32 Burst results for "Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus"

Rasmussen loses perfect game in 9th, Rays beat Orioles 4-1

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 d ago

Rasmussen loses perfect game in 9th, Rays beat Orioles 4-1

"Drew Rasmus and flirted with perfection in the rays four one win over the Orioles Rasmussen had a perfect game until Jorge Mateo doubled on the first pitch of the 9th inning Matteo later scored on a wild pitch by Rasmussen who struck out 7 over a career high 8 and a third innings Randy arose arena hit a two run Homer off Jordan lyles with two out in the third lyles was lifted with one out in the 5th charged with four runs in 5 hits The outcome puts Tampa Bay one and a half games ahead of Baltimore for the final AL wild card slot I'm Dave ferry

Drew Rasmus Jorge Mateo Rasmussen Randy Arose Orioles Jordan Lyles Matteo Rays Lyles Homer Tampa Bay Baltimore Dave Ferry
 D-backs score go-ahead run on balk, beat Rockies 6-4

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

D-backs score go-ahead run on balk, beat Rockies 6-4

"The rays erupted for 7 runs in the 9th inning to beat the tigers 7 zero The game was scoreless until Gregory Soto walked yu Chang and yandy Diaz with the bases loaded Brandon Lau followed with a two run single and Randy arose arena added a two run double Raise opener drew Rasmus and pitched three scoreless innings and Colin poche got the win Tigers starter Matt Manning pitched 7 shutout innings allowing four hits and three walks while striking out 7 The outcome keeps Tampa Bay two games behind Toronto for the first AL wild card birth I'm Dave fairy

Gregory Soto Yu Chang Yandy Diaz Brandon Lau Randy Arose Tigers Drew Rasmus Colin Poche Rays Matt Manning Tampa Bay Toronto Dave Fairy
Nats beat NL West-leading Dodgers for 2nd straight night

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nats beat NL West-leading Dodgers for 2nd straight night

"Washington's Luis Garcia crushed a two run go ahead Homer in the 8th inning off Dodger reliever Garrett Clevenger and the nationals didn't stop there tacking on four more runs in the 9th or an 8 to three win that manager Dave Martinez You know they're playing well right now and I'm proud of the guys because all year long you know we fell short but they don't quit And I love that about them Mookie betts and Cody Bellinger each homered for the Dodgers reliever or Rasmus Ramirez was the winning pitcher Mark Myers Los Angeles

Garrett Clevenger Luis Garcia Dave Martinez Dodger Homer Washington Mookie Betts Cody Bellinger Rasmus Ramirez Dodgers Mark Myers Los Angeles
Tkachuk scores 3, Flames beat Oilers 9-6 in Game 1

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Tkachuk scores 3, Flames beat Oilers 9-6 in Game 1

"Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthew could could could could Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck registered registered registered registered a a a a hat hat hat hat trick trick trick trick in in in in the the the the flames flames flames flames nine nine nine nine six six six six win win win win over over over over the the the the Oilers Oilers Oilers Oilers at at at at least least least least when when when when Holman Holman Holman Holman injury injury injury injury major major major major party party party party scored scored scored scored in in in in the the the the game's game's game's game's opening opening opening opening minute minute minute minute before before before before Brett Brett Brett Brett Ritchie Ritchie Ritchie Ritchie tally tally tally tally five five five five minutes minutes minutes minutes later later later later Blake Blake Blake Blake Coleman Coleman Coleman Coleman had had had had two two two two goals goals goals goals in in in in the the the the opening opening opening opening six six six six ten ten ten ten of of of of the the the the second second second second period period period period to to to to give give give give Calgary Calgary Calgary Calgary a a a a five five five five one one one one lead lead lead lead but but but but Edmonton Edmonton Edmonton Edmonton chipped chipped chipped chipped away away away away and and and and eventually eventually eventually eventually tied tied tied tied in in in in a a a a killer killer killer killer Yamamoto's Yamamoto's Yamamoto's Yamamoto's goal goal goal goal early early early early in in in in the the the the third third third third Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus Andersson Andersson Andersson Andersson netted netted netted netted the the the the go go go go ahead ahead ahead ahead goal goal goal goal one one one one twenty twenty twenty twenty nine nine nine nine later later later later Zach Zach Zach Zach Hyman Hyman Hyman Hyman scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice and and and and Connor Connor Connor Connor McDavid McDavid McDavid McDavid had had had had a a a a goal goal goal goal and and and and three three three three assists assists assists assists for for for for the the the the Oilers Oilers Oilers Oilers the the the the flames flames flames flames host host host host game game game game two two two two on on on on Friday Friday Friday Friday I'm I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Oilers Holman Holman Blake Blake Coleman Coleman Matthew Matthew Matthew Matthe Chuck Chuck Chuck Chuck Calgary Yamamoto Edmonton Party Party Party Party Brett Brett Brett Brett Ritchi Andersson Andersson Connor Connor Mcdavid Mcdavid Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus Rasmus Zach Zach Zach Zach Hyman Hyma Oilers Oilers Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie
Maple Leafs hand Capitals sixth consecutive home loss 5-3

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Maple Leafs hand Capitals sixth consecutive home loss 5-3

"Rasmus Sandin snapped a three all tie with his third goal of the season with three twenty three left in the third period as the maple Leafs beat the capitals five to three sending Washington to their sixth straight home loss standing also had an assist for Toronto the Leafs lead three to one but two goals from Tom Wilson tied the game at three Centene says the Leafs didn't lose focus is going to focus on our own thing and step up and try to try to score another goal you know we're out there to win every game so that's exactly what we did today and we we got the at the dump to so we're a customer after that Michael bunting scored for Toronto while Justin hole added a goal and an assist Peter morale as it made thirty saves in the win Craig heist Washington

Leafs Rasmus Sandin Centene Tom Wilson Toronto Washington Michael Bunting Justin Hole Peter Morale Craig Heist
Georgiev stops 36, Rangers hang on for 2-1 win over Sabres

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Georgiev stops 36, Rangers hang on for 2-1 win over Sabres

"Alexander Alexander kirke kirke have have stopped stopped thirty thirty six six shots shots in in the the ranges ranges extended extended one one of of the the best best start start in in team team history history with with a a two two one one win win over over the the Sabres Sabres there there are are a a lot lot of of shots shots I I don't don't have have too too much much time time to to to to think think about about anything anything else else today today right right I I scored scored two two of of them them so so I I felt felt really really good good to to get get that that W. W. because because the the Bennett Bennett Jack Jack got got his his first first goal goal in in fifteen fifteen games games and and Alex Alex love love for for near near also also scored scored as as New New York York improved improved to to eighteen eighteen five five and and three three with with its its eighth eighth win win in in nine nine games games the the record record matches matches the the Blueshirts Blueshirts best best twenty twenty six six games games start start tying tying the the mark mark set set by by the the nineteen nineteen ninety ninety four four Cup Cup winners winners the the Rangers Rangers hung hung on on after after a a video video review review determined determined buffalo buffalo defenseman defenseman Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin was was offside offside negating negating Victor Victor all all of of his his goal goal with with fifty fifty seven seven seconds seconds left left I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Alexander Alexander Kirke Kirk Sabres W. W. Bennett Bennett Jack Jack Alex Alex New New York York Rangers Rangers Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin Buffalo Victor Victor Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
McCann, Appleton each score twice, Kraken beat Sabres 7-4

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 9 months ago

McCann, Appleton each score twice, Kraken beat Sabres 7-4

"The the expansion expansion crack crack and and have have set set a a season season high high for for goals goals in in the the game game Jared Jared McCann McCann and and Mason Mason Appleton Appleton each each scored scored twice twice in in Seattle Seattle netted netted its its first first two two short short handed handed goals goals of of the the season season in in a a seven seven four four win win at at buffalo buffalo Appleton Appleton says says they they continue continue to to score score gritty gritty goals goals if if your your offense offense obviously obviously there's there's pretty pretty goals goals to to be be had had but but you you know know let's let's count count the the same same as as the the the the gritty gritty one one so so you you know know our our tickets tickets were were a a lot lot of of goals goals that that way way and and we we showed showed that that tonight tonight branded branded ten ten have have had had a a goal goal and and two two assists assists for for Seattle Seattle which which scored scored short short handed handed goals goals are are miscues miscues by by Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin Yanni Yanni Gordon Gordon tentative tentative lit lit the the lamp lamp while while the the cracking cracking were were killing killing penalties penalties Seattle Seattle has has won won four four of of its its last last five five games games Jeff Jeff Skinner Skinner tallied tallied twice twice for for the the sabers sabers I'm I'm the the ferry ferry

Seattle Jared Jared Mccann Mccann Mason Mason Appleton Appleton Buffalo Buffalo Appleton Apple Rasmus Rasmus Dahlin Dahlin Gordon Gordon Jeff Jeff Skinner Skinner
Sabres snap Bruins' season-best 6-game win streak in 6-4 win

