23 Burst results for "Raquel Maria"

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 5 d ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Many service manager's report challenges getting the supplies they need to keep pace with growing demand and more than half so they're having to pay higher prices. As result, inflation watchdogs will be on the lookout to see if those price hikes are passed on to consumers. Federal Reserve expects an uptick in inflation this year, but adds it's likely to be temporary. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington U S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is calling for the adoption of a minimum global corporate income tax bill in putting forth the idea in an apparent effort to offset any potential disadvantages from a move by the bite administration to increase the corporate income tax rate in the U. S. Stocks closed higher. Today. The Dow gained 373 points. The NASDAQ was up 225 points today. This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. Former Oakland State Senator Don Perata is launching a campaign to stop the potential recall of Governor Gavin Newsom. Before it even gets to the ballot. KQED politics Reporter Guy Mars already has more if election officials determined that the campaign to recall Newsome has gathered enough signatures to force an election. Signature withdrawal period comes next. Perata is hoping to use that 30 day window likely in May or June to convince voters to remove their names from the recall petition. Challenge, he says, is finding the voters who signed the petition because their names are not public record, and there will be a variety of different hunches and some data. Some science. Ah, lot of probably prayers and late night hours that we can mail to a couple million people and ask them. Did you really know what you're doing if the number of valid recall signatures drops below roughly 1.5 million Election would be called off. I'm guy Mars Roddy KQED news. Santa Clara County's Board of Supervisors will consider a proposal to waive certain fees for small businesses hit hardest by the pandemic. If passed, the measure would waive fees for weighing and measuring devices and scanners for about 1000 small businesses. Here's Santa Clara County supervisor sent each other's these small businesses are really the life, blood of any community. And so anything that we can do to help we should be doing not just government, but All of us is part of our communities. This would cost the county's general fund about $500,000. I'm Michael Maria Dylan KQED News. Have a good evening. Support for NPR comes from the Wallace Foundation, working to develop and share practices that can improve learning and enrichment for young people and the vitality of the arts for everyone. Ideas and information at Wallace foundation dot or g'kar. I am.

Scott Horsley Wallace Foundation 373 points 30 day Raquel Maria Dylan June May Newsome Perata Today 225 points Guy Mars Michael Maria Dylan 1.5 million Governor Federal Reserve today Janet Yellen Wallace NPR
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 months ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Street. Today, you're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. San Francisco officials. UCSF. The Latino Task Force and others marked the opening of a new neighborhood vaccination site today in the city's mission District. Pop up is part of a strategy to place vaccination sites and community's disproportionately affected by covert 19. Here's supervisor Hillary Ronin, sharing how she felt seeing to community leaders get their shots. So watching them get the vaccine. And knowing. That they are now gonna survive this pandemic when we have lost so many lives. It's one of the most beautiful and hopeful things I've seen in a long time. For now. The mission site is by appointment and on Lee for people in the first phase, which includes those over 65 health care workers. Growing number of Bay Area lawmakers in Congress are calling for the expulsion of Georgia representative Marjorie Taylor Greene Quds, Marco Siler Gonzalez reports. These calls come after videos have researched this showing representative green espousing baseless que non conspiracies and harassing a young survivor of a Maskell shooting, among other extreme and bizarre views. Some members, including representative and A S. You have co sponsored a resolution to effectively remove green from Congress. It would require a two thirds vote in the House, which is unlikely with the Democrats razor thin majority. In a statement, Green said that she's been made into a target by Democrats for defending what she calls American first values. Marco Siler Gonzalez KQED News and in Oakland. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan KQED. Support for KQED comes from the Netflix documentary Crypt Camp about a summer camp.

Raquel Maria Dylan KQED KQED News Marco Siler Gonzalez Raquel Maria Dylan representative Green Congress Hillary Ronin Latino Task Force NPR UCSF San Francisco Crypt Camp Marjorie Taylor Greene Quds Maskell mission District supervisor Bay Area Lee Oakland
What do we know about the fast-spreading COVID-19 variant in California?

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 2 months ago

What do we know about the fast-spreading COVID-19 variant in California?

"Public health officials here in California say they've identified a variant of the coronavirus that appears to be spreading faster across the state. From member station KQED in San Francisco, Raquel Maria Dillon reports. As California approaches three million cases of Corona virus, researchers say they have identified a new strain different than a highly contagious variant, first identified in the UK And this one is not really knew. It was first detected in California this past May. But since early last month, researchers say its prevalence has grown in California, from 4% to 25% of the samples submitted to labs for genomic sequencing. Santa Clara County Public health officer, Dr Sarah Cody. We have had a number of large outbreaks in this variant has been identified in those outbreaks. Scientists are trying to figure out if this train now found in several counties is more contagious and how it responds to vaccines.

