17 Burst results for "Rauschenberg"

"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:08 min | 2 months ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Which I have great news on, by the way. Okay, well, that's the main reason I wanted you on because it's been a while. And I want to get, you know, the update, what is going on to help them. So here's where we're at. We have, right now, in two days, we have the judge, has ruled for the first time. That he's going to look at the evidence that they machine evidence, everybody. So this is in Arizona. It was, by the way, it was an Obama appointed judge, and he said, this is the preliminary injunctions, and he said he made a moral a common sense solution. Hey, I'm going to look at the evidence. We are so excited. This is, this is going to change everything. And Eric, I said it before the judges in our country that didn't have courage a year and a half ago are all going to have courage now. We've seen it with the Supreme Court ruined roe V wade. We've seen it in Florida with the nonsense mask thing on the airplanes that brave judge and we've got preliminary injunctions and now this is the first one in Arizona that they said we're going to look at it. Remember, we have Alabama. We have South Dakota waiting, Louisiana, Florida, Texas. We are, this is coming in from one direction, and then we have from the ground up where we have citizens all over the country going to their commissioners saying we can't have these voting machines. We can't have electronics ever in our elections again or we lose our country. Big, big, big news, everything that I've done. Everything that's been done in this country is going to lead up to one event August 20th and 21st is called the moment of true summit. Eric, you're going to be invited as is all of all hosts out there all influencers, there'll be about 1500 people there, but it's going to be shown worldwide. 24/7, it goes 9 to 9 both days. And this is this is it, everybody. This is going to, this is the event everybody's been waiting for. We are going to be showing the movie selection code there, which I don't know if you know that. This is a movie by Lara Logan. I haven't seen it yet. I've seen previews of it. And it's called selection code. You can go to selection code dot com and check out a little more about it. And then I guess they're getting a free digital download of it on August 22nd. This movie is free. It's a full feature film. I financed it, but I'm putting it out free to the world. Boom, there it is. And what is first of all, I want to say Laura Logan is utterly brilliant. I don't know if people understand what a brilliant journalist she is. Absolutely. And we now know fearless. In other words, an actual journalist. But I don't know. I knew that she'd been working on something. What is the film selection code? What is it about? Well, this is going to be by the time you're done watching this too. You will probably never. Well, I know you won't. I'm hoping it may be because that's what the summit's about. It never want to use electronic voting machine or anything in election that is electronic or that we can't look inside the black box. I did talk to longer. I mean, tolera, I talked to her about three weeks ago, four weeks ago, I ran into her and I said, so what do people have been saying to you? And what's your update? She said, now listen closely. She said, Mike, everyone is asking her, did you find any fraud when you were doing this? This has made a 7th month investigation into these machines, all this stuff. She said, did you find any fraud? Here's your answer. She said, all I tell him is, I have not found any place there wasn't fraud. She has not found any machinery any place where there wasn't any. And now remember, this is not just the 2020 election, everybody. I want to update everybody on what's going on right now. I have cyber guys out there and all these primaries were actually watching them as they unfold. Well, let's just take Georgia. Now Eric, I want you to get ready for this. In Georgia, there were three Democrats. One of them was a nice lady and her husband, she got zero votes in her own precinct. This was on May 24th. She got zero. Now, now that's a little bit of a deviation. They should have gave her at least two votes for her and her husband, so she went ahead a leg to stand on, right? You just said, hey, I'm sorry, nobody likes you. Well, anyway, she raised her hand and said, um, there's something wrong. Now the only way there can be something wrong is if it's computer army inside the machine. So crooked Brad rauschenberger of Georgia had to go look. He goes, oh, we got it. Now we gotta look. So he opens up the machines. And what did he find? 3762 votes for this nice lady and she went from third place to first place. That's just one primary in Georgia. Let me give you another one. One lady got 1662 votes in her precinct? But she wasn't on the ticket. She wasn't on the billet. And she was in a right in. And then you know it round super called these things. Ready, everybody? It was programming errors. Well, I thought we didn't pre program our elections. Eric, I don't know, then Brad rauschenberg got 30. He was pulling at 38%. The night before the election and he got 51%. Just over the 50%, so there's not a runoff. And I've talked to these polars. These are good polars down there too. I'm not going to put their names out there, and they'll get attacked too. These big polling companies, they said in their history, it's impossible that they were off by three or 4%. And much less, but what does that 15 13%? 13% impossible. Then so my cyber guys, we went through it. Every take Frank Kemp, all Brian Kemp and Candace Taylor and Purdue in their race, you can take Brian Kemp every county in Georgia, take it times 5% and that's what they gave Candace Taylor. She has 60,000 people on the ground. She only got 3% of the vote when she was pulling over 10%. The bottom line is Eric, we're catching them everywhere. Tina Peters of Colorado, they stole the whole thing where we got the, we held the algorithms. We have inside the machines. What people don't realize now, Erik, because we know we have what's inside the machines. We have images all over the country. We just haven't put them out there yet for all to see. We do have front Frank speech. We do have the mesa county one where anybody can go there and say, anybody that says there's no evidence, go there, there it is..

Laura Logan roe V wade Eric Arizona tolera Florida Georgia South Dakota Supreme Court Louisiana Alabama Brad rauschenberger Obama Texas Brian Kemp Candace Taylor Brad rauschenberg
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Oldenburg, David novros, Robert rauschenberg and John Chamberlain, each of them did a very small illustration. Rauschenberg just drew a line while Warhol signed his initials, but in a way that makes them look like a very phallic rocket ship. Altogether, the ceramic tile is referred to as moon museum. And it's never been officially confirmed that the moon museum tile is indeed on the moon. After getting the run around several times when going through official channels, Myers managed to get an engineer to find a safe place for the tile on the lander module, and while it's been confirmed that Apollo 12 astronauts did leave some personal effects on the moon, it's unknown if they removed the tile from the lander and left it there. Nonetheless, Myers claimed they did after getting confirmation that it was on the lander from the engineer, and The New York Times ran the story before the Apollo 12 crew even got back home. Notably with a thumb obscuring Warhol's rude drawing on the photo of the tiny tile. But this time, we all know exactly what art will be installed on the moon, except coons sculptures might not be the first to get there. The verge notes that astrobotic plans to send artwork by Dubai based artist Sasha Jaffrey to the moon on their own lander later this year via United launch alliance's Vulcan rocket. So we'll see which comes first. But I guess in the kind of consolation prize Americans are used to with the space race, coons could at least be the first American to have his authorized artwork on the moon. And here's what Kuhn's himself had to say about his moon phases project, quote I wanted to create a historically meaningful NFT project rooted in humanistic and philosophical thoughts. Our achievements in space represent the limitless potential of humanity. Space explorations have given us a perspective of our ability to transcend worldly constraints. These ideas are central to my NFT project, which can be understood as a continuation and celebration of humanity's aspirational accomplishments within and beyond our own planet. Today's.