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Sabres snap Bruins' season-best 6-game win streak in 6-4 win

"Sam Reinhart scored three times including the game clinching empty netter that sealed the Sabres six four win over the Bruins Steven Kampfer had a goal and two assists for the Bruins who ended a six game winning streak and remain four points out of first place in the east division das tablet hockey games when the sharks or actually lost eight nine minutes of the game so it's our it's on us in the room Reinhardt's power play goal put buffalo ahead five one four and a half minutes into the third period but to be scored three times in a five a six band later in the period before Rinehart completed his hat trick Rasmus Dahlin had a goal and an assist as buffalo snapped in waiting to skate against the Bruins I'm the ferry

Sam Reinhart Steven Kampfer Bruins Sabres Reinhardt Sharks Hockey Buffalo Rasmus Dahlin Rinehart
Expand - 15:42 - ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test4 - burst 5

Audio Upload 1

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Expand - 15:42 - ubuntu.podcast.s13e40-test4 - burst 5

"Pi news Martin know in November. They announced their Raspberry Pi 400 keyboard, which I think is my device off of the year, you know, the lucky we've covered all of these Raspberry Pi announcements. They've been busy over the course of twenty twenty, but I thought this was absolutely Splendid the the keyboard fog Factor yeah, really makes it super convenient to have a Raspberry Pi just on your desk and in the corner and you can just pull it forward and do stuff on it when you need it. I love it. It's a great great choice and the book that comes in the full kit is brilliant if you've got, you know kids and they're just getting into scratch and stuff. That book is just a treasure Trove and finally Martin found some open to Martinez. How could we not have a little bit of a PIN to martinis at the end of the year? So in in late November the ability to mate team announced that we had enabled the GPD Win Mag Mobile gaming laptop and official firmware is available from from the GPD website and the ability not a website great. Well listeners wage Good Year. It was for news. If we've missed out your favorite news story from the why don't you let us know you could email show at a bunch of podcast. Org will still be reading your emails wage. In between this year and next year or you can come and tell us about in our telegram Channel go to a bunch of podcast. Org / Telegram. I know it's time for some gooey love and the last gooey Love Of The Year Martin. What did you find? Well, I found a thing called mango hard. I I mentioned earlier in the year that I'd been playing

November Linux October Raspberry Pi 400 Martinez 8Gig New Jersey Late November Windows 4Gig Twenty Twenty Rasmus Raspberry Pi SDK Martin
Martin scores 2 to help Islanders beat Sabres 5-2

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Martin scores 2 to help Islanders beat Sabres 5-2

"Fourth liner Matt Martin scored twice for the islanders reclaimed a share of the east division lead by topping the Sabres for the fourth time in four meetings this season five two islanders forward Casey Cizikas says his linemate doesn't get enough credit for his scoring ability when he gets in those areas he's leave I has a hell of a shot and you know he he can pick his spots know what Dobson if anybody really A. in Jordan Everly also tallied for the islanders who are five oh one one in their last six games overall and eight oh one two at home New York is ten two into in his last fourteen games and remains the only team without a regulation home loss Taylor hall and Rasmus Ristolainen scored for the sabers who have dropped five in a row I'm the ferry

Islanders Casey Cizikas Matt Martin East Division Sabres Jordan Everly Dobson Rasmus Ristolainen Taylor Hall New York
Oshie has 3 points, Capitals open with 6-4 win at Buffalo

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Oshie has 3 points, Capitals open with 6-4 win at Buffalo

"Tom Wilson's third period goal was the difference as the Washington Capitals won for the second time in as many nights over the Buffalo Sabres this time by a score of two to one capitals head coach Peter Laviolette says Wilson came to play we weren't quite on point we need to be assigned to Tom was on point from start to finish also on point with Washington goaltender Vitek vantage check earning his first NHL win making twenty three saves Jacob Rana had the other Washington gold buffalo's lone goal came from defenseman Rasmus Ristolainen Sabres either chances in this game however buffalo went over five on the power play I'm gene Battaglia

Tom Wilson Sabres Washington Capitals Peter Laviolette Vitek Vantage Jacob Rana Wilson Washington TOM Rasmus Ristolainen NHL Buffalo Gene Battaglia
Poor countries being left behind in COVID-19 vaccine distribution

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Poor countries being left behind in COVID-19 vaccine distribution

"Half a million dead. No access to vaccines. Rich countries have locked up. How balanced is the distribution of the vaccines Globally. At the moment, the country like Canada has more than $10. Per capita, big parts off the poorest countries in the world have not secured a single dose ship that was Rasmus Beck Hansen of Air Affinity, which is a company that analyzes health data. Handful of rich countries, including the United States and Canada have 14% of the world's population, but they control 53% of the vaccine supply.

Rasmus Beck Hansen Air Affinity Canada United States
UK Higher Education News: The Chancellor's Spending Review

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:01 min | 1 year ago

UK Higher Education News: The Chancellor's Spending Review

"Stop this week with the spending review. You trialed financing on jobs and jabs helen. Richey cena deliver a shot in the arm for ha setup setup spending review for the next year and we probably already had a good idea about some highlights public sector pay infrastructure investments in the office overseas aid budget. But i mean the review outlines that ambition for the uk to become a scientific superpower and this fifteen billion to be invested in r. and d. next year lots of things around uplift for uk our national academies commitment to build a new science capability and also to establish a new unit for commercializing research. An and this is all really good news for universities in general and it will you know we it will really help us to play our parts in contrbuting to the post pandemic economy and also for an institution like kale. It's really important that we're involved in the level pagendam and this also welcome commitment to unspecified amounts funding to support the preparation for domestic alternative to rasmus. Plus if we need but but outside that focus on research really isn't much to say about higher education There's a lot of attention given to the jennifer skills and i'm further education and there's a tantalizing suggestion of something around a flexible loan entitlement which i'm looking forward to but no order if you know. Fa or h. e. white paper no mention of the pace review or taff and to be honest. I'm relieved know that there are versions of all of these things kicking around government. And there's no doubt in my mind that major disruptive changes is on is on its way to higher education and last week's office shoots consultation on quality and standards gives us a hint of of what might be about to happen. But i think we could probably all do with a short period of just adapting to what the pandemic dealt delta's before we have to start worrying combat. The next thing.