Raquel Maria Dillon California Kqed San Francisco Dr Sarah Cody Santa Clara County UK
California Flooded With COVID Cases as Los Angeles County Sees Cases Double in Last Month

Reveal

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

California Flooded With COVID Cases as Los Angeles County Sees Cases Double in Last Month

"An influx of covert 19 patients in California is stretching hospitals and healthcare workers to their limits. Rachel Raquel Maria Dylan of member station KQED reports, officials say it could be an early sign of a post Christmas surge. The rate of coronavirus tests coming back positive over the past seven days in California has jumped to 14%. L. A County public health officials say the number of cases there doubled in the past month and past 800,000 on Saturday. Hospitals across the state are bracing for a spike in new cases following the holidays. Intensive care unit availability was at 0% in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley this weekend in the San Francisco Bay area. ICU capacity fell to 5.1%. That means all but the northern stretches of the state are below the 15% threshold. It would allow a gradual

Rachel Raquel Maria Dylan Kqed California San Joaquin Valley Southern California San Francisco Bay
$73M To Go Toward Compensating Patients Of Former UCLA Gynecologist Accused Of Sexual Misconduct in Los Angeles

Fresh Air

02:16 min | 5 months ago

$73M To Go Toward Compensating Patients Of Former UCLA Gynecologist Accused Of Sexual Misconduct in Los Angeles

"The coronavirus. All the major stock indexes were up. Especially the Dow, which finished 1.6% higher. The Dow is now within striking distance of hitting 30,000 for the first time. Stocks that have been hurt by the pandemic, such as airlines and energy companies were higher. Investors were also responding to comments over the weekend from advisers to President elect Joe Biden, who said no nationwide lockdowns are being contemplated. Jim's a roly NPR news Yes and P Rose 41 points today. You're listening to NPR live from KQED News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. This is where we are Now. This is me sounding the alarm that San Francisco Mayor London Breed announcing that the city has jumped from the least restrictive yellow tier of the state's coronavirus related reopening plan. Over orange and back to the red tear, and that's effective tomorrow. This means non essential offices must close down again. Jim's can on Lee stay open a 10% capacity. Among other restrictions. San Francisco Public health director Dr Grant Colfax, the rate of increase that were seen in California. This faster and steeper than the summer surge. And here in San Francisco, we're seeing an explosion of new cases throughout the city, with the virus becoming more widespread. Colfax says the city's hospitals and intensive care units are able to care for everyone now. But he warned that may not be true if cases continue to rise. The University of California system has reached a proposed $73 million settlement with seven women who accused a former gynecologist of sexual abuse as part of the class action lawsuit more than 6000 patients of Dr James Heaps. Could receive part of the settlement. Ah federal judge must approve the proposed settlement, which was filed today in federal court. Patients have accused heaps of sexual assault and sexual misconduct between 1983 and 2018. He has pleaded not guilty to criminal charges involving seven women and denied wrongdoing. He's due back in state court next month. I'm

Kqed News Raquel Maria Dylan San Francisco Dr Grant Colfax JIM Joe Biden Colfax London Dr James Heaps LEE California University Of California
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"SACRAMENTO It's 5 30. It's KGB news. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. The 2020 election is the most expensive ever that goes for the national races for president and to control the Senate and for statewide propositions, including the most expensive California ballot measure ever. Here to explain where all this money comes from. And why is politics Reporter Guy Maserati? Hi Guy Perego. So let's start with the big one. Prop 22. It would allow good companies to classify their drivers as independent contractors. My understanding is uber and lived. And Gord Ash etcetera have spent more than $200 million on this. Is that why it's all over my TV right now. Exactly. That's why it's all over your TV all over your mail on the radio. I think this is, you know, blown past all records in terms of ballot measure spending in the state on did so fairly early in the campaign and hasn't stopped. I mean, these companies see, this is a really Threat to their business here in California and potentially beyond. And so they've really pulled no punches in terms of spending to get proposition 22 past to get these reclassifications of their workers as independent contractors. Yeah, it's pretty maker. Break it for them. Who are the opponents who are spending against this proposition? What we've seen organized labor kind of pick up the tab against Proposition 22. Obviously, they agree with the changes that were made. Both by the state Supreme Court, but then ultimately in the state Legislature through Assembly Bill five, classifying these workers as employees, and ultimately, they hope that that's the future for these workers, potentially as unionized workers if prop 22 fails. We shall see so next up prop 15, which would change the way commercial properties are taxed to raise money for schools and municipal services. That would be a huge change to prop 13. Which kept property taxes way back in 1978, who's bankrolling this one? So this is largely you know. Unions at the California Teachers Association is the biggest supporter so far nearing 20 million in support. It's a fairly close contest in terms of the money spent. Both sides are kind of around 70 million, obviously very expensive because a lot of businesses have a lot at stake in this. They want to see Proposition 15 defeated. They feel like this kind of split roll ideas coming at the worst time in the middle of a pandemic that could ultimately perhaps get passed down to small businesses, even though the measure on paper is targeted at larger companies, supporters say the cuts that were potentially gonna have in the state to schools exactly why this is needed now. So let's look at some local races in the South Bay. We've got Senate District 15 That's Cupertino through low Scott owes to the South and East Side's of San Jose. That is currently Jim Bell seat. Why is the race to replace him so expensive? I think because you've got to, You know very well qualified Democrats running for the seat county Supervisor Dave Cortez, e former chairwoman, and Raval Andi. I think there's a lot of steak in terms of what they disagree on. Cortez is more aligned with organized labor, and you've seen that in the support both to his campaign and independent support. Raval has gotten a lot of outside money from the Chamber of Commerce. They see her as more of a business friendly Democrat. They split on issues like prop 15 like prop 22 that we just talked about. So all those players see this kind of as a proxy war for that business, First Labor Democrat contest, and that's why I think you're seeing so much money Pour into the senator's A C. All right. Politics. Reporter guy Mars, Roddy. Thanks for joining us on a very busy election Eve. Thanks for go. May it go well tomorrow. Thanks..

