35 Burst results for "Rasmussen"

Rasmussen: Half of Voters Approve Supreme Court's Abortion Ruling

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 d ago

Rasmussen: Half of Voters Approve Supreme Court's Abortion Ruling

"Rasmussen reports that half of voters approve of the Supreme Court decisions ruling on abortion. Approved 50% disapprove 45%, even though most voters identify as pro choice than pro life, a full half of them approve of the recent Supreme Court ruling that overturned the 1973 roe versus wade decision. And so look Jack, we're both pro life and we're outspokenly pro life. But you and I both know that in our broad coalition of trying to win elections, there are people that will not share the same life views that we have. And with that being said, though, it looks like this decision is I believe actually a moderate decision. Send it back down to the states, let the states decide however they want. You and I would both love to see national abortion, bans come through, obviously, but letting the states decide it seems as if, believe it or not, according to Rasmussen, 50% of Americans agree. It's remarkable, isn't it? Well, and it's also because you have to go in and look at the methodology. So I did check this out. And I check it out whenever I see any of the legacy media polls on pro life as well. Whenever you see the legacy media, whether it be CNN or MSNBC, et cetera, you go even will do this. They'll say has stripped the constitutional right to abortion, right? Or they'll say something like this. Do you agree? And they get these, you know, they get these huge, huge majorities. But the way Rasmussen asked the question was, do you agree with allowing states to decide and to set their own policy on abortion? Well, that's where you get this huge 50% number because well, hold on a second. Wait a minute. I thought that we were supposed to be the ones that defend democracy and all of this is about defense democracy here from the January 6th committee every single day that we have to defend democracy in these horrible far right conservatives or would want to say that that middle part of the country is just telling everybody what to do. No, that's not how it works, right? It's actually going back to the states. It is going to be a more democratic view.

Rasmussen Supreme Court Wade Jack Msnbc CNN
'2000 Mules': Documentary's Message Resonates With Voters

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:36 min | 3 weeks ago

'2000 Mules': Documentary's Message Resonates With Voters

"Please go. There he is as my guy. Good job. How's your new show going good? Very well. I heard good. Thank you. Yes, indeed. Thank you, mister president for asking, did you catch our interview with president Trump just over a week ago? He was on the show for almost 40 minutes. We blew through. Who needs breaks? We blew through the brakes because we had so much fun with him. It's up on rumble. You've got to see it. Rumble dot com slash sev goker that's rumbled dot com slash SEB. We talked about everything. The economy, his second term, the bench. You don't want to miss it. Likewise, you don't want to miss a trip to Israel later this year with our super productive Salem colleague dinesh d'souza and his lovely wife Debbie. We are going to the Holy Land to walk where our lord and save your walk the earth, even if you've been to Israel before it doesn't matter because you haven't been with me and dinesh will be there standing on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. It's going to be the trip of a lifetime. I'm not vaccinated and I'm going. They've got no restrictions. They've dropped them all. So you've got no excuse. Reserve your seats today called 5 6 5 55 19. That was far too quick slow down gorka. 8, 5, 5, 5, 6, 5, 55, 19, stand with Israel to dot com stand with Israel to dot com and as if by magic, who have we got with us today, dinesh d'souza, yes, indeed dinesh. We've been trying for weeks to get you back on the show so delighted that the success of 2000 years has made it difficult to get you back on, but you're with us right now. Welcome back to America first. Thanks, have really appreciate it. And yeah, boy, you know, when we released the movie, it seemed we were facing so many obstacles and then on top of that, the reluctance of Fox to even mention the movie, but it seems like we've been able to navigate around all that and I'm really thrilled that this new Rasmussen survey that came out say because Rasmussen is good. Are you tweeting it out? I retweeted it, explained to our millions of listeners what this poll said. So I actually had asked the Rasmussen guys, would they be interested in bringing in a kind of a focus group that would look at 2000 meals, independent voters, just to see the impact of the movie on people who are not committed politically one way or the other. And they go, well, we have an even better idea. We'll just do a national survey on 2000 mules and ask people, are they Republicans, Democrats, independents? Have they seen the movie? Have they heard about it? And if they've seen the movie, what is the impact of the movie in convincing them or not convincing them? Whether or not the election was stolen, whether or not there was systematic fraud. And what I found amazing is that not just a majority of Republicans, but a sizable majority of Democrats and independents who have seen the movie were persuaded by it that there was systematic fraud in the 2020 election. Wow. Wow, that's stunning. Look, I am so honored that you asked me to be part of it. You had a genius idea to bring your Salem colleagues to a room, show them the evidence that you, Catherine, and Greg Phillips, found and then film our reactions and make it part of the movie. It is now the most successful political documentary of over a decade more than a million downloads in the first 6 days over a 100,000 DVDs mailed

President Trump Dinesh D'souza Israel Dinesh Gorka SEB Rasmussen Sea Of Galilee Salem Debbie FOX America Greg Phillips Catherine
Mortgage Origination Activity Drops to a 22-Year Low

The Trish Regan Show

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Mortgage Origination Activity Drops to a 22-Year Low

"We got news today that mortgage originations are the lowest they've been in 22 years. I mean, you'd expect them to dip a little, right? Because mortgage rates are going up, but they're the lowest they've been in 22 years. You got targets saying, wow, we have all this inventory that we can't move. They're actually going to slash prices, which may bode well, I should point out for inflation, but you get a lot of other things out there now. It suggests we've got problems primarily. I would argue because of energy prices being as high as they are. You can't have a 122 bucks on a barrel of oil and not expect that that's going to have some repercussions on the overall economy in everyday people. There was a study out today actually a Rasmussen pull that showed 34% of Americans say quote a depression is not likely depressed. I mean, that's how bad I think sentiment

Rasmussen Depression
The American People See Right Through the Media's Treatment of Biden

The Trish Regan Show

01:39 min | Last month

The American People See Right Through the Media's Treatment of Biden

"All right, I want to turn to this poll that just came out Americans, as I said, they get it. We get it. We've got a newly released poll that shows the American people really see through the media. And they see through how the media treats president Joe Biden. Effectively with kid gloves, right? Compared to how they treated former president Donald Trump, according to Rasmussen reports, the majority of Americans say, and I quote, the media does not question president Joe Biden as aggressively as they questioned former president Donald Trump. 54% of likely U.S. voters believe the news media are less aggressive in questioning Biden than they were Trump. Look, it's only 54% though. I mean, to me that to be like 95%, it is very clear that this media is quite biased. It's actually a big deal when they actually challenge him on things. Because they never seem to challenge him, and we've got all kinds of problems going on. In terms of our economy, in terms of the border, in terms of what we're going to continue to face with our economy. In terms of infant formula, that crisis that frankly, the administration should have been all over before it happened, or at least when it happened. Anyway, it seems that most Americans are wise to that. And it's important that we are, right? Because you have to be able to vote for the candidate that's going to offer the best opportunity in, well, November and also, again, in 2024, and if everyday Americans can see through the media as you know what, then I think that that's going to make a real

Joe Biden President Donald Trump Rasmussen Donald Trump Biden U.S.
Why the Old Animosity Between Left and Right Is Dead

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Why the Old Animosity Between Left and Right Is Dead

"Scott Rasmussen and Doug schoen were really ahead of the curve back in 2010 with their book mad as hell on the Tea Party movement. And they right there said, based on the data that they were analyzing, that the old animosity between Republican and Democrat or Tory and labor conservative and liberal, the tended to be functioning around economic issues, that was dead and a new political division was opening up. And that's the people versus the permanent political class. And there was this radical sense that the political class governs according to their own values, their own interests, their own concerns, they're becoming increasingly alienated from the values interest and concerns of the people. We've got data, for example, from the chatham House of think tank in Britain, that found that nearly 70% of MPs, so political class believed that immigration was always good for Britain. Whereas only 20% of the population actually believed that. So you could see this massive divide growing. And that's what makes Trump so amazing. Out of the 15 or 16 GOP candidates and back in 2016, he was the only one that tapped into that new paradigm of the people versus the political class, and that could make us that could put us against Republicans, IE Romney, every bit as much as it could pit us against

Doug Schoen Scott Rasmussen Chatham House Of Think Tank Tea Party Britain Donald Trump GOP Ie Romney
66% of Voters Believe Biden Should Take a Cognitive Test

The Trish Regan Show

01:26 min | 4 months ago

66% of Voters Believe Biden Should Take a Cognitive Test

"Okay, so Joe Biden, like I said, dumb and dumber. He's now under fire because the country is realizing that the guys just not that bright. But they actually think he's been declining quite rapidly in terms of his mental abilities. He's no spring chicken. We know that. But now there's a new Rasmussen poll out, which says most voters believe that Joe Biden's mental abilities have declined since he took office. In other words, he didn't start with a whole lot. I think we all know that. But it's gotten much worse. Two thirds agree with GOP members of Congress who have urged the president to take a cognitive test and release the results. Two thirds of American voters want him tested to see if he's all there. I think we know he's not. I mean, 56% are not confident that Biden is up to the job 56%. I mean, these are really startling numbers including 45% who are not at all confident in his ability. Are you, I mean, when you look at what's going on, whether it be what we saw in Afghanistan, whether it be what we're witnessing right now in Russia and Ukraine, whether it be the lack of consistency on things like masks, and COVID mandates, whether it be on our border. Whether it be on inflation, which I'm going to get to it in a second. I mean, my gosh, he's not really doing a very good job.