Richey Cena UK Helen Rasmus FA
"rasmus  " Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"rasmus " Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"I'm John Bachelor. This is John Baxter Show. I welcome Professor Rasmus Nielsen. He is at Berkeley in a school at Berkeley. That's important to understand. This is about what is called integrated biology. It also is true that the professor is attached to a distinguished organization in Copenhagen, the Loan back foundation for Geo Genetic Center of the Globe Institute at the University of Copenhagen. Professor. Very good evening to you. Thank you for joining me. This is about the Vikings. Of course, That's a romantic version. But it's about genetics, Genomics and what our modern techniques allow us to. Learn about our near history dating from the iron Age, all the way to modern Scandinavia. Ah, this is the Nature magazine publication The Peer reviewed Premiere magazine in Europe. The title of the article is Population genomics of the Viking world. So congratulations to you and your colleagues and I begin with what you were working with 442 human remains from archaeological sites. These archaeological sites. They're scattered across Scandinavia and Europe. How far wide are they, Professor? Good evening to you. Well, thank you for having me on its pleasure to be here. Yes. So these air remains that spend Ah, ah, many hundreds of years throughout Europe and also into Iceland there and Greenland this as well as you know, the Viking stays got around so They were and people that had invented a new maritime technologies. So they were very good at traveling by foot. So you find them not only in Scandinavia but also in southern Europe, Iceland and Greenland, and we had samples. From a white range off the distributions. Yes, the samples that were most compelling to me. You kind of want to know what the rest of the story wass that you found in one grave site, which looks to be the remains of a battle. Four brothers buried side by side with the third degree relative of one of the four brothers nearby. Do do do puzzle. What happened that day how four brothers could die together that we make these legends in the 20th century? Yes, This is from reason. Psychological Dick in Estonia. So sweetest, like Vikings. They came this ceiling in the Baltic and also got to Estonia and this is from a grave pick. That was Very, very early in the biking, so the Viking age is bumped from it. There's yes, 750 to 1050, and this is right in the beginning of that period, and there are traditional Viking burials found in Estonia. Where what you see is that the people that were there in the burial? They were definitely noble people. They didn't have the kind of weapons that peasants would have put more the kind of weapons that that noble few happened from. The genetics from the analysis off that your name was found was that several of the people there were related to sell and the reason why that's interested. It tells us that this is the beginning of the Viking age. This Viking Ah group's Viking party instead of being sent out, what is the social structure of them? And it seems to be people that are related to tell that's out in the same boat. So what is going on there? Off course we don't know in this particular case, but we know from the archaeology that the people that went there. They also had the docks with them, and they also had a Fork Inn's for hunting. And so it suggests that there was actually not ritually intention was warfare, but perhaps a trait of diplomacy. But something went wrong and the they were in the battle. You could see the ship that their part with That in the ship has arrows in its from the native Estonian. So something went wrong. They went into a battle. There are birds and state we can then get their remains off and do it that you need and figuring out what the social structure of this group of people you have. These 442 human remains from archaeological sites, Europe and Greenland all the way to Greenland and you compare them to Of a sample of 3855 present day individuals, genomes from them and then also 1118 ancient individuals. This is part of your comparing contrast is that new methodology is that something that's fresh for our ability to use genomes to compares a such a wide range of people. Well. So what has happened over the last few years is that our ability to sequence ancient human has really improved. So it's quite a technical feat to be able to sequence D n A. From the skeleton. What you do is to drill with a troll. You threw out a little bit off off the bone mass. And then you have this powerful from that's that's grounded up, and then you extract money from that. But there's very, very little guinea in the phone and a lot of other stuff of bacteria, fungi and so on. But now we have the technology so can extract the relevant uni and secrets a whole genome. Ah office of a sample, but it's only in the last few years we've been able to hundreds and hundreds of these onto the periods ago. Just one ancient genome was really very, very expensive and very difficult to do. But now we can do hundreds of hundreds of them and oversee this opportunity that we could do that the whole culture like the Vikings culture, how didn't spread what's the relationship to Vikings from different parts of the world? And so on. So it's quite exciting Cross to be able to do that. There are particular here, but I want to give the overview for as we begin. You find that Denmark your home. Denmark has spread to England, Sweden, spread to the Baltic states, Norway spread to Ireland, Iceland and Greenland and also the surprise to me you have European genomes moving into Scandinavia, so there was not just one direction from Scandinavia. There was What we would call bilateral trade. Is that a fair generalization? Professor? Yeah, That's right. So some of my results confirms what I call justice. I already know that is that there were at least freeze major skin name. It's already then corresponding to modern day, no region, Spain's and sweets and they traveled roughly two different places. So much of the settlement in England with better was Danish. If you look at Iceland and Greenland that was the regions and also islands. Oh, and if you look at to the east to Russia and the Baltic countries that were people from from Sweden, and we confirmed that, although there were some exceptions, for example, we find people, things and history in Russia, and there was a bit of surprise because supposed from historical breakouts, most in people from from Swing. But what plants was, what's more surprising is that we find that in the late Viking H. We find that substantial amount off Dean A. That comes from sullen Europe that's coming in Scandinavia particular solvent. Scandinavia, Denmark, where I'm from That's not something that we really know well, well described from historical breakers, and we actually don't know quite why that is, And that could be different hypothesis. The Vikings were traveling a lot. Certainly got to Southern Europe. Perhaps the marriage people there, they pulled, maybe women back or perhaps with slaves..

Vikings Greenland Scandinavia Europe professor Iceland Baltic Professor Rasmus Nielsen Denmark Estonia John Bachelor Berkeley England Sweden John Baxter Copenhagen Nature magazine University of Copenhagen Southern Europe
"rasmus  " Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"rasmus " Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Very possible. Indeed, North Carolina you take a look there two poles that have trump up. The most recent poll has Biden up plus four with a margin of error of 4.1 on 1000 likely voters so Again. You could do I do it both ways. I try to maintain consistency. By the end of this week, there's gonna be a lot more pulling. This is the week. Certainly they're going to do it. We'll be able to see if we can grab anything from it. One thing that is true outside of Poland. Is that many? Many? Many people are breathing to me. Sighs of relief. That Trump is coming back. Trump had a good week. You in last week. What was a good week for Trump? Because the debate went so poorly for Joe Biden. Now does any of that matter when you already have over 50 million people that have voted Now the The answer, of course, is is yes. The answer, of course, is yes. There's still a lot you can do with it. There's also these two things. Right? You have From Rasmus in their White House watch. Their latest telephone online survey showing Trump over buying 48 47 among likely US voters. Utilize that as you will. Then there's Rasmus in from last week. National Daily Black likely voter job approval. On Monday of last week was a 25%. It ended Friday at 46%. I don't know what you do with that information, but it's certainly interesting. I wish I could tell you. Here's what it says in here is what it means. Sometimes you don't know what it means, until does Sometimes you just gotta be able to know what the numbers are and then work with it right now. I think everything is in striking range. But nothing gives you the affirmation that maybe you secretly desire.

Trump Joe Biden Rasmus North Carolina US Poland White House
"rasmus  " Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on Things Above

"Experience in that moment I was internalizing what I was actually feeling and thinking that what he was saying to me was that I was going to have to live with what I was feeling for the rest of my life. I came to realize that later what he meant was. That I was going to need to learn to live with what I experienced what I was learning about myself. What I was finding out about myself when I was finding out about God, putting away this child to narrative that I had made up as we all tend to do. That I had made up so that I could try to understand the world around me and the challenges that were faced in the community I lived in term I lived in and so that idea learning to live a really meant. Take all your good stuff out of this hail hole and use it so that you can live in a way. This life given for you the other part of it about. The disaster. And the diagnosis that we end up getting, and we descended to hail. It's because the reality is no one else can tell you how to get out of your dark hole. there are insights that can be given. There's certainly medications and other kinds of support but I. Think for me when I wrote that. I realized this will. The revelation came a bit later I realized. That literally. I was being given insight into myself. That nothing else could have prompted. Because, we don't want insight for myself. When things are going well, we don't get insight from who we really are. when when life is handing out certificates, bonus checks, trophies and awards. It's when we do. Make the descent into hail that we come to realize who we really are. What we really Mehta. Character really is like. And in that place. We can then begin to make some new choices about how we live in the world, and what kind of freedom? And that for me was perhaps one of the greatest gifts. Emerging from the deep depression realizing I had been given some freedom to make choices that before the crash a never. Intellectually subconsciously knew that I had choices. About how I was Gonna live my life, so yeah, that's. That's about for me. That is so good. Yeah, you're I mean you're right. It's the. You know when things are going well our successes. We don't often reflect, but it's. It's in the the struggle, the pain, the suffering trauma. Whatever when that emerges, then it's like okay. What's going on here? And so it sounds like it was for you and opportunity to go find out some things that I I'm guessing Juanita. You would now say you'd pay anything to learn what you learned. All my Gosh, yes, I remember thinking to myself that the depression I I was diagnosed with a major depressive episode, and my grandmother wouldn't have known anything about a DSM four and categories of mental illness. She would've said baby. My sweet baby. You've had a nervous breakdown.