Raval Andi California Senate Reporter Supervisor Dave Cortez Raquel Maria Dylan Guy Perego Scott Gord Ash Guy Maserati SACRAMENTO California Teachers Associatio president Supreme Court guy Mars South Bay Jim Bell Cupertino senator
"raquel maria" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:50 min | 5 months ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Laura and Delta, which hit earlier in the season for NPR news. I'm taking Wendland in New Orleans. In pre market trading. US futures are lower. Dow futures are down 129 points on stock markets in Asia. Shares are mixed higher in Shanghai. This is NPR news. Tensions have flared for a second straight night in Philadelphia over the police killing of Walter Wallace. Police say more than 90 people have been arrested amid sometimes violent protests. Family members say they called 911 for an ambulance because Wallace was having a mental health crisis. Two police officers were dispatched, A confrontation ensued, and Wallace was fatally shot. Police say that Wallace ignored orders to drop a knife. Pacific Gas and electric is restoring power in northern California following safety shut offs prompted by powerful winds. Needs. Raquel Maria Dillon reports that no major fires broke out during the storm. PG and E is working to restore electricity to about 345,000 customers who were without power during the worst wind storm of the year. Cruz and aircraft are inspecting lines to make sure it's safe to turn the power back on. In Napa County Public Works director Stephen Lederer says roads and infrastructure didn't sustained too much damage. I expect it's probably because we've removed the number of trees following the Ln you Hennessey Fire and the glass fire. This turned out better than expected the something I've not been able to say this year. Very many funds. Forecasters predict calm weather through the weekend but no rain to end the wildfire season for NPR news. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan in Oakland. Two firefighters injured while battling the so called Civil Rodel fire in southern California remain hospitalized. The blaze has grown to over 13,000 acres since it broke out on.

Walter Wallace NPR Raquel Maria Dillon Raquel Maria Dylan California New Orleans US Shanghai Laura Napa County Public Works Delta Oakland Pacific Gas Asia Stephen Lederer Philadelphia Cruz director
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 5 months ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Next we've got all things considered on Raquel Maria Dylan will be in early with K Q. E D news first, though it is traffic Julie de Fishes bringing us to Vacaville. The big rig wrecker on East Bad 80 before Alison Dr Rigas on his shoulder. The car involved is in the left lane. Traffic stop Backto Alamo Drive, So battling that fire, the vegetation fired soon. City Highway 12 remains closed both directions between scaly Road and Walter's Road and in Berkeley. It's a hit run crash east about 80 before Ashby. Look for that. Blocking the left. Lane. Julie, deputy for Kiki, we d Thank you, Julie, and traffic support comes from good eggs. Support for cake comes from Audi conquered, featuring a selection of Audi sedans, sports backs or sport backs, SUVs and a new era of Audi Electric. The E Tron. New and Certified, pre owned out ese are now ready to test drive at Audi conquered and Audi conquered dot com. Red flag warning in effect through tomorrow afternoon for the North Bay Mountains, East Bay Hills and the Diablo range. You're listening to K Q. E. D F M San Francisco The time now is for 30. Live from Kait VD news. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. Firefighters responded to several small wildfires in the North Bay and the East Bay last night. Strong winds lead P. Jeannie to shut off power to hundreds of thousands of customers. DJ meteorologist Scott Strength Fell says winds at higher elevations should die down tomorrow. However, unfortunately, looking out of the long range, we don't see any rain in in the next 7 to 10 days, So it looks like we will have a ridge basically of high pressure, Move west and kind of park itself over California. For now. P Jeannie says it's working to restore power to some of its customers today. California prison officials failed to enforce.

Audi Raquel Maria Dylan Julie Audi Electric East Bay Hills P. Jeannie Alison Dr Rigas California North Bay Mountains Kait VD Vacaville East Bay North Bay Ashby San Francisco Berkeley Scott Strength Kiki
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 9 months ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The news. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan President Trump made a move yesterday to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census count that determines state's congressional representation. That could have a huge impact in California. We have the largest undocumented population in the country here. So to explain. We're joined by securities immigration reporter Farida Jaballah Romero. Hello. Hi. Reckon So, what is the president's rationale for this? Well, the president signed a memorandum that says undocumented immigrants should not be included in the census count to decide how many seats in the House of Representatives a state gets, he says. That's because it undermines American citizens. And the president also says thes, you know so called sanctuary policies and states like California. Attract undocumented immigrants to us and that states should not be rewarded with more political representation. The president's order pointed out to California not by name. It referred to it as one state, and I quote that has 2.2 million undocumented immigrants. And, he says, including these immigrants in the count means two or three more congressional seats that would otherwise be allocated. Okay, so that would impact the state's political power in D. C. What was the reaction here in California? Well, it was pretty swift. I mean, just hours after this memorandum was made public, there was a delusion of state elected officials like the Governor, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and others who said this directive is is unlawful and Palo Alto congresswoman and issue told me the president is just trying to appeal to his base before this election. In the 14th Amendment of the Constitution does say representatives shall be apportioned among states counting the whole number of persons in each state. Yeah, A lot of people are saying what he's doing clearly violates the Constitution. Can he really do this? So it's unclear at this point how the administration would implement Thiss. That's because the senses does not ask participants about citizenship status, and the Census Bureau can't share people's information with immigration enforcement or other agencies. Nonprofit representatives. They're doing a lot of outreach now trying to increase participation in the senses, which is underway. They say This could make it even harder to get a full and accurate account on undercount also means a lot less money from the federal government for schools and hospitals and roads. I heard from state Senator Tom Umberg. He co chairs a committee on the 2020 cents is, he said the state could lose more than $1000 per person who's not counted per year that could add up to a lot of money. What is the state going to do about it? Well, California has not shied away from legal battles with the Trump Administration attorney general how the best ERA recently said there's about 91 lawsuits the state has waged against this administration. But he says his office can't just sue on something. The president says that there has to be an unlawful action from the federal government that hurts the state. And this order would for sure for the attorney general's office to take them to court. So at this point, they're just going to watch very closely for what comes next. Thank you, Farida. Okay. Thank you. Record the immigration reporter Farida Javelin Romero. I'm Rachael.