Joe Biden Rasmussen GOP Congress Biden Afghanistan Ukraine Russia
"rasmussen" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Bill Rasmussen. And the reason they had a big check. Yeah, so from Memorial Day, 1978 to 25th, 1984 was my active tenure with ESPN. Do you ever regret having left? Do you wish you could have stayed longer? Not for a second. And I think of all of the things that have happened the creation of literally hundreds of thousands of jobs for freelance people for network people for all the teams have their own networks now. And basically, ESPN spawned all of that. And I'm really proud of that. I pleased. If somebody wanted to get good at negotiating or just pitching like this, do you have any particular recommendations for them? I know I have a few books about huge impact on me. I'll share what those are. But do you have any recommendations? I think one you have to know as much as you can possibly know about your subject. The other thing is I don't have to know all the details about your business. What are your goals and what your general business? I don't have to know all the details about my business. Where do we want to go? And where do we want to take it? I'm not an engineer. I'm not a mathematician. I'm not an accountant. I'm none of those things. But I kind of have an idea to put the idea together and have a general knowledge and of some statistics that make some sense. Well, you have a really good combination of a number of things. And I remember at one point reading an article by a gentleman named Marc andreessen, so Mark andreessen is billionaire. He was co author of the mosaic web browser. So the first really popular graphic web browser. And he noted that most CEOs are kind of in the top 20% in two or three fields. But they're very rarely the Michael Jordan of just one thing. You have to have a few overlapping skills. And the good news is it's a lot easier. It's a lot easier to plan that and engineer that in your life than it is to try to aim to be that one Michael Jordan. Yeah. So the books I was going to mention for you guys, if you're interested, I found very helpful. Getting past know a little more realistic than getting to yes in my opinion and then secrets of power negotiating. I would get the audio if you can because you could tell with the cadence of bill's voice and the delivery, there's a lot of nuance. Let's see if we can pull up some audience questions. This is from lex, how does it feel to have captured the attention of so many people and our boyfriends? And bring them together through sports. Well, it wasn't always that way. In our early days, some of the men in the audience got so enamored with the ESPN that we were on the air, barely a year, and we were named in a divorce action. A lady in Texas included us because her husband was paying more attention to ESPN than he was to her. And when it arrived in Bristol, our general counsel and our whole legal department was only one person, so our general consul went, oh, my word did what's going to happen in our PR lady said, we want to spell her name right? Did she put out a press release? And that turned out the first of many times, ESN has been frequently named in divorce suits. For alienation of whatever. I don't get it, but addictive entertainment. Addictive entertainment. Aside from family members, when you hear the word successful, who is the first person who comes to mind. Successful. Success is described in so many different ways when I think back to my father surviving the depression, getting four kids through college coming through World War II. Yeah,.

Bill Rasmussen ESPN Mark andreessen Michael Jordan Marc andreessen bill Bristol Texas depression
Majority of Americans Want Biden to Consider 'All Possible Nominees' for Supreme Court Vacancy

The Trish Regan Show

01:31 min | 5 months ago

Majority of Americans Want Biden to Consider 'All Possible Nominees' for Supreme Court Vacancy

"In the meantime, I want to report on this story. You know that the president had promised that he would appoint a female and a black female at that to the Supreme Court. According to a new survey at a Rasmussen, Americans expect them to do that 59% of Americans expect them to do that. But they're not really happy about it. And I'll tell you whether or not that happy about it. Because since when did your gender or your race matter more than your intellect and your capability? This is still the United States of America. And I realize in this woke movement that's in part funded by the likes of super pacs from billionaires that want to spend a $125 million on 2022. This is the problem, right? You've got all this money that's force feeding a set of values and so then it becomes all about your race, your gender, as opposed to your capability, your intellect, et cetera. And so Americans don't like this. Everyday Americans are like, but wait a second. None of that should matter, right? Going back to the words of Martin Luther King Jr., we really should be a colorblind society. We don't want to see race or gender first. We want to see who someone is as a person and yet it's like all you can see because they're making it that way so much that the person that's going to be appointed to the Supreme Court has to be female and has to be black. There's something really, I think just off putting about all of

Rasmussen Supreme Court United States Of America Martin Luther King Jr.
U.S. Perceptions of White-Black Relations Sink to New Low

The Larry Elder Show

01:12 min | 5 months ago

U.S. Perceptions of White-Black Relations Sink to New Low

"Latest Rasmussen reports on race relations, only 25% of American adults believe race relations the nation are good or excellent. There's barely unchanged from April 2021. 35% now give you race relations a poor rating down from 44% last spring. Now I've said before, the definition of race relations in America is how black people feel about white people how white people feel about how black people feel about white people. That's really what it comes down to. And the high point of the percentage of Americans who believe that race relations are good or somewhat good with 71%, and that was during the administration of George W. Bush. That percentage fell dramatically during the Barack Obama years. For all the reasons I mentioned earlier. I think Americans felt they were duped. American felt that they black president they hired was a guy who was on 60 minutes. When Steve Croft asks senator Obama, if you don't win, will it be because of racism? And senator Obama said, no. If I don't win, it will be because I failed articulate a vision that the American people can embrace.

Rasmussen Senator Obama America George W. Bush Steve Croft
John Solomon on the American Public's Sentiment Toward COVID Regulations

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 6 months ago

John Solomon on the American Public's Sentiment Toward COVID Regulations

"Do you have a sense John I know you're not a pollster? And I've got so much more to ask you, but you have a sense of where the public is generally with this one. Fauci says things like masks forever on planes and, you know, maybe you should avoid Christmas and new year's with your family. After two years, I get the sense the public en masse is a little tired of hearing from that guy. You are spot out and it's funny. I'm writing a story for tomorrow at just the news on this very top because my good friend, Scott Rasmussen, the great bolster. Just did a poll on the gap between what President Biden and the Biden administration in Washington and Fauci want and what Americans want. And these are some fascinating numbers going to be on our site tomorrow morning, but we'll give your listeners an early listen. Only 27% of voters believe the worst of the pandemic is behind us. That is a 29 point drop from the spring and remember in between those two points Joe Biden declared victory over the virus only to be proven wrong. Americans are expecting that this is going to linger on and perhaps the worst is still ahead. Despite that, despite that, only 28% of voters want stricter lockdowns, 53% believe it's okay to go mask us now, particularly if you're immunized and 74% say they just want to go back to resuming life as normal will have to learn to live with the virus. A very strong sentiment that we've been locked down for two years. It hasn't really made much of a difference for God's sake just get back to normal. And I think that these polling data is really strong data, very strong pointers. That's fascinating. So people believe the worst is still to come, but they want to get back to living normally. Yeah, it's an amazing thing. And I think the reason is they have come to conclude that these all these solutions that came out of Washington that sound great. We're going to flatten the curve, wear a mask, you'll save your neighbor. Get a vaccine shot then too, then three, maybe four now. They haven't worked. And at some point, they realize, you know what? I'm going to manage my own

Fauci President Biden Biden Administration Scott Rasmussen Joe Biden John Washington
Judge: Loudoun County Teen Guilty of Sexually Assaulting Classmate in Girls' Bathroom

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Judge: Loudoun County Teen Guilty of Sexually Assaulting Classmate in Girls' Bathroom

"You are seeing in loudon county Virginia and this is new out of loudon county, Virginia. That parents that have children in loudoun county Virginia, 54% of them are going to vote Republican or for young kid. So The Washington Post came out and they were like, oh, the story is very misleading of what's happened in loudoun county. But guess what allowed in county judge, this is breaking in the last 24 hours, finds boy in a skirt, guilty of raping, female student and girls bathroom remember we talked about the story, and the media told us that this wasn't true. The victims have been vindicated, and their parents demand apology and kids walk out of their classroom and protest against schools. This couldn't be happening at a worse time for Terry mcauliffe. This is hit a apex where all of a sudden, in Virginia. And let me just reemphasize this. I said this yesterday. Virginia, this is the ruling class governorship. This is the place where you wine and dine Boeing and north of Grumman and Lockheed Martin, where you give money to Pfizer AstraZeneca and Moderna. This is the governor of Virginia is kind of a ribbon cutting deal. You get all the nice handouts you get invited to all the Washington D.C. parties because you're nearby. You get treated really well. Being governor of Virginia is one of the top perks of being part of the Democrat ruling class. It's rather desirable. But now all of a sudden the Democrats have deployed Obama, they deploy camel Harris, which I don't think that's going to help. They're deploying Joe Biden, Rasmussen reports. 32% of America believes 32% of Americans believe America is on the right track. 64% of Americans think America's on the wrong track. 60 4%.