Juanita major depressive episode
Disappearance of Jennifer Kesse

True Crime Garage

09:59 min | 2 years ago

Disappearance of Jennifer Kesse

"Picking up where we left off captain we are discussing some of the possible suspects or at the very least people that we think should be looked at in this case we we now need to take an in depth. Look at two men whom Jen worked with many people believe that one of these men not both is likely responsible for Jen's ends abduction. There is a lot in this case that points to Jennifer being abducted by somebody who knew her knew where she lived her routines whom she might have have trusted and possibly let her guard down with. Perhaps this person confronted her over her recent trip with her boyfriend and an argument ensued. Dude the story about the two co workers at Jen's workplace makes them suspects in the eyes of many followers of this case. The Orlando Police Least Department did not prioritize Jen's workplace in their investigation. Probably because she never made it into work that day the crime happened elsewhere. Swear we said that in the week after Jen's disappearance the Orlando Police Department conducted interviews with some colleagues of Jennifer's and took her computer. But really that's about it. The building she worked in had over three thousand employees Orlando. PD did not speak with every every or actually very many of them at all and there are two in particular who are Internet favorites for being her abductor. These men and were not interviewed in-depth until three years after Jennifer vanished drew. CASSIE has long told a story that may have helped spark public interest in a Co.. Oh worker of Jennifer's as a possible person of interest. He enjoys maintain that a manager in JEN's office. We're going to call. Oh Him John. He was her peer not her superior but he was very interested in Jennifer and repeatedly pestered her about going out with him. Jennifer did not date colleagues and this manager was married. Drew enjoys suggested Jennifer that she handle it by having lunch with the manager in the building's cafeteria and letting him know firmly that she did not date in the workplace drew says that as far as he knows. Jennifer did do this then after her abduction at a public event the Kassy's conducted publicizing Jennifer's case. This manager approached the Kassy's en- gave them a secret Santa Ornament Jennifer cap on her desk. Now if that were all there is is to it. Then the manager would likely get a side I from the public but he might not be a person of interest but there is much much more to this story. Oy In two thousand ten. Another Co worker of Jennifer's who is known in online forums as the pseudonym Adam Frank although although that is not his real name filed a harassment suit at cf I west gate resorts against the manager. Who We said had a crush rush on Jan rain? The manager was Adams Superior at work this lawsuit alleged that the manager was known to have a relationship with Jennifer Kesse and to have made comments deemed threatening since Jennifer went missing these included comments. That Jennifer was likely eaten up by alligators by now which he said to more than one person. It also alleged that the manager was late for work on the morning of the twenty fourth of January. Two thousand six the day that Jennifer went missing according to this complaint. The manager made disparaging comments about about Jennifer's boyfriend and he was obsessed with her Adam. Frank claimed that the manager and Jennifer had a confrontation about her trip. With Ron Ron on that Monday morning after Jennifer got back from Saint Croix within days of Adam. Filing this Rasmus suit. He was fired from West Gate. Now it is is not known whether the manager was actually late for work that day as alleged by Adam managers were not required to keep time cards but in the wake of of Adam suit and dismissal from the company a source told on concluded that it was Adam not the manager who was obsessed with Jennifer. He had sent her an email telling her she looked nice and he was creepy Stalker Ish by these accounts. It seemed that this Adam Adam Frank Guy may very well have made up the whole thing about the manager to cast suspicion on this manager on John Rather than himself right. The upshot is and we don't know but a private investigator who worked for the Kassy's views this manager as the the prime suspect and says that he has not been cleared by Orlando PD. Which one the manager? John John this this manager John was the boss us of this other employees. Who later filed the complaint Adam? Yeah thank you it is. It is difficult to follow because you really have one man saying. Look look at the manager. He said some weird stuff he might be guilty of this one. He's also saying that he also came in late that day and we have no evidence of Jennifer talking bad about this Adam before she went missing but we have evidence of her talking to her parents about this John Character. That is correct. The weird thing though is we have other sources that say that it was Adam who was late for work on the twenty-fourth and not the manager The private investigator also states. That Adam Frank again. A fake name passed a polygraph and she was able to corroborate his statements. Somehow the manager knew about Adams complimentary email to Jennifer indicating that he was monitoring her emails emails again. Another thing we just do not have answers to but it looks interesting. And I'm going to point this out here captain i. I firmly believe in reviewing this case that the individual or individuals responsible for her disappearance. They had some knowledge judge so it whether it be extensive knowledge about Jennifer Cassie or even just some general vague knowledge but they had some knowledge about this young young woman and her activities. One man that we have not yet addressed and now many feel could possibly be linked to what happened happen to Jennifer because of similarities between Jennifer's disappearance and one that he is believed to be responsible for this is two two thousand and nine a young woman named Tracy. A Cossio left a lar- in Metro. West neighborhood of Orlando with a man named James Hat. Away away the bar was called the taproom and Jennifer Cassie and her friends had been to this bar at least on one occasion which was in Jen's old neighborhood. Tracy Cossio was never seen again after this at that bar at the taproom with this man and her case is is still unsolved her. Chevy Cobalt Tracy's car was found in Cohee just blocks away from the home of the man. She left the bar with James Hat away away. Jennifer Kesse worked in Cohee hat away is now serving life in state prison in Florida convicted of an attack on another young woman. Rachel Rachel Clark whom he tried to strangle to death in her car after she gave him a ride. He was known to Brag about how he liked to strangle his victims and break their necks. Had Always ex-girlfriends told detectives. He had a morbid obsession and vampires cannibalism encierro murders. The Orlando Police Department has looked at James Halloway and Jennifer Kesse case but the fact it is there just is no real evidence to make a connection for one thing. Both Rachel and Tracy were voluntarily in hathaway's presence whereas it is very unlikely that this would ever have been the case Jennifer Cassie. It is theoretically possible that had away saw all Jennifer cassie somewhere and decided to attack her. That is possible but again it doesn't seem to be that there's any anything of evidentiary value to connect him to her missing persons case. Yeah doesn't seem like there's much of a link at all. I mean definitely similar cases but no link yet and it's it's interesting that one of his possible victims. It sounds to me has never been found as well. I think that is. There are several problems with Jennifer Kesse case. And when I say problems I mean. They're they're mysteries. These little mysteries that are inside the big mystery and one of them is not only. When did this abduction take place? And where. But also why is she never been found Bryant. There was not that big of a window a to get rid of her or conceal her and we went through a lot of the searches that were conducted. They had some hits and some leads along the way but she's never been found and that's another thing that is cadaver dogs hit on her car. Rei either right. And that's the that's the other thing that is still so troubling and hurtful to her family to this day

Jennifer Jennifer Kesse Adam Adam Frank Guy Jennifer Cassie Adam Frank Jennifer Vanished JEN Orlando Orlando Police Department Orlando Police Least Departmen Tracy Cossio Investigator Drew Cohee Rachel Rachel Clark Ron Ron West Gate CO
"rasmus  " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And I am the insight meditation society that's in Boston in April. You should go to it. And then he'll finally be on the podcasts as soon as we posted. Anyway, I Joseph doesn't take him seriously at all it'd be takes the Dharma seriously. He takes your practice. If you're one of his students very seriously. But when he talked. About himself. He's incredibly light. And that to me just seems like a really interesting data point, this just one man's opinion. There are on the question of lineage. There are many flavors of Buddhism as you listed some of them just in terra vodka, which is kind of old school. There's zen there's betton, and then even within those there lots of little nooks and crannies, so and and, you know, major schools within Tabet Buddhism with within Zan with Tara vodka. So I think these things are interesting. But personally, it's really been about the teacher. I for me, the one of the thing, I'll say, and and I think I've said this before but it bears repeating that people when they get excited about meditation often want to Hoover up everything. But I I would argue that when you're going to you know, when it comes to your practice in your teacher. I would pick one thing to start with. One school one teacher one practice or one set of related practices taught by in a particular tradition and really go for that for a couple of years rather than trying a million things all at once because it's really hard to know what's working when you do the ladder when you're just doing everything at once. And then what you have a grounding in one type one lineage per se or one teacher one style. Then I think doing a little taste testing from there. So I think it makes sense to do taste testing at the beginning to really get a sense of what your what resonates with you. And then to commit for awhile. And then then you might wanna pop your head up and look around do some comparative practicing. But again, that's just one guy's opinion. Really? Appreciate these guys keeping coming, and as I've said before we are now going to or soon start having teachers answer the questions, and I'm told that the first teacher who's going to be answering a bunch of. In the very near future. We've got a ringer for this one. Sharon, salzberg, one of the most important and well known eminent and lovable meditation teachers on planet earth. Thank you. For listening to the temperature percent, happier podcast. We love that. We have a growing and engage audience would back next Wednesday with another show. I'm going to say what I always say at the end of the show. But at please note, this miss this as a perfunctory thing if you go onto your wherever you get your podcasts where you go onto the player. And if you give a rating and review, especially I mean, I'm just I'm like somewhat bias toward five-star reviews. But you know, I'm not trying to put my thumb on the scale here. If you give us a rating or view that really helps us in the rankings. And so it makes it easier for people to find the show. So do doing that or telling people about us on social media, all of that is incredibly helpful and helps us. Can you to do what we do? And we love what we do. So please. If you've got a moment do that. I wanna thank before I go the producers of the show Ryan kesler and also Saint John's, and we will see again next week. If you have ideas for guests hit me up on Twitter. We really do look at that. At Dan, Harris. We'll see you. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes? Set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash Dan. H that's indeed dot com slash, Dan. H..

Joseph Dan Boston Tabet Buddhism Ryan kesler Twitter Tara vodka Sharon Zan Harris
"rasmus  " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Fast paced, busy business life. You over struggle implementing any of the aforementioned, I would be lying if I said mill Aisling ever struggle. Are never struggles. So it is. I mean, relive the lives of our clients. So we run or chlorine ization. So we have emails coming in all time zones. We have meetings and all the time. So as we managing around five hundred large clients, so we're living their live travelling most of both of two hundred and fifty two hundred days a year. So we know the reality that they are in. Do we always manage to do everything that we have course, we don't be ridiculous? What we are. I think both of us one hundred committed suicide eighty practice because without that it seems just thinks falling together falling apart how much meditation. Do you do? Everyday depends. How easy it is. If it's vocation, I think at least I go a little bit more lazy. I don't need it as much. But when it's when it's busy especially when travelling does and lease twenty twenty to forty minutes in the morning. Do you ever get really pissed off? Our our time imagining that. I would say. It's not in my culture dance. So, but I think that what I find is that I think what restaurants was saying about the practices. I find that. When I'm I can tell what the practice has given me is I can tell when I need to pull away. And I think that's probably one of the most valuable things that the practices. Given me is that if if I'm in a meeting, and I'm starting to notice how you know, I'm starting to feel a little bit of tension in my body or I'm starting to feel a little bit of frustration arising. I've practiced enough to know that I can see it before it takes takes over. And I can say, you know, what I'm so sorry, but I've got a call quits on this meeting. And and I mean, I really seriously like because I know that I'm whatever I might say next is not going to be my best self. And so for me, if if people don't balk it. Well, I think that people respect it. Because if I say, you know, what Dan I I really this is really important to me, and you're really important to me. And this conversation is really important to me. But I'm not in the right head space to have this conversation right now. And this applies to the toddler and maybe not so much. Sorry. Just have to throw the didn't. Because I thought that was cute. But this applies I think in the workplace, but also in all of our social interactions. I think that it's so important for us to be able to call it. And to say, I am not going to be my best self in this moment. So can I just go take a break to be able to make sure that I can clear my head, and I can come back and be able to be more calm more clear. More focus. So I'm not just reactive. I want to be responsive to every moment. And if I know I can't be I should do something about it. And take responsibility. Concern. I have we on the ten percent half. At we have a communications course. And the teachers Mazen guy orange so for who's been on this podcast at least once and one of the qualms I had in the production of that. And I would run I sort of peppered him in the videos a lot about this. And I would put the same question to you guys. Which is how do you implement this stuff, especially around communication without sounding a little program that sounding a little Ernest with this. You know, like this conversation's really important to me, you're really important too. I mean, I think it was ineffective thing to say if I was on the receiving end of that I would like it. But also, I wonder whether I think we'll K is is that sincere, or is that, you know, or is that is that, you know, she so earnest like, she can't drop an F bomb Carlsberg or whatever. So I do you think do you understand what I'm getting understand what you're getting?.