president California Farida Jaballah Romero Raquel Maria Dylan President T federal government reporter Senator Tom Umberg Census Bureau House of Representatives Trump Administration Nancy Pelosi attorney Palo Alto
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Raquel Maria Dillon there's an election coming up March third and apart from the presidential primary and super Tuesday Mountain View residents will be voting on rent control some same measure D. is a compromise between landlords and renters and others say it's no compromise at all KQED is a deep on the moody explains today a annual rent hikes in Mountain View are controlled by the rate of inflation that fluctuates but for now it's at three and a half percent measure the wood top annual rent increases at four percent among other things and Mountain View mayor Margaret Ave Koga supports it there's more predictability on both sides frankly from the landlord side and the tenant side she calls it reasonable rent control which is not how former Mountain View mayor Lenny Siegel would describe it an outspoken advocate for affordable housing Siegel says we have a lot of software engineers have moved in here to work at Google and other places will they have cafeteria workers to feed them if there's no place for the cafeteria workers who's gonna feed the Google employees if teachers can't afford to live here how are the kids of of the the more affluent residents going to hi how are they gonna be taught you can be an affluent renter and still feel that high rents make living in Mountain View tenuous someone know were moved to Mountain View about three years ago from upstate New York when her husband got a job at Nokia they landed in a cozy is some let one bedroom apartment downtown that they pay thirty one hundred four say though that is about average for the city I feel like it's my duty as a citizen because I have evil to make sure that it goes to protect community members she's been knocking on doors to campaign against measure D. even though more no where says she can handle four percent a year which she can't handle is another part of maturity that allows landlords to pass along the cost of improving your unit up to a ten percent hike on the annual rent we would be displaced so why is that improvements coda in there despite historically high rents in Silicon Valley many landlords have drag their feet upgrading the properties they own a classic example would be soft story apartment buildings that should be seismically retrofitted again mayor of the coca we've heard the tenants who want upgrades they're being told no because property owners don't have a guarantee of cost recovery but local tenants rights groups have come out against measure D. compared to the California apartment association and other landlord backed organizations that support the measure make of that what you will as the only pulling down for this race has been partisan nature I'm either the bundling moody KQED news and now it's time for a story from KQ Edie's bay curious podcast team this week they answer a question about coyotes a listener noticed coyote warnings at local parks and wanted to know how those critters came to be city dwellers and what their lives are like reporter Bianca Taylor brings us the story when I started researching this story I knew I had to talk to this one woman and not my first priority upon Twin Peaks and this coyote was as interested in me and my dog as I was in her it must have been a youngster and we sat down and watched each other with her showing her enthusiasm her interests for excitement her intelligence all of that came to the fore.

Raquel Maria Dillon
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Calling for an immediate ceasefire and heightened efforts for a political solution for NPR news and Linda sue low in New York less than a half an hour to go to the opening bell on wallstreet U. S. futures contracts are trading lower you're listening to NPR news from Washington live from KQED news I'm Raquel Maria Dillon the clock is ticking for Californians who still need a real ID but as KQ Edie's Tiffany can hi reports there's a new effort to push the deadline back over seven million people in the state have a real ID according to the California DMV but about sixteen million more Californians still need to get one before the federal deadline of October first or they can't for domestic flights without a valid passport Fairfield assembly member Jim Frazer says getting that done on time is a long shot that's why he co sponsored a resolution to push back that due date for the hundred and eighty DOB is in California so trying to get sixteen million people into the DMV by over first I mean you do the math is just absolutely impossible the resolution asked the department of homeland security for a three year extension which would allow most Californians to get a real ID when they renew their driver's licenses I'm Tiffany cam high KQED news Santa Clara county health officials say there's no evidence that the new corona virus is spreading locally to people in the county remain in home isolation after testing positive earlier this month but county public health director Serra Cody says there's no need for the general public to change habits we encourage everyone to go to school every day go to work every day Kerry about your life the only thing I would say and this is general is if you are sick stay home with whatever you're sick with state labs are waiting for test kits from the CDC so they can identify cases more quickly I'm mark how Maria del.