Virginia Loudon County Loudoun County The Washington Post Pfizer Astrazeneca Terry Mcauliffe Washington D.C. Moderna Grumman Lockheed Martin Boeing Camel Harris Joe Biden Barack Obama Rasmussen America
The American Voter Will Turn Against Biden Policies

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:36 min | 9 months ago

The American Voter Will Turn Against Biden Policies

"So you were telling me about your somewhat optimistic that the American voter will not continue to vote for these policies that are destroying the economy? Yes, I think it's very difficult for people to ignore the price at the gas tank. It's very difficult to ignore the prices at the grocery store if they've even got some things on the shelves that you can purchase. I think what people are facing day to day is very, very negative for President Biden. And it's showing up in the polls. He's about to look at the RealClearPolitics average he's about 8 and a half points underwater positive versus negative ratings and Rasmussen hasn't done around 42% quinnipiac down around 40. Those are the kind of polling numbers that are very, very damaging in the election. I spoke in Cleveland to a group of about 200 people last week. And I went pretty hard to President Biden the speech and I warned people I was going to do that Cleveland's my hometown. And I really thought I'd get some blowback from the audience afterwards. People supporting Biden and criticizing Trump. I got just the opposite. These people were mad. I mean, they were they were actually more critical of President Biden than I was. So I think there is a movement out there maybe not in the heart of New York City or Los Angeles. But I think in flyover, America there's very serious resentment for what's going on on how it's affecting people's lives.

President Biden Cleveland Rasmussen Biden Donald Trump New York City Los Angeles America
"rasmussen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:38 min | 9 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"In my life. I've wanted to get some data out of some website. Where maybe they had pagination in place. And i went under the hood was able to mock my own request. Also the form send the different limit and get a big request back as not exactly an epic hack. But it's something a form. Builder might have to contend with if they have sneakier clever users there's also the sensitivity of the data being put in the form. Do you have to take any security stance as you develop the library right so my position as the library author is you. Give me your uncommitted function. And i don't care what you do. The four values i wreck but obviously the right way to build a form of the full stack form. You have to also validate your values that you received from the form just because you have a a java script thing that's running make sure that for sure the person who entered their street address in if they hit submit. You really need to be checking that on the back end to because anyone can most people don't but for sure you can spoof up a post request and potentially keno get invalid. Data database and. That's one of the reasons that i favour. What i described as record level validation because if you're validating the whole object of all the foreign values if you're using note on the back end you can share that exact function to validate on the back end as well which is very handy to make sure that you don't get bad in your database. Well my understanding of the successive reduction form and also your inspiration to build. Final form was really about filling a need that didn't exist are there any vacuums in the market. Today that might inspire a next generation of a form library from you. That's sort of what final form attempts to be. Has nothing to do with the name. The name there was so much namespace pollution on n. p. with anything using the word form that the only remotely remember -able phrase for forms was final. Four so i went with that. Ironically it could be like. I said the form library engine that at least as long as reading script could extend into the into the future. I had that hypothesis tested way. Sooner than i expected to because i wrote this long before hooks came out and hooks a totally different way of managing state in react when i went to rewrite react. Final form to use the hooks state management paradigm. It was interesting how easy that was to do because the design of final form was such that. It's all subscription-based where you say. Hey i want to subscribe to these values about this field. The subscribe function returns. The unsubscribe function. Which is a pretty standard thing in the observable pattern but guess what the api for us effective. It's exactly that so. It was quite easy to rewrite. Vital for him to use hooks. As i was doing that. I had the realization that o. Ate this this field component. All of the all of the hooks that i'm using in this weekend can abstract all of that out into a us field hook and then my field component is nothing but a call to use field. You know in the night. I can export that use field hook and that allows anyone to turn any component into a into a field component connected to final form. That was very powerful. So in the form space. I don't know. I don't. I don't think they're really unsolved problems. It's just that doesn't necessarily get messy with facing foundation. Like i was saying. There's no obvious way to get around that but i'm i'm always thinking about it. I've several other ways of thinking about the flow of form state that i've thought about over the years but none of them have materialized into anything. That's particularly better than this subscription model one quick code level implementation question for you a lot of people who are new to react hooks find a sort of an added challenge getting two different components to share data amongst each other. If i've built a complicated form it's built out of a ton of different components. What's the developer experience. Like if my states distributed across a bunch of stuff so with react final form you put a form component around your form and that creighton instance of the final form core engine that gets put into context and then anywhere inside that you can subscribe to parts of either form or field stay. Let's talk about it. In the context of the state machine abstraction it seems like the state of my form is pretty simple right. it's just a values. I've put in every field. What else is there. Yeah so it seems pretty simple but there's really like three or four different parallel state machines within a just within a field right not even talking about the whole formula. There's you know whether or not you currently have the focus. And then there's whether or not you currently have an error whether or not you are currently a synchronous ni validating and then there's you know your your value so there's quite a bit of state just within one particular field and then there's like whether or not you have been visited you have had the the focus ever that's really useful for only displaying errors after the user has like tabbed out of an input so you don't aggressively tell the user. Hey this field is invalid before they've even had a chance to try and fill it out. I've taken a run couple times at implementing a field with a state like current favorites library x. Date i've been learning a lot about state machines and it's it's been changing the way that i think about how station flow through an application. And whether it's this top down redux sort of way of thinking about the state lives at the at the top somewhere and from below you can subscribe to it or updated with x. date in state machines. It's more about this actor. Model where each component has its own state and has a way to talk to other components that need to know about changes rather than tell the top level that your state has changed. You can tell an actor that knows one level one level up or level up over because you are coating it's like you're anthropomorphized thing. The component where the user user clicks the button on your component. The code you have to right there is okay who needs to know about this and then you you send an event to to whoever needs to know about it. And then as far as you're concerned as that component you're done and then you go to the component that needs to receive that and you sort of put yourself in in that component shoes and you say okay have received this event. What what does this mean about my state in hoodoo. Who else do i need to tell. It's very very interesting. I've introduced it to to my team lately. And and everyone is really really enjoying that way of thinking about data flow applying these data flow principles to your process of developing the library or is this and other aspects of your work so potentially form library could be using state machines. Under the hood and v consumer of the library wouldn't really need to know about know-how that was being done. I could conceivably rewrite the core of final form his with state machines but i lately have been using them more not as elaborate developer but as an application developer to organize my my state like for example for building a form where i had some sort of need for my foreign in different states. I would use a form library. Like i would use react funnel form and then win. Reform gave me. You know the on submit then. I would do something to orchestrate what happens with that. I would move my form into a submitting state although manages that for us well but then you know whatever has to happen with my state machine outside of that in fact a couple of weeks ago i gave a talk where i built the common wizard form where you've got a forum that on several different pages i left the form values and whether or not the fields were had an error not to react on a form and then i wrapped that with a state machine that kept track of what page you're on in the form and allowed for in my example. It was If you're ordering a pizza or something in you choose pickup rather than delivery then you can skip over the page where you have to give your delivery address and so you can use your state machine to manage the user flow but not worry about the form state itself. I'm working with more state. Machine driven designed does that affect the way you.

