18 Burst results for "Ray Stevens"

"ray stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:42 min | Last month

"ray stevens" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"To the donbas region Ukrainians say that they shot a Russian warship in the Black Sea Nearly 200 children have been killed in the fighting 351 injured the U.S. now providing more military aid including helicopters and cannons While some are speculating that there could be additional corruption cases in the works linked to alderman former alderman Danny Solis there may not be here is Nigel Prosecutors Wednesday revealed that they are looking for the deferred prosecution deal to last for another three years Former federal prosecutor pat Brady says there's a reason for that He tells ray Stevens on WLS I think what happened with this deferred prosecution agreement they entered on Wednesday as their probably my guess is they're done with his cooperation and they extended out the date that he would actually figure out what they're going to do with him until these trials the matting and the berk trails That would align with what other legal experts are saying that it could be due to the time needed to get ready for those trials Yet some are still saying it could signal there are additional corruption cases in the works that we just don't know about yet Nick Gale 8 90 WLS news He wants to be Chicago's next mayor on WLS 15 four worth alderman ray Lopez says he's ready for the job I've stood up for Chicago from day one taking on the gang bangers in my own neighborhood and seeing what's happened to the city with a crime running out of control with the enablement of criminality I know I can stand up and make a difference He says if elected one of his first moves will be to fire Chicago superintendent David Brown Chicago police are searching for a suspect in an attack on 61 year old Jin Liu who was robbed and left unconscious on the street in Chinatown last week It happened at 25th place in Princeton family spokesperson doctor Kim Ye spoke to ABC 7.

alderman Danny Solis pat Brady Black Sea ray Stevens Nick Gale WLS news Nigel ray Lopez Chicago U.S. Jin Liu David Brown Chinatown Princeton Kim Ye ABC
"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

"Committed, focused, high quality science, that will get us there. And absolutely, do we protect our IP? In all the geographies, absolutely. But getting there fast and efficient is really important. That's actually something very similar to what Stefan von Sel once told me about the early days of Moderna is that yes, they have a whole lot of intellectual property around mRNA, but the most important thing was this culture of high-speed learning that were constantly getting better constantly pushing the edges and other people will presumably come along and make knock off mRNA vaccines. They know that. But they need to keep moving. Yeah, I was just going to sort of add to that. One of the reasons why in Shanghai, if we need 20 chemists Friday, it's easy. If we don't need them two weeks later, because we've tested a hypothesis and made it easy. We can turn the spigot on and off. So it's very capital efficient in that regard. And if you're in the same city and you can look across the table at the people doing the work, that also makes a huge difference. Okay, so just a few minutes left here, right? What are you actually working on here with this company? What do you hope to discover and develop? Yeah, so the so our first program went into the clinic last May. That was the one that I was literally in my tent at Everest base camp. It's funny you say the tense flapping. It was a big snowstorm and I was stuck in my tent trying to get I was carrying a sort of satellite booster to get a signal. So that molecule we've just finished phase one, that's for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PH, so we're focused on chronic disease, pulmonary cardiovascular metabolic, our second molecule, we're about to dose for type two diabetes and obesity. And very excited about that. And again, this is all in each of these. There's biologics out there. And the biologics have validated the target. But these medicines just are only available to a small subset of the world, so those first two. So we're two molecules in the clinic right now. And the third one later this year, probably early next year, we'll have the third one. So we've learned a lot of lessons over the past 25 years of building BioTech companies. Each time we try to do it better and better, I think we've been quite efficient in that regard. But what I'm most excited about right now is, you know, we're now in the clinic or clinical company, getting this to the patients really seeing the response, it's both, you know, I'm nervous, but also incredibly excited that we're finally getting these medicines to patients that can help them. And at the end of the day, the way that I want to measure show tea success is I know my investors want market cap and value. But my measure of success for show tea, number of patients that we treat. That's going to be our metric for success. FDA approved medicines that reach a lot of people. You mentioned their biologically validated targets by biologic medicines, and these are going to be orally available, small molecules, presumably available at a lower price. Is that part of your thinking as well? Yeah, and this is where different geographies come into play. And you know, one of the we are going after chronic disease, my investor Friends, my CEO, Friends, I'll tell me, ray, you know, it's great that you want to take these things as far as you can. Well, we're committed just like receptors. We were committed all the way to market. We would love to be able to do that. We may need to partner, but the piece that I want to be sort of careful about is I want to make sure that we maintain some rights for rest of world because I want to make sure these medicines become available to all countries, not just those that can afford them based on pricing. Maybe that does come home for you and for me, people have been to places like Nepal or Tanzania. And when you see people in these places and realize what kind of medicines are available and could be available. It's a big, a big need. Absolutely. It's worth our time. To work on these things. Absolutely. Ray Stevens, thank you so much for joining me today on the long run. Thank you, Luke. A pleasure. Thanks for listening to the long run. A production of timberman report. Pedro rosado of his stepper media was the sound editor. Music is from DA wallach. See you next episode..