Kerry director Santa Clara county Fairfield assembly KQED NPR Maria del CDC Serra Cody California Jim Frazer California DMV Tiffany Raquel Maria Dillon Washington New York Linda sue
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Senators and twenty twenty their reelection hopes largely hinge on trump's base turning out in November Franco or down yes NPR news days and days of heavy rain of impacted a wide area of the southern U. S. with Mississippi and Tennessee being hit the hardest Mississippi's Pearl River has reached its highest level in thirty seven years while a dramatic fire department video capture houses tumbling down a bluff over the Tennessee River with more rain in the forecast thousands of evacuated residents are being urged not to return home just yet this is NPR from KQED news I'm Raquel Maria del one for the fourth time this week a malfunction at chevron's Richman refinery prompted the facility to send gas to its flares thank you ladies Ted Goldberg reports the latest problem took place Sunday morning chevron says one of its units experience some sort of problem that led to a flurry operation and the release of an undetermined amount of sulfur dioxide the company and regulators have yet to release detailed information about this particular malfunction we can go Monday sure run experience a problem in its Haidar cracking unit that prompted the evacuation of close to a dozen workers from the unit that led to a series of flooring operations twice that morning and then again the following day local air regulators say they're investigating all of the incidents over the last two years flaring operations have increased at chevron I'm Ted Goldberg KQED news Travis Air Force base in Fairfield is now housing more than a hundred and seventy people who were passengers on an Asian crews who've been quarantined to make sure they don't spread the new coronavirus a flight from Japan carrying the group that had been isolated on the diamond princess ship arrived at Travis overnight Dr William Walters with the states to with the state department's bureau of medical services says seven of the passengers have confirmed cases of the virus but they're symptom free from the IRS positive that a symptomatic were taken to the healthcare facilities in the in the vicinity of tracks surfaced as the group is being quarantine for fourteen days they've they're being house separately from another set of evacuees from Wuhan China who arrived at the base earlier this month I'm Raquel Maria Dillon KQED news support this afternoon comes from the San Francisco Symphony featuring world renowned artists Sanders celebration of Beethoven's two hundred fiftieth birthday support for NPR comes from heather Sternhagen and Paul G. Hager supporting African wildlife foundation working to ensure wildlife and wild lands thrive in modern Africa learn more at a W. F..

Beethoven Sanders San Francisco Raquel Maria Dillon bureau of medical services Haidar Richman Raquel Maria KQED Africa African wildlife foundation Paul G. Hager heather Sternhagen trump Wuhan China IRS Dr William Walters Japan
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Secretary treasurer and the official announcement is with a win our goal well we do it that's always going to endorse we know polyethylene daughters eight counties the union is clear it does not support a Medicare for all plan the workers fought hard to have their health care and they want to keep it the union says it has felt the wrath of Bernie Sanders supporters online for NPR news I'm free Xander in Reno on wallstreet stocks are mixed the Dow Jones industrial average is down seventeen points to twenty nine thousand four hundred six the nasdaq is up more than twenty eight points at ninety seven hundred forty the S. and P. five hundred is up about four points you're listening to NPR news from Washington live from KQED news I'm Raquel Maria Dillon moms for housing says they've been told the Alameda county district attorney will not file any charges against the four people who were arrested when county sheriff came to evict members occupying a vacant house in west Oakland on January fourteenth the group was protesting the cost of housing and property flipping by corporate interests now moms for housing is calling on the Alameda county sheriff's office to release all of its reports on the eviction action a spokesman for the company that owns the house and is negotiating its sale to a local land trust had no comment mayors from the bay area's three largest cities are commanding governor Gavin Newsom for including spending on homelessness and his proposed budget but as KQED is Tiffany camp high reports at a state hearing yesterday they all said cities need more than one time funding to deal with.

Gavin Newsom Tiffany camp Alameda county Raquel Maria Dillon KQED NPR wallstreet Bernie Sanders official Secretary treasurer Oakland Washington Reno
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That won't be a problem this time because there are new rules in place to make sure staff are well trained and don't make mistakes this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Raquel Maria del on hundreds of condemned inmates on San Quentin's death row will soon have a chance to move to another state prison transferring to a different high security facility could mean more freedom and an opportunity to participate in rehabilitation and work programs the options were created by a ballot initiative voters approved for years ago aimed at speeding up executions but prosecutors who pushed for proposition sixty six say this is not what voters intended when they pass the initiative there haven't there hasn't been an execution in California since two thousand six and governor Gavin Newsom imposed a moratorium when he took office last year an elderly San Francisco woman is suing Wells Fargo for for closing on her baby you home two years ago and as she faces a fiction she's got support from city supervisors cuties Erica Aguilar reports that is the double basses she made mortgage payments for twenty four years until she fell behind in twenty eighteen Wells Fargo for close on her home and sold it at an option for about fifty thousand dollars her attorneys argue was Fargo didn't have the right to auction off the home because the bank had allegedly sold the mortgage to another company okay who is seventy seven years old says she worries about becoming homeless I will do everything I can to give it stars I don't know how much longer I have left a spokesperson for Wells Fargo says they tried to reach public about her missed payments but didn't hear back in time San Francisco supervisors point above the situation as a reason the city should open a.

San Quentin California Wells Fargo Erica Aguilar NPR KQED Raquel Maria Gavin Newsom San Francisco
Roundup trial: High-stakes trial over cancer claim begins

Forum

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Roundup trial: High-stakes trial over cancer claim begins

"A federal trial involving the popular weed killer roundup is set to begin today in San Francisco, kqei acuity is Raquel Maria. Dylan reports more than nine thousand people have sued. Bayer claiming roundup causes non-hodgkin's lymphoma, Edwin Harman's case was picked as a test trial in federal court for years. The sonoma's residents braid round up around his property to control poison oak. He was diagnosed with cancer in two thousand fifteen the EPA says, the primary chemical and roundup glyphosate is not carcinogenic to humans, but researchers with the World Health Organization say it probably is. Bayer says the herbicides has been an essential tool for farmers for the past forty years. It bought Monsanto for sixty three billion dollars last year, but Bayer's stock price plunged after a San Francisco state court awarded. Two hundred eighty nine million dollars to a school groundskeeper from Venetia in August damages were later reduced to seventy