creighton
"rasmussen" Discussed on Behind The Screen

Behind The Screen

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Behind The Screen

"And authentic tells about the animation house. You chose to work with so some creature was like when we started. This project was also starting up. And it's it's a bunch of amazing days french guys who who and girls Whom it up here in denmark and and seven of them and they started this company right around when i kind of started doing this project so we kind of grew together. And they just an amazing bunch. They're they're based here in copenhagen mao but also opened still young fans and they basically due to the animation. That's that's our expertise and they've they've done You know things for riot games for like commercials for coke They've they've done for travel oregon. They've done a lot of amazing stuff. Commercially. and then they kind of handpick projects that want to work on more artistically and then you also incorporated some live action yes. I did a lot of research in the beginning. You know just looking at you to finding from The one afghanistan of re finding you know trying to find materials from the area and lived in again but also in moscow And i read from being thought. It was too important to have that in the film. You know to kind of remind people throughout that that the is not a fiction The reason why and is taking on this journey is because of historical events and everyone wanted to show those still convinced into film and remind people that is this is not a fiction this is. This is a true story in its coal. How many years is this take to make what went to actually get started. Well if you kinda depends on when you start counting the The initial idea was came in. I was invited to that workshop in here in denmark in two thousand thirteen. So that's eight years ago and but you know and then we spend a lotta time developing financing Writing doing the news. I think it's been like three or four years interviewing them in where it is like a span of three or four years. Why did like fifteen twenty. The news and kind of transcribe. Everything wrote a script. Why kind of chose my ways to all the material. I was giving And then when we went into production. I think production probably took us about two years. You know so while you were making it. What was a men's involvement in the storytelling. And then during the filmmaking process. Well i mean he was very generous first of all like he he trust because we known each other for so many years when each other twenty five years so he trusted that i would sell his story in a way where would recognize themselves But of course he's been a big part of their puzzle making film as well From the interviews. That i did that this kind of script where i organize older material. I was giving And he read that you know he read that a couple of times eight notes especially on things. Where if something were factually wrong. All if i had left out things that he felt was really key to this story. Then we got conversations about how to get it back in there or why wasn't important and the same thing with the when we had like i edit you know in animation you edit before. He's talked animating We did this is really rough it with the rough story bolts and he saw that as well and i'm coming in in the same way say so he's been a big pot throughout In the process of making the film to make sure that first of all that it was factually correct but also that he felt that is what his story. What did he say when he saw the finished film. It must have been incredibly emotional. Yes exactly and that's when he said that the first time you saw it wasn't kribi emotional time but he wasn't sure if it was actually a good film Because you know it's his story it's his traumas. Everything's in there so of course it's muslim but for him to kind of know if also worked for them for anyone else. He didn't know so for him. It was very rewarding to see how films reviews and received at sundance when it premiered It it got really well received. I think he was a little afraid. if people would be able to relate to historic And seeing that people actually were even though the refugees or weren't gay Was really how woman for him free. What was the most difficult part of the story to tell i think The pa takes place in in depressing day. does him and his boyfriend trying to seven bound and and i could tell from the beginning that that you know i mean Had difficulties doing that and being in the middle of that as a friend and also the french who casper is boyfriend you know i could just sit and watch which was difficult whereas you know everything that to the of course. It was harrowing And how to here. But i couldn't do anything there whereas everything into was was a little you know how to be in. Because i could see that he was kind of hurting himself. Of course this is also a very timely subject in light of recent news. What do you hope people take away from the film. Well i i. I really hope it gets perspective on what's going on now. I mean to me you know. It's just heartbreaking to see it through repeat itself and and i. I've worked on this film for so many years and just to see now bike shops that i worked on for weeks months for this film. And now you just see on the news and it's the same thing happening. It's just heartbreaking. So i hope that people will get some perspective and we'll be able to relate to the stories of refugees bring with them that that p. that all refugees you know they carry these traumas with them. And you don't see on the surface of course but they cared underneath and it has an affect from everything do in their life it is underneath and and and so hopefully he gets a little bit of understanding of what these people have been through and how it affects everyday china. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me..

denmark copenhagen coke moscow oregon afghanistan casper china
"rasmussen" Discussed on Behind The Screen

Behind The Screen

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Behind The Screen

"Janis. Welcome and thanks for joining us to start with you. Tell us about your friendship with a mean and how the two of you decided to make the film. I'm so. I met him in when i was fifteen years old I'm from a very small danish rule city or village that i four or five hundred people in it And then one day. When i was fifteen years old. I in arrived and he was sixteen. And you know when you're from that tiny of others like having another kid your age in town this is kind of a big deal so Quite soon we started meeting up every morning at the bus. Stop going to high school and we still. He became very confronts This is of course. Twenty five years ago now And i was of course curious about his past and why and how he got to the mac already back then but he really wants to talk about it And he had actually talked about it all in all these years until bs back white finally decided to open up and me the story. And that's what's in. The film is the first time he tells. The story is testimony way. Talks about how he got from. Getting since then mac i. Actually i have a background in radio myself and i asked him. I think fifteen years ago. If i could do a radio documentary about his story and he back then said that he wasn't ready but he knew that he would have to tell sorry at some point and and when he was ready he would tell it to me And then you know yes past. And and i was invited to said this workshop here in denmark cold any dark sweating come combined animators government. You'll make us to develop ideas for image countries. And i thought about his story and asked him if he would be if he walks it's tummy starting at an animated documentary. And if said yes and as years ago and also because with the animation. We could make him an anonymous which was kind of key to him so yes and animated documentary about a man who spent five years of his life on the run. Fleeing afghanistan the taliban he grew up in kabul in a loving home And then everything was toned pieces as russia withdrew from the country end events over and he had to flee and still come undis- herring journey through russia and limbo. And where he's been you know. I'm thinking fishing boats. He's been in prisons So it's it's it's his story and all this. He kept a secret for so many years. And it's really been it's been hurtful for him to be able to shy before because his past and present greedy don't stick together So yeah it started out being refugee story about trying to find a place in the world where you can be who you are with everything that entails. Yeah it's about trying to find a home. Tell us about the decision to use animation in order to tell the story and give him that anonymity while you're make making point was to give him an anonymity 'cause you know this is the first time he tells the story It's really you know intimacy christie's would dive into somebody's life traumas And he he really wanted to keep it this private still so that he could decide himself when he wanted to open up and talk to people about it so that he didn't you know meet people industry with maggots and they would immediately know who he was and know his his traumas But also you know because most of the story takes based in the past So animation was a way to kind of Give life again to his childhood home to afghanistan like how what is the eighties andro moscow in the nineties and also. Because it's really a story about. You know memory and trauma and with the end making that enabled us to be more expensive so so at times. When i could kinda tell it when i i didn't use when he's talking about things that are were hot some remember or we're specifically Traumatic to him He started talking in another way. And i really felt we should send that enemies as well so when he died it eats memories Then he amazing becomes more surreal and expressive and and we kind of try to stay more true to the emotion rather than being realistic on. What happened so. I think those three reasons like the main reasons why we chose to to make death moniz animation. Do you wanna elaborate a little bit of what you were just saying about the visual style. Sure so this different kind of visual styles in the film one is You know where we reenact his childhood and what he went through and there. We've tried to be really realistic Authenticity was really key I feel like a documentary and we. We did a lot of research. Found cockatiel found footage and photos from afghanistan in eighties and must go in the nineties. A lot of that is in the film And we really wanted to like fluid transitions going from archive to any mason So keeping this kind of authenticity was was was key. And then there's this other kind of animation which is up more simplistic Which is when he starts talking about things that were that are hard to talk about when we dive into a trauma or wendy's something where he wasn't there himself but he just has had an emotion About it this doesn't part of the film where where his sisters just. I transported in a in a container Which were very dangerous and because she wasn't there himself it's more about house depict defeat. He felt about his sisters growing on this journey in a container with a bunch of other refugees. So there's those read the different kind of visual styles And discount. And yeah. I think i think authenticity was really key throughout. I really want to feel authentic Within the first test at some point where the cactus felt a little tune in and everything was a little little to clean So we kind of went back and redid The to the signs because they should feel human they should feel flawed.

Janis afghanistan russia kabul denmark taliban moniz animation christie moscow mason wendy trauma
Boris Epshteyn Comments on Poll Showing 52% of Americans Want Biden Gone

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:06 min | 10 months ago

Boris Epshteyn Comments on Poll Showing 52% of Americans Want Biden Gone

"Having front of me. A report from our buddy pulled the dodd that rasmussen reports found survey fifty two percent. Boris fifty two percent of americans want biden to withdraw just because of his handling of kabul. Yeah i would say fifty. Two percent is actually lower. I've seen the polling. That came out yesterday from the left sebastian. From you governor. Communists morning concept did the twin poles long. Do you go. the yougov. Connersville had a fifteen hundred persons sample. So a little bit inside baseball. That's a huge samples. Usually you're looking at seven hundred. Eight hundred people. Fifteen hundred american sampled right track wrong track upside down by thirty points. Thirty percent more people thought not thirty percent difference but but thirty percent more people thought the wearing going on the wrong track. Doesn't the right track agra. I'm surprised they've roberson that. Boris and the published across which is very unusual. Now because usually these lefties they hide Hide the background information. Twenty nine fifty eight twenty nine right direction. Fifty wrong direction and serve use a thirteen percent on shore. Okay hang on hang on the twenty nine percent who is twenty nine percent of americans who think we're going the right direction. They've people haven't seen the news last couple of weeks. Here's the interesting and realclearpolitics been talking about this and as a as somebody who's studied this for a long time you know this i noticed you know a lot of presidents political leaders. They have built base right. Obama had a base yes. President trump unbelievably as a huge mega base. So by got no base. Nobody wakes up in the morning you know puts on their close shaves. Looks in the mirror gets ready. You know puts on their makeup. Whatever they whatever you're doing. I love joe biden. He's got nobody likes that. And and that is going to cause. I think 'cause approval rating is gonna dip into the twenties. If not below. You've gonna be. Nancy pelosi

Connersville Boris Rasmussen Kabul Biden Buddy Roberson Baseball Barack Obama Joe Biden Nancy Pelosi
Vets in Congress Face Hurdles Evacuating Afghans

WSJ What's News

01:12 min | 11 months ago

Vets in Congress Face Hurdles Evacuating Afghans

"Taliban has set up checkpoints on most access roads to kabul's airport making entry for those hoping to evacuate more challenging our correspondent sooner angle rasmussen has more both afghans and westerners are trying to get out of the city. Say that it can be quite difficult. Even though flights are arriving in kabul some of them are leaving with seven passengers. Ten passengers on them simply because people are having a hard time getting into the airport. Meanwhile protests against taliban rule broke out in several cities today three cities in eastern afghanistan in jalalabad and asadabad and in host hundreds of people gathered today to try and hoist the afghan republic flag which has been taken down by by taliban fighters in recent days when they took those three cities and to disperse crowds. The taliban fired first gunshots in the air. And then when the crowds grew they turn their guns on people and according to witnesses at least two people were killed and half a dozen people injured as intel then managed to eventually dispersed these protests. But it's definitely a sign that the taliban might face some popular protests going forward

