26 Burst results for "Rauch"

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

03:00 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"Things don't like about the internet but it's it's an extraordinary thing. And i do have your hope that like many other innovations that we struggle with i we will figure out the norms and institutions. That'll make better. Maybe even the regulations not my first choice but could be true Because i don't have any final say here. And i'm i'm believing the fallible principle but i think there's an interesting aspect of this that you do talk about in the book and we've talked many times here which is tribalism and you could argue that. What the internet's really. Been good for his tribalism away. To feel the you belong to something whether it's through virtuous signaling or ganging up on someone and especially anonymously as you point out. It's part of the part of the problem. I wonder if we might think of some other ways to indulge your tribalism. Religion is on the wane throughout the world certainly in america. That was one way that we felt we belonged was was through our religious life. Some it was still have that but the numbers getting smaller Maybe we can find other ways to feel connected to each other. Certainly the internet has the potential to do that in ways. That are not outraged. Trevon not just virtuous signaling. So that's that's my area of hope will. There's nothing crazy or strange about that. Beautiful statement of the walk. Walkways somehow got to walk on. That's making not just the internet but the constitution knowledge and markets and democracy itself Figuring out ways to adapt that so that people feel it's responsive to their lives so they don't look for illiberal and dangerous and sociopathic alternatives and to find ways to deter people from organizations from presenting sociopathic alternatives. And that's been a problem for every society since plato's republic. Plato got the wrong answer which was totalitarian top down very hierarchical system and we know that doesn't work. We know that what does work when we can do. It is trying to create a form of liberalism which provides lot of good things to people but doesn't try to provide everything and leave strong the realms of civic society family faith And all the other goods of life that you know science can't provide journalism can't provide government can't provide You gotta have that going to today. Has jonathan row. His book is the constitution of knowledge. Jonathan thanks for being part of become talk. Thank you for having me and don't forget. Go look for the book. Villebois find bookstores everywhere. Thank you so much for us. It's been a pleasure you're welcome. This is c. Contact part of the library of economic liberty for mauri contact. Go econ talk dot org where you can also comment on..

plato america Villebois jonathan Jonathan library of economic liberty mauri
"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"To stop and think and use their Their slow brain instead of there fast brain and there's lots of efforts to do stuff like that and they're going to be policy changes but it's going to be about this going to be top down stuff like that where these institutions organizations begin to try to build in better structures and incentives and then there's the bottom up stuff and those are the things that you and i and that's what you just referred to earlier us which is why. I'm so glad you said what. That's am i gonna re tweets fake stuff just because it's fun and we're going to take the burden of actually checking for example mother. Something is true. Am i going to join ana trolling campaign or cancel cancer. Or am i gonna actually say no. This is wrong. I'm in a stay away from this. Am i going to stay strictly accurate in what i teach my classroom. Even when i tweet something. I personally i try to check it. I try to make sure it's accurate. And i think that's the social norm that if individuals pursued that. We're not certainly not the best gauge of accuracy. But it turns out actually that if you change in santa's little and you just prime people to consider accuracy. When they're doing a social media post actual experiments find that they do it better and all you really have to do is prime them to care about accuracy with a statement like accuracy agree or disagree. Accuracy really matters is important in life. So it's going to be talked down. It's going to be bottom up. But it's got to be kind of an all of society multi-layered response the bad news is. That's really hard. The good news is we've done it before. The good news is markets are based on all kinds of incentives like that the constitution acknowledges to we can't be complacent but we also shouldn't assume that it's impossible job. Disclose close with a crazy idea that inlet your act which is I don't think the internet was was designed to destroy journalism or anything. It just happened It's an outcome. And i wonder sometimes whether it's not it's not a vehicle for And i just. I have to say it mostly or not i love. I think it's fabulous i. I love twitter. There's a lot of things things. I don't like about twitter. Things don't like about the internet but it's it's an extraordinary thing. And i do have your hope that like many other innovations that we struggle with i we will figure out the norms and institutions. That'll make better..

cancer santa twitter
"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:21 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"This is a tough vote for you. But you know that second runway at the airport in your district you've been asking for. I think we can do that this time. Well maybe no planes. You're gonna land there. Maybe it's a runway to nowhere but that's how politics works on so i'm is a separate conversation. But you might wanna have a look at my little mini book. It's really an article. It's called political realism. How hacks machines. Big money and backroom deals can strengthen american democracy and. i think we've actually gone combination of libertarians and progresses conservatives. Have gone too far in moralizing against all of that stuff and thinking that we could substitute some kind of cleaned system in which politicians have less discretion in the result is the chaos that we now see as that russ. That's awesome throwdown with their. Or what i loved it. Except the implication that i think technocrats shit desire god just want government to be less powerful but i take the point. It's an it's a really interesting observation that that the system runs through this book average or other book. I'm sorry but it runs this idea that you know you don't get exactly what you want. Almost no one does. You've gotta compromise in the in the political arena and that that's healthy in all kinds of ways even though you might not like anyone outcome so that part of beautifully stated you wrap the whole thing up there one elegant elegant loop that was wonderful. Thank you sir. But you should be a college president thanks. I'm working at it I play one on tv or on on the internet. I guess Before we leave. I want to get a little closer with with some discussions of of where we might encourage that hope and optimism. That could be there for you. I i just want you to talk about the two principles that underlie the The constitutionality that we haven't mentioned yet we talk about liberal science Meaning the freedom to explore and test ideas and just the two ideas no final. Say and no personal authority. The reason i like that. It's only two fantastic. I know it's not the whole story. But they are hugely important. And i think they have something to say. We're on personalized not just for this system of constitutional the constitutional show talk about what those principles mean and why they're important and then we we'll talk about the personal side. Yeah i'd love to. I love to hear your reflections on how they inflect. Our personal lives. what. I call liberal science. Also the constitution knowledge this whole system that we have a figuring out what's true and what's false by essentially outsourcing it to a giant social network. A lot of things go on there is stay but there are two rules that are at the heart of it and wherever those rules are followed socially by people you'll see the emergence of something that looks a lot like modern science lot like modern journalism and law. The first is no final. Say this is radical idea. That says no matter. How certain are you might be wrong. And so might everyone else and that means you need to put in place a system. Where first of all any idea can be applauded because it might have something to contribute to correcting an error somewhere and second. No one's allowed to be in charge of this process. No one's allowed to come along and say okay you can say x. But you cannot say what because what might be right. You never know so that sets up an open ended process of constant criticism and checking and that's a revolution in human affairs. No one had thought of that until basically the mid the mid sixteen hundreds. That's underpinnings called the fallible stool that's the underpinning of not only free speech but the whole era checking system we rely on the second is no personal authority and this one's equally revolutionary and even harder to implement and this says okay. So how you gonna figure out what's right and what's wrong will. You can't do it by saying god revealed it to you or by saying i'm the dictator I'm buying the president of the country to tell you what's right you know. You can't sam. I'm xi jinping. So here's what's true. No one gets authority just simply based on who. They are so at every to check an idea..

russ xi jinping sam
"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"You wound up with basically kind of of swamp fetid swamp of fake news and hyper partisanship. Because that's where it seemed like the readers wanted to go. That's where you were making money and if you'd been alive to have this conversation with me back then we both would have thrown up our hands and say this is terrible and there's no way to get out of it right. So how do we get out of it. And the answer is incentives and institutions. Which is kind of the way we always get out of these loops right The environment the information environment. That was being created. Back then was toxic for the business model in the long term You know you can only publish so much stuff. That's that's fake and extremely outrageous before people get on with their lives. Wanna do something less talks on. It was bad for the country and a lot of people didn't like it. People in journalism realize this unsustainable so in the early part of the twentieth century they formed institutions like the american society of newspaper. Editors the first thing they did we start promulgating professional standards and ethics codes. Like don't make stuff up. Be accurate run corrections things that we take for granted now will someone had to come up with that. And then they had the development of journalism schools professional schools that basically inculcated those north said the right and wrong ways to do things and then those people found out into the process and then you had the incentives this i know dear to your heart. Russ in all of the constitution acknowledge. It relies much more heavily on rewards than on punishments which is really as you know the thing that works.

american society of newspaper Russ
"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