Bayer San Francisco Edwin Harman Raquel Maria Monsanto Dylan Venetia Non-Hodgkin Sonoma World Health Organization EPA Glyphosate Two Hundred Eighty Nine Millio Sixty Three Billion Dollars Forty Years
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Survivors, coping and fire ravaged California New orders from President Trump for US troops on the border raise legal questions chief Justice, John. John Roberts rebukes, the president's criticisms of the judiciary. The Mississippi Senate race becomes more competitive after controversial comments and much more. It is a very difficult. Thanksgiving holiday in California for tens of thousands of residents there while the fire in the southern part of the state is said to be contained. There is fear that rain could lead to mudslides in the coming days. Meanwhile, in the northern part of the state, the campfire is still not fully out, and it has left a burn scar. So to speak that is larger than the city of San Jose, many people are still stuck with temporary shelters and few housing options. Raquel Maria Dylan of public media, K Q E D has been reporting from the area around Chico, and I spoke with her by phone just a short time ago. Started by asking what she's witnessed? There's just so many of them. I think the folks who are worse off in our second WalMart parking lot in RV's or in an empty field and ten and when I left there earlier today as the rain was just beginning to come down for real. And it's a low lying, and there's a lot of concern in the community forgetting those folks out of there or just helping them get through the bad weather. People are putting wooden pallets underneath the tents and getting harps out. I got the sense. Some of those folks were really living on the edge when they were back home in paradise one guy told me straight up he was homeless. Another gentleman was telling me about his, asthma and medical conditions, and you really shouldn't be sleeping out in a tense. But I I will say the vast majority of the evacuees or crashing with friends or family on couches in people's RV's parked in driveways, and and other options like that. But people families are split up. And it's a very stressful time in those situations will not last forever. Well, who was in charge of providing facilities for these people who don't have a home or a place to go anymore. I mean is there a visible organized presence doing the organizing? Yes, FEMA has opened up an old stuttered fears department.

Raquel Maria Dylan California John Roberts president Mississippi Senate WalMart US San Jose FEMA Chico asthma
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to forum. I'm John Sepulvado. My krasny. The campfire has destroyed almost sixteen thousand structures and his killed seventy nine people almost six hundred people are still missing with rain expected. Tomorrow, we are checking in right away with reporter Raquel Maria. Dylan who is in Chico Raquel, how are people dealing with this threat of rain. That's coming into town. Good morning. John. Let's see the firefighters are very relieved to hear the latest weather forecast. This is going to be a huge help. They have some work to do in terms of putting their away their equipment before it gets buried in Ashton and bits of rubble and stuff, but it is generally, really good news. I was at the morning briefing this morning and sent in the tape that you just heard on the local newscast, you could feel the relief in the room. It means that some of these people are going to be going home for thanksgiving. Is interesting about that is is the firefighters some of them have have you know, kind of been updating people through social media. And of course, have been some really heartwarming videos, but for the most part, I mean, these are some very. Serious professionals who are working incredibly hard with little to no brakes more than twelve hour shifts. It was really great to hear that celebration that you were talking about earlier what about the rest of the community are they feeling in a celebratory mood. I imagine some people might not know if they have a shelter as these rains come. No, there's. Chico is just reeling with the influx of refugees from paradise people who've been evacuated people who don't know, what's whether their houses still standing and people who know that they've lost everything there is a big coming together of the community longtime homelessness. Activists have been on the ground sorting through all of the donations and trying to connect people with services, and but it's not enough because of the sheer numbers Chico is a town of about eighty six thousand people with twelve thousand homes lost to the campfire. There's. We can say that many tens of thousands, at least tens of thousands of people are are going to be looking for shelter. Short term long term. I'm hearing all sorts of stories about crashing on couches. And then people's trailers in their driveways. And all, you know, one of the interesting things, you know, when when myself and Michelle Wiley were down there this weekend, we saw people doubling up in hotel rooms if they didn't have children, we saw people doubling up intense if they weren't able to of course, many people don't want to be in the shelters where those are because there was a norovirus outbreak. And when you have a stomach flu, you don't really want to face a porta potty, as you know, recall just from from being there and seeing the conditions there is there anything that people are looking hopeful to are are people talking about thanksgiving at all. Are we seeing any resiliency or buoyancy of folks mental health state there? I think that the volunteer efforts are sort of a way to cope with both practically and also with the the emotional toll. I met a guy yesterday a carpenter from paradise in his sixties. And he was telling me that he was just sorting stuff out of boxes donations and sleeping bags and tarps and stuff. And I was like, oh, wait you lost your home because I thought he was just volunteering, but no he lost his apartment, and he doesn't know if he lost his workshop yet and this was his way of coping because he's always been involved in its community. And he's just putting his efforts into unpacking boxes right now. And. Crashing with a friend and and paying four hundred and fifty dollars a month for room. Raquel Maria Dylan joining us from Chico recall. Thank you so much. You're welcome. Well, when a disaster like the campfire strikes, we tend to reach for the numbers to make sense of it. But the truth is behind every number is a life and be in each one of those lives is a lot of trauma often. How many acres are burned? How many homes destroyed how many lives lost those numbers are important? But we want to get into what happens with a person when they lose a home or a loved one or even a pet or they just go through the traumatic experience of seeing this fire. We heard on the California report earlier today for man who saw people burn in cars as he was trying to get out of the campfire. This is something we haven't seen before. And we're going to turn and as far as the scope of this, and we're going to turn to guests now who can help make sense of this. And we're going to start with Caroline. She's a fire survivor who wrote an article for K Cudi about parenting through natural disaster. Caroline, I'm so glad you're here. Thank you. Thank you for having me. An caroline. This article that you wrote for for K Q and tell us a little bit about this in in your own experience going through the valley fire a few years ago. How I speak with. History. Don't want to catch you off guard as I begin to stutter. Nora's? Can you repeat your question? I'm sure sorry. No. That's okay. Caroline. Let's let's start again in the when people you went through the valley fire you have children you had to care for those children. You had to be apparent you'll side to soothe yourself, and I want you to tell us a little bit about that experience. What it was like going through that moment, you love you lose your home trying to keep your kids entertained, tell us what you remember the valley fire. West logistically at dependent without infrastructure. I think having children in some ways made it. Par. Doable. Because I. Purpose to have to get outta bed. Every morning and to move forward. And then in of chaos, and so what I remember most is just. Focusing on. How do the daily tasks that needed to be done? While caring for the emotional needs of. Our children. So how old were your children at the time of the valley? Fire Taber seven. And nine and they were both home schooled. So are. Home was not just our home. But it was also they're like education center. Ten in many ways like a. A community center because our home was used by our home schooling coop ham for regular. Events every week. And so this is the center of your life. This is the center of their lives. And I think one of the things that I have seen at the campfire is a lot of these parents were working one to two jobs. They were dropping their kids off. They would go to school. There would have daycare afterwards. I'm so they were going through long periods where they weren't with their children for the day. And now all of a sudden just getting that reorientation of having to be with their kids all the time something that, you know, the two differ minds, and I'm saying this as a parent, there's the work mind, which absolutely. And and so it sounds like you didn't have to go through that. But I imagine you must've saw other parents who are kind of struggling with trying to juggle that like China all of.