David novros moon museum Warhol John Chamberlain Robert rauschenberg Myers Oldenburg Rauschenberg coons astrobotic Sasha Jaffrey United launch alliance The New York Times Dubai Kuhn
"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Who was a boyd. An art critic they made sham studied. I mean just. We started a very meaningful relationship with shop. I mean he's been thinking very very much very deeply about the sham for many many years. I think he's still thinking about the shop. Yeah exactly and scott there was. Of course it's really important moment at the start adjustments career. Which is that. He he shows in the whitney annual the bayou then but the annual in nineteen fifty nine and he wasn't actually surrounded by for instance robert rauschenberg at that time and and his peers he was he was he was fairly alone. In that sense any company that was pretty intimidating. All say you know. I mean it's so interesting. Jasbir is one of the only people alive who i know including the granddaughter of our founder and the artists alex katz. Who remembers visiting all four. Whitney museum's he first came to the whitney on eighth street in the forties as a teenager where he remember seeing pollack he showed in our second location which was in the fifties during the fifties in the fifties. I mean the block The streets next to moma. And then of course in the seventies he had a great early surveyor retrospective at our former home. The boyer building with an amazing cadillac by michael crichton. So it's been a long journey. He's shown in three of those four places and we have now more than two hundred works in our collection. Although the i was not acquired until the early sixties puts a little behind a place like moma and you know as you were mentioning. When he was showing at the fifties. I would say the whitney was maybe not quite as adventurous. Curatorial became known to be in the sixties because it was a little bit more looking at a different kind of abstract painting figuration and he was neither of those things. That's really interesting. When it comes to jones's early where he he's that famous phrase about the stuff that he was using in his paintings. which was things. The mind already knows to a certain extent. Aren't he's paintings for an art audience or anyone. With level of familiarity with american essentially things the mind already knows and therefore does it become difficult therefore to curate and to find new avenues into that word to tell stories about them to a certain degree. Well isn't it the interesting Banned the minor really knows the minor really knows everything right. I mean because the mind is basically the vehicle through which we know. So i mean we assume that the joe jones by saying well things in minority no. He means symbols..

Jasbir Whitney museum boyer building robert rauschenberg alex katz pollack michael crichton scott whitney jones joe jones
"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We conversations with more than twenty five artists from michael armitage to testing now. Jasper johns even if they were organized by multiple museums major perspectives of artists. Work tend to begin in one venue and then travelled to others of course but in an unprecedented collaboration between t- museums the latest survey of jones's work which opened last week the first in the united states since the mid one thousand nine hundred and containing what made across seven decades by the now ninety one year. Old artist has been organized. Jointly by scott. Rothkopf at the whitney museum of american art and carlos although at the philadelphia museum of art and has just opened simultaneously at both venues. It's mind mirror. And the principal theme the show is the doubling repetition that carries through jones's career from his earliest work. He's a real artist artist. He's influences now. Stretched across several generations of followers. One of them is sarah z. Who i spoke to assist the podcast. A brush with. He's what she said about john's work after a visit to the whitney show. I just saw the jasper johns show. Which is phenomenal. I think a lot of people relate my work to rauschenberg which i love. But i also think john's if not as much or more as someone i learned a lot from think about And this cross between sculpture and painting now even from the most basic idea of having the kind of playfulness with the black slow at jar. That has the you know the face on the side. Simple thing of saying. I'm an image image. You're making me into an object. I'm not an object and then to to paint objects to paint a flag to paint a A target to paint a can of brushes. And say you know that paint is immaterial that we can build a sculpture out of paint. Think one of the things. That's interesting to see the shows. I think he almost has a pilot of marks. That and i feel like this myself powder marks and that mark can being silenced. That mark can be a big mark can be a color of paint. That you like But we know this is repetitive. Very intimate and you know they have this kind of urgency. That you don't know they are there like the young boy or the criss cross marks or as. I explained that you know the vase that comes out of two profiles but they have kind of urgency to him. That somehow comes through. I love that about our. I feel like when there's an urgency in the making of the work.

michael armitage jasper johns Rothkopf sarah z jones whitney museum of american art philadelphia museum of art carlos rauschenberg john scott united states
"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Thank you robert dumb luck of almost meeting him. I was at school. One day at the corcoran and i walked by this guy. This professor mind skip. He was in his the printmaking studio with with the guy and they were looking at this piece of art that look sort of like a robert rauschenberg. And there's this other guy with skip. And i'm like like sitting there working with skip leg. They're looking at something that looks like a russian bergen. They're like at my friends are like. Oh that's rob arou- shamburg. He's here making a series of prince. And i'm like no shit and then by the time i got back he was already gone. So buck that close well. At least you're greeted the same air for some time. Oh skip ended up telling great stories about him so it was. It was still nice but it was just like would have been so cool to talk to him but anyways total good egg so my shackle in respect to yeah. I almost worked with her. Richard avedon as well but that didn't work out either but that's a whole nother drama. Well at least you're in the vicinity in. Yeah i am so close to being something. But i just can't seem to like cross that threshold toda y. Your time will tone tenacity. Tenacity is the keyword. I'm working on it. Yeah no it's like you know. Having talent is not sufficient to be an artist or an artist making a life for themselves as an artist so tenacity is number two and then number. Three is just luck. You need to come across some people who catch an interest in your work and enables you to go to to elevates you all right well that's sort of touches on what i'm going to do for the last question so you ray for the last two questions sure. Are there three contemporary artists. That you're looking at that. You think the listeners should be also looking at all right so all mentioned three artists to are also personal friends of mine who i find extremely talented. One of them is hans. Lemon who's a dutch artist. Who creates wonderful drawings that are mysterious and weird and compelling any. You're not really sure what's going on in them but he'd always draws you in and he's also indefatigable creator he just keeps at it and he works in this farm outside of the major art centers where there will be chickens and dogs will walk into his studio and sometimes they will walk across the canvas that he's working on the floor and then those footprints will become part of the pattern and the work his grading. He's also a very generous person. Look into whole up other artists and always willing to enter into collaborations. So for sure hunts. Lemon is somebody take a look at. And then there's another orgies who's called shock koji. Who's a young artist from the netherlands. Who also lives outside of the main city centers. But i met him because he's come to spend time aboard the mothership so he sailed with us for several times. He's been here three times. Actually and i've been able to put into shows that were created by knows fair arts and he has a very interesting blend of old masters skills combined with contemporary themes. That are they create jarring dixon positions. But somehow it's still works. It all comes together. So i'm very confident. He has a great career ahead of him. And he's a good thing. So i absolutely recommend jock and then number three is barbara for nah whose italian. She's also very classically. Wold you can see. She masters that take technique oil painting and drawing really well but she puts it to us for very odd and disturbing things. It's her works are they're not pleasant. They're beautiful but there's something really jarring about them and she's also a really generous artist to helps her pierce do their thing and always willing to enter into collaborations and also has enormous energy level..