08:06 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"You in for those you listening on the audio only. It's a lovely. It's a lovely covering. You're missing out. But i'm gonna play you all of innsbruck because it's been such an inspiration to mayan and lavigne notes that no society can function without functioning institutions. That shape us people you know. That's the journalism profession at. I came into the newsroom. Said shape me by really hammering intimate. Gotta get it right. I've gotta be accurate. I've gotta check. I've got a double source of go to go back to people. Before i write about them gotta run corrections. If i'm wrong even though i'm not happy about it. And no one else is happy about it. Institution shape us. And that's very true of the constitution of science unlike the Commercial marketplace constitution of science. The reality based community is mostly a professional network because it takes typically years in any of these fields law journalism public administration and especially science to get up to speed to understand the ideas to get the jargon the education to learn the literature to build a track record so that others know that you're on the level so it's very much a professional network in it relies heavily on a lot of unwritten rules and they range from obvious things. Like you can't make stuff up in regular life. You know people make stuff up all the time or you can't believe stuff just because somebody told you and you think it might be true. You can't do you on in science journalism. You have to be fact based that's really hard in. All of those norms can be undermined. And i argue in the book that there too big attacks on the right now. One of them is from the outside. And that's from people who were using disinformation and other forms of episode democ warfare and the force at the center of that right now in america is donald trump and maga- and his movement very very dangerous. But the other is the one that you mentioned russ and that's from the inside. And that's factions that come into academia increasingly journalism and seek to politicize it seek to erode the norms that what really matters is accuracy above all in we shouldn't be following political agendas. We should be seeking and following facts. Sometimes it's hard to know the difference but where our heart should be what we should be striving to do is keep political agendas out of it and there has been a pretty serious dementia that at a lot of institutions. We'll come back and talk about both of those I'm going to bring an an economist. Respective i that i think is important to add to the just the cultural trends that we're dealing with at some of those cultural trends. I fear are the result of incentives. Which is the economists perspective before we get there I wanna talk about the constitution and knowledge in. It's ideal form which you are quite eloquent and Thoughtful it's lovely to have a book like this where you get to actually show some nuance and let the reader understand the subtlety of what you're talking about And we won't do justice to that next fifteen minutes or so of trying to to cover that. But but i really liked that part of the book where you try to give the flavor of what is actually going on but at a higher level it's sort of a bird's eye view you talk about the episode funnel the way that ideas get turned into what we have is knowledge and in particular the importance of. It's being shared knowledge. Which i'd have not really seen people emphasize enough. You draw charles perse. Who's a personal favorite of mine. Almost never gets mentioned outside this program. So i'm thrilled. That he's in your book number places but talk about that episode mcdonnell and the rules and norms and institutions that. Take the myriad of ideas down to what we would call share knowledge. I love to because that really goes to the heart of the matter and also relates. To what i said earlier. The marketplace of ideas is not enough so most people most of the ideas that most people have about. What's true what's not true. Most of the time are wrong. Just wildly long to human condition wherein a state of abundant bumbling error. Most of the time. We're you know we're pretty good at immediate problems that affect our lives and demand and give us immediate feedback like you know. Is that a tiger in the bush just debris or where's the next tribe But we're not good at all at bigger abstract questions. Like what's the cause of the disease. That's that's decimating. Our our society our tribe. Or where's the next were. Pardon me or were which god do we worship and those we tend to be deeply in error because we're riddled with cognitive biases. We and we look for evidence and actually perceive favorably evidence that favors that helps us with status or favors. Our point of view really really makes us feel good makes us feel good. Yeah that's pretty much how we choose ideas and the result of that is that most of what people want to believe on any given day is not just wrong but wildly wall. So the question is how can a society find that small fraction of one percent of people's ideas that actually advanced knowledge and that's finding needles and haystacks. And the way you do that is to set up a kind of i liken it to a giant funnel the input and is free speech. That's the idea. Anyone can believe anything anyone can say just about anything. And that's the raw material for the reality based community but then it goes into this process. I think of it is like a system of pumps and filters many many nodes in this network. Most ideas are so screw. All they don't even get acquired like some people think elvis is alive but no research dollars. Well i hope not at your university. Anyway we're going to be spent finding out why elvis is still alive. A small fraction of ideas will be acquired by the system and science and journalism will say okay. We need to look at this. And then it'll be divided up into units sitter refutable that are checkable be disallowed peer. Reviewers will look at it. Editors will look at it if it passes muster and only some of them will then it will be passed on it'll be published then others can pick it up. They look at it. They do their own assessment over time. An actually pretty darn quickly through all of these nodes in this network of checkers. I think the mistake being pumping and filtering stations. The good stuff drips out at the end of the funnel. A very narrow end which on any given day is new knowledge a tiny tiny miniscule prussia's fact a fraction of what goes in a. This is a way what it does is two things i it converts information which is free and cheap and mostly wrong into knowledge which is very expensive can very precious and is humanity's greatest resource objective knowledge is a species transforming invention. Put the shot in my arm. That's protecting me from cogan. It's changes from small. Tribal societies in which knowledge essentially never grows from generation to generation to one in which we now add more to the cannon of human knowledge any day any one day than we did in two hundred thousand years but also very importantly it gives us a way to settle disputes to work very quickly through this massive of ideas. And do that in a way that's peaceful and it's decentralized that no one can take control of no prince or priest or polit bureau can say okay rest robert. Here's what you're teaching your university. Because we think it's true..

charles perse lavigne maga donald trump russ dementia mcdonnell america elvis bush prussia cogan robert
"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:03 min | 2 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on EconTalk

"My guest is journalist and author jonathan. Rauch latest book and the topic of today's conversation is the constitution of knowledge. A deep look at how we know what we know or at least what we think. We know how that's been changed in the internet age and what might be done to make it better. Johnson was last year in september. Two thousand eight talking about the chevy volt and corporate culture a long time ago jonathan. Welcome back to econ talk. I'm happy to be here. One of my favorite shows. We should make more often. You got it. I think thirteen years is a long for in between episodes. You're lucky i'm still around. What do you mean by the constitution of knowledge. It's lovely title. Would what do you mean by it. It's our system collectively as a society for figuring out what's true and what's not true and doing that in a way that respects our our freedom and keeps us sane and keep civil every society. Large and small needs a way to do that. Many many societies have broken up over questions of truth of fact western societies wars raging across europe and many other places until we got a constitution knowledge which says you know what instead of having rulers make decisions about facts. Let's have rules to do it. And we set up a system to do that. Looks a lot like the. Us constitution in many ways. And that's the constitutional knowledge. We say we set it up The constitution of the united states was hammered out by a group of people. But as you point out a number times on the book there's a parallel between the constitution of knowledge. The that is the process by which we try to figure out peacefully what is true and what is true and the marketplace the economic system. We have where they're both decentralized they both rely on quite a bit on competition and on the norms and feedback loops that that really sustain it and make it do positive things and not just Randomly produce outcomes. I i was struck with what you just said about the wars because i used to like to quote. I haven't done it in a while. But i like to quote walter. Williams said in the old as if you wanted to get rich you hit your neighbor that with the stick and took took abor stuff and capitalism was away markets. Were away to a lot of people to get rich instead of zero-some game strategy similarly if you kill someone have award to make them believe what you think is true. It's not as effective as what you outlined in the constitution and knowledge. Yeah yeah well. That's exactly what it might be more effective but it's not as nice guy then. The same is true of the us constitution. There is the disa- analogy that you mentioned that the. Us constitution was written down by a group of people in a room. But as i say again and again in the book the real. Us constitution isn't normally starts with the words on paper. What it really is is all the norms institutions things like political parties on judicial review and popular sovereign tea and All the many things that built up and the same is through of the constitution knowledge. It's wasn't written down to begin with but it was set up by human beings it does have. Rules was conscious about that. It has lots of institutions the big four branches of it our research which is academia and science of course second is the world journalism the world i come from also fact-based also professionals trying to figure out what's true in a disaggregated decentralized way the third is the world of law people don't know this but the idea of a fact originally comes law predates the world of science because you had to have some facts in common in order to figure out out to rule in case and the fourth is government which has to be reality. Based in order to function until two thousand seventeen january twentieth was fact-based and still mostly is so those are the big four and they all function using a set of rules and lots of institutions. Lots of settings that you have to get right. Which is the problem with. The standard metaphor for where knowledge comes from the marketplace of ideas that assumes free speech is enough and that leaves us vulnerable because you need to get a lot of settings a lot of institutions. You get a lot of rules in place. A lot of professionals and those are easy to attack and are under attack. So that's the idea of my book. Let's talk about the informal norms. That because i think they're so so important in in all these worlds were talking about that. The world it produces knowledge the world that produces political outcomes that the us constitution mediates and the commercial world. Of course the world that that marked real what we would normally call real markets What they deal with an enormous enormous or underrated And i think the last five to ten years as the internet is ramped up in the world has changed a lot of dorms that used to sustain decency and human behave human civilized. Outcomes have been degraded The behavioral expectations of people. In i would say an academic life in journalism and politics have all taken a hit. You all levin. Sure you know his book time to build it was on. You're talking about it. Then somebody people use their platform as a place to perform rather than a place to be obligated to a duty to the to the institution. And i think some of what's going on is that degradation of the institutions is the norms of deteriorated. Will your college president. So you're in some ways. I'm a better position than i am. To speak of that. And your job is going to be to defend those those norms against some of the trends. That you've always talking about. Yeah you follow vince. Wonderful book a time to build. I should be plugging my book. I should be they tell you what you do. You hold it up three times at least there. It is available at a bookstore near.