Taliban Kabul Asadabad Rasmussen Jalalabad Afghanistan Intel
Franco, Zunino Power AL East-Leading Rays Past Red Sox 8-1

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Franco, Zunino Power AL East-Leading Rays Past Red Sox 8-1

"Wander Franco hit a tiebreaking two run Homer in the sixth inning sparking the race eight to one win over the red Sox Mike Zunino added a three run Homer in the eighth to insure Tampa bay leaves Boston with a five game division lead over the red Sox in the AL east Kevin care Meyer went three for three with a walk and scored twice for the rays who rebounded from a blowout loss tonight earlier drew Rasmussen threw four strong innings in a spot start for Tampa Bay our office did a great job I mean you talk about like that wander at bat in the middle innings there that was incredible especially I mean the kids twenty thank you you know you don't see twenty year olds have it like that the red Sox had just two it's only a day after clobbering the race twenty two eight Boston has lost eleven of thirteen I'm Dave very

Mike Zunino Homer Red Sox Al East Kevin Tampa Bay Drew Rasmussen Franco Meyer Boston Rays Dave
"rasmussen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

04:43 min | 11 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Even more transmissible. So i think we really don't need to stay up all night worrying about completely vaccine resistant. Newton's emerging. I don't think mas- gonna happen. I think that there's a reason why the people who are saying that a no disrespect to my physician colleagues that the reason that people who are on the news saying that a lot are not virologists immunologists. I think that it's just very very unlikely. This isn't like an antibiotic Where a couple of mutations can render completely drug-resistant. This is something that the virus would have to fundamentally. Change into something new and i think that that is is really just not going to happen is unlikely to the point of being impossible. Muniz possible but not very possible dr andrew rasmussen. Thank you so much for joining us today and helping to clarify and help us to better understand this delta variant and where we go from here always grateful for your time and your expertise. It's always wonderful to be here. Thank you so much for having me as usual. Here's what i'm watching right now last week. New york city mayor. Bill de blasio announced. This new york city will be the first in the country to require proof of vaccination for those dining inside restaurants in gyms and movie theaters. If you've been listening you know. I'm a big proponent of vaccine verification if we're serious about taking on this pandemic we've got to take away it's thanks and that means vaccinating more people and the best way to do that make being vaccinated easier and being unvaccinated well parter. There's been a prominent. If bogus response to this that somehow requiring. Vaccinations creates two classes in society or discriminate against unvaccinated. People if you think you're being discriminated against for something you can change in fifteen minutes at your nearest pharmacy. You simply don't understand what discrimination is being unvaccinated isn't immutable or deeply-held fact of your life. Besides your choice carries cost for other people. Economists call these externalities when a choice and individual makes has consequences for other people take for instance pollution or even smaller smoking a cigarette and a crowded place if you're remaining. Unvaccinated hurts other people or restricts their choices public policy has a responsibility of making sure that other people don't have to pay for that choice. You do vaccine. Verification is good policy and we need more of them in other news there. Some evidence heavily promoted by vaccine manufacturer visor that immunity can wayne and seniors are folks with weaker immune systems based on this evidence. There's been a concerted pressure campaign to offer boosters vaccine but here's the thing millions of people around the world have had no vaccine at all the pressure campaign. The pharmaceutical industry is mounting. Is all about money. They want to sell boosters governments in high income countries at a premium rather than sell the same vaccines to low income countries. Less it's a shameful outcome of the way we fail to value human lives in this world in response this was. Who director general. Ted ross baristas last week. Accordingly h. is calling for a moment moratorium on boosters until at least the end of september will to inevitable ten percent of the population of every country to be vaccinated. This moratorium would be about making sure. The most vulnerable in the poorest countries have a chance at their first and second doses of the vaccine before the folks in the richest countries in the world get their third. Lastly if you're a nurse and arkansas or are willing to be a nurse and arkansas you can make twenty five thousand dollars simply for signing a contract. that's right the infamous worker shortage has hit healthcare. But here's the thing. Maybe it's just the fact that for too long nurses have been forced to bear the brunt of this pandemic short-staffed short of supplies and shortest support. And when you have to go on the front lines again because people just won't take the damn vaccine maybe at some point you get tired of carry for folks who don't seem to want to care for themselves but what do i know. That's a for today on her way out. Do me a favor and go to your podcast. Stop and rate and review. The show goes a long way to getting. Its other folks. If you really like us going over to the media storm and pick up some research we've got our new logo. Tease in mugs are safe and effective shirts and our.

dr andrew rasmussen Bill de blasio Muniz Newton Ted ross baristas New york city new york city wayne arkansas
"rasmussen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

07:42 min | 11 months ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Five dollars off. We think magic spoons for sponsoring this episode. Well let's let's jump right in Can you do this yourself for the type. I am angela. Rasmussen i n d i ever virologists at the vaccine and infectious disease organization. Vaccine research institute at the university of scheduling. I'm also an affiliate at georgetown center. For global health sciences purity. Dr andrew rasmussen has become our resident virologist here in america dissected. We've had her on from time to time to help us. Understand how the biology of sars covy to is shaping. Our experience of the pandemic obviously tell to give us a lot to discuss. So we wanted to invite. Angie back on to help us better understand what delta could mean for the future of the pandemic. This is our third opportunity to to chat and learn from you. I wanna step all the way back right. Because i think for a lot of folks understanding this whole conversation about variants is a little bit hard right. We're constantly hearing about these new greek letters. Can you give us a sense of what a variant even is and what makes sars cova too so capable of evolving new variants. Yeah absolutely very unser. Actually completely normal. It's not a unique saying that sars current virus to does variants are basically just mutants every time. The virus replicates itself at copies is on genetic material when it does that it makes mistakes. Those mistakes are called the mutation most of those have no effect whatsoever. Some of them have a negative effect on the virus in southern was under. What's called negative. Evolutionary selection meaning a virus that gives one of those won't be able to survive and go on replicates more so it will be selected out and sometimes those mutations which occur randomly happened to be in a place that gives the virus some kind of advantage when that happens there under positive evolutionary selection and those variants will outcompete the ancestoral variants. That were in that population. And that's exactly what we're seeing so we shouldn't think about these uses outliers are actually completely expected. There's just unfortunate because they really can't be prevented by by bringing transmission down by not letting the virus Ripped through the population out of control so turning our attention to delta specifically. Can you walk us through how it originated for some time they were calling it the double mutant so can you speak to us about what makes delta delta and why it's so Transmissible yeah so. The double mutant part just refers to two mutations that are in the spike protein actually has more mutations than just those two in this fight per teen and also has other mutations throughout the genome. We actually don't know what most of those mutations do. We've been focusing for all the variants on the mutations. That are in spike. So you'd be forgiven for thinking that. That's the only place that that these viruses. These various are acquiring mutations But they are actually acquiring them throughout the genome and those might have An impact in terms of the viruses fitness. Its ability to replicate Not really infectivity that. That's usually in this fight per team because despite protein is what binds. The cellular receptor allows the virus to infect enter cells. No about a lot of those other proteins. They may play a role in antagonism immune system for example. They those other mutations may be important but The the mutations in spite the one that seems to have the most impact is the p six eighty one mutation that is right at the boundary of s one and s two. These are two different parts of this fight protein that normally get cut in half an enzyme called protease in this case they are in the urine cleavage site. Which if you've been following discussions about virus origin you may have heard about a few in cleavage. Site is actually just a consensus sequence. That tells an enzyme called theorin that hey you should cut me here now. What this does is it exposes. What's called the fusion. Peptide of the virus a peptide. It's usually hydrophobic or Sorta like salad dressing. You can think of oil in water normally the sort of water levy amino acids on the surface And the oil amino acids are like little bubbles in a salad dressing that you haven't shaken up. They are inside by cutting of urine cleavage site. That exposes this hydrophobic peptide in allows That part of the spike protein to get into insert itself into a membrane which has a A hydrophobic core an oily core and that allows the virus to enter the cell because the virus has to get through that membrane barrier that that has essentially oil in the middle of it so that is thought to be well. That's why the urine cleavage sites important bowls alpha ends delta. Which have been more transmissible. Have a mutation at site six eighty one in which a pro lean in alpha is turned to history dean annan delta. It's turned to rj Positively charge amino acids. And they probably make for a more optimized fear cleavage site meaning that there's more cleavage there others more fusion There's more virus able to get into sells. It makes it more effective. We don't know that for sure there are other mutations might be contributing but that that's the one that seems to be really important that he's highly transmissible variants. So that's really helpful to understand. So you've got some change. In the rna which codes for a different one of the protein building blocks that then allows the the sort of sticky part of the virus to be more sticky and it helps us to get through the cells. And what a lot of folks don't appreciate is that cells. Are we think of cells is being the building blocks but but really they're all soft and the example of salad dressing. You used as really helpful because basically every cell is like some some little oily part right that surrounds a watery part. And what allows you to get into the cell. Faster is what allows you to puncture the oily faster. So what you've demonstrated for us is thought this little change in in one piece of our neigh- fundamentally changes the biology of this particular virus and makes it so that it sticks and gets into cells faster in you know you can imagine right. You have a hundreds thousands of particles of virus and the ability for any one of them to get in faster means that more of them are going to get in. Meaning that you're going to get the higher probability of of illness. That's right and i mean they're very well could be other factors to this too. There is a study that came out of china on that followed people who had been exposed to someone infected with a person infected with delta And then they did pc on them every day to when they actually became positive. The ones you did become positive had viral loads that were a thousand times higher than people who been infected with other variants. So that suggests that there's a fitness advantage to that cam as -sarily explained by that fear cleavage site. And as i said that could be one of the other mutations in the spike It could be a combination of mutations throughout the genome. It could be a mutation in another viral protein. There's twenty nine proteins stars corona virus. Choose so it's not just spiked. It's doing stuff so there's still.