robert dumb rob arou robert rauschenberg Richard avedon Lemon koji the netherlands dixon jock Wold barbara
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"I wanna do now particularly after this last year and a half or so is just kind of take stock and and pay closer attention to things that may be I sort of sped by in an attempt to get to a better place you know last year so. I don't think that i had pinpointed that. But i think that maybe that's why i was so especially toronto goldenrod because i am bad at staying still being character and so i'm always drawn to somebody who can who can speak to the benefits of being still noticing things and that seems to me as something that poetry is very good at. You know you're zooming very closely into something and you're talking about details that you know i may not be seeing indefinitely wouldn't be describing in the beautiful way that you describe things and so i guess how do you handle that tension of i think i think it sounds like it was important for you to keep on moving through your divorce and through the challenging experiences that we've all had over the last several years and at the same time i it sounds like you also fully believe that it's important to sit still and is it. Something that should be done in seasons is something that should be done. Both at the same time is one better than the other. I don't know. What do you think i don't know if it's really a hierarchy but i do think you know we. We live in a time where we often associate are worth with how busy we are and how productive we are in there sort of this cult of productivity that really goes against the idea of slowing down paying attention and it's sort of Not the space that poetry occupies. So i you know. I think there are times when we need to sort of. Maybe put our heads down and push forward. Because that's that's what's going to be most useful to us and then there are times where we need to stop and take a breath and it might be that you have to do both in the same day. We're in the same. Our and it may be that that there are seasons seasons for this. I mean i think you know robert rauschenberg. The artist robert rauschenberg said that the job of an artist is to is to keep people's eyes open. And i think that's kind of the job of poets and your eyes can be open as you're moving quickly through the world but you'll notice a lot more if you slow down every once in a while and just sort of You know. put your phone away. Maybe take your headphones off and listen and You know schedule a little a little. Nothing time into your day. I think it's incredibly important. You can be so busy. And what is it. add up to just. I don't find that satisfying. And i need a lot of kind of like the white space between stanzas and you know poetry. I need any white space in my days and weeks to kind of be myself and process things. I absolutely hate everything you just said in love what you just said because i think you just you just diagnosed me so they you feel called out yeah. I'm stopping this interview right now and seen.

robert rauschenberg toronto
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"What do you have all right. I'm afraid karen that this this endorsement is going to make you think that i'm he kissing up to you so you'll be on future episodes but my endorsement is actually something that you wrote in slate interview that you did with the two writers from luca about the character of uncle google so for background last week. We talked about Luca the new pixar animated movie on this show. And karen. And i also did a spoiler special about luca in which we got more into uncle. Go the character voiced by sasha baron cohen who only appears twice in the movie. He has one scene in the main movie. And then he's got a little stinger scene after the credits. But he's really funny. A complete scenes dealer and karen had the great idea of going to the luka writers who came up with this character and just talking about his genesis. And you know how it came to be that they decided to give luca the little fish mermaid boy. Who's the main character this deep sea dwelling uncle who's transparent and lives on bits of whale carcass float down to the bottom of the and they have this whole history of you know things that they wrote for the character that didn't make it in how the character got so dark. That director told them. I'm sorry we can't. We can't go this direction And it's just a really sweet funny interview. And i loved it. It's just focused micro focused on this this one character hugo. So if you go to slate look for the story behind lucas whale. Carcass loving breakout character and Just read a little a little background on the movie. It's really fun. Thank you so much and also truly no kissing up necessary. I will come back on gap anytime. You guys have an open slot. Karen what do you got. Well i've been watching. I occasionally will watch dramas on net flakes and i just started watching call navy. Lara which is about like the seventy year old man who never pursued his dream of becoming a ballet dancer and now that like after a partic- after one of his close friends dies and sort of has his final moment with him where he's like you need to pursue your dream while you're still alive. He decides to get into ballet as this kind of stocky seventy year old guy and he becomes friends with this younger ballerina. Who is having trouble remembering why he first got into ballet and remembering his passion and so it's the story of this very sweet old man in this very surly younger guy who are trying to do ballet together. It's very sweet. I like it a lot. I want to endure say extremely solid piece of music that i discovered recently by a composer. I knew nothing about morton feldman. I'm embarrassed to say that name. That nothing to me until a couple of weeks ago. I love morton feldman excited to hear what your pieces. It's so wonderful dana. i. I'm so so grateful to have discovered a avangard. Composer combining all of elements into his into his work and influences into his work. But he was. He was very drawn to abstract expressionist. Painters he knew them personally. he knew. philip guston and rothko and pollock and rauschenberg and And was very influenced by what they were doing with found objects and paint and tried to turn it into you know sonic equivalent in some ways. I mean that's maybe a little simplistic. But in this instance maybe not. He was commissioned by the rothko chapel by the people who funded and built the rothko chapel to compose music for rothko. Who had.

luca karen sasha baron cohen Luca pixar luka morton feldman google lucas Lara Karen navy dana philip guston rothko rauschenberg pollock rothko chapel
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"What do you have all right. I'm afraid karen that this this endorsement is going to make you think that i'm he kissing up to you so you'll be on future episodes but my endorsement is actually something that you wrote in slate interview that you did with the two writers from luca about the character of uncle google so for background last week. We talked about Luca the new pixar animated movie on this show. And karen. And i also did a spoiler special about luca in which we got more into uncle. Go the character voiced by sasha baron cohen who only appears twice in the movie. He has one scene in the main movie. And then he's got a little stinger scene after the credits. But he's really funny. A complete scenes dealer and karen had the great idea of going to the luka writers who came up with this character and just talking about his genesis. And you know how it came to be that they decided to give luca the little fish mermaid boy. Who's the main character this deep sea dwelling uncle who's transparent and lives on bits of whale carcass float down to the bottom of the and they have this whole history of you know things that they wrote for the character that didn't make it in how the character got so dark. That director told them. I'm sorry we can't. We can't go this direction And it's just a really sweet funny interview. And i loved it. It's just focused micro focused on this this one character hugo. So if you go to slate look for the story behind lucas whale. Carcass loving breakout character and Just read a little a little background on the movie. It's really fun. Thank you so much and also truly no kissing up necessary. I will come back on gap anytime. You guys have an open slot. Karen what do you got. Well i've been watching. I occasionally will watch dramas on net flakes and i just started watching call navy. Lara which is about like the seventy year old man who never pursued his dream of becoming a ballet dancer and now that like after a partic- after one of his close friends dies and sort of has his final moment with him where he's like you need to pursue your dream while you're still alive. He decides to get into ballet as this kind of stocky seventy year old guy and he becomes friends with this younger ballerina. Who is having trouble remembering why he first got into ballet and remembering his passion and so it's the story of this very sweet old man in this very surly younger guy who are trying to do ballet together. It's very sweet. I like it a lot. I want to endure say extremely solid piece of music that i discovered recently by a composer. I knew nothing about morton feldman. I'm embarrassed to say that name. That nothing to me until a couple of weeks ago. I love morton feldman excited to hear what your pieces. It's so wonderful dana. i. I'm so so grateful to have discovered a avangard. Composer combining all of elements into his into his work and influences into his work. But he was. He was very drawn to abstract expressionist. Painters he knew them personally. he knew. philip guston and rothko and pollock and rauschenberg and And was very influenced by what they were doing with found objects and paint and tried to turn it into you know sonic equivalent in some ways. I mean that's maybe a little simplistic. But in this instance maybe not. He was commissioned by the rothko chapel by the people who funded and built the rothko chapel to compose music for rothko. Who had.