jonathan united states Rauch volt chevy Johnson walter europe Williams levin vince
"rauch" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Days. And the vaccine was designed first vaccine basically over weekend Journalism journalist my first job. Winston salem journal north carolina. I was a beat reporter and you quickly learn that. Even if you're in a hurry you have to be accurate. You're going to have to pass through an editor who is going to ask you some pretty tough questions. If the thing doesn't be credible. Say i need to look at your notes here. Did you call so and so then you're going to go through a copy dusk. If it's a magazine or creasing lee now online publications. You're going to be fact checked by someone who's gonna save producer sources. Now that can be done in hours not years but those are all gates that you're going to have to go through the past the skeptical scrutiny of others in the system and then something else you know when it goes into print. If you're wrong other people are going to find that out. They'll either write letters or they'll get online or some other outlet will try to follow and say wait a minute davies megs. They completely botched the story you know. Maybe it's the wuhan lab release story about corona virus. The key in all of these fields isn't how fast or slow they move. It's that they're all basically hunting for errors and holding themselves accountable to the other people in the system for their mistakes. That's the magic formula fast or slow. Speaking of the need to check our facts. One troubling example last year and earlier this year was the unwillingness of much of the media to report on or take seriously the wuhan lab leak theory about the origins of covert is that an example of eroding standards and journalism. I don't know about eroding. I worry about journalism because finding facts is so expensive and so painstaking and writing opinions and spouting half truths and tweeting is very very cheap and collects eyeballs. I unlike a lot of people. Actually i disagree with those who see the wuhan lab reporting as a black-eyed journalism when you go back and look at it actually. A lot of outlets did not miss reported. Some did many many did not and the most important thing is that. Why did that hypothesis re-surface months later it was because accomplish mainstream journalists at places like the wall street journal and the new york times stayed on. The story watched it said. Hey wait a minute. Maybe we went to fast. Here's some evidence. Look at what these academics are saying they resurfaced. They brought it back and now we're having kind of almost festival of journalistic navel-gazing to figure out how we got it. So wrong will. That's the system actually working the revolution in human affairs. it is the constitution of knowledge. It says know what everyone makes mistakes and it shouldn't be the end of your career if you just have a hypothesis and it's wrong as long as you hold yourself accountable you print the correction you. Come back and get it right. That means your errors. Your mistakes become fuel for further learning. This is how do we fix it. i'm richard davies. And i'm jim megs. We're speaking with jonathan rauch author of the brand new book the constitution of knowledge. A defense of truth..

Winston salem north carolina the wall street journal new york times jim megs richard davies jonathan rauch
"rauch" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Advice to listeners. Before we get going there is a swear word that was used once or twice in this episode. yeah. I don't think it's anything that most people are gonna find too jarring but if you have kids in the car with you or other sensitive ears in in your location you might wanna be advised. Okay let's start with a quote from our guest. Jonathan rouch he writes acquiring knowledge is a conversation not a destination. It's the process journey a journey. We take together not alone. Others are always involved. A knowledge is not something. I have more fundamentally. It's something we have. This is such an important concept that are sent to the world. Our knowledge of the world is something that's shaped through a good faith effort of trying to establish facts then challenging those facts to make sure they really hold up discussing them and allowing our understanding of the world to evolve and. This is a process that. Today i worry might be under threat. The constitution of knowledge with jonathan. Rauch maybe.

Jonathan rouch jonathan Rauch
"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A lot of the other ones maybe too slowly but i think in good faith are now looking for ways to change their policies and especially their platform designs in ways. That will be more pro social and will reward sharing stuff. That's true instead of stuff. That's false that will try to root out the fake identities the bots in the trolls. And i'm especially interested in facebook's oversight board which is kind of a supreme court that's trying to set accountable rules for how people behave on facebook and social media. That's how we got out of this one hundred years ago We set up rules of the road. We had institutions in journalism and elsewhere. That said you know what. Let's have ethics codes. let's have guidelines. Let's be transparent. Let's set expectations for how you behavior and overtime. That actually worked because it created an environment people wanted to be a did not feel manipulated by if anything works. It's going to be that. So i see these. Companies as potential allies that have to be drawn even deeper into the process of reform. If an only facebook uses the judgment of the oversight board as precedent setting and to end would apply them off facebook rather than the case by case basis basis. Which is seems to me. They're approaching this with. I mean i. Maybe i should have you back to the debate. The oversight board here but with that. I'm so afraid that we've we've run out of time. The new book is called the constitution of knowledge and defense. Truth we've got an excerpt of it at on point radio dot org jonathan row. It's been a great pleasure to speak with you. Thank you so much for coming on the show. I enjoyed it so much. And i'd be happy to come back anytime. I'm meghna chakrabarti. This is on point.

facebook meghna chakrabarti one hundred years ago jonathan row radio
"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:43 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It did and all about the warm up for the election. So it's a perfect storm well and regarding the tech part of it what i think. More and more people are finding increasingly appalling. Is that as you said. this actually isn't by accident. It's by design right. There are very specific. Decisions made by You know facebook. For example that that state clearly they are not interested in the advancement of truth or a robust debate of ideas but rather they are interested in simply delivering to shareholders. And that's why i mean as you. Well know jonathan shoshana zubov calls it an epidemic coup that in fact there's a deliberate coup in terms of how we know what we know so so so that sort of chaos part of it i think is is pretty well trodden ground and i appreciate you bringing it into your analysis here about its impact on the overall constitution of knowledge. As you as you describe it In fact we've got some feedback from listeners. Here russell says both sides can't face the truth or facts. The media seems to be the catalyst sources in today's world consequently the public align themselves with propaganda. They listen to or view. So that's one side of your dichotomy here jonathan. I'd love to spend a considerable amount of time on the other side. The conformity side. You say that there's a rise in the pressures towards conformist thinking and you particularly take aim on the left and there's sort of different aspects of the left we could explore here but i was wondering if we could spend a few minutes talking about how you see this happening on university campuses. And here's why because you we'll talk about solutions a little bit later but one of the solutions you talk about is that diversity of viewpoints is actually quite important to the constitution of knowledge. What evidence do we have Polling evidence or or analyses about the adequacy or lack of diversity of viewpoints on university campuses. Now who will. We know from lots of survey research that about two thirds of university. Students say that they're reluctant to state their true opinions on politics and other controversial matters for fear of calling out facing other kinds of of social retribution and pretty robustly confirmed and by the way. It's not that different from the same number. In american society. Generally whereabouts sixty percent of americans say they're reluctant to state their true political views because of social pressure and third of americans across again by the way amazingly all ideologies from the right to the left a third of americans say that they worry about losing job or career opportunities. If they're frank about politics this according to one study this is about four times. The level of chilling that we saw the height of the mccarthy era so what we're seeing now on campus but also increasingly off campus is an epidemic environment that is hostile to diversity of viewpoints. Where people are just afraid to speak out if they disagree but tell me. Tell me more about that because you actually write in quite a bit of detail about college campuses in particular and because you you you consider universities one of the key pillars of this constitution of knowledge so if we are moving towards a university culture across this country that supposed be one of the places where this this sort of debating and sorting and filtering of diversity of ideas then leads to common sets of behaviors and beliefs. And yet we're not having that. That robust churn if i can put it that way. I mean tell me a little bit more about what you've written about the evidence that you see for that. Who will there. Certainly the kinds of polls we talked about there. I interviewed many professors students for for my book And i frequently heard professors say for example and by the way progressive professors on the left and on the right this is not an ideological phenomenon strictly speaking they said i'm afraid of my students. I'm afraid of getting investigated. If i say the wrong thing. I'm just generally afraid of the climate around here Students say the same thing. Those students who turns out are now the main enforcers of social conformity on campus. Not a majority of students but very outspoken minority. That's very capable of weaponising. Things like investigation so the professor might get reported if they use the n. Word in a law class where the cases about that word so that creates a chilled environment. the most poignant comment i think in my whole book i was talking to a senior rising senior at one of the famous. Liberal arts colleges. I won't name it but you've heard of it and she saying that. She regrets the fact that she has not been exposed to conservative viewpoints in college even though she's a liberal and then she said that she gives herself some solace because she says well at least been exposed to a variety of progressive viewpoints. And that just made me cringe. Because the core the constitution of knowledge the very center of wyatt works is like the us constitution. you have to have diversity. we don't see our own biases. We just cannot and if all we're talking to people who share our biases we will make error. We will go wrong. We will go down into epa stomach bubbles and rabbit holes and when you start seeing departments and even disciplined in academia where conservatives are scarce. Hen's teeth you get a couple of problems. One is the chilling effect. We talk about where everybody thinks. You're crazy if you have a certain non orthodox point of view but the second is that the science becomes bad. You stop asking the questions that ought to be asked in the challenges posed by other points of view hub. So we know now. Another important sources statistical information. We know now that in some of the humanities and social.