Ernest Dan fifty two hundred days forty minutes ten percent mill
"rasmus  " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"I mean, maybe that does help you get over that creative. Yeah. It probably doesn't it. Probably just sucks you in to destroy. Traction fast, which is wonderful for the mind because the mind loves, you know, tapping into novelty in something new, and so the, but it, but what could be, you know, more Beneficial's going for a walk getting some getting some space station, the performance break or maybe doing one minute of mindfulness practice just to be able to clear the clutter because that's what you really need a spacious mind to be the annoying person who espouses taking a walk, but or meditating in those moments, but the fact that matter is now that I have a marginally improved self awareness through meditation. I noticed that when I step outside all the baloney that I was worried about some significant percentage of it evaporates, and I'm seeing things more clearly in a different way with a different perspective. Or if I sit and meditate, I may I found this when I was reading my last book, and I was really miserable the whole time, and occasionally I would pull away and just meditate which. Felt counter intuitive. But often the problem that I was trying to solve I would get answers not necessarily interest. I was looking for and sometimes they were stupid. But but sometimes there was there was something really there. But it was certainly an a geyser of new ideas that we're not available to me when I was standing there intermittently pounding my head against the computer screen and checking social media, exactly exactly. Okay. This is a challenge. This ounce like an intervention for us, Dan. This is exciting. Can we help you? I'm prepared to ask because I'm going to use this as my own personal benefit. And if you don't wanna listen, no, usual, listen, what else sleep was the other thing, you mentioned in terms of helping people actually before we get sleep meetings. I think this is another area where I don't do a good job of bringing mindfulness to the table. Find that's me at my worst in meetings, especially for discussing a creative project that I'm trying to push forward. And I'm I noticed that I'm impatient with other people or if they're not fully understanding everything I have in my head. I can't believe how dumb they are. Of course. I haven't even explained it to them show. How does one bring the practice into meetings? The first thing is to be prepared for the meeting. What often happens many organizations that we have back to back meetings? Meaning we kind of few minutes late for after one meeting. So meeting runs over. I mean, we'll be too late for the next meeting. Meaning we are going to enter that meeting in fifteen I mean, it's just going to be focused on wrapping up. What happened in the previous meetings? We constantly behind from mental point of view. Yeah. Really practical thing is always many meetings five minutes before it's I'm like in your outlook, always schedule. So that you have at least five minutes of transition sign. The what'd you do in that transition time as you basically prepare yourself, mentally, so whether you're walking to another meeting room, or whether you just sitting on waiting for a conference, call or phone call rather than checking Graham or emails or Facebook, or whatever just take one min or even just thirty seconds to just sit there and just breathe. Just take a short polls whereby you mindset, little bit and your mind will be more clear for the next meeting a couple years ago. I started volunteering in a hospice and it. I was trained by a pair of zen Buddhist..

Dan Facebook Graham five minutes thirty seconds one minute one min
"rasmus  " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Find more calm, more peace and for more happiness with us. Ten percent, more or less doesn't matter. But people just become happier. You know, I have done some meditation. And I definitely agree. It's helped, but I still even just know last couple of days, Phil overwhelmed and confused, and like not sure what I should be focusing on or and like I have too many ideas and running them into two. Too many different directions. So it's not a panacea. No, definitely not says no silver bullet around mutation meditation helps if we do the practice if we don't it doesn't help knowing about it doesn't help reading about. It doesn't help. Doing the practice helps doesn't solve all problems. It solves some foundational Neville helps us to be more calm focused on centered. But we also need to work on how we live our lives, obviously. And that's what we have specialized in. How to Rehoboth people in the corporates to im- embeds the practice of mindfulness into they deal with emails how they conduct meetings how they set their priorities and how they get good sleep. And how they make sure to have better work life balance? So it's not just sitting for ten or twenty minutes a day. It's also about how you utilize those techniques of mastering the mind into everything you do actually think that that may be one of the areas where I have a shortcoming in my practices that I do the practice. But I'm not sure I really integrated into a lot of things, which is embarrassing. Admit it. So let's talk about something. How can you be mindful on your Email? I think the first thing is just be aware that different times in the day. It's not always best to Email. So one of the things that we know is that first thing in the morning, if you've had a good night's sleep is actually when hopefully you have the most creative most expensive mind. And if you download your Email, which too many people do first thing in the morning checking it on their phone. You're basically dumping a whole bunch of clutter in a mind that actually potentially has really good space to solve creative problems. So just simply looking at Wendy, check, your Email through the day would actually be just a simple way to be more mindful and less clutter fascinated okay? That for me as a news, man. I need to I feel maybe I'm wrong that that when I wake up in the morning, I need to find out what happened overnight, and he's of missiles from the boss, not that my bosses that many missiles, but whatever I seems to me like I feel this pressure to check in check. News. Make sure that no emergency has broken out in my any of my professional endeavors or anything like that. But you're saying, I mean, do do you think would be responsible for me to say, no, you know, maybe? Instead the first thing I should do is pick up. The pro big creative project. I'm working on and focus on that for a couple minutes. Yeah. I well. I think every job is different. Of course, you know, in news that may be appropriate that you need to check. But I mean, could you wait like maybe the first hour and not check it for the first hour to be able to do some other things. I mean, just from a mind perspective. This is about understanding our mind and making sure that we use it to the best of our ability. And honestly checking your emails first thing in the morning may be necessary. But it is creating clutter. It's cluttering that potentially spacious open mind, I've never spent a happy hour or two checking answering. Exactly good good awareness from checking emails ever, bringing fantastic ideas. Right. Oh, it's a complete rain creativity. Anna menu..

cluttering Rehoboth Neville Phil Wendy twenty minutes Ten percent
"rasmus  " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Meditation. A secret because joy consulting, the fast paced world of high-pressure consulting environment. The last thing that I was going to tell anybody was that I like to sit on a uncomfortable cushion for extended periods of time and count my breasts that was just never going to happen. And so it really took me a long time for me. I talked about it as coming out of the closet as a as a mindfulness practitioner because I just realized the incredible benefit when you look at organizations and how they managed change the idea of being able to integrate these practices into that environment is so powerful. But it's really, and I again, I really respect people like yourself, and and others who have helped all of us be able to bring these into daily work life and and for us. Our passion is bringing them into Dealey organizational life. When you say us, what are you referring to potential project? That's what we do. Tell us tell till what is the potential project razzmatazz. Centra pride global leadership organizational, change and research firm. So what we do is with training, basically leaders and please in large organizations like Google, Microsoft ends on in becoming more Kia minded focused on on calm. So basically mindless training for for the corporate world doing this for about twelve years now and Vince raining hundreds seventy thousand people now those pretty pretty extensive networks around two hundred and fifty trainers around the world and just doing this work. Yeah. And our mission is very simply to co create a more peaceful more kind world by helping people who have more call more focused and more more more kind minds. Basically, how does it? How does sitting on a cushion or a chair or whatever have any impact at all on the way corporation works? Oh, it has everything to say about that. So what we see? Today's is people are completely living. What we call a page reality. They're under pressure. They're always on information overloid distracted. And as a result of that. Basically losing our pets engine. We just see from a resource perspective that our ability to be focused is really declining. And that means people running around like headless chicken and not really doing. What is most important, but just doing everything that calls for that section and mindfulness is opposite of that is the ability of managing our attentions of VDB focused on what is most important right now. And that helps obviously on performance and productivity, which is what the company wants. But also helps like you experience from your own life. It helps us set less and.