Stefan von Sel pulmonary cardiovascular metab Moderna chronic disease Everest base camp pulmonary arterial hypertensio Shanghai obesity diabetes FDA ray Tanzania Nepal Ray Stevens Pedro rosado Luke DA wallach
"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

02:25 min | 2 months ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

"We so when we develop this technology and then we had the engineers build the equipment, we realized, you know, we can get through structural biology, structure based drug discovery, way faster than anybody's ever been able to do before. So we started that first company called cyrix. And that was pretty successful. Ended up being acquired by Takeda. And you're able to figure this out like within your other responsibilities of being a faculty, you know, doing research. I don't know if mentoring, publishing, seeking out grants. But what did you learn about the experience with industry and what it could do to advance your research agenda? Yeah, you know what? What I love about starting BioTech companies is it's a real team sport activity. You have to have people from all the areas, finance, HR, chemistry, biology, all these different pieces. Everybody's working together for one single reason. They want to make a medicine. Now, some might be doing it because they want to make value in the company. Some are doing it because they're passionate about the patients. But everybody's pulling in the same exact direction. And that was one of the things I really, in academia, particularly at Berkeley, we used to sort of joke. If we could get a couple professors together to work together, wow, you could do something significant. And I think times have changed. People do collaborate way more now than they did 25 years ago. And that's, I think, a good evolution of academia. But academia is still largely rewarded for independence. Whether you're a graduate student in that first author of paper or you're an assistant professor and you're trying to balance the teaching load with the publication with the grants and everything. So what I learned in the first company, I loved how much it was a team activity and everybody, all these smart people pulling together for the same cause. Do you enjoy listening to the long run podcast? Then you'll love getting full access to my coverage of the top people and trends, my Popular Front points column on Fridays, plus the expert views of BioTech leaders who I curate and edit at timmerman report dot com. Subscribe for a month, a quarter, or a year at a time. Discounts are available.

cyrix Takeda academia Berkeley
"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

07:46 min | 2 months ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

"1920 years, and we failed miserably year after year. And what I would do like any system professor starting up. And that's why it was really important to have this balanced portfolio of projects in my lab. The neural enzymes that worked out really, really well. And in fact, led to the development of two drugs that we that my lab got to develop. Cuban and Palin seek that are both now in the market. We also worked on botulinum neurotoxin, which messes up neurotransmission and we help we worked with a company allegan on Botox. The so, you know, we did the projects that paid the bills. We would use some of those funds that we got to the skunk work project to continue the GPCR project. But I got rejected, grant after grant, no agency was going to fund something that people didn't think was possible. And so it wasn't until Elias sahu, who was director of the NIH. When he took over as director, he knew that there were a lot of these really pie in the sky areas that we needed breakthroughs, but it was going to take a interdisciplinary approach to overcome them. He created a program at NIH called the road map initiative. And that road map initiatives singled out membrane protein, structural biology as an area that we needed breakthroughs. And so we didn't get it funded specifically with GPCRs. But we had been developing a lot of new technologies. Nano volume crystallization, small microfluidics, and so that road map initiative really gave us a big breakthrough to develop the technologies that we could then relay into G protein coupled receptors. Now, was this all happening at Berkeley or did some of this stuff happen later when you were in San Diego? Yeah, so we moved to San Diego, this would have been 1999, I believe. And the reason was I had a really close collaboration with Pete Schultz in the chemistry department at Berkeley. We had asked me whether I'd be interested in crystallizing some of his catalytic antibodies. And I told Pete, you know, I don't know a lot about antibodies, immune system, but I thought it was really interesting. So I'm happy to help him out. You know, to me, one of the common themes in my whole career is, I like helping people plan and simple. And so I told Pete at help him. What happened? And within about sort of four to 5 years, I think we generated 9 science and nature papers. We had the cover of science one year. We really got to understand how antibodies mature. So the maturation process of antibodies going from germline to mature antibodies. And so the reason why I'm telling you this story is that collaboration with Pete was incredibly productive wasn't specifically in my neuroscience track, but just helping him out. And so Pete was being recruited to Scripps back then. And Pete asked me he said, ray, you've done amazing things with the collaboration. He also liked the technology development that we were doing to ultimately get GPCRs. He believed GPCRs were important. So Pete suggested that I might want to move to Scripps at the same time he was moving. And I went down to Scripps, met with Richard Lerner. And the negotiation took about maybe 90 seconds, and that was it. You know, Richard asked me what I wanted. I said, this is what I want to do. And Richard really wanted people that were that really wanted to do ambitious projects that could really move the dial. And the GPCR project was exactly that type of project. So that's why I always included the scripts. There's the collaborative piece that you're referencing that a lot of scientists will appreciate. But there's also the community that you're in. Like the other, so what kinds of skills were you surrounded by there, whether it be a scripts or just in broader San Diego that you were able to be stimulated by? Yeah, so, you know, again, it's interesting how life so it goes. So when we moved to San Diego to Scripps, Pete was starting to sense to for the Novartis foundation. And what he wanted to do, his crazy idea was his roommate at Caltech was from the car industry. I think he worked at Saturn at the time, Saturn cars. And Pete wanted to use automation from the automobile industry and apply it to drug discovery, biology discovery, and one of those areas was structural biology. So I got to work with these engineers from the automobile industry, and they said, all right, show me what you have to do to express a protein to purify it to crystallize it. And they automated the whole thing. And at this time, I remember when I was going to Berkeley, I was trying to negotiate for crystallization robot, and the chairman of the department said, you don't need a crystallization robot. You have graduate students. They can do all the work. And back then, we didn't have the technology. So that was probably the most efficient approach. But working with these engineers from the automobile industry, they really got it. We had this big breakthrough in microfluidics that was happening in the whole field. And so they automated everything. And so now there are crystallization robots, purification robots, expression robots. We use these routinely today. All structural biologists do. This is a very similar story too, you know, what I talked about with Lee hood and the book about the automated DNA sequencer. Same exact story about the graduate students and the manual. Yep, you're absolutely right. That's in fact, if you think about the timing, this is right after Lee hood and DNA sequencing. The next area was, of course, what are you going to do about the proteins? And so, you know, I work in a protein world. So that's what we got our inspiration from. So you're developing these technologies with some help from engineers. Was industry involved or at what point did you start working with people who were in industry? So about the same time that we were putting this together, we had to actually at Berkeley, we had developed what we call nano volume, crystallization. And again, this is a great example of so in structural biology would typically work at the microliter scale. That's what students can pipette reliably. That's why that was chosen that scale. And when you go down to my athletics, all of a sudden, you can go down to nanometer volumes. And with membrane proteins, when it's so scarce, we really had to scale down tremendously. So we started working with the engineers and we realized, you know, this probably a BioTech company in this. So the first company that we started was a company called cyrix. In fact, we started this with somebody else who we've had on your podcast before. Net David. So Ned David was one of my was actually my first PhD student at Berkeley. And Ned, you know, really, he loved the technology. I give Ned all the credit for really driving the company at the very early stages. And by the way, every company I've started has been with a former student with something that I really enjoy what the process. But we so when we develop this technology and then we had the engineers build the equipment, we realized, you know, we can get through structural biology,.