Chico Raquel Maria Dylan Caroline Chico Raquel John Sepulvado Raquel Maria reporter norovirus Ashton Michelle Wiley China California Nora fifty dollars twelve hour
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Though night. I'm already sick. Sick from the smoke. And now they can catch him on you. Get him hospitalized here. You know? Yeah. Listen to his voice, his sixty three years old. He's got asthma and a respiratory condition. And he said what he needs is a van or mini van or something like that. Because he lost his car in the fire and the people that are living out of tense right now. How are they preparing for the rain? There are volunteers bringing in palettes and tarps and moving tends to higher ground. So nobody wakes up in puddles. When it starts to rain on Wednesday. There are some people moving out they've found somebody to stay with or they've been able to get a check from the recovery center, but among the volunteers there's some disagreement about how best to help some people say, well, we have people living in an empty lot. Let's make sure they don't wake up in the mud and other people say that really they should be connected to services, and that's what they're recovery center exists for and they should be able to get checks and housing assistance. Just like anyone else? And Raquel are there any other concerns with the rain? The firefighters. Say that this is generally really good for firefighting except it does make driving up in the mountains. Very dangerous with these big, rigs and engines, they have to be super careful. The other thing is the way the fire burned. A lot of trees were scorched or are still burning inside add some water and the trees could come down. So they need to be careful the ongoing recovery effort the teams looking for the bodies of the fire victims, they're going to be extra special careful in the next coming days. All right. Thank you. Thank you, Tiffany that. With Raquel Maria. Dylan you can stay up to date on wildfire and air quality coverage online at K, Q E, news dot org. I'm Tiffany Cam high as the US clamps.

Raquel Maria Tiffany Cam asthma US Dylan sixty three years
Peter Strzok fired from FBI: Special agent texted about his dislike for Trump

1A with Joshua Johnson

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Peter Strzok fired from FBI: Special agent texted about his dislike for Trump

"Longtime FBI, agent Peter Struck, has been fired. Over his anti-trump text messages struck lost. His job last week but NPR's Carrie Johnson reports that is fine Firing was not made public until now a lawyer for Peter Struck says the counterintelligence agent was. Fired late Friday the lawyer says the FBI deputy director ordered the dismissal overruling recommendation for. A sixty day suspension strikes text messages about political candidates with an FBI lawyer were uncovered by the inspector general but he says, there's no, evidence has personal views, ever affected, his work, on the Clinton. Email investigation or the Russia probe strokes lawyer. Says the firing is the result of political pressure and he says it departs from typical FBI.

NPR FBI Adrian Npr Peter Struck Carrie Johnson Raquel Maria Arne Duncan General Dynamics Santa Clara Julie Schumacher Google Justice Margaret Workman Facebook San Juan Puerto Rico Senate Justice West Virginia Maria Dylan
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Seven thirty one from news, I'm, Brian watt attorneys for victims and women's rights groups say federal guidelines for investigating sexual assault on college, campuses violate title nine which banned gender discrimination in education k.. Qaeda's Raquel Maria Dillon has more from the federal court hearing in San Francisco yesterday Education secretary Betsy DeVos has said campus. Sexual misconduct investigations don't give accused students due process, but the plaintiffs say her policy change has discouraged survivors from reporting incidents to universities or. Schools Jennifer rice of equal rights advocates it. Puts schools, are in the position of no. Longer taking seriously and an implementing their duties to ensure. Equal access to all students regardless of sex attorneys for the government said devices. Efforts are an attempt to improve sexual assault investigations and not. Meant to discriminate against women I'm, Racquel Maria Dylan news veteran. Berkeley city councilman, Chris Worthington plans to retire this fall, Worthington was first elected to office in nineteen ninety six he was considered, the first openly, gay person to be elected to. The council the progressive councilman announced yesterday that he will not seek really Action in. November Worthington is known for authoring pro environmental pro labor pro tenant legislation earlier this year Berkeley councilwoman Linda Myo who has been in. Office for twenty five years said she won't run, again I'm Brian watt news support for this morning comes from visitors coverage providing international travel..