VDB Dealey Centra Vince Google Microsoft twelve years
"rasmus  " Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on WGN Radio

"We are lady. When we started out in Nashville, we never imagined what we going to be able to achieve. We got here because we work together and had each other's backs. In America, we have the privilege of being a diverse society made up of people from all kinds of backgrounds, and that's a big part of what makes this country such a great place to live out, our differences and work together. There is no challenge too. Great overcome. This message is brought to you by the US air force. Sex over Rasmi and discrimination are never okay. And you don't have to tolerate them break the silence speak out, if you experienced harassment take a moment to document what happened is the four ws. Did it what happened where it happened? And when it took place if you have additional questions about your rights com. Illinois sexual harassment and discrimination helpline at one eight seven seven two three six seven seven zero three. Checking WGN sports this morning. We say Hello to Joe brand. Plenty of sports this afternoon on the airwaves. We're live from SOX fest at the Hilton Chicago will be here all the way leading up to northwestern basketball as David and Joey Meyer have the pre game at one o'clock tip off in the Kohl center at one fifteen right here on seven twenty WGN and wgnradiOcom other college basketball today, Illinois and Maryland are playing in New York, you I see is that Oakland Notre Dame hosts Virginia Marquette is at Xavier Bradley travels to Missouri state. The Chicago Cubs have signed Japanese right-hander, Junichi Tazawa and also Illinois native, George kontos to minor league deals, Joe brand WGN sports. Thank you. Joe? Checking WGN traffic, the icy conditions and winter weather have.

WGN Joe brand harassment Illinois basketball Nashville Rasmi US Chicago Cubs Junichi Tazawa America SOX Chicago Joey Meyer George kontos Kohl center Oakland Missouri Virginia Marquette
The biggest tech conference has some of the same old problems with women

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:36 min | 3 years ago

The biggest tech conference has some of the same old problems with women

"The. The biggest conference in the world has some of the same old problems with women from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Today is the last day of the huge Las Vegas tech conference CAS, and it's ending on a mixed note when it comes to gender diversity in the tech industry on the one hand, the consumer Technology Association, which puts on CAS announce a ten million dollar fund at the show to support women and minority tech bound IRS on the other hand the gave an innovation award to a company that makes a robotic vibrator for women, but then before the show even started took the award away and banned the company from the conference, but sex TEK like augmented reality porn did show up on the floor. NCIS still has no explicit ban on what are commonly called booth babes models in skimpy clothes hired to draw attention to company at the event. Let's dig into this in quality assurance the segment where we take a deeper look at a big tech story. Heather Kelly is tech reporter at CNN who was also at the ES. She said progress is just slow like last year. They had a ton of criticism for the all male. Lineup and they did something they went, and they got some like big amazing women to be speakers. And they've tried to cut down on booth. Babes before the rules are a little fuzzy. And I feel like there's been a decline, but yeah, the sex toy issue. It was just them digging themselves deeper and deeper, and they didn't just take back this award. They gave them they also wouldn't let them exhibit at the show anymore. And it created a much bigger problem than just quietly letting be out there might have done. What responsibility. Do you think big conferences like this have to set the tone? I mean, they have a huge responsibility. And it's not just to say, hey, we have rules for the kind of exhibit. You're gonna have and whether or not booth babes, but also codes of conduct for the people there to help women in case, you know, there's Rasmus how do the report it and a believe does have a code of conduct. Now, they didn't always. But you know, I don't know how much any of these things are enforced. I will say one thing about the booth babes. I not. This year. There were also a lot of booth broS. They're like, I don't know if people are being ironic, or what that they had, you know, like young men dressed up in outfits. A lot of them were at the fitness startups. But there's an event called com, which is football teams, and they always have these cheerleaders and this year they had guys in football outfits handing out footballs. I wouldn't really call that a move in the right direction. But is an interesting shift for sure, but yeah, I think I think. Itself. Still have a lot to do to to come in and help women feel more safe and accepted at the conference. How important is this? If you're gonna show case for female CEOs in tech companies how important is it for a conference like this to say future female CEOs? We want you to feel comfortable everywhere you go at our meant. I mean, and it's also like we wanna help you become CEO's so much networking goes down at CS people go there, and they get jobs, and if women don't even feel comfortable early parts of their career, these places it's gonna make it difficult to move up and be the next CEO of IBM. It's huge. It's the largest technology show in the world. It's one hundred eighty thousand. I believe attendees, they have a big responsibility to a pretty big and growing industry. Heather Kelly is tech reporter at CNN. We asked to see TA for comment. It's linked to its code of conduct which says it prohibits overtly sexual tire and the said, the sex toy just didn't fit into any of its existing tech categories. And now for some related links. I you could find a link to that's ES code of conduct on our website along with a blog post by me about my experience on the show floor this year, the code of conduct only says that it prohibits quote overtly sexual tire, but it has no further details for comparison. You'll also find a link to a story from twenty fifteen about when RSA which puts on the world's biggest security conference became the first big tech conference to ban booth babes from its event, it explicitly outlines the kind of clothes and behavior it's talking about. And I think you will see the difference immediately. I also included a linked to a maximum article on the hottest booth babes of CAS 2017, where the magazine notes that trade show models may be controversial, but they haven't gone away. And maxim says it's glad about that. And look I know that sex is part of the tech industry, and I am all for sex pavilion at ES. Where all the tack is welcome. But I can tell you that. I personally don't wanna show up at a global celebration of technology and feel like it's simply not for me. I don't wanna see men in the north hall at a booth showing off a giant party yacht. Jostling to try to get their picture taken with two women in skin tight ballgowns that barely cover anything who frankly, look miserable. And here another woman next to me, say those poor girls and then walk away in disgust. And then realize there are hardly any other women around us and think I just wanna go home. Now, that's not what an industry. That's welcome to everyone looks like this was my eighteenth CS, and I feel like it should be better by now. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is.

Tech Reporter Heather Kelly CNN CEO Football Molly Las Vegas Consumer Technology Associatio IRS Rasmus ALI TA IBM North Hall Maxim Ten Million Dollar One Hand
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"How many of us are paralyzed by the intelligence of our knowledge. Another question about being sceptical about success. Are there specific questions that you explore with your team to generate that? To generate skeptics like we talked about the discipline to ask these objective questions. Can you provide any specificity on questions that have been helpful for you? Yeah. Some of some of the ones I mentioned earlier like, for example, if if if I was my own worse skeptic what what questions would I ask myself if I was. If we were if we had to go to our most. Skeptic customer. What would they say about our product? If you know, we were our competitor. And soak the knowledge we have about ourselves and put it into the perspective of competitor. How would we beat ourselves think there is a lot of those questions you can do to back conversations about so basically to put spotlight on your own blind spots, so act like your your competitor? Yeah. Around that. But also have one question. I always find interesting is if you were leading your industry, what would you do if you were number two? I mean, it's a paradox. And in sports, we often talk about you. If you're number one, you have to act think as if you were number two because number one has all the answers, right? And number two as the questions, and if you wanna move what it's better to have the questions than the end. So I really liked in jail s talk you alluded to even reframing your view. So once you're number one, you talked about coca Coca-Cola, for example, once here number one as a soft drink while we have a much smaller market share in everything that we ingest that is liquid right? So now, let's look at that perspective, just broadening your perspective that way and putting yourself in the context of less of a winner. Then you are basically you want you wanna find benchmark up. You wanna pick up and smock not? That will make you look good. But one that will inspire you to get better. Yeah. And and and that is why I think what what Coca Cola. What legal that by asking that question with industry are we actually end because when you successful you don't have burning platform to drive urgency and improvement. So you need to create you know, you can say burning Shunichi, listen guys. This is what we can become if we do this. And that and I think that is what good leaders do they change they create that perception about how far we can actually go Raza's. Thanks so much for joining us on this edition of the podcast. You have not only inspired us to create environments of high performance where we are never satisfied with our level of success. You may have even given us the secret ingredient for my beloved Toronto Maple Leafs to one day hoist the Stanley, thanks for joining us on this edition of the podcast. We hope today's conversation has challenged. You continue growing as a leader for more content on how to be a successful leader Goto global leadership dot org and search success. Thanks so much for joining us today. And until next time get better.