"rauschenberg" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome back to the situation with Michael Brown right here. Let's go back to Georgia for a minute. I don't believe that completely hanging It's interesting because Trump's there Now I'm not quite sure what time the rally starts. Biden and Harris the work there earlier today, Pence has been there all day. Possibly be there tomorrow, too. So we have, in essence, a referendum on both Donald Trump and Joe Biden. The referendum on the election. We just held Last November. Much of the buzz. He's a Running this weekend phone call. If the president made with with his lawyers. Georgia Secretary of State Brad Rustenburg. There's now a long conversation. And Trump really tried to persuade the secretary of state to quote find 11,780 votes to show the trump really one Georgia. The secretary of state would have nothing to do with It was really a sharp disagreement. What I find interesting. Is the back story to that phone call is this You know, the White House operators are the absolutely most fascinating People you'll ever meet. You can tell. I've actually done this on Air Force one. I need to reach so and so. I need to reach Jessi. Well, All right, Can you get it? Give us the last name. I'll give you last night. 15 minutes later. Uh, reflector we got we got Justin on the line with you. Has just little undersecretary. President, United States. Hey, get me the secretary of state in Georgia. I think his name's Ratzenberger. Rustenburg what everybody's getting on the line from So the White House makes a call. The White House off switchboard. Makes the cold of the Georgia secretary of State. Yeah. I don't know that they actually did it this time, but generally that's how it works. President says. I want to talk to somebody, and here's why they do that. You don't waste the president's time. The president doesn't sit there and dialing the number. And wait there till somebody answers. No. They call and they say. Mr Rauschenberg. The President. United States is on the line. Would you please hope? You take the call. I don't care who you are. You take the call. Except that the Georgia secretary of state did not do that. He didn't take a call from the president of the United States of America. I don't care what you maybe he assumed. Maybe he made a big ass assumption that he wanted to talk about. The November election. What if he did? The President. United States wants to talk to you. You take that phone call, But here's what you don't do. And I don't know in front. Quite frankly, I don't care whether Georgia is one party state or two party state. And by that, I mean If it's a one party state if you're going to record a phone call At least one person on that phone call needs to know that it's being recorded so that if I'm making a phone call Where you'll find the one receiving the phone call if George is a one party state That person can record the phone call and not violated the privacy laws if it's a two party state. You have to give notification that they were recording the phone call, you know you call like I had to call a company today. Goes home call may be recorded for training purposes B s. You just want to record the phone calls, you go back and see what I said. The Georgia secretary of state. Recorded the phone call with the president. Without the president's knowledge. Okay? You wanna be a dirtbag B a dirt back. But if you wanna be a real jerk, dirtbag You've been released that phone call. The recorded phone call. Jeff Basil, Amazon. I mean, I'm sorry, Washington Post. You release it to the Washington Post. Right? I don't have any words. Other than I just think that's a despicable act. The whole the whole point. About Georgia. Is what's at stake in the Senate race. Because for doing left their failed to reach the Breakfast that 50% of the vote last November. They're facing these two goobers. Cross off could be described simply as as a trust fund, baby welfare Liberal and Warnock. Is truly radical racist pastor Doesn't preach in the same vein as Dr King. No. Instead, he has people like Fidel Castro. Come to his church and speak to his church. That's exactly the kind of people with these two guys are. So a victory for one or both of them. That would make New York Senator Chuck Schumer The Senate majority leader. That would give Democrats that unified control. Of Washington. And the ability to force through a radical leftist agenda. Medicare for all the Green New Deal statehood for D. C in Puerto Rico, which means form or Democrat senators. Trying to pack the U. S. Supreme Court. He'll be a wild ride for two years. Left, and that's not even Touching. On what the The kind of Despotic team of Joe Biden. Tony Fauci would do If you think that Taxes and regulations and the pandemic shut down or bad for the economy. Just imagine what Tony Fauci and Joe Biden will do. Joe Biden has magically said that he's going to impose a mask mandate. 400 days. I guess after the 100th day Depend on it will be over. We've all worn masks for 100 days. Louisiana Stones or John Kennedy. It was a way of words being the Louisiana that he is Said that if Democrats when you've got nothing to worry about Alicia, a taxpayer Or unless you're a business owner. Unless you're a parent, or you're a cop. Well, you're a gun owner. Or you're a.

Georgia president Joe Biden United States Donald Trump White House Senate Washington Post Michael Brown Tony Fauci Pence Brad Rustenburg Fidel Castro undersecretary Jessi Louisiana Mr Rauschenberg Washington Justin
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"So it's it's droning in a an. It's changing the The people often say that the weather is making the sound of. That's really inaccurate. A statement that really sounds being generated. This i've built a sin. Generates an f major quarter will drown or you can shifted to different Cords one release. You right now is at major. So you've got the root third the fifth in the high octaves and those Notes are being pushed and pulled in and filtered through various classic analog circuitry inc by changes in the different tone of the weather. That's the nut show explanation of what's happening beautiful and so let's you can build this thing and enjoy it yourself. Other people could do this. But you've You've essentially also turned it into a web streaming online radio station. Is that right. Yeah the real. I think the the real importance of this project in the epiphany that i had i had this idea forever and a been kind of working on it forever and i did A big residency of my first one ever Our residency in kept tv florida. It was a robert rauschenberg residency. And i went there to work on this weather center. I i knew what i was going to do. I had two circuits and handle the pieces to build and then As i began doing it. I realized about my first thought was like how can i make this smaller and cheap and manufacture it for people to buy two you know. Wouldn't it be cool to be able to go get a hardware store. A weird weather drone help you get to sleep at night and wacky invention and then it hit me literally in the middle of the night. Black light bulb by this should stream for free. It should be free. I should make 'cause i was holding myself back from building the best one i could build. I was constantly thinking like cheaper component smaller. How can i cut corners here to make it affordable for your regular person and maybe it seems obvious that somebody else. But it wasn't obvious to me and i was like i know this needs to be radio. Free radio online radio all the time currently changing forever. And then i can make the ultimate deluxe one and i can don't have to cut any corners can do do the craziest circuits i want and add the wildest you know additions and it just is part of this kind of shared project and that was really That that kind of changed a lot of my thinking about everything that that idea to make it public and free and streaming and that is available to us now for fairly cheap. Pay maybe thirty bucks a month for my for somebody else.