Pete GPCR Elias sahu San Diego Berkeley Scripps NIH Pete Schultz Richard Lerner Lee hood Novartis foundation Cuban Palin Richard ray cyrix Ned David athletics Ned
"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

06:50 min | 2 months ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on The Long Run

"On the long run. Ray Stevens, welcome to the long run. Thank you, Luke. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. It's an honor to be on your show. Very glad to have you on the show. And for the listeners who don't know, I'm a share a little known fact about you. I really kind of wish that this recording were done in a tent on some desolate mountain somewhere with the wind flapping. Maybe we'll have to do that sometime. And the reason I say that for those who don't know is that ray is a serious mountain climber, made an attempt on Mount Everest in 2021. And so I'm very much rooting for you as a fellow BioTech traveler. You could say, who loves the mountains? Well, you'll appreciate this last year when I was at Everest base camp. I was in the middle of also we were dosing our first patient. And we're also closing our series B and I was trying to do that from a satellite phone from Everest base camp. And I got to say, it was quite challenging. So we were successful, but it was challenging. I can imagine calling in the middle of the night, not feeling so well, difficulty breathing. Yep, exactly. You know it. You've been there before, Luke. Yes, yes. Well, so I'd like to weave these threads together as you know as a listener of this show, the personal and the professional. So can we start from the beginning? So you're a boyfriend, man. Absolutely. What part? So I grew up in auburn Maine went to college. I got my bachelor's degree at University of southern Maine. And my hope is someday. I really want to return to Maine in the later chapters of my life. I want to get back to the state of Maine as some stage coming up. What was it like growing up there? You know, very, I would say normal. I played outside as a kid. Not surprisingly, I was a boy scout. So I did a lot of things outdoors. Really enjoyed growing up, didn't, you know, when you're a kid, you don't really know much about anything else that's going on. The state of Maine, this is another small fact state of Maine had a really big paper industry and shoe industry. And about 20 years ago, both of those industries left the state. So Maine as Maine's economy has struggled quite harshly. And I kind of look at main, particularly Portland Maine, and places like Seattle and Portland, Oregon, where they've really those cities have really come up. I think, you know, Maine has a lot of potential, but largely the only industry left is really tourism. So they have a great natural environment where we exposed to that as a kid, boy scouts you mentioned. Absolutely. One of my fondest memories was in the Boy Scouts to do something called order the arrow where they drop you in the middle of the Woods and you spend the night by yourself trying to find your way back. And then the Woods of Maine, that can be quite intimidating. But I just loved it. And so I really got my love for mountains, love for outdoors. And I have three kids in one of the best gifts that I've given them is the same love for the outdoors. It's something that you can do. It's free. You can go outside, you can climb mountains, and all three of my kids at the time they complained about it. But now they're all three are grown up. They have the same love and passion for the mountains and outdoors. Now, when you were growing up, what did your parents do for a living? So my dad was in the air force, we moved up, moved all around the U.S., they were both from Maine state of Maine. My dad passed away when I was 6 years old. And so my mother started raising us. She had a hard time raising three kids by herself. So we moved back to Maine. So each of us sort of went separate ways when we were young, and then my mother was able to then work and get us all back together again. So growing up, so my mother was in the army. And so that was part of it. So father in the air force, mother in the army, I joined the army. The day that I turned 17, I joined the army. It separate ways. Your siblings went to go live with somebody else? Yeah, so my brother went to an orphanage. My sister went to neighbors, and I went to an aunt's to help take care of her. Oh, wow. Okay. And how old were you when this happened? This would have been my father passed away when I was 6. This would have been when I was about probably about 9 or ten years old. Wow. So that's pretty traumatic. You know, when you're a young kid, you just kind of do, you know, what it takes to keep plugging along. So you went to university of southern Maine. What kind of schools did you go to prior to that and how did you get interested in science? Yeah, so one of the questions that you always ask, people on this podcast is, what type of student were you? And I've thought about that. I was not your typical student. I was not a good student. I did very well in math and science. I love math and science. In fact, my freshman year, I was able to have a college in our hometown called Bates college. And I was able to go at a very young age for those that are skilled in math. I was able to take college classes as a freshman. But other subject areas, particularly like English, I almost didn't pass tenth grade because I was very late to turning in my required term paper. At that age. So but I got through it. And I graduated on time. So very, very proud of the fact that I did graduate. You learned later that writing is actually an important skill. Communication and writing, you know, absolutely. You can do the most amazing things in the world. But if you can't communicate them, you know, it's hard to be able to share these things, these breakthroughs that you have. So what was it about university of southern Maine? Was this just like the local state school, like you could afford or something about it? Yeah, so what happened was, as I mentioned, I joined the army when I was 17, literally went to fort Dietrich in, oh no, fort Dix in New Jersey..