vaccine and infectious disease Vaccine research institute university of scheduling georgetown center Dr andrew rasmussen Rasmussen Angie angela delta dean annan america china
Nelson Cruz Homers, Drives 5 to Help Rays Beat Orioles 10-6

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Nelson Cruz Homers, Drives 5 to Help Rays Beat Orioles 10-6

"The rays have padded their lead in the AL east by thumping the Orioles tend to six Nelson Cruz homered and drove in five runs as Tampa Bay won for the sixth time in eight games putting the race two and a half games ahead of the red Sox Cruz tied it in the fifth with a three run shot and edited go ahead two run double in the eighth right right here so definitely feels good to be able to to drive those Ronson ospiti the situation's Manuel Margot had three hits an RBI for Tampa Bay drew Rasmussen picked up the win with two scoreless innings of relief Paul fry took the loss Pedro Severino in Austin Hays homered for the Orioles who are one in nine against the racist season I'm Dave Ferrie

Al East Nelson Cruz Tampa Bay Orioles Ronson Ospiti Rays Manuel Margot Red Sox Drew Rasmussen Cruz Paul Fry Pedro Severino Austin Hays Dave Ferrie
Biden Approval Drops to 50%, Lowest for Him to Date

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Biden Approval Drops to 50%, Lowest for Him to Date

"So in a new gallup poll and and gallup is starting t me off a little bit because we asked them look. We need the methodology of your poll and refused to give it. Their methodology is how many democrats how many republicans. How many independence do you talk to. There's no reason why they shouldn't give it unless there's some sleight of hand so anyway. This poll just released says that joe biden has dropped and job approval to fifty percent lows and six months disapprove. Forty five percent rasmussen telling tracking has biden at forty nine approval. Disapprove forty nine now. Biden's numbers will continue to fall because you'll continue to pay more for gas food clothing and other stuff you need gotta buy a car and pay a lot more. So once americans figure that out. They'll blame him and it is his fault to some extent not one hundred percent but you know you attack the fossil fuel industry the oil and gas industry. They prices go up

Gallup Joe Biden Rasmussen Biden
"rasmussen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

"Occasion been some opportunities. Come my way And but i've i've really had a love affair with crichton. You know we talk about the personal nature the education we talk about The community omaha is an unbelievable community especially a community where it's great to raise a family and if if i'm going to be successful at creighton and if i was going to be successful crate i needed to be all in in order to be all in my family. My wife and my kids had to be happy and they were happy in omaha and while there were a number of opportunities that came my way none of them seemed better than the one that had you. I don't know that it's accurate to say europe. overly modest guy. But you do you do. Certainly pass credit around bruce. When you look back is there. One thing That stands above everything else That that you point to bryant as part of your legacy well the it would be our product When i see how are students who were also athletes how they are leaders in their families their businesses communities once they leave here I feel real good about the process. You know we talk so much especially in this day and age about the monetization of sports and and how we've become so much more professional and we've forgotten that our primary purpose is to not only develop young men and women individually and as part of a team in their sport but also to help them become better leaders and their families businesses and communities. And when i see our product. That's what i'm most proud of. What are you gonna do. Come on you've been at this. You've been staring that car toward that. Hilltop forty years. What are you going to do and a half well. I'm not gonna go away you know. I'm just switching chairs. I think is probably the right expression I love omaha. i love creighton. I'll be around. I'll just have different responsibilities but take a little bit of time and try to figure out what what to do next. I'm not a guy that can sit at home There are a lot of things that i've wanted to do In my life. That i haven't been able to do because i felt like i needed to be all in creighton but i'll always be a blue jay and i'll always be Someone who live in omaha on roose. Santa congrats on many great years at hilltop. You're not leaving thank you. I am not. He might continue to listen to cafe. Be well bless we know. That's that right there. This is the unwritten gospel of bruce's success. That he turns on. It'd be every morning and we tell them what to do. The instructions to the letter does that does that. Robert doesn't debbie ambrus raza's on kabc's morning news..

omaha creighton crichton bruce bryant europe roose Santa debbie ambrus raza kabc Robert
"rasmussen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

"Seven fifteen good morning. Gary sadder here baby is morning. News jim rose. And that's our pleasure to welcome creighton university athletic director bruce rasmussen back to the program after yesterday's announcement That he will be retiring after many years as the head of the athletic department at creighton university. In just a few weeks bruce. Good morning thanks for coming on. Good morning gary gyms to have you here this bittersweet Decision for you. It definitely is You know being the athletic director creighton has really been the privilege of my lifetime. And how missed the daily relationships that i've had with coach staff and especially students eighteen to twenty one They kept me somewhat young. After twenty seven years this becomes kind of habit forming. How you going to just not to do this anymore. My wife's asked me.

creighton university bruce rasmussen athletic department jim rose gary gyms Gary bruce creighton
COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

"Is kind of the pulse of this. Pandemic globally right now alana. Where are we at with infections. Well the big picture of marco is that the world is actually experiencing a steady increase in infections leaders at the. Who again sounded the alarm today. Because it's been seven straight weeks of rising infections actually is some of the highest surges yet in the pandemic and it's been four weeks streep of reisen deaths would areas most impacted. We have a sense of that. So i talked with ali mokdad about this. He's with the institute for health metrics at the university of washington and he's been modeling this pandemic since the start he says what's going on in five regions really stands out so i that is an increase in brazil. That snow started to come down so brazil is the big one. Neighboring countries like argentina and chile are now starting to experience rises to and then here the other hot spots this a big rise which still going on in india pakistan bangladesh at bark that is an increase in europe and the middle east following. What's your doping seeing. That is a. It is in cases in the philippines and that this is in south africa and african country. That's now started to come down so the fact that infections are increasing globally even parts of the us. We don't want to forget that. That really worries him. I mean it sounds like overall the world is just not close to controlling this virus. Do scientists have a handle on why cases continued to rise even with vaccines. Is it now all about the variants. Not points to the variance and lots of scientists do variants like be one one seven have become a dominant in europe and this has been found to be more transmissible. But there's another strong message. I'm hearing from a lot of scientists like angela rasmussen. she's just at georgetown. And as of this month the university of saskatchewan which is that these rises are not just from variants like the breakthrough masking and distancing another really important prevention

Ali Mokdad Institute For Health Metrics Alana Brazil Marco University Of Washington Chile Argentina Bangladesh Europe Pakistan Middle East Philippines South Africa India Angela Rasmussen United States University Of Saskatchewan Georgetown
Arenado's late HR lifts Cards over Brewers in home debut

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Arenado's late HR lifts Cards over Brewers in home debut

"No one ever knows two run home run in the eighth inning steps a one one tie it leads the cardinals past the first three to one in the red birds home opener the home runs the second of the season for the third baseman it comes off of relief pitcher drew Rasmussen the card is also gonna run scoring single off the bat of Tyler o'neill neither starting pitcher figures in the decision with the purse Corbin Burnes tossing six shutout innings allowing one hit while striking out nine St Louis starter Adam Wainwright allows one run over five innings pitched the cardinals have won four straight and I have a record of five to two Milwaukee is three and four Mike Reeves St Louis

Drew Rasmussen Red Birds Tyler O Cardinals Corbin Burnes Neill Adam Wainwright St Louis Milwaukee Mike Reeves
"rasmussen" Discussed on Sales Success Stories