robert rauschenberg florida
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Pantheon

"Long long long long. God. That's right. Special orders don't upset us. Yes. Yeah. That's what they changed it into. Yeah, and You Know Burger King just shot through the roof and and came in a really close second place to McDonald's those days. Was And we thought that's how you do it you subversion and so. The commercials interested, US and then. When I first got commercials, they were like, Hawaiian Punch. Mercedes. Some tennis shoe I. CAN'T REMEMBER THE TOWANDA was. Converse with something. And and I remember thinking. Well There's gotta be more than just putting some catching music on it and so. In in punch near the end is like has a big build up in the commercial and then there's a there's a drum fill in it. I put sugar is bad for you underneath the you know I just said that underneath. Tom Com's. For. Hawaii, which is also. Landed near at the time and he says WE'RE GONNA get in trouble for they're they're gonNA like. Why are you and so we went to What was the name of daily associates? I think was the company we went there and we're sitting there with a bunch of. at executives and we brought them years again and we're playing for them. And their disguise sitting there tapping pen on. On the table and in a robot voice I go. I did the line they wanted me to do coli and punch it you all the right places and then the drum fill comes in sugar is bad for you. Tapping their. Like Waiting their heads to the music. Happy. Valley just look over. It'd be lights you lucky. You lucky and that and they went with the. Mall God so I probably saw. Yeah. That's awesome. We did. Somewhere in the building are men right now Tahoe with the moment. UH, my my office on some of an toddler in here is a three quarter inch tape about thirty. Commercials all how. subliminal messages. That's amazing. I wish you could put that out. I took it I took it to. I was during a vigil art show and I put it on. You know in the room and People. Why would you put your commercial long? One that's amazing that there's commercials that were running out there and people were just totally consuming them and they had some mark mothers by had subliminal messages. Talk sugar is bad I. Love It. That's incredible question. Authority. See. That's some. That's some fucking neil man. Shit. Right. That's like a Neil Young. That's really Neil young moment you guys don't know this but actually in the thor soundtrack of you turn it up all the way you can hear him say DC is better. Mark. I wanted to ask you just real quick as we're winding down here. Are you what are you listening to today and know we're all in isolation? We're all quarantining airy artists that you're that you're listening to right now. Well, I'll tell you what what I'm doing today. I'll just beyond. I. finished. Scoring a movie called crew to. Not GonNa Cruise to new egg. I think they did the first one like eight years ago. Yeah DreamWorks. Did the no one and I just finished scoring that and you know now that we have the long distance You know. kind of sophisticated versions of zoom out there. I was able to record and at Abbey Road which is. Favorite Skater, the workout and incredible and. Know there's a orchestra over there that I use a couple of times a year to from films. And so I stayed here for that but that's done but I wrote a song. That I got Jack Black and then. some ladies, Hiram sisters I don't know. Yeah Yeah there's somebody that's out there now. And they sang and they recorded a remotely. So allow I didn't even. I didn't even go to their studios they I spent some tapes and. All, saying. So I'm sorting through tracks now because everybody over recorded. Like a guitar friend of mine I asked him to put a Qatar part on on the song and he sent me seventeen traps. We're that's the danger of A. Digital. In steely Dan. Cheese. Work my way through that. Speaking of Jacksonville. Boo Bam. I'm. Not GonNA lose one of. Them I. Go I hope. Jack. You did that movie envy which no one ever like has heard of our talks about but I think that movies awesome and I know you did the film score for that and I I just wanted to say that because you said Jack. Oh, yeah, yeah that was Yeah. That was an. Odd Experience Really. But I did have fun writing music for Who's WHO's The guy? Chang on. Yeah, the yeah. The one who is. Always like. News kept doing. Yeah. He did a great job of singing for. GOT TO PUT LIKE A. He was Kinda like the the group chorus narrator or something. Yeah. That was my favorite part of that movie. That's working on anyhow. Well Mark we really appreciate your time because we know you're obviously you're telling us all this stuff you're doing. You're very busy. I also want to mention mark is is Are you still doing this thing for the US Postal Service the postcard? Thing. Yeah you know I draw. Fiona started out because of my eyesight and also traveling with diva. I've drawn on and and written. On Cards Since the early seventies back when I was still at Ken, I got involved in something called mail heart and found out if you get a piece of art on a Postcard Senate to Jasper jhom. Johns. Rauschenberg or You know a lot of different people out there. Andy Warhol didn't respond course. But but other people did and they would send you could get people to send things do art work on on cards for new and. I don't know to an unknown nobody blue-collar. TORP from. Akron. Ohio. That was like really. An amazing thing and so I've been doing. Artwork on cards at size ever since and.

Mark Jack Black Neil Young Mercedes tennis McDonald Andy Warhol Hawaii TOWANDA DreamWorks Johns Tom Com Ohio Rauschenberg Fiona Jasper jhom Akron US Ken Qatar
"rauschenberg" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on No Agenda