Maine Everest base camp Luke Ray Stevens University of southern Maine Mount Everest Portland army auburn Seattle Oregon air force U.S. Bates college fort Dietrich fort Dix New Jersey
"ray stevens" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I just fired a number three week Wacker. There. We can do this. You will not get rid of this theme song. I like this theme songs so tired of this listeners would be very upset. I love the song. What if I wrote a song value would be great. They'll be good. I might be able to make that. Maybe we could use that not only on this show, but also the movie. I think that's an excellent What's the name of the movie? I think it should just be called path. Um, we could use your middle name. Yeah. Heard Sullivan. Just think. That I like that. I was also thinking it up over there. Do you hear what he just said? E think it Zen idea. Something to consider. Just gonna say two clowns and a microphone. Began its one thing I demand its respect, Lord Oh, man, you know, the only problem is that what's that gives Denny too much building course it does. Oh, golly, Welcome to the third hour of the home and garden show. It's aren't the best hour. Let's get rid of it. I think that theme song has run its course. I'm telling you this time last year you said the exact same thing. And we took a poll on Facebook and people were right roll. Here's the thing. You're gonna find our house. Okay? Right across the seals know how about just for like Every once in a while then, although that that was the 1st 10 years of my show is that and then you realized every home improvement. What across the country? What's the theme song for this old house? Do they have one? You know, I don't know. I'm sure they do Guess we could start displaying the green Acres name song. What about Kevin writing the song or you could even cover it. Yeah, I think, uh, I think that's probably the best idea, right? Something original. Yeah. All right. Maybe I could. Maybe you could sing on it. And there you were dead. He could probably sing on it too. I can sing you are you commissioning him? Is that what you're doing? All right. Sounds like sounds like a plan. All right, So you know, I don't want it to be something you could kind of talk over a little bit. You want some, like acoustic guitar? Something like rustic Maybe a banjo. You know, there doesn't even have to be any vocals. Okay? Could just be What's a rift? You mean a riff that an entire rebel is something else? That rift is what Jenny and I have. We have a rift. No, it's it's the same. It's just a quick little ditty. Usually at the beginning of the Donna and Ana. It's what people remember. What about just a flat out drum solo? I mean, that's even better. I could probably do some bongos layers. Um Bongo solo and over it. If in the next couple of lit this fuse, I want to know who lit the fuse. In the next couple weeks to three weeks. If each week you could just bring us a little sample don't have be long. A complete piece. Just some ideas. Kind of like some storyboards type thing. I'll get on it. Okay, thanks. You're content attributing to the delinquency of a minor. I'm not. I'm trying to get rid of them theme song that we've had for 15 years. I like the song people. Ray Stevens. Are you kidding me? I was in class Higgins, but Don't we play some other race? Steven's things like exactly what I know there's a really popular streak. Oh, no, He actually had some serious songs like Ray Stevens didn't have any serious so sure he did, like raindrops Keep falling on my head. Maybe that one. You are beautiful. Find that we've Alison Please. Find that out. You boss her around. That is not yet they call in the street. I know, but that's that's his parody stuff. He's got something you're must judge Kevin when we come back later. See if you can find some other race Stevens. He has a very famously called the street. Does he okay? We have to play that quarantine song. Can we just take spring? Maybe it's time to bring back Jason Moore. As is everyone Just get along. Damn it! I'm not kidding with that show. Yeah, we played this Jason Moore as pure song. And I swear I got so many messages on Facebook from people safe that song in their heads, and they need to stop. I've got it on the playlist, actually. Let me see what I can do here, huh? We played it every time somebody would complain about plumbing or something. This boy.

Ray Stevens Kevin Facebook Jason Moore Wacker Sullivan Lord Oh Higgins Steven Denny Jenny Donna Alison
"ray stevens" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"And every thing is beautiful in its own way the inbounds are flowing fine just like a starry night or snow covered winter's day wait wait wait wait put the brakes on that's not true if you're on south on thirty five W. right now you are seeing brake lights between the U. S. highway ten county ninety six but other than that everything is looking really good there ray Stevens have fun and good luck this morning our five Eyewitness News forecast from Ken Barlow partly sunny fifteen degrees today blustery and fifteen overnight but then clouds drizzle and thirty eight tomorrow it's one above right now my talk Mr my top you can always stream or download your favorite show as a podcast wherever you find your podcasts or at my top keywords the best when they give me in the back we had a party we don't wanna Sir can some people see on the road welcome back everybody Jason and Alexis in the morning on my talk with a seven one it is hard candy with the six twenty traffic alerts thank Hansen needed on alert what did you see on the road okay reach out you guys you know how you see someone driving and you think like all they must be texting or something because it's not.

ray Stevens Ken Barlow Jason Alexis Hansen
"ray stevens" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"The gas station. What happened? You're getting McCarthy. Jay here comes streaking around. The Greek didn't have nothing. Bitter cold, right? It's too late. She'd already been moon. Pro shop. Just you. Quarter covering. How did you see what happened? Yeah. Hi, I'm just going down. Our get up the snow. Come out of the same. Right down the middle of the didn't have nothing, buddy. Made a hook shot and got after the confession staying power. NFL? I said. She'd already got free. Grand theft. From the hull. Come with it. What? Dirk. You got. Excellent. Nineteen seventy four. Maria Molnar began with a midnight at the basis. Off to the cinema with Jack Nicholson in Chinatown, the Patty Hearst kidnapping update that took quite a turn off the TV to catch us a nineteen seventy four hits Maude good times. I think even the FOX was in there. And then, of course, news report on new fad called streaking up all by Ray Stevens, Masan he calls the streets. It's all from nineteen seventy four. You're listening to the Santa Fe hometown project nineteen seventy four. Project. That'll be right back. Radical this important. Echo one hundred really alive. Cameramen radar XL.