Brian watt Chris Worthington assault Raquel Maria Dillon Racquel Maria Dylan Betsy DeVos Linda Myo Qaeda Jennifer rice San Francisco Berkeley secretary Berkeley city twenty five years
Investigators examine why Army helicopters blew down tents that injured 22 soldiers in California

All Things Considered

01:49 min | 2 years ago

Investigators examine why Army helicopters blew down tents that injured 22 soldiers in California

"Services to pet insurance to other add ons now the San, Francisco based Bank is in the. Process of paying those customers back according to a report in the Wall Street Journal on Wall Street today the Dow was down one hundred and thirty four points This, is NPR news I'm Tiffany Cam high the US army is investigating the collapse of a. Large military tent at an. Army base in Monterey County that injured twenty two soldiers military officials say a Black Hawk, helicopter being used during a medical training exercise at fort hunter Liggett believe the tent over last night Master Sergeant Valery resonate he, says it, was part, of a, training exercise we had men come in and practicing landings, to drop off and pick up the. Casualties all of, this soldiers injured have been cleared to return to duty attorneys for victims and women's. Rights, groups say federal guidelines for investigating sexual assault on college campuses violate title nine which bans gender discrimination in education kick you ease Raquel Maria Dillon. Has. More from the federal court hearing in San Francisco today Education secretary. Betsy DeVos has said campus sexual misconduct investigations don't give accused students due process but the plaintiffs say her policy change has discouraged survivors from reporting, incidents to universities our schools Jennifer rice of equal rights advocates it puts schools in, the position of no longer taking seriously, and an implementing their. Duties to ensure equal access to all students regardless. Of sex attorneys for the government said vases efforts are an attempt to improve sexual assault. Investigations.

San Francisco Assault Wall Street Journal Master Sergeant Valery Fort Hunter Liggett Raquel Maria Dillon Francisco Based Bank Tiffany Cam Betsy Devos NPR United States Monterey County Army Jennifer Rice Education Secretary
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to weekend edition from npr news from k q e news i'm tiffany cam high an officer involved shooting on a crowded street in north beach last week is getting more scrutiny cake you at ease raquel maria dylan reports and a quick warning this report contains audio of gunshots the shooting happened just past midnight last saturday after the golden state warriors won their final championship game an officer approached four men standing on a corner your body camera video released by the san francisco police department captured the chase the man oliver barcelona's dashes away it's less than ten seconds between the moment for cena's bolted and when officers shot at it marsinah's falls to the ground and there's chaos marsinah's his friends personally officer police say they found a gun at the scene marsinah's was taken to a hospital and arrested at a town hall meeting supervisor aaron peskine called for a thorough investigation those videos do not look good having said that we will let these independent investigations run their course i hope that they are truly independent stanford criminal law professor robert weisberg says it'll be up to the officer to explain why he drew his gun and shot twice on a busy sidewalk no evidence that the man was turning to shoot at the officer there's no evidence that he was pointing the gun anywhere else it's a question of whether in a volatile situation like that the man was.

officer cena aaron peskine robert weisberg npr raquel maria dylan san francisco oliver barcelona supervisor professor ten seconds
"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"raquel maria" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Very deliberately track this and what we ended up having to do is to my surprise i started calling in late october to agencies and to the attorney general's office just asking for hey give me a list of these things and of these settlements and there is no such list are nobody's owning up to having it so we had to literally send out public records act requests to the largest agencies we cut that at nine hundred employees and we also queried the attorney general's office this state prison system paid the bulk of these claims and had more settlements than other agencies what's up with that department well i i will say that part of that figure of fifteen million was driven by one ten million dollar settlement involving four latino wards of the former herman g stark youth correctional facility and the allegations were just devastating that a youth counselor staff member had been accused of systematically sexually abusing and assaulting these boys and exchange for privileges in their correctional facility but even so even if you subtracted out the ten million you've got corrections way out ahead of the other departments it is one of the largest departments in the state that is indeed true but you will have employment lawyers and an victims saying that it's very much a maledominated culture you have you know and certainly um as soon as situation and corrections where you have predominantly male inmates and women mixed into the correctional workforce how should we put this into perspective we're talking about a huge workforce with employees up and down the state what what are we have to compare it to you know very little that was one of my frustrations michigan has done a good job for many many years tracking its claims and what's important portent there and i think what i have come away with from the series is how do you begin to address a problem if you don't know how big it is and if you don't know where your biggest problems lie either so much talk about sexual harassment but if you're not asking the questions that quite frankly you're asking me why corrections why the ucs how do you ever get out a solution thank you very much margie thank you so much for having me that's margie luntz straem senior rider with the sacramento bee i'm raquel maria dillon kqed news support comes from the asia.

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