"Because at this point in time to studies on Sneeze and the weapon-grade idiocy we get from people this I don't even the member full, but I'm sure you might be the next time but what I do. Is that this is on its knees and the morons wicked in this. Who blame everyone else by Blind Victorians Blamed, hospital workers, they tried to blame the federal government. They even tried to blame overseas governments, sideline everyone buffed themselves I some responsibility. For what is happening this state? What they're doing children to our elderly. Tight some responsibility. We site the premium not. All. He's pointing to twice excuse me I heard him say, premier. Not Premiere you're an American premier premiere. He's going to muddy tweaks. He's going to save money on facebook because for the premiere this study's about him. About him, he's governments about him. It's not a bad. These back bridges encourage their passes, AIDS all about. It's always if Bain about him, it's not a bad anyone else and that is the problem we're having Victoria that the premier, the site that I say this all about him and his legacy, and he's you Mitch. and. Squad. We've got a problem that we do because he wouldn't accept support from the federal government. It was also because that would not. Even besieging with masculinity to cy all now I'll take someone else's help tone about him because Dan, the man can solve everything he thinks. And solve it did not create a problem. Hated we're all paying for our economy will pay for for decades. Sounds like Cuomo to me. Out Always. Oh, I did it. All right. I'm perfect. Here's my poster that I made show you the great path. We made his show every day everyday his TV show. Yeah. There's there's some I can see where you get that Pale from tip of the day now. Okay. I shouldn't have said that yes. All right Geez. You get. So grouchy sometime have clip of the day coming. I understand the problem now. Okay. Let's move to vaccines for a moment We have the Russian. Vaccine that has out is a problem. It's all camping, right? This is us through these guys. Good FAO cheat don't lie shot of vodka out she don't like the Bloomberg Television, which is where you want to get your actual vaccine information because they have to kind of find out what's going to work and what won't. So people can make informed business decisions decisions or if they are out to deliberately misinform, and then you can get that kind of knowledge as well. This is a interview short peace with an invest a Russian investment manager I think he handles one of the big Russian funds about the Russian vaccine. Reputation of the vaccine. Sore. But I mean called Sputnik I, mean there is the idea. This forgot to mention. Their sputnik moment because once again, they beat Mirka. They beat us into space and they beat us with the vaccine. He wanted to get out there and you want to be I. Didn't say that Russia is I Dr. Anthony Fauci who the majority of the US listens to when it comes to. The the. Says, I do hope. Majority. the backseat before they're misreading the vaccine to anyone because claims of having a vaccine ready to distribute before you do can be very challenging. Very difficult. I mean what's your response to something like that? You move too fast you cut corners there's going to be problems well, I think it's a very uneducated woman by Mr Foul and respect him as a professional but the force Russia. Extensively China's swell can we count the same? Like scenes in the fifties and sixties, no one Russia was criticized actually somebody in United Nations. Trust us. We Love our children and our families as much as you. So this like she didn't have been tested extensively. On several thousand people we use also very proprietary testing tools that allows us to measure very efficient, anti that are being generated that fact. Tags. Garner virus. So basically, it will be extensively. Tested over the next couple of months. But Matheson. Nation on the Russia will start GonNa Palmer and I think it's important. It's responsible to make sure that people are saving. Back on track, we own phrases Dole's other countries received more than one billion dollars, requests from twenty countries and expect to produce then with five countries that bill partners and producing Rauschenberg seen. So there was major momentum and I. Think the world will see. Russia really blade huge rolling fighting coronavirus, which is a joint struggle. Okay. Well, look at back home in the sputnik moment we're having trouble. We have to slow down on our third phase three trial. We don't have the right people. We've got a problem Houston, slow it down, slow it down, slow it down. Hey, Carl will so much attention being paid to the speed of enrollment in these large vaccine trials for covid nineteen, dern on Pfizer, of course, in the lead having both started their vaccine trials in late July Madonna CEO's to fund on sell telling me that the company is slightly slowing the enrollment in their large phase three covid nineteen trial in order to ensure participation from minority communities who are most at risk of. Madonna has updated its numbers as of Friday is expected to update. Again after the close today Pfizer CEO said yesterday, they've enrolled twenty, three, thousand of thirty, thousand people. So they appear to be ahead of Madonna. Saying. Rolled enough people from the black and African American communities about seven percent of those enrolled so far are from that community and we've seen from the data that the black community faces not just greater risk of getting covid nineteen. But if having more severe disease when they do get covid nineteen so. Why don't they just go into the black community? This wish he keeps calling it I'm sure you can. It's ZIP code. And just force it on them. There's a reason why the black community is not turning out in droves for your vaccine is called intelligence. It's not stupid. They don't trust them coursing go into the prisons what desperate they've used to do a or the army. If you're a soldier you have to do it. Yeah. Soldier for sure. Paso there's plenty of. Members of the black community that could be Recruited that way. This is this whole thing. Broke cramped. Hey. Well. I love how it's now a race. Well, they've got these many black people in the Trou-. Looks like we're debtors movement ahead by. Got More. Black people on the black community is into. NPR did a piece which is your beat, but someone sent it to me. About the vaccine, trials. and. Throughout.

Russia Pfizer Madonna facebook CEO Mirka Cuomo China Bloomberg Television Dr. Anthony Fauci Dan Trou Bain US investment manager Mr Foul United Nations NPR Matheson
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Alley Chats

Alley Chats

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Alley Chats

"Help it. It's a it's a passion project will of of love and. Tears and pain that Cameron I have put into this but we also have an incredible team Cameron mentioned the sugar gamers they are A. Primarily female south side Chicago primarily black. Gaming Organization that has lasted for the last eleven years and has helped us play test acts on punk how to do it well, get that also cyberpunk hip hop flavor in there and do it well, and so and how do you do what you do it with a team and that's really the lesson we've taken with acts on Punk, and so we've. Got A. Great Team of a dozen people at this point now, and so cameron I are kind of taking the lead on this stuff, but it's it's a it's a total team effort. So every time every every dollar and every share you put into the kickstarter goes such a long way to help out get new people into the tabletop world. So yeah. Yeah. So. So what camera you're the artist on this when I interviewed Colin on go fund this where we talk about the the kickstarter and got into real details. So if you want to hear about it definitely check out that show it's go fund this and I think it's the last or next to last show that I put up there. So we try to keep them real time there's only three days left to this kickstarter so you definitely want to listen through on that one and It but but Cameron your the artists on this. One of the things we talked about with Colin was how striking the art was I was really Found myself just digging through it on the kickstarter page You're primarily an artist, right? Yes that is actually what I went to college for that is what my first degree is in. I got a bachelors in Fine Arts and Photography and multi mixed media because this was still a little pre computer. and we were doing a lot of dark room chemistry at the time. So it was really really crazy darkroom chemistry wonderful wonderful like weird science and so we used to do a lot of stuff like that. So I was really really inspired by all of these really wonderful older photographers that had kind of. Pushed me through like a good example is a gentleman named Ernest withers and he did these amazingly wonderful handed street photography. But on all over the south for about sixty years during the civil rights era I remember looking at his stuff and it was the most intense like amazingly thrilling artwork I ever seen There was also another one of Andres Serrano when he actually went and did. The KKK project in the south, and he took these very very serious portraits of these KKK members and as a black man for Andrea Serono to travel to the south and do this and getting physically see these things as I was finding my art like this was the art that was like hanging the galleries and Fort Worth and Robert Rauschenberg and Sherman, all of these wonderful artist Carrie may weems Lorna Simpson like these. The major influences that brought that might mentor is brought to me and that I had when I was growing up. So this amazing like urban, cultured street photography that took so many risks like people that were above and beyond braver than I could ever be And so a lot of my inspiration for arts and why should do art the way I do is from them because I want to show. Skin texture and hair and and proper proportions. I don't photoshop proportions. I don't Photoshop shoulders. Waist size busts is. Any of those things and I rarely rarely remove hair or adjusted I try and keep the found art that a used for acts on concord photos of the team members that we've used like the photos of Kisha for the cover or wonderful members of sugar gamers that posed for a lot of the is i. want to keep them and Take them out of their cyberpunk experience and making them as as artistic expression as I can but also keeping their humanity within that and and the things that make them beautiful within themselves. That's what I enjoy the most. And so excited to do this one in color because it frees me up so much on I have said, the colors are really striking to. I'm so proud because secret about I am partially clear blind just like mildly. So this is a big fall into the rabbit hole, and so I'm getting these I don't see the same colors you guys are seeing on the other end especially when it comes to purples and pinks. So I, am hoping that other people are experiencing this art but that's that's such a cool like Double Lens for me when I'm doing color is because it I know it looks different than the way I'm seeing it, which is funny because one of the one of a couple of pictures on the six starter have predominant pink and purples in them. So, this is one of those like acts on punk is about diving and facing fears and either limping away and knowing you survived or overcoming something. So for me in a public setting doing this would so so scary to do color in production especially. Representing this with my own face but. A purples and pinks really important to me for myriad of reasons. But also because it has wonderful queer coding that I grew up with and the purple and pink and these particular colors even though I know that vision I don't see them as well as other people but they code to me when I was growing up in the south leg going to high school and being queer.