facebook sixty percent One jonathan shoshana zubov both sides second one study russell third one today jonathan one side four times americans two thirds american problems mccarthy wyatt
"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:18 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point. I'm meghan tucker body. The sky is blue fact right well not really because it in fact changes color depending on time of day and where you are okay. Here's another one. It is wrong to murder. Another human being. That's true right except that in war and frequently in the courts the taking of another life is seen as justified and even forgiven. So how about this. One president joe biden freely and fairly won the twenty twenty presidential election. There was no widespread voter fraud. Well that one is a quantifiably measurably and replica. Replicable fact quantifiable measurable and replicable. And yet it is not the truth to everyone more than half of republicans. Continue to believe the election was stolen so these are just a couple of examples of a society in the midst of what. Jonathan rauch calls an episode amick crisis. He's author of the new book the constitution of knowledge a defense of truth and he joins us now. Jonathan welcome to on. I'm happy to be here. Thanks okay so first of all love to start with some definitions episode democ crisis. What do you mean. That's when a society small tribe major nation. Whatever loses the ability to be on what facts are and how we get to fax for public purposes symptoms of that include polarization forking realities extremists civility in hostility and strange tation strange disorientation. Okay tell me a little bit more about that that last one well a good example is the one that you just began with what happened in the election in twenty twenty two completely different stories. No clear way to bring them together. One side just will not believe what the other side believes. This becomes disorienting and lot of people in the middle. Don't really know what to believe anymore. They're in a kind of state of confusion disorientation. Well which side is right and who hacked to the democratic server in two thousand sixteen was at the ukrainians or the russians will never know. We don't know who to believe we don't know who to trust So this is the key thing about The idea of an epa stem crisis. Because it's not just. There are no shared facts anymore or or universally agreed upon. Facts is that people don't even know how to know or how we come about forming those facts or judging those truth. So it's a it's a a hijacking of even the processes of of coming up with reliable knowledge. That is exactly right. People never agree on facts. That's the fundamental truth about all human societies. And it's how societies Have to deal with the problem of bringing together people who disagree. They'll continue to disagree but we hope they can agree. On is a process that leads society toward being able to draw conclusions at least for public purpose. It's like you know some people believe elvis presley is still alive. Do we send him a social security check. No lot of people may still believe that but for public purposes. We figured out a way to come to a conclusion when that breaks down. It's not that we all have to agree but when we can't agree even on a process that's the episode crisis and that's what's happening now so in your book you You hold to account in terms of creation of this epidemic crisis. Both the right and the left and i'm and i'm going to want to dive into specific examples of later in the show but in a sense you open the book with this conundrum. Though that this question of how we know what we know is as old as humanity itself. I mean you. Start with the ancient greeks. Can you tell us a little bit about that. It's the starting question of all philosophy magna. How do we know truth. And how do we know when we know truth because we could at any moment be wrong. Of course you know for all of us their times we were certainly were right. Only discover that we were wrong. This is a problem that plagues humanity the ancients knew it. Modern psychology has greatly elaborated on it. So we know a lot now. We know that the human brains were very good at distinguishing. You know what's true. In immediate circumstances that involve life and death or major stakes where we get immediate feedback like is that a tiger in bush or is that a breeze or where the next tribe camp but on bigger abstract questions like what god do we worship or where does disease come from where bad if that and we were wired to believe things that increase our status in our group and the confirm our identities and our pre existing beliefs are biases will. That's a recipe for entire societies to go down rabbit holes of confirming what they think to each other believing what your friends believe confirming your biases. That's you know in a small scale. That's reverend james jones and his his colt down there in ghana and a very large scale. It's soviet union or it often ends up the sex will break up into Into smaller sex go to war with each other in a large scale. That's the word of religion which lasted one hundred years killed. Maybe thirty percent of the population of germany. That's how people throughout time most of our two hundred thousand years as species. That's how we dealt with disagreements about truth. We went to war. We split into saxon. It did not end well and so what's different than now sounds. It sounds as if we're just doing doing the same thing but a lot faster. Well this is why it's so important to have a constitution knowledge and even more important is to know that we have a constitution because it worked so well for so long that we kind of forgot that we have this thing you know. We thought well free speech. Marketplace of ideas truth will just autumn arise from that. So that's not the case. Starting you know three hundred three hundred fifty years ago. Pick your date. Some people we can name them they're not obscure. John locke is maybe the most famous of them look around at thousands of years of human suffering combat to talibanism dictatorships all getting truth. Wrong doing a terrible job and they say there must be a better way to do this. So instead of having rulers decide what's true in a priest or potentate era prints or a politburo else beginning with p. they say let's have rules instead of rulers figure this out let's set up a system. It's what today we call a social network in which.

Jonathan John locke thirty percent james jones one hundred years ghana germany thousands of years today two hundred thousand years three hundred three hundred fi One side Both elvis presley twenty twenty two republicans biden more than half first presidential election
"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:43 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Those principles there needs to be a rallying of liberal smaller liberals pluralist who think universities are places where almost any idea should be explorer where no one should be investigated simply for offending student or making them feel quote unquote unsafe that those values are there and my hope is that they can still be mobilized. You're you're out of university. You can tell me whether you think that's realistic. But i think we're starting to see fight from the liberal side. I think especially progressives but non authoritarian liberal progressives people who believe employer lysm are starting to organize and fight back. They're starting to realize that. These weapons of cancelling social coercion investigations. That this is not about progressive ideas this is about domination and division so we're seeing the emergence of tons of new groups. And there's going to be more that are fighting for academic freedom free speech on campus academic freedom alliance just to name one example so our side hasn't really begun to fight and if we if we counter mobilize thin i think yeah i think ultimately we do very well because remember the counselors are actually a small group the sirius woke left no woke quote unquote about eight percent of the american public campuses bigger. But it's really never majority so you've got to organize the disorganized majority and then you get somewhere. So that's that's the first thing that could go right. The second thing that could go right is we have another huge ally on our side and that's reality itself an angel problem with information warfare. Disinformation is it the propaganda fall for it themselves. It's very hard to keep this stuff at arm's length because you have to fool people or did it be effective at that. You often have to fool yourself. You have to make sure people don't really know what's true or false even within your own racks and trolls and disinformation artists propagandists. They are almost completely parasitical. They can tear down institutions. They can demolish trust. They can have a completely nihilistic attitude toward truth but they cannot put the vaccine in my shoulder that is protecting me from corona virus right now only. The constitution of knowledge can make the new knowledge improves society and keep us as a society in touch with reality and that is a huge longterm advantage. But having said all that something you just said is true. This is the constitution of knowledge does not prevail automatically it prevails because people realize there is a constitutional knowledge. There are these norms and these institutions that we value with its society depends on that truth depends on and we rally and we organize and we mobilize and we defend that has to happen. I think that is actually a wonderfully optimistic and quite inspiring note to end on. So i will leave it there. John thank you so much for joining. It really is a wonderful book and it is clarifying. It really is quite inspiring and i. It could not come at a better time. So thank you for writing it and thank you for joining me to talk about it. It's a privilege to be on l'affaire. Thank you offer. Podcast produced in cooperation with the brookings institution. If you've liked what you've heard please take a moment to rate the podcast or let someone know so. They can enjoy this well. This podcast is produced by gen potier. Hobble i'm shittu of goat rodeo audio engineer and sophia yan performed on music as always thanks for listening.

