may will be back in a couple minutes of Deborah DiMaggio and Raymond Benson to finish off of this hour talking about. large. Tuesday night.

W. Wilson John John John Raymond Benson Lincoln Park Bauer Chicago writer commander Kevin Pearce Jimmy Nolan Freeman officer Deborah DiMaggio Paul Paul Palmer. one foot one year mill
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"But also through the artful hand of writer novelist. renaissance man Raymond Benson who kind of. he was given a. very polished piece of clay and managed to massage it and mold it into this a compelling book that tells you around Chicago from nineteen sixty to nineteen eighty you will get a real. trip back in time it really is very evocative of the time you'll get it from of the perspective of a police officer who was in the middle of all this stuff the book also is sort of quietly honors rose merry the wife and mother who will this is an honor W. Wilson a dozen one of the great lines of a written a book I dreaded driving Wilson home some days when he would tell me to pull over and buy him a bottle of Bourbon there's that I mean that and it will send one of the best characters in the book you know no question yeah and he captured the way he talks is if the recall on drone. that will send a couple times the other interesting thing if you get the the kind of there's a miss Martino slaying these the death of a. woman in a housing and housing complex a eight nice kind of apartment building out near o'hare. and that's what you get involved with many scars who was one of the legendary outfit guys in the history of this town in where where sergeant DiMaggio meets a guy named Bob Glickman and he says Bernie Glickman Bernie click many rights was my first mob points and I was surprised at how help pleasant and helpful he was however a completely different Bernie Glickman testified at the inquest into the death of this poor young woman named miss Martino. I was shocked when he said. miss Martino was in low spirits and expressed a desire not to live there by covering up trying to pretend a that a suicide took place rather than it was a murder one of the other interesting things about this you too. is learning that that your dad was involved even though it didn't take place in the suburbs with the case of Valerie Percy. murder of Charles Percy's daughter and I I think it was kennel worth how did that happen. remember I mean he might he was a he was a great detective and I'm sure that kennel worth laughed a huge detective squad that wanted him I think he writes a. he was my firm belief that the truth of the Percy came as would finally emerge all the agencies that worked on it came together a sum of the parts of the puzzle. that's the thought I cured with me ever since the investigation was dropped especially when I read this quote newspaper. the case would be cleared should be cleared for the anguish family in the sake of justice and because Valerie's voice is still calling out to us from the grave anybody who remembers that case will will be I still remember that there is a high profile case all they had to get resources from all all around sure no and that's how you got involved because he was a good detective. what do you think your father think of this book but he'd be proud of it very very proud what do his buddies think of this book aside from telling stories about scaring her their kids of boyfriends and girlfriends there came over they're thrilled with that because it honors the police and the police force yeah work they do and I think the public really doesn't understand it and I remember my dad telling me once that it's unfortunate that the most people view the police department based on some traffic stop in it's usually an unpleasant experience but the public doesn't see the work of the detectives the homicide detectives the burglary robbery what they're doing how hard they work how many hours they put in and the dedication Yang also think that you know we we're living now in a time where were the relationship between you know people who live down here for instance in were in the Tribune studios lacquer. and Columbus and a very nice part of town peoples you know relationships with police officers down here or basically Hey we're we're we're engineers breakfast place and again an answer it's vastly different in beleaguered neighborhoods where it's you know due to some people are afraid of the police and the police are justifiably afraid of some neighborhoods and some people it's more I think it's more complicated than it was in your dad's day rain what do you think about so yeah we'll just because of technology and and you know population growth and everything just the. just.