Cameron Colin KKK Ernest withers Chicago Andres Serrano Fort Worth Robert Rauschenberg Andrea Serono Kisha Lorna Simpson Carrie Sherman
"rauschenberg" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

Dead Celebrity

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

"The Reynolds the Fisher and Lord for so long, and they haven't been on the market. It's an educated guess as to what the value might be. Things I do. Framework value is really important to nail home, also because of how fickle and sort of as well defined as is, it's completely undefined in a weird way on a very famous example sort of people fighting with the irs over this ridiculous one. Actually, the art connotation as the row Stromberg. Chase where nor those Robert Rauschenberg piece that had aid a Bald Eagle on it. into the peace, and so when he passed. That was. The piece was worth the value by the IRS as working with hundreds of billions of dollars. And, so the family got hit with this giant tax bill for passing on this four hundred billion dollars, painting, or whatever, but because of black market sell laws because you're not allowed to sell items. Feature endangered species. Thing was unsellable, so it was sort of this weird catch twenty two. That was created of this is worth an enormous amount of money on the fair market value, but actually you can ever sell it because there's no market for it because it's to sell it. And so that's like an extreme example of sort of the ridiculousness, but when the irs you can get into determining a fair market value is not like. I think ten dollars fifteen. Okay, we'll call it twelve and a half. It's it's really handy, quite a quite a big production and can be like. And no pun intended. There's an art evaluation..

"rauschenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I looked up to the Mike well I compared to whatever but I I think kind of sensitive to emotions you know and and and and and just little things including little grimaces which indicate that someone else is lying here's a difference I sense just to complete this sort of look at what you can and can't do all over can remain I want to ask you about things you written twenty two years ago a lot of times if you talk to an author about something they wrote twenty two years ago they give you a sad look of you know well that was a long time ago but you seem to remember much of what you have learned you seem to remember very little of what you put like when you were in high school it was time to take the test drive you once described me a an all night bath tub no I I used to kind of sensory deprivation tank in order to memorize things and it's very hard for me I still I don't know how to add or subtract without using the spots on domino's the visual system I still on all the multiplication tables I didn't take algebra geometry physics or chemistry at the junior college in my home town did not have not taken every taxpayer son or daughter I could never have gone to college one zero but that's the coping part of this for both of you it's been kind of interesting because both you are very very smart so you just put your intelligence where you have to be one of the great quotes I've ever heard this from other the great painter Robert Rauschenberg who was of the about the most learning disabled the selected person I've ever known and he said when here this way you have to find other venues for your intelligence right you have to prove to teachers and even though you're not gonna be able to spit back the name of the names or dates thank you that you care about the material and we have to prove to the people who we see that we care about them even though we're not going to recognize their faces and maybe you remember their names so you have to be charming you have to be a book you have to be fast on your feet and figure out how you're going to explain your way out of the fact that you don't know who they are remember that you find people calling you like a snob or I mean like it's like what do you mean you don't know me I'm the host of this dinner party kind of thing yes I'm usually in my my assistant cakes will say to people beforehand before they come in don't ask if if he remembers you if you say no to me she says don't just say no say hi I'm hopeful the faces I didn't recognize my own mother I'm not I am but I'm not good at yeah I I I I tend to withdraw you withdraw so you you solve it by going into a corner not talking to anybody well it doesn't solve this it is tough to makes it works by Tom my approach is to be more outgoing more friendly whatever and to try and charm my way through things and I also lecture and talk all the time about face blindness and my other problems so that people are aware of that I have them and have them they'll cut me some slack but when you go out like every chance you can run a new stadium every chance you can't right mmhm well moreless I don't stay in but hi the other things besides human beings and when when for example when I first visited Australia I came back with with hundreds of photos and people look through his head yes but didn't meet any human beings books all my photos were of scenery compounds where I'm very at home and I I noticed that when you get in the elevator in your apartment you don't have any idea who the neighbors are but you do look down right I know that dogs and.

Mike
"rauschenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mike well I they compared to whatever but I I think I'm a sensitive to emotions you know and and and and and just little things including little grimaces which indicate that someone else is lying here's a difference I sense just to complete this sort of look at what you can and can't do all over can remain when I ask you about things you written twenty two years of a lot of times if you talk to an author about something they wrote twenty two years ago they give you a sad look of you know well that was a long time ago but you seem to remember much of what you have learned you seem to remember very little of what you like when you were in high school it was time to take the test right you once described me a an all night bath tub no I I used to kind of sensory deprivation tank in order to memorize things and at this very hard for me I'd still go I don't know how to add or subtract without using the spots on domino's a visual system I still don't know the multiplication tables I didn't take algebra geometry physics or chemistry at the junior college in my home town did not have not taken every taxpayer son or daughter I could never gone to college one zero the but that's the coping part of this for both of you is been kind of interesting because both were very very smart so you just put your intelligence where you have to be one of the great quotes I've ever heard this from other groups the great painter Robert Rauschenberg who was of the about the most learning disabled the selected person I've ever known and he said when here this way you have to find other venues for your intelligence right you have to prove to teachers and even though you're not gonna be able to spit back the name of the names or dates that you that you care about the material and we have to prove to the people who we see that we care about them even though we're not going to recognize their faces but and maybe you remember their names so you have to be charming you have to be a book you have to be fast on your feet and figure out how you're going to explain your way out of the fact that the dog know who they are remember you find people calling you like a snob or I mean like it's like what do you mean you don't know me I'm the host of this dinner party kind of thing yes I'm usually in my my assistant cakes will say to people beforehand before they come in don't ask if if he remembers you if you say no to me she says don't just say no say hi I'm hopeful the faces I didn't recognize my own mother I'm not I am but I'm not good at yeah I I I I tend to withdraw it withdraw so you you solve it by going into a corner not talking to anybody well it doesn't solve exit is tough to makes it works but my approach is to be more outgoing more friendly whatever and to try and charm my way three things that I also lecture and talk all the time about phase one this and my other problems so that people are aware of that I have them in hand they'll cut me some slack but then you you go out like every chance you can run and you stay in every chance you can't right well moreless I don't stay in but hi the other things besides human beings come on win win for example I first visited Australia I came back with with hundreds of photos and people look through admins had yes but didn't meet any human beings books all my folks as well see anyway compliance why I'm very at home and I I noticed that when you get in the elevator in your apartment you don't have any idea who the neighbors are but you do look down right I know their dogs yeah.