McCarthy Maria Molnar Patty Hearst Jay Jack Nicholson Ray Stevens Dirk Santa Fe NFL theft Masan kidnapping FOX Chinatown Maude
"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

"Today. The rate on former Trump lawyer, Michael Cohen's office have been made public AP Washington. Correspondent saga megani reports. The show the agency was on his trail long before the rate a heavily redacted version of the search warrant gives new details about the federal probe of Cohen's business dealings and the two raids in April twenty eighteen it shows the Cohen investigation started in July twenty seventeen much earlier than previously known the rates were the first public signs of a criminal probe that has threatened the Trump presidency agencies more than four million electronic and paper files and Cohen has since pleaded guilty to tax evasion and making hush money payments to two women who claimed affairs with Trump a judge ordered that the redacted Warren beaver released after news outlets, including the AP asked that it be made public saga megani at the White House. Country duo Brooks and Dunn Ray Stevens and industry veteran. Jerry, Bradley will all be inducted into the country music hall of fame, the Grammy winning duo of kicks broke, Sandra. Ronnie Dunn have had twenty number one hits including songs like boots scoot, boogie and brand new Man Ray Stevens is known for singing zany hits like the streak, but also some sentimental ones. Like, everything is beautiful Bradley's the son famous producer, Owen, Bradley, and he was the former head of RCA records Nashville office, most plastics used at restaurants could be banned under legislation being considered in Hawaii the proposals aimed at cutting down on waste that pollutes the ocean. Dozens of cities have banned plastic foam containers, but Hawaii would be the first to bar them. Statewide, a second more ambitious proposal would prohibit restaurants in Hawaii from handing out in using plastic drink bottles utensils stirring, stick. Six bags and straws activists believe the first measure has a better chance of passing. Some businesses say the legislation would force them to raise prices because there aren't any good alternatives to plastic..

Michael Cohen Bradley Hawaii Ray Stevens AP Trump Ronnie Dunn Grammy producer Warren beaver RCA Nashville White House Brooks Sandra Jerry
"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

"Authorities president effective on Wednesday. It did not give a specific reason. He's not seventy eight years old and has led Kazakhstan since one thousand nine hundred nine when it was still part of the Soviet Union. He came to power as the central Asian nations communist party chief and was then elected president. He took nearly ninety eight percent of the vote in the most recent election in twenty fifteen when elected for another five year term, according to Kazakhstan's constitution, the upper house speaker acts as head of state until the new president is elected President Trump says he's donated his quarterly salary to another government agency AP's. Jackie Quinn tells us where the president tweeted out a photo of a check for one hundred thousand dollars written this month to the department of homeland security. You may remember when the billionaire candidate was running for office. He vowed not to. Except the four hundred thousand dollar a year salary of the president. He's donated other paychecks to various federal agencies, including the departments of education, health and human services, veterans affairs and the National Institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism Jackie Quinn. Washington. Country duo Brooks and Dunn Ray Stevens and industry veteran. Jerry, Bradley will all be inducted into the country music hall of fame, the Grammy winning duo of kicks Brooks. And Ronnie Dunn have had twenty number one hits including songs like boots Putin. Boogie and brand new Man Ray Stevens is known for singing zany hits like the streak, but also some sentimental ones. Like, everything is beautiful Bradley's the son of famous producer, Owen, Bradley, and he was the former head of RCA records Nashville office. Radio news. I'm Tim Maguire special counsel. Robert Muller is expected to soon releases report on his lengthy investigation into Russian meddling in the two thousand sixteen election, and what if any relations the Trump campaign had.

president Jackie Quinn Kazakhstan Dunn Ray Stevens Bradley Ronnie Dunn Robert Muller Trump Soviet Union Brooks Tim Maguire AP Grammy Washington special counsel RCA Nashville National Institute
"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

"And it's not just that they reached a certain number thrive in. Was it? Good genes. Modern medicine. Why are so many people living such active lives in savannah nineties from his recent documentary, if you're not in the obits eat breakfast, Carl Reiner ninety seven and that's our birthday round up for March. Twentieth. I'm Bob Kessler country duo Brooks and Dunn Ray Stevens and industry veteran. Jerry, Bradley will all be inducted into the country music hall of fame, the Grammy winning duo of kicks Brooks. And Ronnie Dunn have had twenty number one hits including songs like boots Guten boogie and brand new Man Ray Stevens is known for singing zany hits like the streak, but also some Santa mental ones like everything is beautiful Bradley's the son famous producer Owen, Bradley and Netherlands shooting. I'm Tim Maguire with an AP news minute in the Netherlands. A suspect is in custody after gunman killed three people and wounded five on a tram, and what a thirty say may have been a terror attack. We are investigating all possibilities. So that means. Possible terrorist Motors, but also other possible personal motives, the Dutch Justice Minister says the attacker was known to police and had a criminal record. But would not elaborate a rally held in Sacramento, California to Mark the one year since Stefan Clark was killed by two city. Police officers Reverend Al Sharpton, one of the speakers you might expelled him a year ago. But you can't kill the movement. Clark was shot to death is police responded to calls it. Someone was breaking into cars that night, local and state prosecutors announced earlier in the month. They would not charge the officers because the police thought Clarke had a gun and feared for their lives. Clark was holding only a cellphone. I'm Tim Maguire. AP digital news back in a moment with Amazon music of voices. All you need. Alexa, play Whitney Houston on Amazon music. Okay. Get access to over fifty million songs. Download the music.