Toronto Maple Leafs coca Coca-Cola Goto Raza Stanley one day
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"When we recruited players we we couldn't afford to have fifteen scouts traveling around the world watching games. Afford a couple of data guys who could actually collected data from from from all over the all players all over the world. We also said wacky. We get that information from we can probably go to fan for on the internet because typical scout would say all the fans don't know as much as me because I've got so much experienced whether way we looked at it was okay. If there are fifty thousand fans, and they what's one player each fifty times, that's a lot of data points. And if there is a pattern in what they say, that's probably that's public. Correct. So there was just a way of trying to collect information that other clubs paid a lot of money for in a more creative ways. So we try to which we tried many things like that to try and and find ways to out think the competition, not just outspending them think about the humility that that would take. To actually listen to the inmate. I can be a raging fan. But to actually reach out and listen that actively to the trends of what people are are saying because maybe there's some truth in those trends, bent. Question about leading and lagging indicators here. Do you have tools or platforms that you can use to get these metrics? I think I mean, the it depends on the organization, I think it's I gave example this morning with saying that a lead in football. Leading indicators lagging indicate is the league table leading indicator is shut differential goal difference. Or we call it the expected goals, but any organization needs to look at what are what are the specific leading indicators for us. And I think is different from organizations to organize Asians. But there's a ton of material online about leading indicators visions lagging indicators example, stuffing, it's possible to go and look up. Yeah. Okay. Question here about your learning when you're in Jamaica, one of them was to focus on performance and not comfort. Any other key learnings that you observed in your travels? Yeah. One one thing I was one. Those also me was a lot of depicts coaches. I'm it did not have a background as Tabatha lease themselves. So Stephen Francis. Jamaica was that station. The KOMO Connell. The most successful coats of long distance runners in the history with an Irish skew graphic teacher the came to. Easson in ninety seventy six to teach geography at a boarding school. And then became a running coach the best coach of South Korean. Golfers is a guy called one pack who was an environmental activist actually fighting against these step of golf courses until you feel in love with the game became a golf coach. So a lot of these guys came from the outside. And it's I think is interesting from an innovation perspective who do you give problems to in organizations? Sometimes we give them to the expert. But is that actor what we think is? But is that really the expert sometimes problem solving can be fictive you give that to someone the best. The most problem the most effective problem solvers are often I find people who work in the margins of the field. So you don't give him chemistry problems or chemist? You give a chemistry problem to molecular biologist, you know, he understands enough to understand the problem. But he don't know so much that knowledge becomes an intellectual handicap frame. So I think so I think having that outside of you. Is important for innovation and a lot of these these things I observed in the gold mines. It kind of came from people who didn't have the same mindset and have the same sumptuous as people who been doing only that for the whole life, massive massively convicting or sitting there..

Jamaica KOMO Connell golf Tabatha Stephen Francis football
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"Bold running around with someone who ran twinning together with someone who rent twelve seconds on two hundred meter, and I was saying that coached the why you have an elite environment in my view would be like the best with the best. But he said something really interesting. He said no one would be able to train as hot as we do if they did it on their own. So a good social environment makes hard work easier. And I think I find really interesting in even the most elites environment in the world. You know, they were really aware of having those relationships, and and and having a great social environment because that actually had a constructive effect them on performance. I hope that those of us who are in leadership positions running organizations are taking notes on this to try to figure out what those social environments and kind of collective climates are that we can create to nurture a greater degree of high performance in iron virus as well. Rasps? How do you increase buy in among data cynical stakeholders, gambler friend, you're getting the data you've got the leading indicators lagging indicators you're making decisions, but someone's not buying into the analytics in football. We have that friction between scouts who goes out and and watch games. And and then they come back doodo reports the subjects reports. Then you have the data guys as they don't speak well together. Sometimes I think there are strengths of both ways. But the key is to have someone. Maybe sometimes except that you're not going to get them to buy into each other's worlds. But trying to have someone facilitating the process in the middle of collecting information. So you take things from the subjects of world, and you take things from the object of world and you make decisions on that basis. So I think. I think it's tricky sometimes to get people to buy found. Sometimes you not maybe you gotta accept you cannot get these people's who buy into it. But you've got to manage the process better. And and having someone who can balance of us, and this really is the genius of this. I hope that you're not hearing that a data driven approach turns leadership into math, right? You can see his body language, and he's wiggling around trying trying to describe the delicacy of incorporating both of these worlds because you do believe that there's an intuitive side a subjective side to leadership as well. Yeah. Yeah. No, definitely. I mean. The whole relationship side is is is very important and. I think I mean we have in football. We, you You know. know, the data guys always felt there was era Gance on the coaching side in terms of they know best, and we cannot use data. But I also felt that was actually a lot of arrogance on the other side of the table with the data guy. Sometimes don't not understanding, you know, because what I learned from running these two football clubs is that strategies one thing, but in implementation is a very different thing. And implementation you can have the best strategy world. But implementation is about relationships and getting people to buy into it and executed, and that's not beta that's people ski leads to this next question. These football clubs you start to use some gambling level analytics towards them. But the question is how did you and your partner transform your team? Because it wasn't just through spreadsheets. What was that? How does how did you and your partner transform these teams? What the process of transforming them into winners and champions require it required. More than spreadsheets. I'm sure yeah. I mean. You gotta find your strategy, and we took like a really close strategic look at our positioning. And what will we realize very quickly that we couldn't win by spending more money than everyone else? So we had to find a way of being more creative finding competitive edges that didn't cost a lot of money. So so one thing we we did was..

football partner Gance ski two hundred meter twelve seconds
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"India kademi, we fought would be the best five years in the future that we collected all the piece of paper, and we put them into an envelope. And then five years later, we've reviewed the papers. How many think had someone among their fire? Not a single one. And we were not amateurs, I mean, we were highly skilled highly educated coaches, we all the finest coach significant you can have. And none of us had silent that guy the guy that was number one on my list. He doesn't play football. So that he runs the pizza place in this. The pizzas are not even that good. So. May be Finkel out. Like like, what is telling how do you identify talent? How do you grow challen questions that all business does asking themselves? And then I became familiar with these places that seems to just again and again produce disproportionate amount of top talents. And I fought I don't I'm not going to do this in a feel ready disc research, I'm going to go there. Trion embrace myself in those environments, and that's what I did. So and in that experience, what would be the one thing that you learned that differentiates, you know, good even great garden variety performers from the truly differentiated high performer is the environment. I mean massive on these environments is role models. I mean, I I came out. I remember I I ride to eat San which is a small town in Kenya. That produced the mirrors. The American runs into will. I mean, I think it was a couple of years ago that seven something like seventeen American men in history had run on the two hours and twenty minutes on the merits and forty two runners from this town ran on the two thousand twenty two. On American last October is like the biggest concentration elite athletes ever and win. The first thing I did when I ride was to go for a jock in the morning, Ferdie minutes, Ferdie minutes or so free will champs. If you run ten stri didn't. But if you run ten strides behind the guy that wonder world championship last year. There's a good chance you think I can probably do that to one day if he can do it. Why can I'm that is the most important thing. In those environments is having close role models not distant but close I see that with this ice hockey club in in then mug, as well produced all these in its helpless. They were so close, you know, with the first team, and and what happens often in these environments, then they want to build new facilities better facilities. And then we put the first team over here, and and all the youngest over here. And then you lose that connection. So having role. Models close because the most important thing in Intel development. I think is to get people that idea that if he can do it. I can do it too. It's amazing. I run a little kind of a developmental club for kid distance runners, and the oldest of which is my oldest son, and he's been becoming quite competitive and last year through a conversation that we had actually relinquished him as part of our club to be part of another club to participate in a training group to have that environmental effect of role models and encouragements around him. And he said, well, you know, what if what if we're not doing the same workouts that we used to do and just as a gut reaction, I said, the less perfect workout with better people will be way better for you than the perfect workout alone. Yeah. That you're talking about. I know exactly. I mean that was in the in in when I was at Kingston Jamaica to study MVP track and field club one thing that really surprised me was I saw use..