Mike
"rauschenberg" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:44 min | 3 years ago

"rauschenberg" Discussed on KCRW

"Life maybe you want to make our Robert Rauschenberg or have a kind of flat bed picture plane of a hamburger on focaccia and everyone can add their own toppings and have it be a kind of communal enterprise and maybe that would be a really interesting new tradition to start from conceptual artist in cook S. Detroit and we're going to learn about the sub conscious messages behind those call colors at the LA Auto Show that's all coming up first up though it is being a time of loss in LA architecture this Paul Saturday deal no extra son of the hugely influential early modernist architect Richard Neutra well he paused Dion had spent decades preserving his father's legacy and then there was ray campi who died Thursday at age ninety two way Cappy was the architect of stoning houses and other buildings who also founded a highly original school he was concerned with environmentalism before most people had heard the term he also saw his career get eclipsed by a feisty younger generation and then he made a comeback that kept him busy until the end of his life today we're going to hear about that life wait happy is to me one of the more influential most influential and southern California architect this is Joe added he was co founder of the a plus de museum which mounted an exhibition of copies work back in two thousand and four he's carried on the tradition of the experimental southern California architecture through the works of people like Greg Ellwood and damn Schindler and now I tracked into I think its most refined contemporary and expression and to may have ray is been able to synthesize all these ideals into at working level long Amagi texture and obviously we know ray as a great educator when he was born in Minneapolis he studied at Berkeley he moved to LA and he started his own firm in Santa Monica in nineteen fifty three he went on to design over one hundred homes many post and beam inside outside and open plan in the California molten tradition in nineteen sixty two he and his wife Shelly board to steep locked in rustic canyon the seventeen thousand dollars the LA times reports because it had been deemed on buildable and he commenced work on his masterpiece a four thousand square foot house for his family an amazing composition of split leveled open plan flows of flying staircases and views up down in out old built in wood concrete and glass and supported on six concrete house over small stream while working on designs like this he was busy teaching and that led to a project would change the course of LA architecture told Ganon was a professor of sialic and he curated an exhibition about that period in nineteen sixty nine he was teach at Cal Poly Pomona and soon had a kind of disagreement let's say with the leadership of the school which caused him to leave the school with several faculty and about twenty five students joining him two forms I Arkan warehouse in Santa Monica in nineteen seventy two Psylocke short for the southern California institute of architecture and also science and architecture the school is now located in the arts district near Morse designers of notes have come through silex tools one of them was the Japanese architect she gave Bon who presented his work to cap he when he could barely speak a word of English and he was admitted on the spot I was talking to thousand and nine way Cappy said the following there was one of my better moments I and many like that because I I really didn't believe in the you know this the leaders system of worrying about with the GPA was and what the SAT scores were and so forth I think in in architecture to the portfolio speak for the the person back to top Ganon well I think ray he had a very interesting attitude he was someone who felt that students should really lead the organization of their curriculum let's say and when stark began it actually had no curriculum this turned out to be a bit of a problem you know ray was a very demanding person he would he was very soft spoken and I think very humble but also I think you have very clear ideas of what he expected it was really in the late nineteen seventies when a kind of tension had really emerged between the generation of people like Eric moss Tom main Michael return D. quite Howard who really formed kind of core younger faculty coalition let's call it and raise generation that's told canon he's head of the architecture section of the Knowlton school at Ohio State University he was a professor at sci arc and Frances Sanderson this is DNA and we're talking about the late way Cappy not one of the renegade young teachers who left Pomona to work inside out with way cap he was tall main you might know his dramatic Caltrans headquarters in downtown Los Angeles he has built around the world and won numerous accolades way he says it was like a father to him he effected didn't help for a lot of young people certainly may well I would have been I have no idea what I've done I'm again I'm twenty six years old I'm twenty seven we're starting sire can it can pull the shape to reshape her shift in my whole life and gave me opportunities and kind of conditions I could ever imagine he was able to develop an institution that was researching in innovating can a state of the art ideas of what architecture of and could arm tolerate and could promote huge differences and so it is even more interesting because it was it was not easy for is he was awesome but we used to have relief flights next morning at breakfast sit down work it out talk about it and we were close the dear dear friends he has a very open idea about how to educate let people follow their own halls of expiration but he's fairly is doctor now the white world I mean he's got a fairly fixed idea about what is the right kind of architecture at least as he produces is not true absolutely it's a really complicated the subject number one because absolutely he had a very clear idea what architecture was he represents the end of an era and California modernism exactly and again he's working with young people that are all kind of a tacky rather than a wasn't simple it wasn't easy for him I'm sure while washing the next generation in nurturing this group of people which is my generation that was domain we're talking about ray Cappy so for Wall Cappies work fell out of favor along with the rest of California's modernist houses we settled into a semi retirement then you got a knock on his door from yes see the fine she's an architect based in Venice to its studied at sialic ari loves raise war and just driving around Santa Monica canyon I always wanted to go and they found the courage to go knock on the door and Shelly warmly accepted me and gave me a tour of the house and I asked a great place to work with him and he said that he's retired and he said can't you see you're merely retired and I said great my number retired I'm never going to let you retire day and between Shelly online so we went to ray's house and gathered to drawing all of their hands on working drawings and knight inked over them now this was in the early nineties and the digital age is just starting but I had no intention of doing so and then we could swim towards together and not only myself but nobody really wanted to leave the building and police work was very memorable in a way that even when you would leave the building it's sort of invoke to their sense of being part of the building so the billing became part of your skin that's yeah Siva five now starting around the time she what with where there was a revival of interest in California modernism and ways what came steaming back into focus it even made it onto a TV series just listen to this clip from an episode.

Robert Rauschenberg seventeen thousand dollars twenty six years