Stefan Clark Tim Maguire Ray Stevens Bradley AP Ronnie Dunn Netherlands Reverend Al Sharpton Carl Reiner Amazon Brooks Bob Kessler Alexa Grammy Whitney Houston savannah Sacramento producer Justice Minister California
"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on AP News

"Out the answers to hundreds of canine questions and now visitors will be able to see here. And of course, smell like a dog. One of the highlights of the exhibit is a replica of a fire hydrant next to a button that you can push to well, smell what a dog smells nine similar stations. Allow people to see like a dog does their color. Vision is limited, but they pick up motion better than us determine what a person has just eaten by licking their hand. And hear sounds so subtle where completely oblivious to them the exhibit will travel to museums across the country after it closes in Los Angeles early next year Maine's cod. Fishery plummeted to its least valuable year in more than a half century in two thousand eighteen the state's cod. Fishery was once the most lucrative the northeast, but data from the main department of marine resources as the state's cod were worth just a little more than two hundred thousand at the docks last year. That's the lowest number since nineteen. And sixty seven and a fraction of the two to sixteen million worth of cod country duo Brooks and Dunn Ray Stevens and industry veteran. Jerry, Bradley, we'll all be inducted into the country music hall of fame, the Grammy winning duo of kicks Brooks. And Ronnie Dunn have had twenty number one hits including songs like boots Guten boogie and brand new Man Ray Stevens is known for singing zany hits like the streak, but also some Santa mental ones like everything is beautiful. Bradley's the son of famous producer Owen, Bradley, and he was the former head of RCA records Nashville office severe flooding. I'm Tim Maguire, the napi newsmen at three people are known dead two others missing and flooding that should along the Missouri river and its tributaries floodwaters over topped or bench levees along a two hundred mile stretch of the river stranding people in parts of four states. Private pilots have been flying in people food and supplies to Fremont, Nebraska, which is surrounded by water.

Bradley Ray Stevens Missouri river Ronnie Dunn Brooks Los Angeles Tim Maguire RCA Fremont Grammy Nebraska Nashville Maine producer Owen Jerry Santa
"ray stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"For fifty two degrees. Coming up on the news at five thirty new statues of Harriet, Tubman and Frederick Douglass gets approval for Maryland statehouse. Right. And it's time again for our historical headlines. Today's birthdate challenge Neil, Leslie diamond, celebrating a birthday today singer, actor and singer and actor Ray Stevens. This is close the streak. We have the Arab go with a had a red. I'm gonna go with Stevens. Neil seventy eight Ray Stevens eighty years of age eighty eight hundred forty eight James Marshall discovered. This at Sutter's mill in California. Yes, gold nugget started the gold. Rush of twenty nine nuggets was Chuck Whittaker in nineteen fifty seven. Thirty-five this alcoholic beverage takes on a different form for the first time the United States. Nineteen thirty five beer. Yes in what though? Well, it used to be near a beer now. Then the bottle. It was the first time they can. Yeah. Can't beer goes on sale. Nineteen thirty five nineteen forty two the Roberts commission. They were in charge of investigating what happened at Pearl Harbor. What was their conclusion? Who they blame? Jack. Besides the Japanese were the culprits. But they.

Ray Stevens Neil Chuck Whittaker Frederick Douglass Pearl Harbor Harriet James Marshall Roberts commission Maryland United States Tubman Leslie diamond Sutter Jack California fifty two degrees eighty years mill
"ray stevens" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on KTRH

"Miss the hokey story songs of the seventies. Picture on whether it was Ray Stevens this one girl on the billboard. But del Reeves read so vast teddy bear, I read Solon had a few Johnny cash. Glory. Join named sue those songs that had. Clever word play. Miss. It was a good time. Yesterday. We told you the story about the big foot statue in North Carolina. That was placed just inside the woods where you can barely spot. It make you think it was big foot. And there were lots of calls that came in to nine one one, and they interviewed the local folks, I've always thought that there was something in there. Would you never know? What's really after the oh my gosh. Back then. What I'm saying just say, no, I said come over here. And what I stop and slowing down from Rhode turnaround kinda wild looking well more than a few of us more than a few of us, send us emails asking if Ramon could do a mash up with the get fat and sassy soup lady. And as always we live to serve I've always thought that there was something in their mood won't sit around and cook some other Omar gosh, Marion dessert. Just say, Nina. No, I said we'll come over here, and what kind of wild looking just get fat and. Listen.