miss Martino Bernie Glickman Bernie Bernie Glickman Bob Glickman Raymond Benson W. Wilson writer sergeant DiMaggio officer Chicago o'hare.
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"For personalized traffic on demand get the traffic Chicago apple proved by the mortgage experts of team Hochberg just search T. R. A. F. F. Chicago forecast from the WGN Chicago weather center rest of the overnight mostly cloudy little round fifty nine Monday chance of showers through one in the afternoon otherwise mostly cloudy with a high near seventy eight Tuesday partly sunny and windy the high near eighty seven temperatures now sixty three at o'hare and Elgin sixty four along the lakefront sixty five at midway like Michigan water temperature sixty seven wins of the Easter date I'm Roger Batterson the WGN radio news from these are the stories that matter on seven twenty WGN. I remember when I met Carol Martin it must have been a dozen years ago. this wise old Sam Goodman ladies and gentleman back with a new CD it's been gone for many years now the CD is called Santa Ana winds. and it's going a police detective sergeant John DiMaggio is back fill in a way he is back among us telling incredible stories things to not only his daughter Debra modular tourney and his other two children whose names are. John and Diane but also through the artful hand of writer novelist. renaissance man Raymond Benson who kind of. he was given a..

WGN John DiMaggio Chicago apple Roger Batterson Raymond Benson Carol Martin Hochberg Sam Goodman Michigan Elgin Santa Ana writer Diane
"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"raymond benson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Because they are dealing with that matter you know it's it's a little more intense but don't you agree very much so and then you can tell that from the book the no no quite different Deborah's mother was rose merry was right there with the family and you know helping to keep the family together while he was out risking his life and I would also so when reading his stories you must of had this incredible new kind of respect for her absolutely. so you talk what must have been you know it's very interesting at the end of the book indeed the last line of this book is there are many more stories to be told I would imagine that the manuscript of this book was probably twice the size of this pretty much was I think I I think it was about a third longer. and I was gonna say earlier that you know when I first read it it was the voice the came out I couldn't really hear his voice and that's that's unusual specially for first time writer yeah you know it takes writers sometimes four five books to find their voice you for that will bring some writers twenty five books and they never exactly he did do though he was doing an early kind of a sorry dear Sarge kind of not exactly like him landers but it was of sort of on line kind of thing that he started doing really early when did you start doing that why. it was a column yeah when he was in Las Vegas retired I think was S. Sarge asks ours that's right and they would writing questions and he dancer who was he doing at Ford was formed from the mystery writers of America right right so we obviously had these aspirations to be a writer do you remember Deborah DiMaggio your dad doing a lot of reading at home you know sitting by the fire place you remember him doing anything. that approach the literary life what was he like as an at home dad we didn't we didn't have a fireplace. you're romanticizing the so he wanted to be a lawyer yeah I know you went to DePaul and wanted to be a lawyer and kids came along and did he did he live long enough to to see you become a lawyer yes that must submit a pretty proud to yes but he did it in ten the book here I think you went to DePaul for a couple years anyone want of going to Korea right right in the war and came back and why did he not pursue what his father was a a truck driver and self water market right right. I'm just showing off for you because to show you that I've actually read the book why did he not pursue law do you think we came along. but one angel only law enforcement then do you think. I you don't speculate I don't know I think I keep I yes my aunt and I can't remember he just applied and got in the academy they were looking for please. I seem to remember in the book that he was working. Thursday right and is that basically said we can't afford the college stuff and however this policeman thing could be an opportunity didn't wasn't it yeah I gave that memory too yeah one of the one of the cool things in the preface in the preface to the book in again the book is called Sarge cases of a Chicago police detective sergeant nineteen sixty to nineteen eighteen of those of you were of an age and remember what those years for like in the city of Chicago is I do those were rough years there are some very rough self storage in here I'm gonna spend this entire hour with Dever DiMaggio in Raymond Benson it's kind of their collaborative effort I know your brother John and your other in your sister were both involved in this but this is a this is quite a book will be back after a short commercial break that all start by telling you. Sunday's your official like to tour the city wash your call is best at ten PM and stick around for the latest and shopping entertainment and events on C. Chicago at ten thirty PM on WGN TV will be right back..

Deborah DiMaggio Chicago DePaul S. Sarge writer landers Las Vegas Ford Korea America Raymond Benson official John