Sales Success Stories

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Sales Success Stories

"People's information diets and the things that they're reading and listening to and watching so so far. We've got the bible in the morning and your wife's podcasts. After hours while you're cooking what else is. Is there anything else that you're consuming. So there's little sprinkles of things actually are throughout my day when i get distracted. But it's it's kind of intentional. So i watch pretty much every video that john barrows puts out or every i read every post that kevin dorsey or josh braun or justin michael puts out. Those are little nuggets of information or sam nelson. Those are little nuggets of information. That i i just digest. I think subconsciously comes out in the work that i do. And that's why i'm intentional. About like the only social media that i have is linked to happen so even if my wife is out doing something it's probably not good for my initial reaction to go grab my phone when i'm not around anyone but i'll go and i'll scroll through and look for post from josh josh bronner. Any of those sales thought leaders and then as things go as i see a post about a webinar. That solves the problem that i'm experiencing for example there sanded one on same nelson at outreach. Did on a sales tech stack a couple of months ago. We had no no sales stuck here. Tell you so. I'll digest content very specifically based on problems that i'm experiencing but it's it's been down a lot since i haven't had my my commute because that was where i used to soak up everything. Yeah yeah one. More austin thing. This is totally ridiculous. So these kevin dorsey. And i all live in the same zip code within about two miles of each other in west austin. I didn't realize i knew scott was here and we were out for a walk and talk. And he's like you know katie just moved here like i gotta be kidding. Me so yeah. It's pretty fine. We're having a good time. Yeah that is fun. And i'm i'm actually in his. He's got like a patriot. Group and justin. Michael has a similar. Yeah like community. And i'm in this group called sdr nation. And so that's kind of how i almost digest. Most of my content in my information diet is on a community level where it's real time giving feedback on certain people's messaging and getting feedback on your own messaging and things like that love that so we will link all that stuff up top dot. Fm forward slash. Kyle dash rasmussen. Sorry um script your name. There were top one dot..

kevin dorsey john barrows josh braun justin michael sam nelson nuggets josh josh bronner west austin nelson austin katie scott justin Michael Kyle dash rasmussen
"rasmussen" Discussed on Podcast Onion

Podcast Onion

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Podcast Onion

"Molyneaux pick over my Expediency all facile bay assoc sadaqa by the memories of fourth quarter. We'll see as age we primarily was. Say you officer. Pr consider tomorrow. Kiki kloden salaries go also for work expedite. Yoga did see up to kukasemkij. Pass up part of the district. Zero to five telegraph would be a boy who was actually data mesa. Popeye surrey. backstage report. Secure tobacco asking with the phillies tacky. Severe kara sissies corral bit of tv. a key fit disappear disappear guy. We actually listen. Something you feel you feel is a look for the deal is a inch professor michio. What tv movies. Inquisitor commissioner in pre. Ki- do solid you that you walk the government. Should we be tv. Bitty my position is I yeah me at the movie with each of them. She's huge mcgahn. Say simply and he's someone who is coming for the gig work was not got contesting combined to be janci -sego as specified on. Cg put up a sagging cutter. Saint louis Excessive simply because of out but eligible cece survey longer. Doctor you've ever dodgers did research. Was he is a key. He always gets accusing cheeky. Jokic stuff as auto reviews. There's at least masondo important getting the same buttress another print book but you can put it includes even also caused in the defeat surgery for quantitative ordina. Also the nozzle trouble for one month and it was that among who could you say that you wish that egypt coordinate squats into as akina theft squad. Tabu bonus court records. I won't go into the character issue floor chicago. Karch watch the dame who work utilities community fusion treasury squad with five kind of principle. the look and michael moore. Ask you both Corralito city book tan feisty to some beats the to meet with a series. Be the seals. Similar care. Gordon context of a follow. Do or got the flu. Not your shoes now. I guess he will casamayor today to go but if american z. You cool no.

Molyneaux Kiki kloden Popeye surrey mcgahn michio Jokic masondo phillies mesa Saint louis akina dodgers Karch egypt michael moore treasury chicago Gordon flu
"rasmussen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fizer can work with the federal government's operation warp speed to start distribution. That is no simple task for this vaccine, partly because it needs to be kept very cold. Here's Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University. Those freezers that we think of as a freezer is a minus 20 degrees Celsius freezer. This requires storage in minus 80 degree or below freezers. So those ultra cold freezers are not in your neighborhood, Walgreens Visor has created its own specialized storage containers with dry ice to make it a bit easier. Here is the next challenge. Manufacturing has already begun for several vaccine candidates, including Pfizer's. But first there will still be limited doses. As army General Gus Purna of Operation Warp Speed told NPR yesterday. I think by the end of December, somewhere between tens of millions to 30 million doses will be available. Each person needs two doses. So best case that's enough for only 4% of the population by the end of the year. Although more doses will become available as the months go on, those doses will get shipped out to public health workers and healthcare providers who need to be ready to receive the super cold vaccine and get it quickly to the right people. And that brings us to the last reason why this is going to take a while. This is not a first come first serve situation. The limited doses will be carefully doled out to different groups like front line health workers, seniors those most at risk. So, says Rasmussen. It's not as though vaccine is available and suddenly the clouds part and the sun comes out and everything is just wonderful. This is going to be a process that takes many months and we're still going to have to be vigilant In the meantime. About reducing.

Angela Rasmussen Gus Purna Fizer Walgreens Pfizer Columbia University NPR
"rasmussen" Discussed on Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

"January talk about business and lifestyle designed from the inside out and I invited my guest on to join me today because she is a money manager and coach her name is Tara Rasmussen and in this video, we talk about really understanding the beliefs that underlie why they have certain relationship with plenty why recurring themes.

Tara Rasmussen
"rasmussen" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

The Past Lives Podcast

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

"From any of these websites in the message in a bottle that's how everything started so that letter. Well thank you for giving me so much of your time been fascinating conversation and I am definitely going to continue with the process and using using the MP threes and remember put them on repeat as well Gosh Corporation before we went after. I know you who have been invited. Incredible guests we have seen a win on your website as well before we met today. What is the one thing that you will take from this book on the Temple World? Where'd you go that you didn't before? This book has a process in it though. I haven't seen before and it's something I can take myself through and I can use the sounds and playing on the the headphones and it's almost like a hypnotic process but you don't need a hypnotherapist or any Kinda hypnotists to take you through it. You can do it yourself and also you can experience it with other people you can get together in a group and say and support each other and talk about and if somebody's not going so far with it other other people might have gone far and say well. Have you try this. Try that right. It is and that's why people say Christina Christina do guided version of the audio with your voice and always say no. It's your voice than its take you it is your consciousness launches this than it should take you there so yes exactly. Well thanks again. Thank you Saima so much for your work as well. I I really appreciate you and thank you for having me today. So that was a great interview with Christina Rasmussen. This is the free one hour version of the interview. You if you'd like to hear the full extended version that she's one hour and thirty eight minutes. You can sign up to the five dollars here on patron you get access to the weekly twenty minute bonus episodes and the going back catalogue which is now with a forty episodes. Sometimes when the.

Christina Rasmussen Christina Christina Gosh Corporation
"rasmussen" Discussed on What We Said

What We Said

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on What We Said

"The following podcast is a deer media production. Hello guys. And welcome back to what we said podcast. If you are new. I'm Jay see, I am the redhead. I went blond for a second therapy. But we back in business. I'm Chelsea I'm am the brunette one and we'd like to clarify because our voices sound very similar if you're new podcast. You're probably wondering why it'd be think this is one person who has kids affronting, but it's two separate girls. So hopefully that clarifies things for you guys today, we have a very special guest Crecy, Rasmussen otherwise known as hair by Chrissy on Instagram. Chrissy has done my hair for years, even before I mean, she still she did social media when I started, but she has really taken off yet taken off since she's been doing we're here for years and years, and she is the only person, I trusted touch my hair. She is basically the hair Queen I go to her with any hair questions. I have she's always done an amazing job at my color. Mike cuts and making sure my her's always been healthy. And so a lot of people don't actually know this. I'm not a natural redhead. I'm actually more of a natural brunette with kind of Auburn hints in my hair, but the red she does on the hair looks so natural that no one even believes me when I tell them, I dye my hair docked. And she also specializes in blonds like she does it all she's so good at every single aspect braids. Yeah. If you've seen on Instagram like, the big blonde, braids extensions. That's chrissy. Yeah. So we're super excited interview her she's one of the hardest working people I've ever met in my life. She is a go getter. She does not stop until things are perfect. And she just always strives to be the best. But she's also really humble and always treats people really, well, which I admire lot her husband rich also came to the interview. So we interviewed the two of them together. And they're such a great duo and their business partners. And he. He is such a huge part of the business as well. Which is why we wanted to include him in on this. Because he's been a huge reason. I think they've reached success because he's handled kind of all the business aspects while Chrissy worked super hard or her craft. So I think they're really good team. So without further ado here they are. All right. We are here with Chrissy and rich live. I the podcast studio. Thanks for being here. We're just gonna jump right on end this interview get into the good stuff. So first of all tell us where you're both from the start with that. All right. My going go for go read. So this is the classic American story. Right. Okay. We lived exactly one mile away from each other both in coldest sack both directly looking right at an elementary school one mile as the as the crow flies. They say right soulmates. But yes, but because that's separated by Gilbert road here at Mesa northeast Mesa at the time, we were in different alimentary is of course, we're different junior. Highs different church groups, we didn't ever meet each other. It's not like social media in our he just kind of connect with everybody who's kind of your. Innocenti exactly. But then you didn't hear like a product of geography, you know? And so basically high school comes along and we both born and raised in northeast Mesa high school. We have a I'm a senior she's a sophomore, and we have class together. That's the first time. But again, I think I'm big man on campus. I hate to say that but sounds really conceited..