del Reeves Ray Stevens Solon Marion dessert North Carolina Nina Omar Rhode Johnny Ramon
"ray stevens" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"May continue to the region. Hi, kendall. Hi effect, you well, the fog. It was live. Hey, everybody. I'm sorry. The fog was already starting to come in a bit last night when I was leaving the radio station. And then when I got up this morning, and I looked outside. I was like oh my goodness. Yeah. And then it just stuck around all day. This is one of the things where I love living. Why I love living where I live where I live in the foothills. It's right at this point where I call it a bowl, it's below the snow line and just above the fog line. I didn't even really I knew it was gonna be foggy. But what live it was just like beautiful sunshine all day till I came down here. And then of course, we're now in the in the thick of the fog. So just be careful out. There is I'm saying special on P soup tonight. Yes. I swear I had something else to get to before. I move onto this anyhow. Hey, we keep it a little wider tonight. Oh, good. Yes. Well, you know, we we hash this wall thing for two nights in a row. Yeah. They've been rehashing it for like three weeks. You know? You know? I know what's important and all that. But I right. It's gotta shelf life for discussion show. It has a shelf life. It just does so guests and fish. Anyway, go on shelf-life, man, you've ever I shouldn't even say it. I don't know. This is going to sound very random. I understand. Well, it's a random Thursday right thought Thursday. And drinking my hot TM chain warm and cozy I don't know what I was following today. Put a sometimes I wonder what is happening in the vehicles in front of me around me. Driving down the freeway today. I'm just minding my own business. Everything's is Ray Stevens Z. Everything's beautiful in its own way. Right. And then it goes from beautiful to suddenly this the overwhelming stench of death. I mean, just like death is in the air it, smells, like death. And I'm thinking man, did I leave a piece of chicken in my truck? What's going on here? What's happening here? But who sorry, it's up body. I forgot scared of this roll down my windows. Right. And it's just like..

kendall Ray Stevens three weeks
"ray stevens" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"In December January. So that it starts on time. And the date doesn't really matter. The day of the month. Just the March is what matters. That's right. The picking of this myth. Brought to you by professor Rick. Regarding deeming says Dan, well, I be forced to apply as well. Because she applied on her own record. I guess I'm confused about this deeming thing. My plan is to wait until age seventy to apply on my own record. But like you guys say on your show, occasionally, don't trust everything that folks that social security tell us thanks in advance for your help. So I guess this question is if we could well, she's older she she turned sixty when she turned sixty six she will apply for her own benefit. He wants to know will Dan also be forced to apply. She applied. No, she can apply for her benefit. And that's completely independent of you applying for your benefit. Now, if you wanted to try to take a spousal benefit if you wanted to when she starts taking her benefited her full retirement age, or whenever she starts taking it and you wanted to get a spousal benefit while I'm going to wait until full retirement age, and I will take a spousal retirement benefit and wait until eight seventy to start my own. That's when deeming comes into place you were born in nineteen fifty six you do not have the ability to apply for a spousal benefit without applying for your own benefit. I so when you apply for a benefit they're going to deem that you apply for your own benefit. I so, but as long as you're going to wait until he's seventy to apply for your own benefit. You're not applying for anything. There's no deeming involved when you apply at age seventy you will be applying you will be deemed to be applying for your own benefit. But you're gonna. Be applying for your own benefit it'll be larger than the spousal benefit. So yeah, the deeming only comes into play for somebody who was born before January. Second nineteen fifty four who was full retirement age, and who is born after January first nineteen fifty four or I shouldn't say it that way. Quite true because it could be it could happen to almost it happens. If you're trying to apply for a spousal retirement benefit before full retirement age. Yes, then you always have to your deemed to be flying for your own. I it happens to anybody. Born after January first nineteen fifty four at anytime. They apply for a retirement benefit. You're always deemed to be applying for your own benefit. I. We're still a couple of years away from just being able to forget the different rules. We're getting there. We're getting there were still another year to let's see. Nineteen fifty so be what after twenty twenty one. Nineteen so twenty twenty well, the the folks are born in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. No one thousand nine hundred fifty three. Hoax. It started in fifth at age fifty five so after next year. Yeah. Yes. So in two thousand twenty one that's what I'm saying. In twenty twenty one we won't have this in twenty twenty. We won't have you want to have it all starting next year. No, just all right. If you were born in nineteen fifty four how old will you be in in twenty twenty. I know. Sixty six sixty six so your full retirement age is fifty six or fifty four doesn't get it. So anybody was born except for January first in nineteen fifty four. Why are we going to really we're just gonna pretend that everybody? Born in nineteen fifty four it will be deemed to arrive for their own benefit. Exactly now, then that'll be that'll be next year. So we've only got the rest of this year to deal with this. Right. And if you're if you're one of the few people who getting January vice because you're born January first nineteen fifty four accept our apologies. We're not gonna make an exception anymore. Nephews born in January. I wasn't nineteen fifty four. No, I would hope not. Although I guess it's possible. You could be you could be older than your you could be older than your nephew. I mean, you'd be younger than your nephew. That would have been. Yeah, I guess so. If you could be it can happen. If Ray Stevens can figure out a way for you to be your own grandpa. He didn't write that. But I who ever wrote it. All right. Oh, and okay. Now, here's the thing. We had a question on this. Just just you just reminded me of this. Somebody had asked me, and I said, I would talk about it on the show because I guess there's confusion somebody asked me is everybody's for retirement age. Did everybody's for retirement age, go up as of January? I know this isn't how this works. The full retirement age is based on your year of birth. So if you were born in nineteen fifty five or later.