Finkel India Kingston Jamaica San Trion Intel Kenya hockey football MVP five years twenty minutes two hours one day
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"Leading reveal excuse me dot clouds on the horizon. So so. Whatever industry you're in. I think company needs to identify what I leading indicators for us, and what are lagging indicators and being really shop on the leading indicators. I think because that is what what what makes you able to what then defied the need for chains before it becomes obvious. If I if I give a simple example, I read the book about. How it's shielded wrote about Starbucks, and it was a good example of this in the book, so Starbucks is the adults of success, but they just on the on the key figures. It looked like a really healthy company. But some are leading indicators said that they were actually the guys that normally came into Starbucks twice a day. Only started coming in one today, you know, it was it was a leading indicator. So that catch us up with you. And that's why a lot of successful companies hesitate to chains because they don't pay enough attention to those leading indicators and this just so our here's aren't missing this. This is the this is that discipline and the objectivity of distrusting success. I hope that we're not confusing that with just not being content with success or happy about success or hyper critical or perfectionist dick or you can get someone who's just grouchy and. Well, of course, I never trust success. This isn't about not celebrating acknowledging success. It's about having objectivity to understand the authentic accurate. Why for the success annoying as a human being because we have cognitive bias? We have tendency to assume naturally that good results are the outcome of good decisions the necessarily. So how are we going to deal with this? We need to think questions as great way of doing it. And whoa. Trying to force yourself to look at yourself from the outside in like. So if if I asked the most critical skeptic of our business about what they thought perspective. What would they say? Like, if we were our competitor. And with the knowledge we have we had to be occupants and beat ourselves. What would we do, you know, those kind of questions, you know? If I was fired tomorrow someone else got my job. What would they do because value opportunity on a blank sheet of paper? No emotional. She has and what worked in the past. So you can you can ask a lot of incipient questions to force yourself to look at you self from the outside and be skeptical. But it doesn't mean you shouldn't celebrate success. But it's just it's just you got you got you got to ask those tough questions and not just when you're failing. But also when you're success. And I think that's the practical takeaway for all of us in whatever season. We're in organizations is to have the discipline to take the time personally. And especially in groups to ask a certain number of tough questions to to get that object tippety for sure. Let's shift gears to the focus of your second book, the gold mine effect, which was all about human performance. Just give us a bit of a background on what kind of triggered that curiosity for you. Yeah. It was I was I was a football coach I started being a football player. And then I got injured I had to take trust in the fact that the bis coaches than frustrated explains with unreleased vicious, so I became a coach and I helped build the first football academy in Inskip navy, which was the club. I'm off today Mitchell, and there was one particular story that it inspired me to do the Goldman effect. And we were recruiting the first the first year we recruiting sixteen players to the academy. The last player we recruited were says was a fifteen year old boy called Simon. So we basically only took him because we couldn't get anyone better. And he's father worked as a Kidman at the academy. And. I really wanted to keep him. So we recruited his son. So, you know, for years later, we end we actually end up selling Simon fall. It was six million six million US dollars twenty talion club. And he was named as the football player of the yen. Then Marcus youngest today. He's the captain of the national team. And when he was fifteen all the coaches in the academy, including myself, we did an exercise so each of us wrote down piece of paper the names of the fireplace..

Starbucks football Simon Kidman US Mitchell talion club Marcus Inskip navy Goldman fifteen year
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"Can you just give us a little more on that story? Do you become friends with gamblers? Do you? But he's he's really interesting. So he's become a good friend of mine. He's my boss. But we've you know, we have a we have a great relationship. And he's he's almost cystic. You know? So the thing in the world, he would hate the most would be to sit here now because he doesn't like a room for the people, you know, but he's very intelligent. And I learned a lot from him in terms of. How to make decisions not just an intuition and got filled but on on on data and objective evidence. And I think this is this is something that's. It's not just about football. Because I think in football. We have a problem that many other industries have as well, it's I tend to call is the disconnect between the IQ guys and the issue guys and the IQ guys are the courts statisticians they can cross the data very bright guys. The guys coaches in football been in the game for so long. They make decisions on gut feeling intuition. But they don't communicate. Well, so the IQ guys the end up answering a lot of questions, but the problem is no one has asked those questions, and this is this is the is way a finger one thing I learned a lot of a med is when you work with data is not about you gotta start with the questions. What is the questions you want to answer? And if you knew the answer this question, you will be able to do something different. That's where it starts is all about finding the signal in the noise. And there is a lot of. Noise out there. So how'd you find a signal, and I think it's about using into right away starting with the question and through your experience with f c Mitchell than. Other environments business in whatever you've discovered a few key lessons here.

football Mitchell
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"Of them. I think it's important that an organization pays equally attention to secondhand minute hand, and one of the problems we have in football is that from an organizational structure point of view. For example, a lot of English clubs is structured in a way where you have a manager is the kind of a hit coachie sits in the middle. He is responsible for both selecting the team but for Saturday scheme, but also for long term development of the club. The problem is the average lifespan of managing football is sixteen months. If you have your job, sixteen months, you know, how are you going to think ahead you're going to on the next set of that's it? But you cannot run an organization like so they end up living in the second. That's I've of organization. On my job. I think for example, as gemin- is to make sure that I'm going to take care of of the hour, hand and the minute hand as well. So think there are different perspectives and different leadership roles in an organization, but it's all about finding finding that balance between short-term long-term. I absolutely love that metaphor it actually brings a lot of clarity to me. And I hope to a number of our listeners almost makes you wonder which of those hands you are in your organization because when I look at a sports team, I see a whole lot of different people in different roles leading. I think they're all contributing something to leadership, but what's what's the difference? That's a great. That's a great image. They're just a follow up. Are there? Features of those different hands minute. Our seconds, whatever that are different kinds of leadership attributes that are most appropriate to those roles. I think there are many ways of being a good leader. I don't think there is one where you gotta be like this. I think the most important thing leadership is that you are authentic. You. It's like, you are yourself and people can feel if you are yourself if you were trying to be someone else, I think it might have been the big role of a leader is to create the environment where ideas, but also people can grow. So big project you'll like this because you are you're live in Toronto, right and you ice hockey fan. So I'm doing a TV documentary at the moment about actually where I'm from. And then there is a small really small town fifty fifty thousand people, but if if you look at NHL players produce per capita, this is by far the most effective. If town in the world, so even tease me so there. More. There are more ice hockey referees in Sorrento than there is okay players in Denmark. And then this little town that produce five minutes built Lewis in the in a pasta Cineas, one of them is the goalie of Toronto Maple Leafs, by the way. Oh, so I went as the last week. I went to to Kingston because I wanted to meet a professor there who stunned some really interesting research in this. He's name is shank would say, and he's done something called the birthplace effects. So he's basically realized that if you look at towns between fifty thousand and one hundred thousand people in off America only been less than than one percent of the population live in towns of that size. But sounds of that size producing eighteen percent of all NHL and NBA playoffs. And I think is really interesting because when we talk about high performance, we talk about. Is it about how work is it about is about genetics. This kind of to extremes where this is actually indicating that there's more to the story. There is an environment that has to be right and towns of a certain size seemed to facilitate an environment what selling king role more effectively than other places. So we need to rather looking at individual characteristic of leaders. I think we gotta look more at the environment. That is created. What are those components that you got to put in place for whatever you want to happen actually to happen in that environment? Phenomenal phenomenal. So you're saying that you have the secret to make, Freddie Anderson. Our Stanley Cup winning goaltender telling me here. How much would that be worth know? You know, you have no idea. Hey, just tell us a little bit. You alluded to in your in your jail s talk about the history of approaching sports from this friend of yours who was a gambler..

shank NHL football Freddie Anderson Toronto Maple Leafs gemin Toronto hockey Sorrento Denmark Kingston Lewis professor America NBA sixteen months eighteen percent five minutes
"rasmus  " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"rasmus " Discussed on The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

"All right. Well, welcome to a very special edition of the podcast Geoff here with you. Again. I say very special though because first things first we have a live audience for this podcast. So welcome here. Everybody who's listening live and making your presence known. The other reason I feel like it is very special is because I get to have a conversation with someone who I am totally fascinated by faculty member Rasmi anchor sin. So welcome here. Hey, just for a bit of background. I don't want you to get into your whole, childhood and all that. But when growing up would you have said that you I realized that you were leader. Good question. I mean, I think one one. Milestone in in my life was I was growing up. I fought it was going to be a professional footballer. I got injured, you know, it was tough tough tough period. When you had your mindset on on doing one thing and. One dog closed lots of other doors opened, and I think that was kind of a moment for me to try and try and redefine what my life was going to be about because it was not going to be about a football football player. So I think that was tipping point. And. And probably way I started taking ticking clear stand on how I wanted to use my life, and as you reflect on your own discovery that you were a leader. Are there traits that you now look to that enable you to pick out leaders from a crowd or in a group more immediately automatically? Well, I think for me. You know, I spent a lot of time on trying to recruit talent, whether there'd be leaders or specialist, or you know, and I I think key characteristic for me is always to people own their own ambition. You know, who's not someone else? It belongs to is a damn Bishen. And I think you can you can feel that when you speak to people, and I think that's that's a key characteristic of of a leader as well. Yeah. I've heard that what separates leaders from kind of the rest of us is a bit of a disproportionate drive. And you would say that that hunger. Passion. Yeah. You gotta you know, if you want to inspire others, you you got to be inspired yourself. I think that's great. Hey here at the we learned from all kinds of different environments. What fascinates me about the opportunity to talk to you Rasmi is that we get to learn a little bit from the sports world. And we don't often do that around here today. Really were learning from the football pitch notice. I said pitch I'm trying to work with it here. The live audience is American mostly. So we don't understand house not full two to four quarters. Exactly. And and you can actually have a drawl. No shootout. Always draw I'm an ice hockey fan. So I'm way out there. Hey in your experience. What does sports unlike business or education, or whatever what what does sports uniquely teach us about leadership? Sport is simple easy to understand enough ink in a match whether that be American football soccer baseball is. Okay. You have a lot of the challenges you meet in life in like compromised into very short..

football Rasmi Geoff first things first faculty member hockey four quarters