Chrissy Mesa high school Mesa Mike cuts Crecy Auburn Rasmussen
"rasmussen" Discussed on Bear Brook

Bear Brook

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Bear Brook

"Just. It was just so. It's hard to it's hard to describe. It was just is like a dead, man. Looking at you in some ways. Do you? Remember, how old you were at that time. I think this was I was right about three and a half to four right in there. Well. Any any recollection or ideas to as to not that? There's a good reason. But why he would have been doing that to you know? That goes to the question. I think everybody has is how does a man like that exist. And how does a man like that do anything? I guess it doesn't make sense to me. But I kinda really need to know in a. In kind of a morbid sort of way. This is the shadow that. Terry rash mucin casts over Eric Rasmussen ever since he learned about his father's crimes. Eric has been gripped by questions of how why questions that? I think we all try to answer when we hear a story like this. But the difference for Eric is that whatever answers he comes to also say something about him not just because Terry was his father. But because Eric has come to realize that he and his father's lies have in some ways moved along a parallel trajectory. It's a really odd parallel because you know, the there were two things that he was heavily interested in and that was mechanical and electron IX and the way that my unknowingly my my path directed which exactly down those same ways. You know, I spent time as an auto mechanic. I spent time in the Dyno field, which is heavily electronic. I mean, he went into the navy. I spent time in the Marine Corps. I don't wanna be like him. But unfortunately, I mean, I kind of in a way and that that is a scary thought in itself. I mean, that's. That's the one when I can't sleep at three o'clock in the morning that draws me. You know? I know I'm not gonna do what he did. But. I don't wanna get anywhere close to that line. And that's the one that keeps me up. It's not only the outlines of a career path at Eric in Terry share. They also bear a striking physical resemblance. Diane told me that when the state troopers were first breaking the news to her one thing that helped convince her it was real where the mugshots of Terry. And how much they looked like Eric, you know, you read about, you know, the people that talked to them and the detective in California's at all gosh, those crystal blue eyes, I get that every week at least once a week somebody says, oh, my God, you have to just gorgeous, crystal blue eyes, and I'm like, I just don't want them. But you know, I I looked like him. Yeah. I wonder what was your idea of your father as you were growing up and after he had left. What was your sense of him? You know, my mother which has never been very forthcoming with a lot of details constantly reports. The he was a bad, man. But she couldn't quite say why sometimes it would be because he drank sometimes it would be because he slept around with all the babysitters. You know? Well, I mean there was some time. She said to me you're just like him, which really is a phrase that kind of drags home now. So you know, I chewed tell me how I looked like how is just like him. And then she would take it out on me physically. But you wanted to you were curious despite all that. Oh, yeah. I mean, you have to you know, you're growing up in a in a single single parent home. I mean, you wanna know the other half of you. So. So has this led to other conversations within your extended family? I mean, I know obviously that your relationship with your mom is is fraught for obvious reasons. But have you found yourself talking to family members from his side or reconnecting with folks have I I have found a few family members from his side that are willing to talk and the one story that came out that really struck me as intuitive was they were at a picnic, and he was maybe eight nine Terry was eight or nine. Yeah. And he he chased someone around at the picnic with a knife he'd been using to cut watermelon because he became so angry. So talked to other members on that side of the family who talked about a darkness that flows in the in the resumes and family, and they they don't call it depression. They call it darkness.

Eric Rasmussen Terry Marine Corps California Diane
"rasmussen" Discussed on Bear Brook

Bear Brook

06:25 min | 3 years ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on Bear Brook

"Many people know what it's like to live in the shadow of their parents, but some shadows are longer and darker than others. Before Teri Rasmussen killed four people and dumped them in the woods near bear brook state park before he was a serial killer, the chameleon he had family in my reporting. I was able to speak to one of his children his daughter, Diane. You heard from her in episode six Teri, Rasmussen also had a son. Let's can I have you just introduce yourself your name and your your relationship to this case why we're talking. My name is Eric Terry res- Musa, my father, and I guess we're talking about it to try and find some answers. I couldn't find Eric when I was first reporting this series, but a few months after we released the podcast an Email sent by someone with the last name Rasmussen caught my eye. Eric wrote to say that he had listened to the podcast. He said he was glad to hear that. With the breakthroughs in genetic genealogy, at least some good had come from the case, but listening to it also had him thinking about his father ever since Eric learned about Terri Rasmussen's crimes. He's been holding up an image of his father's life next to his own. And what he seen has changed. This is bear brook update. Number two conversation with Eric rest news. I'm jason. as you can hear me. Okay. And everything I can't. Okay. Great. I think a few weeks ago, Eric, and I sat down to talk about what this story has been for him. I started by asking him about the Davis all began for him. Remember like Diane, Eric grew up not knowing all that much about as father as far as he knew. He was just a deadbeat dad who left him when he was five years old since then Eric grew up joined the Marine Corps than the army had some kids got married and divorced if you times then in two thousand seventeen four decades after he last saw his dad Eric got a phone call from the New Hampshire state police. I mean, it was very surreal. I mean, it's it's it was you know, you just you can't. It's nothing life for pairs you for a phone call like that. I mean, it's just I guess the only way I really dealt with that first moments. Was that it it just wasn't true. Eric says it didn't fully sink in until later when the detective sent him an Email with some more information about the case it really became real. When I clicked on the link to the interview that he did in California. And I heard his voice. Talk any more about Zunes or my problems because you're not my priest entered on my boxer. That's when it really became a hundred percent real for me is I heard that voice. I'm from the past that it's hard to explain, you know. I guess the closest I could put it and forgive me. If I go off on a tangent here is when I was in Desert Storm, we had been across the Kuwaiti border for about a day, and we were moving towards Kuwait City, and we had camp for the night, basically with bunch of tanks laid out, and we were digging foxholes, and there was machine gunfire that starts up, and then all the sudden there's this call of gas because missile had landed and my gas masks when it seal. And the sheer terror of that of of. Of your mascots ceiling. You're you think you're going to die. You're you're starting to panic somewhat. And you're trying to keep cool at the same time. And just that feeling that builds up, and you of all this stress anxiety this terror. And that's what I felt when I heard it. Choice. Let's go to that phone call with catheters. Any questions for you? He he has me what I remembered about my father. You know, what did you tell them? I told them the two prominent memories, I have my father. I I remember. When he came to visit us in zone after my mother had left him. Just a reminder. This is the unexpected visit that Terry rescues in made sometime in nineteen seventy five or seventy six it was the last time his family som- Terry had with him an unidentified woman who investigators believe may be another victim. And I remember him being with a brunette woman. You know, I remember that. I remember him not saying much. He said something to my mother, and that he kind of looked at us, but you know. I'm a father myself. And you know, the first thing you do when you when you when you contact your children after not seeing them for a while as you wanna physically be there for him. And he just didn't seem to hold that connection. The other memory, Eric has of his father is something that Diane also mentioned to me, she said, it was the moment that finally convinced their mother to leave Terry. I remember the day that he he burned me with cigarettes. I don't remember it was one or two, but I remember feeling burnt, and I remember crying, you know. And I just remember the look he gave me it just.

Eric Eric Terry res- Musa Teri Rasmussen Diane Eric rest bear brook state park Terri Rasmussen Kuwait City California Desert Storm jason. New Hampshire Marine Corps Davis army two thousand seventeen four de hundred percent five years
"rasmussen" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rasmussen" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"2013 Rasmussen poll asked blacks, whites and Hispanics of these three groups which. Is more racist? White said blacks Hispanics, blacks blacks. Simplex? Systemic racism. There are two major think tanks, and I refer to them frequently throughout the course of my career. One of them is the Heritage Foundation conservative and one of them is the Brookings Institution left wing. And they don't agree on much. They do agree on the importance of having fathers in the home. And they do agree that there are three things that you have to do in order to escape poverty, although they phrase them somewhat differently with a pretty much the same number one finish high school. Number two, don't have a kid before your twenty number three get married. I both the Brooklyn's institution. And the Heritage Foundation left wing and right wing respectively came up with the same formula to escape poverty. Didn't say anything about race. In fact, a poor black kid raised by a mom and dad will have a better outcome than the middle class. White kid raised by only a mother, I repeat. A poor black kid raised by mother and father. We'll have a better outcome than a middle class. White kid raised by just a mother. Institutional racism, you're not helping Anne Hathaway going to help me to listen Milano completely.

Brookings Institution Heritage Foundation Anne Hathaway White Rasmussen Brooklyn