John second thing first thing sophia corona virus tons of new groups about eight percent gen potier one example brookings Hobble american goat rodeo l'affaire
"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:58 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And that stopped the seal. And you know what that looks like. And you know the result which is seventy percent of republicans now think the election was stolen entirely false. But there you are. We've never seen anything like this. In america we don't know how to cope with it. We have no immunity. And it's a very bad place to be. The only the best defense against these tactics is for politicians not to use them to begin with but unfortunately we have crossed that magical line replicable speaking of the inspiration that that trump has had for the trump is part of the republican party which sort of increasingly the majority part of the republican party. How replicable do you think this approaches. If trump runs again in two thousand twenty four which is not outside the realm of possibility presumably. We're gonna get a bunch of his style of information warfare but what if trump decides not to run you. Do you think that the tools of trump est disinformation warfare are learnable by your average politician. Is there's something special about trump. I mean if a normal person stands up or let's say an ordinary person stands up and says it's not raining when it's clearly raining. Will you think that person is just is just delusional. But there was something about trump where he could say that and the very fact of the obviousness of the li- almost rebounded to his favorite. I mean is trump unique in the kind of whatever weird combination of charisma and political genius. Such that we don't have to be quite so afraid of this guy or is every republican. Who tries this and maybe one day. God forbid you know. Democrats will start doing this too. Is this going to be something that you think is is could become a stable future politics when can only conjecture. We don't know that yet. That's the sixty four thousand dollar question. I'll tell you why i'm discouraged about this. When i wrote the book it was before stopped the steel before the election and one of the things i thought is. Okay well maybe. The full chapter on on trump and disinformation what the russians are up to. And how trump copy that and and magnified it. Maybe that's all going to be obsolete when the books published. Because maybe he's out of power in joe biden is president and it's all gone away then. Stop the steel happens and we see the trump is out of power and he loses his twitter account but the republican party and specifically the republican base takes up. These lies this disinformation campaign and run with it and it becomes almost like a game for them. It's just lots of fun. you know. Republicans in arizona. My home state decide well. Although the election returns were checked twice internally and then went through to audit which found no problems and were certified by the republican state officials including the governor who run the election process. We need to go back. And have a new recount. A true recount conducted by trumpy people with no experience in the election. Who will do things like check for. Bamboo fibers. in case ballots were shipped in from china. So that may sound clownish. But it's not that's the grassroots saying We can do some trolling some conspiracy. Theorizing some disinformation here and sure enough. Other republicans around the country copycat that and they start demanding. These sham recounts of their own. So what we've learned is that yeah once. Genie is out of the bottle. This is a fun way to do politics. Can you can just make stuff up. You can be outrageous. You can broadcast through channels. I don't know that others will be as good as trump. But i do know that. Lots of countries am lots of political parties and politicians have used these tactics with great success for one hundred years. And there's no reason why. American politicians of both parties cannot also do the same and they already are so before we get to you how we might fix this this state of affairs. I wanna spend a few minutes just on the third probably five which is which is often called cancel culture in but i want to ask you about there. Is this so. I think there is an increasing understanding even on the left that cancel culture and kind of general. Censorious of of pinon is a real problem. But what would you say to someone that says. Look this is a problem. But it's just it's not on the level of the other two problems. Identify social media is completely ruining. Our discourse in spreading misinformation and in parts of the world is causing violence. You know the trump and his enabler have ruined american politics and then cancel culture. I mean it's not great. It's kind of silly. it's mostly on university campuses. You know why do you devote a whole chapter and seemingly elevated to the to the same level of importance right. I mean presumably some of this as you. Your admirable attempts to be even-handed politically. But i i assume you you think this is as important in some ways as social media and as as you know political lying who will minor adjustment i. I thought that as of october of twenty twenty now. I don't now that we've seen the stop the steel campaign the big lie the effect on us the fact that seventy percent of republicans. Now think we're no longer in a democracy. The invasion of the capitol I now think that one of these things is clearly not like the others. and that's the weaponization of russian style. Disinformation and the conversion of the republican party into a propaganda organ. Institutionally i hate to say those words. I'm not a partisan person. I have voted for many republicans. I'm central right. But i don't think we have ever had a situation in america where we've seen weaponized russian style. Disinformation run against the american people by major political party. So i'm i'm more worried about that. The other two that said so. What is canceling basically..

seventy percent arizona america china one hundred years two thousand twitter Democrats five both parties two problems one republican party twice third sixty four thousand dollar two Republicans republican october of twenty twenty
"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"rauch" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"But one of them is what researchers call the firehose of falsehood and. That's where you put out so many lies in half truths and conspiracy theories so fast through so many channels that people become confused disoriented. Cynical fact checkers. The media can't begin to keep up with just trying to refute them gives them more currency. And meanwhile you've got ten others out there. The goal of this isn't necessarily to persuade people of something. That's false though. You like it when that happens this to persuade them that nothing is true that there's no one no one they can trust him or they become cynical about about the media and about what's true much false. They become in fact unable even to tell. What's true and false if this goes on long enough. So no one ever imagined adapting and using techniques. Russian style disinformation techniques. Like the fire hose of falsehood. And there are others like conspiracy bootstrapping and trolling so. No one imagined applying those at mass-scale to american politics much less as a candidate for the presidency or as president of the united states. I'm alan rosenstein. And this is the law fair. Podcast june fourteenth two thousand and twenty one public discourse is in bad shape. these days. We all yell at cancel each other on social media and college campuses and politicians especially those on the trump bright lie so much that the very notion of truth threatens to lose any meaning. Jonathan row is optimistic that this can change for the better. Jonathan is a senior.

Jonathan alan rosenstein trump one Russian Jonathan row two thousand ten others twenty one united states american june fourteenth
Joshua A. Rauch was arrested Saturday and charged with second degree arson in Houston

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Joshua A. Rauch was arrested Saturday and charged with second degree arson in Houston

"A collaboration of Houston police and the Fire Department's arson bureau has led to an arrest of a suspect for a string of fires in the greater heights area. In the past week or so. 27 year old Joshua Roaches charged with seven counts of second degree arson and the fire marshal says that there could be more cases one neighbour tells or TV partner channel to. He can't figure out the motive. It's just why I think is the biggest like why would you do this to someone? Those fires included vehicles, trash cans and sheds

Arson Joshua Roaches Fire Department Houston Partner
The Trump 'clown-iverse' continues