Dan professor Rick Ray Stevens
"ray stevens" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"ray stevens" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"We'll get to the next one here. Dan in Fremont, California. My wife is eleven months older than I am and she will be applying for her own benefit in two thousand and two thousand twenty one on March eleven when she turned sixty six. She's probably want to apply sometime in December January. So that it starts on time. And the date doesn't really matter the day of the month. Just the March is what matters. That's right. The picking of this net. Brought to you by professor Rick. Regarding deeming. It says Dan, well, I'd be forced to apply as well. Because she applied on her own record. I guess I'm confused about this deeming thing. My plan is to wait until age seventy to apply on my own record. But like you guys say on your show, occasionally, don't trust everything that folks at social security, tell us thanks in advance for your help. So I guess his question is if we well, she's older she she turns sixty six when she turned sixty six she will apply for her own benefit. He wants to know will Dan also be forced to apply she applied. No, she can apply for her at benefit. And that's completely independent of you applying for your benefit now, if you wanted to try to take a spousal benefit if you wanted to when she starts taking her benefited her full retirement age, or whatever she starts taking it. And you wanted to get a spousal benefit. You've I'm to wait until full retirement age, and I will take a spousal retirement benefit and wait until eight seventy to start my own. That's when deeming comes in the place you were born in nineteen fifty six you do not have the ability to apply for a spousal benefit without applying for your own benefit. I so when you apply for a benefit they're going to deem that you apply for your own benefit. I so, but as long as you're going to wait until he's seventy to apply for your own benefit. You're not applying for anything. There's no deeming involved when you apply at age seventy you will be applying you will be deemed to be applying for your own benefit, but you're going to be applying for your own benefit it'll be larger than the spousal benefit. So yeah, the deeming only comes into play for somebody who was born before January. Second nineteen fifty four who is full retirement age, and who is born after January first nineteen fifty four or they shouldn't say it that way. Quite true. Because it could be it happens. It happens if you're trying to apply for a spousal retirement benefit before full retirement age. Yes, then you always have to your deemed to be applying for your own. I it happens to anybody. Born after January first nineteen fifty four at anytime. They apply for a retirement benefit. You're always deemed to be applying for your own benefit. I. We're we're still a couple of years away from just being able to forget the different rules. We're getting there. We're getting there were still another year to let's see. Nineteen fifty Sobe what after twenty twenty one. Nineteen so twenty twenty well, the the folks who are born in nineteen fifty nine no nineteen fifty three. It started in fifth at age fifty five so after next year. Yeah. Yeah. So in two thousand twenty one that's what I'm saying. In twenty twenty one we won't have this in twenty twenty. We won't have you won't have it all starting next year. No because all right. If you were born in nineteen fifty four how old will you be in in twenty twenty sixty six sixty six so your full retirement age is. So fifty and fifty four doesn't get it. So anybody was born except for January first in nineteen fifty four. Why are we going to really we're just going to pretend that everybody born in nineteen fifty four it will be deemed to arrive for their own benefit for exactly now then that'll be that'll be next year. So we've only got the rest of this year to deal with this. Right. And if you're if you're one of the few people who is getting January because you're born on January first nineteen fifty four accept our apologies. We're not going to make an exception anymore. Nephews born in January, I wasn't nineteen fifty four. No, I would hope not. Although I guess it's possible. Yeah. You could be you could be older than your you could be older than your nephew, right? I mean, you'd be younger than your nephew. That would have been. Yeah, I guess so. It'd be a little could be it can happen. If Ray Stevens can figure out a way for you to be your own grandpa. That's he didn't write that. But I wrote it. All right. Oh, okay. Now, here's the thing. We had a question on this just you just reminded me of this. Somebody had asked me, and I said, I would talk about it on the show because I guess there's confusion somebody asked me is everybody's for retirement age. Did everybody's for retirement go up as of January? I know this isn't how this works. The full retirement age is based on your year of birth. So if you were born in nineteen fifty five or later than.

Dan professor Rick Fremont California Ray Stevens eleven months
6 months after Hurricane Maria, parts of Puerto Rico continue to struggle

The Steve Dahl Show

01:33 min | 4 years ago

6 months after Hurricane Maria, parts of Puerto Rico continue to struggle

"General embattled cook county assessor joe berrios is facing a challenge from fritz craigie and there is the third congressional district race pitting political newcomer marino against congressman dan lipinski and former alderman bob fioretti is challenging cook county board president toni preckwinkle stay with wls for complete election coverage starting at six tonight with john howell ray stevens bill cameron and stephanie trestle the board of the data mining firm cambridge analytica has spended ceo alexander knicks pending an investigation it comes amid a data misuse scandal involving facebook information the company reportedly used fifty million facebook profiles without permission meantime facebook says it has received a letter from the federal trade commission with questions about data acquired by cambridge analytica but it does not have an indication of a formal probe the us house energy and commerce committee will receive a briefing from facebook tomorrow and half a year has gone by since hurricane maria tore apart puerto rico plunging the entire island darkness correspondent steve kastenbaum says many puerto ricans say fema is not doing enough to make the island whole again hundreds of puerto ricans from the new york area went to females offices in dc to demand that the agency does more to improve conditions on the island six months after hurricane maria devastated the island around one hundred and twenty thousand customers are still without electricity some recent deaths are still being blamed on the impact of those power outages caused by maria on the island many people say they feel abandoned more than a million have applied for assistance but so far only around one thousand have received.

Puerto Ricans New York Puerto Rico Alexander Knicks CEO John Howell Ray Stevens Toni Preckwinkle President Trump Cook County DC Joe Berrios Steve Kastenbaum Hurricane Maria United States Facebook Cambridge Analytica Bill Cameron Bob Fioretti Congressman Dan Lipinski