Between The Lines

09:55 min | 1 year ago

The Trump 'clown-iverse' continues

"Another crazy waken US politics. Remember this. Now back they sure you. In fact, let people know Senator I'm not going to answer the question. Because the question. Just as radical left would you out Mason who is on your list? Not. Surprisingly, the media responds to the debate especially Donald Trump's plan rudeness it was overwhelmingly hostile wasn't it? Couple of days later, trump was diagnosed with code. After mixed messages about health trump got in a car and run around waving to supporters. Then he was released from hospital he returned to the White House and he went on one of those twitter rants among other things. He told the American people not covid even though he's doctor has said, he may not entirely be out of the woods yet. So, what does all this main awake after the debate and only weeks before the US presidential election and what does it mean for America's image in the world? For answers. Let's turn to a leading. American Common Taito a conservative who says he's quite sick of living in what he calls Donald Trump's clown verse or drama drivers over believers or I can't believe these guys actually the president. Verse. Brad. Stevens is a columnist with the New York. Times, and formally with the Wall Street Journal, where he won a Pulitzer Prize for opinion writing I should just warn you all that he comes to us via a scratchy on in Manhattan. Bread. Welcome back to the Shire. Back Be Sydney. Well, the rate is of the New York Times I can't wait to see the end of trump you yourself are prominent never trump you your New York Times columnist this week you say you was trump will give us just a few reasons why I wish a speedy recovery. I think to wish ill. To reduced to his level on that, of course, it's been. Core of the trump EST project which has been to based political norms and diminish moral standards. So why would I wanNA join trump along along that road a bit for more narrowly political reasons. I. Wish it well, because God forbid he were to die before the election, he would go down so to speak a undefeated. And what I hope is that a resounding electoral defeat in November and I'm speaking of the conservative. will put an end not only to the trump presidency, but she trumpism as a an ideological force. In American politics. Now. You rauch trump. The man needs to leave and lose because it's the only way the trump cult might die it unsubscribe to the cult trump obviously. Is that why you among that never trump was. Are exerting very little influence on the political right in America these days. You know I I hear that and. I was struck by the disconnect between my supposed- irrelevance and irrelevance might never trump fellow travelers. And the fact that the president. Describing us as human scum the conservative press keeps denouncing us if we're really quite so irrelevant, you think they want to go so much energy. Truth. Election that is probably going to turn on a small number of a relatively small number of voters in swing states, and so I think we're not quite so relevant have some people allege and stressed that never trump is include many prominent conservatives lock yourself William Kristol George Will Max Booed David. Brooks. David. From and Applebaum. Jennifer from there among others. But you see your critics would respond inside the Elat media consensus with there on the left or the never trump conservatives they've been consistently against trump wrought from that said. And Nights. I haven't you guys foul to understand what got America trump and indeed Britain brexit in the first place. You know. I'm not quite sure I agree with the analysis. Is and came about in part because there was unquestionably failure of the mainstream conservative establishment, which I guess I was park in recognizing some of the populous tides in American politics. I think it candidate for a much more specifically than which was a luxury crisis. In Europe, but went unchecked help create brexit brexit had knock on effects in the United States. As well, and and I would add a larger point com, which did you those who are listening here are left in any healthy democracy need a mortally healthy a conservative movement. There's no democracy that doesn't have a conservative side of politics. and. So even our adversaries are opponents politically should want us to succeed want a conservative movement that is optimistic that is inclusive that is in favor of growth, and that favors the open society and the free world. That's the way I can feel, okay my politics, they remained unchanged from the days before trump and hopefully will remain unchanged. Have said analysis requires us to listen attentively to individual voters tell us about your subject to Chris you right about her and you'll recent York Times call him. She's a registered Democrat and a trump voting lesbian store manager from Manhattan, and she fits none of the cultural demographic stereotypes of the trump by Brett tell us about Chris. Chris is a woman who is well educated. Well traveled and as you mention, she is She's gay and she the trump supporter and I one of the things that I I occasionally will be with my column in The New York Times. Is. Essentially. handed over not not fully. But at least partially handed over to Voice of that I think the predominantly liberal leadership of the Times. Need to could here because What she observed is that at least until the pandemic, her savings accounts or pension or private pension account for the United States a call four one ks. Arising smart. The economy was doing better in her view than it had been under Obama and that that's the counted for voters like her as opposed to you know questions about the president's mannerisms or read myths or his coarseness on the world stage and I wrote it Tom for the simple reason that Hillary Clinton would it become president? Her supporters hadn't been so convinced. That it was only a bunch of rednecks Yak. In the middle of the country, we're going to the trump. He is indeed and make the point. She's not an outlaw. She's a red voter in a blue state. My guest is Brit Stevens he's an award winning columnist with the New York Times. And we're talking about. Well, let's be frank. The crazy times in American politics. Let's turn to the debate bridge sixty years ago October nineteen sixty. The World Watch the Kenji Nixon debates we were too young. We went even. We weren't even born. To civilized will informed holly. Intelligent. Courteous Navy combat veterans are both in their forties. And yet six decades later. The world's being shocked and horrified. By the time of the first presidential debate these to all men engaging in A. An angry angry exchange is the best the both major parties can offer the American people sixty how's it come to these? You know when I was when my wife I ever watched, my wife has his permanent immigrants United States actually came a citizen. BECCA very. And I have to turn to her engine apologize for bringing her country because it was mortifying fortunately, the United States is a lot more than its leader. But debasement of politics has been long the making and it's one of many reasons why I just can't accept trump as president even though can time-to-time agreeing with his policies because he is he has brought the state about politics shoot a level that. Be chargeable to describe it as over Banana Republic and and you know onto. The Kennedy Nixon debates that I am are well enough to follow up one of the great issues that debate. The status of key Moi in Matsue, he's a little time with his island off the coast of mainland. Just unimaginable that piece to standard standard-bearers would have that kind of exchange although I. Walked by what Action Nowhere Chemo in that. So actually are. Yes you said that Donald Trump in that debate was channeling Alec Baldwin Channeling Donald Trump and yet he was holy himself. I get all that but is a more wrong with America than Donald, trump, Brad Stevens yet they're into lot more. You know I think Adam Smith Donald trump is a symptom of of some of that ruined but in seeking to an Australian audience I think it's worth remembering and reminding this audience that there could. Be Fixed his right in America

Donald Trump United States President Trump America The New York Times Manhattan Brad Stevens Brit Stevens Chris Senator Mason Pulitzer Prize Matsue Banana Republic Wall Street Journal William Kristol Twitter Shire
"rauch" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"rauch" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"It Rauch E. IBM network boll and branch so I can tell you how special they are but you just have to experience them for yourself folks they are the softest and most comfortable sheet you will ever experience because they're made with pure one hundred percent organic cotton and they only get softer over time they are V. definition of comfortable easily comparable a thousand dollar shades but they started only a hundred and sixty dollars Bowman branch uses that same organic cotton in their pillows and throw blankets and in their towels and there's just one place to get it all that's on there website boll and branch dot com start with the sheets you get thirty nights risk free to try the shipping is always free and you'll get fifty dollars off your first set if you use the promo code rush which is my name it's spelled B. O. L. L. and branch dot com promo code rush restrictions may apply see ball and branch dot com for details the reality is running a business isn't easy and the one thing as a business owner you don't ever have enough of his time you know who doesn't get that big banks you need funds quickly for some new equipment or new location and banks give you a long application process and even longer wait for a decision it was time for that that's why on deck change the way business owners get the cash they need their simple online application only takes ten minutes to complete and they give you a decision quickly usually same day and on deck says.

How has React changed web development?

Software Engineering Daily

02:06 min | 1 year ago

How has React changed web development?

"Rush. Welcome back to software engineering daily things having me again. We're about six years into the release of react. How his React Change Web Development? I've been saying for a while. Now that I think broadly the most exciting paradigm shift of react has been moving away from templates into components. If we had to summarize the great innovation I think has been to create a workflow for teams to see the rise of the signed systems to give people greater ability composition power and ultimately empowering the front end developer. I think before especially with templates were confined to servers surrendering things that would do. Spin Abacha. Jvm Box and write some temple leading language and then just not care about the front. That's much anything. React has made people gravitate in the opposite direction. You know even teams that were not that fun of J S Realize. Hey to build a world class front would probably have to use this reacting the development of react application has gotten easier over time. What was the boiler plate that was historically needed for starting a react application? How have they gotten simpler? That's a great way to put it. I think there was a lot of boy to play in fact when we started next Jay. S which was solving the problem of making react application top to bottom entire experience. We are seeing a lot of GETUP repos floating around that were basically copy paste of boilerplate. S- they weren't providing a framework on an altogether solution. They were like hey clone this boilerplate and then started making changes. And then you'll diverge from the border played at some point because you're not merging changes back in so we created next year. Solve that problem. Exactly it was okay. Reinserted as a as an embassy was kind of like component specific library and wanted to create an entire obligation with react. Next year it's kind of became that

Spin Abacha Front End Developer JAY
Michel Rauchs - Benchmarking Bitcoin

Crypto Voices

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Michel Rauchs - Benchmarking Bitcoin

"So very happy to have Michelle on one of the first shows here to start the year in twenty twenty Michelle. Thanks for joining the welcome much batting. Yeah really appreciate you coming on. I've been wanting to have you on for a while. Actually just done You guys over there at Cambridge And curious to learn more about doing a pair of dignity and you've done Just wonderful wonderful work past few years in in Bitcoin and Crypto blockchain. Just a lot of fantastic nick research that certainly will linked to our users haven't already heard Of the work that you're doing but I guess just to just to start for those that don't no. Can you provide a little bit of background for us on sort of how you got into Crypto and Bitcoin and everything at Cambridge. Yeah sure so interested in Financial in systems and especially monetary systems so the different types of the exist how they achieve over time and then in house and cheating you once come up of slowly successions sessions and so yeah. It's been quite a bit of time researching and then I stumbled upon bitcoin into fourteen which interests Pretty much right away. I have had no idea what exactly was what it meant. And how he worked so is essentially took the form university. I need teams Just to research basic so getting benching computer science but also Economics Game Theory and even the politics of it and so as a result of this Masa `this is only kind business ecosystem so collected data of thing was around five hundred different even companies on projects in the space and visualize evolution of the system structure Over the first five years of its existence is that that's how we got into both cryptocurrency space and just off the wedge trading. I didn't we know what to do. Call the professor anew anew worst sees what it didn't know as he actually moved to Cambridge on to join the central ten defines these and pick a benchmarking studies and so I never wego almost study which was reason. I don't take the time you've got a job instead. So that was pretty good Any associate India There as assistant so we CO author team benchmarking studies where we reached out to companies in space but surveys and Indian off the yellow took over as the program and lost two years. They're doing quite a bit of studies and other things any indication Asian material in in that kind of stuff well presentations and just recently. Six months ago moved back to Mike. Country CI launched a consulting firm. You were essentially help. Individuals and situations to navigate. This complex landscape which is in most cases means convincing companies. Why light they shouldn't start to own the press? blockchain shamed him if you were think about alternate s. both internal technical as little so upon business perspective. It's very interesting. I think to describe it So that his DIG MMA your company. There you're referencing. What sort of Things than would would you direct companies to. What sort of sort of advice would you give them? If it is not to start their own enterprise blockchain in many cases. There is absolutely city. No need to do that so we came. She opened in one of the study. Said I offered said Cambridge with a term the cold the blockchain mean where it's pretty bad idea that blockchain this concept is one. We in abstract thing has become an abstract thing that can use as a political tool to either Detroit organizational change actually overcome organization in show. I'm so when we talk T- Stuff it's Eddie engine. Eighteen innovate bank. They if they sold the IT project which is essentially nothing else than Upgrade alone over to Um to infrastructure to essentially portrayal frame it as has a blockchain project. Then they will get executive buying and the budget to that. Although of course they knew they would use anything. That's remove close to what we would consider boxing. A which is waiting in because the guy gets better infrastructure The management has something to sell his public in terms of like. Look how over to your. Your engineering team is happy because finding the budget so in the end. It's kind of like a win win. Situation the only problem is that it just creates edition confusion. I guess at the Public Nick Timber. Wolves isn't what it can achieve so that creates a lease a very unrealistic expectations and so a rule. There is first and foremost almost Telling them what action actually is. Winning the project looks more like a blockchain move and then actually showing some alternatives so essentially focusing on specific civic elements log digital signatures like a public infrastructure cryptographic hashing algorithms in order to essentially a team that business case without atten overheads and disadvantages said in a real blockchain would actually cover okay. Is there a view. Then that you're taking specifically now regarding eighty enterprise consulting and blockchain's whether it's smart contracts on a theory or Peter. Todd's open timestamps on Bitcoin. Essentially many cases it's exactly that and so most companies would actually be better off by just Um Breglio occasionally Thompson thing system states in blockchain because that would just be a little more cost efficient and secure repudiation then building their own to know blockchain that's controlled by them but just in many tatum vans jazzy. Both thing the hype at least in the and the press blockchain industry or community of the hype is stated away and has given room to actually Syria's series initiatives now. Most of these initiatives have numb that much in common with these multi-party consensus systems. But it's we need more bads. It's a lot less about about multi-party consensus systems. But by creating shed infrastructure it's not controlled by one single entity more three consortium or joint ventures and and it's just taking a long time actually get to that point and that was mostly because of corporate governance talking about it's ten different things that our competitors and that we want to build a shed infrastructure that they use but nobody owns while that's quite complex and complicated Actually kickoff so now after we three four years of development of intensity station so we we see the first networks actually deploy and think it's actually really exciting developments. It has not that much to do. With willow would consider blockchain's more about its cryptographic shared infrastructure which deafening those benefits. Everyone involved including the end customer Indians. Well

Blockchain Cambridge Michelle Boxing Public Nick Timber Mike Professor Um Breglio Syria Executive Todd Detroit Peter
"rauch" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"rauch" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Is rich with let's come back on the it's eating for Rauch's legacies creating division on using race and immigration as a real a vehicle to do that know your front your legacy is that we're leaving the European Union is something that that several elections so we had a referendum in twenty sixteen we have a a general election twenty seventeen where both the major party said they respect result so let me make this very clear to you you'll talk about Matt and who has failed to either be in and P. or any has it failed to political parties you don't see the brakes apart all you kids in the house of Commons when you talk about him into divide what in god's name are you talking about he then divides should be between the brexit as I would mean is not deep between the brexit as you don't talk about him in any device anybody that should be put on the on this list should be somebody that come bridge the gap it doesn't matter what your politics is I don't agree with brexit I can respect people who are able to bridge the gap who can have a conversation I'm not used advisedly search it this is Amanda because of him and people like our prime minister people on the streets today in the United Kingdom that experiencing as part of their daily lives once this abuse I'm sorry I don't think they are told to me by healing one exactly what you're doing does not achieve that is burned out wrong I would say to you Mister bridges shame on you not only did you defend those incredibly vile comments against the grand fall victims now you sit here talking about using Nigel for Raj as somebody that can heal no hill to break absolutely not he called do that you're rewarding your kind you will want to people that think like you know people who have actually achieved something one I have one hope you feel better after that round at the end at the end of the day at the end of the day you you criticize much across the not successfully getting elected to the house of Commons well we just had a lead generation with the vast majority of candidates were intellect he takes great courage to stand for parliament and you okay I'm the vice president of a tall and this is the time now to bring this far I just think it is okay to use racist methods it is okay to whip up hatred against my quest that's what you're saying that's what I'm saying shame on you for what I that's what I'm talking about and it doesn't leave him one of one of the most tolerant countries in the in the world I I can assure you yeah there's something comforting in order it seems like you know we're back to normal with the U. K. this is what I've become accustomed to we've all become accustomed to for the last three and a half years even before that because.

Rauch
"rauch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"rauch" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Christy temperate and this is on being today with writer and community Gardner Rauch gay one here someone gave but just before that also you you did write this I think the thing more on this theme of if you know justices love made public but more contour to Love Me public and you've also been writing about mercy this beautiful piece in the sun just want to spend a couple minutes on this and so striking to me back to your garden this starts with you doing potatoes and charred and garlic and your back seizes up in you realize eventually that that that has to do with an experience that you had that your body is taking in this experience you have with the police the night before in that where you where you go with mercy like with tenderness is that it may be the only that we have to say everything that needs to be said and reveal everything that needs to be revealed and then make this other move from which I can it's kind of that beyond a mere justice I don't know how would you for say it again say would you ask it again this one toward is weird it where could mark I'm sure somebody's Ashley this is like I'm going to use a word like joy right now can use a lower were like mercy right now being a black man and doing nothing wrong and having to constantly think about what's going to happen when he's a policeman yeah for example yeah yeah I don't know you know that that piece remains a puzzle to me and what's interesting to me about that essay is that there aren't any answers no yeah know that there's a there's a fundamental question which is like we ought to know each other better different move yeah there's no answer but there's a move I mean here's here's here's a little piece of it what if we honestly assess what we have come to believe about ourselves and each other and how these those beliefs shape our lives and what if we did it with generosity and forgiveness what if we did it with mercy and you're talking about really are a hard inexcusable things in our history and our president and he wrote the corrupt imagination might become visible inequalities might become visible violence might become visible terror might become visible and the things we've been doing to you to each other despite the fact that we don't want to do such things to each other might become visible if we don't we will all remain phantoms and as it turns out it's hard for phantoms to care for one another let alone love one another yeah that's a restaurant.

writer Gardner Rauch Ashley president
Farewell, 'The Big Bang Theory'

This Morning With Gordon Deal

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Farewell, 'The Big Bang Theory'

"More than a decade on the air, the big bang theory ends tonight. Fox's Michelle Pollino. CBS sends off its most popular television comedy with a one hour series finale, the big bang theory, twelve year run after having scored some of the networks, highs rate, and turn it stars received some of Hollywood's highest salaries, this show starring Jim Parsons, Johnny lucky Kelly cocoa, Simon Helberg canal, Nihar, miam-, Bialik, and Melissa Rauch produce, two hundred seventy nine episodes filled with love penny. Laughter. Plenty of Star Trek from this Sheldon live long, and prosper, Leonard nimoy, and of course. Buzinga quotable Sheldon

Sheldon Michelle Pollino Leonard Nimoy Melissa Rauch Simon Helberg Jim Parsons Bialik Kelly Cocoa CBS FOX Hollywood Buzinga Johnny Twelve Year One Hour
Global Stocks Outlook

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Global Stocks Outlook

"With that this morning as we say Asian stocks are mixed fluctuating after positive data on China's economy raised doubts over additional stimulus. But it does look like the stimulus has been working thus far taking a look at the major indexes overnight. We see the Nikkei and the topics up a quarter percent or or more of the Hang Seng in Hong Kong, though, down two tenths of a percent. And the CSI three hundred the broader Chinese index is also down about one tenth of one percent. So very interesting after we saw the Chinese economy growing six point four percent taking a look at the futures trade early in the session here, we see negative trade on footsie few. Features and one tenth of one percent. Dax futures unchanged right now, and US futures all showing a positive trade. So a lot of times it takes a while to work out these prices in the morning, we could see some swings here or there. So let's take a look at some other risk indicators to see which way things could go US ten year. Treasury yield is very little changed at two point five nine four percent. So it did come up substantially in the last twenty four hours but currently hovering around two point six we see gold at twelve seventy seven. So it fell decently over the last twenty four hours, but is now on its way back up, and we see a yen little changed at one eleven nine. Almost one twelve right now, the euro holding at one thirteen a pound at one thirty sixty one and we have some breaking news here out of Sweden, Switzerland right now. Now Rauch is raising its guidance for two thousand nineteen taking a look at the ticker or g at SP as as as the one I use raising its two thousand nineteen sales growth guidance to mid single digit percentage. So basically saying, you know, four five six percent sales growth in two thousand nineteen sees core EPS earnings per share growing broadly in line with sales. So if you wanted to a look at what's going on in terms of Russia's forecasts. You've got it there. It did report. First quarter sales beating the analysts estimates, in fact, beating all including the highest analysts estimates so watch for Roche

United States China Hang Seng Roche Hong Kong Rauch Russia Sweden Switzerland Twenty Four Hours One Percent Five Nine Four Percent Four Five Six Percent Four Percent Ten Year
Why the 2019 Indian election feels different to 2014

Between The Lines

05:19 min | 2 years ago

Why the 2019 Indian election feels different to 2014

"Today. We chat with one of the world's leading communists about India richer Shama from Morgan Stanley. He's argument is that in rural India old class divisions. Still rule local politics which could spell trouble for Narendra Modi in my elections, plus climate change student politics, a divide between two impressive school students. Stay with us for that. Well, you might recall Narendra Modi's landslide election victory five years ago. How to believe but twenty four nine huge landslide election victory Ahmadi. Now, we lived the BJP this is the Hindu nationalist party live them to power. This was the first Indian prime minister in thirty years to govern without a coalition any Hedda rare opportunity to enact market friendly reforms that had stalled under his predecessor Manmohan Singh now until relatively recently Modi's BJP was odds on favorite to be reelected. But such as the magic politics that Modi's chances of victory. And now fifty fifty says, my guest richer Shama is chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley investment management. And he's author of a terrific new book called democracy on the road at twenty five year journey through India as just out by penguin Random House richer. Welcome back to between the lines Gregory back with your own thing. What do you think Modi's? Reelection is no longer a sure thing I think that when I wrote the book, and he was coming across a very United opposition. You just mentioned about how you wanna landslide victory in two thousand fourteen but one very important statistic. From that election was that he only or his party only got thirty one percent of the total vote share in India, and he was able to win a majority of the seats because the parliamentary democracy is so fag minted in India that the opposition is quite divided and you get a disproportionate number of seats with even thirty percent of the vote. So what was changing over the Bosnia? Is that a lot of the opposition parties in India state by state were coming together to put up a United front against that removes? That's really what was changing and why at taught is fog ability or winning the election was now much more fifty fifty than sort of hundred percent probably than most bookies were giving him. I'd say. Euro even to ago now, the only thing which has changed, and this is the changing nature of politics and any country, especially in India is the last couple of weeks they've had this escalated tension between India and Pakistan, and that's sort of please into Modi's hand. So I would say that once again, the the momentum has shifted back in his favor. Just because of the very unexpected develop in that taking place over the past few weeks, the accidents of history we've had on this program. Several times of the last five years, Richard Soudan, undo my from the American Enterprise Institute, you know, and he said that in two thousand fourteen there was an ABC mood that is anybody, but congress this is the the left of center ruling party for so long in India's history. You don't really see an anti Mody y emerging. Then do you know, I think if election is not about that his base remains pretty much intact. But I said the big difference that the opposition is coming together in many states. I'm critical battleground states such as the most populous state of India with really two hundred million people in such critical states the opposition is coming together. And when they do that, then typically the the leading party tends to be in trouble. That's the history of Indian politics. So that to me is the big dynamic at currently. Yes. So in a way, you're saying that these elections in my they more likely to shape up as a series of state contests. It's not really a nationwide contest between Mody and congress is it. That's right know, that the outside world likes to think of it that way because the two names that sort of resonate most with the outside world. I I now in the Gumby dine in but it's important to member that booties. Put together the total vote share in. India is Bailey fifty percent five zero. And so the other half is about all these regional parties in India. And that's really what I've tried to bring out in my book, which that this is the story of many India's India's less a country that our continent like the European Union with many states Funk's practically functioning like countries. And I think that that is the story of India which gets lost in translation to the outside world often. Now, this new book of yours democracy on the road. It's the result of your travels through India following election campaigns, pretty much since the lighten awning ninety south of the last twenty years, and you Rauch quote in an era when democracy is said to be in retreat worldwide, it's thriving in India. Yeah. That's the curse of the fact that when I've traveled for these elections, I find it soon remarkable that despite only advantages that the incumbent

India Narendra Modi Morgan Stanley BJP Shama Bosnia Manmohan Singh Prime Minister Gregory European Union Hedda Congress American Enterprise Institute ABC Rauch Richard Soudan Funk Pakistan
Single-dose flu pill wins FDA approval ahead of winter season

00:31 sec | 3 years ago

Single-dose flu pill wins FDA approval ahead of winter season

"Health regulators have approved the first new type of flu drug in two decades. Last winter the government counted some eighty thousand Americans who died a flu and it's complications the highest death toll in at least four decades. Now just in time for this year's flu season comes a new pill. Zo flus the pharmaceutical firm Rauch, which also makes tamiflu says Zo flu can reduce flu symptoms after just one dose and it works about as

FLU Rauch Four Decades Two Decades
Wedding guests in Texas rescued from rising floodwater

Sean Hannity

01:11 min | 3 years ago

Wedding guests in Texas rescued from rising floodwater

"In Texas wasn't rain down. They were flooded out from the rapidly rising. San Gabriel river guests had camped out in our visa intense writing waiting for Saturday's wedding ceremony. The father of the group says the water came up so quickly. There was no time to escape were camping out down there too intense, and they had to rescue some people from top of the cars rather cars got Rauch down the river. The Williamson county sheriff's office began receiving calls in the early hours of Saturday. Asking for water rescues some guests had to climb trees to escape water. This

San Gabriel River Williamson County Rauch Texas