2 Burst results for "Raphael Carranza"

"raphael carranza" Discussed on The Impact

The Impact

08:40 min | 10 months ago

"raphael carranza" Discussed on The Impact

"From the VOX media podcast network. This is the impact. I'm Jillian Weinberger. This season. The twenty twenty. Us presidential candidates have some big ideas. We've been investigating how those ideas worked or didn't work in other places or at other times up until now we've focused on the Democratic candidates in our final episode of the season. We have president trump's signature proposal a wall along the US Mexico border. It's a drum. He's been beating since twenty sixteen campaign a project that's already started and that he's campaigning on building out. Even further new gala has lived with a very similar wall for about twenty five years today on the show. The story of that community on the wall. That changed it. Raphael Carranza was my guide through the Gallas as we walked the border. He explained how dramatically different from what came before the very large tower is keeping an eye out on this entire border area Has infrared sensors cameras lights not to think of a prison? Yeah I think it definitely does give off that. Look to understand how all of that change Gallus. You have to understand what the city used to be like back in the one thousand nine hundred sixty s and nineteen seventies back then Ambos. Nogales felt more like one big community as a kid. There was just no issue going across the border. It was a seamless process. And everybody knew who everybody was a Mexican holiday like a Scene Cohen Mile? They would actually everybody come across the border and it was a great celebration. Would greet my mother's and you'll get our kindnesses Valencia. That would have been my mom. How are you today and mom was at? Oh we're finally going over to get thirty s customs agents. They knew who your parents were. So as you got older new went across the line you were drinking. By the time he got home. Your parents already had a phone call so just crossed the border. We just wanted to let you know that happened to you. My brothers I was a little sneakier but then now gala started to change no gals. I'm Nora will never be the same as when I was growing up. Even were joined the police department in Nineteen Sixty six and beyond a lot of those changes have to do with factors far outside and a gallon of city limits like globalization and the nineteen seventies and especially into the eighties American companies started to move manufacturing jobs across the border a lot of Mexicans migrated to border cities for work and the population of Nogales Sonora exploded. It just started growing by leaps and bounds if you more dangerous population the poverty when I talked with the county Sheriff Tony Strata. He told me that the Arizona side also started having problems with crime especially in the area right next to the fence where carbon floor is lives. I've lived here all my life. Sixty five years CARMAN's back porch opens out onto the border from the zone aside. Rafael and I sat and talked with her out there. We could see the trains ferrying goods between the US and Mexico to the West tracks right here on the wall with its curls of barbed wire stretched in front of us behind it no gala Sonora was preparing for Mexico's Independence Day celebrations later. That evening we could hear these. Intermittent Trumpet Blasts Musicians practicing for the festivities. They're getting ready for the parade. Carmen's parents bought this house when she was a freshman in high school. My parents both are immigrants. My Dad actually immigrated from the border and then mom immigrant from southern Sonata. They moved into the house in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and soon after the break ins began we had gone to the beach and we came back that weekend and my room in particular had been the room that had been trashed the most and to see my very private thing messed with and touched. That was horrible. That was something that took me a long time to deal with and then a few years later when Carmen was in college. That's the only one in the house in his bedroom. And he hears the stir any wakes up turns on the light and there's a guy standing on the free dorm. He's got icepick in one hand and a screwdriver and the other and that goes what are you doing here? I really see it as providential the fact that the guy got scared and ran out of the House Carman's family house was broken into again and again a total of seven times but still her parents held onto the house as their kids grew up left home and created families of their own. They watch from their back. Porch as Nogales. Sonora continued to grow and again that growth stemmed from factors mostly outside of new gala. Says control like when this happened. I'd also like to welcome here. The representatives from Mexico and Canada in December of Nineteen ninety-three President Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement into law which meant more and more companies moved their manufacturing plants across the border that will tear down trade barriers between our three nations. But Nafta did more than that. It had all kinds of knock on consequences like cheap. Us produce flooded the Mexican market and that put a lot of Mexican farmers out of business including Raphael's family now they needed to look for work. My family like many other families decided that they states was probably the best place to do that. Ravel's dad actually got legal status in the United States during the Reagan administration. So he was able to bring his family over pretty easily when he decided to give up farming for good for many others. That wasn't an option and they needed work at a terrible time. Mexico's financial crisis. Got Worse today and this is where another major global factor changed the city of Nicholas in December of nineteen ninety four. The end of NAFTA's first year to Mexican government devalued. The peso peso fell further against the dollar despite efforts by the Mexican. Us governments to prop it up. In Mexico. Unemployment RATE DOUBLED. The number of people living in poverty increased by more than twenty percent. A lot of people wanted to come to the United States to look for work illegally. Crossing the border between Nogales Arizona and Nogales Sonora has always been routine but the numbers of people crossing. This week have been anything but routine on Tuesday. Six hundred ninety people were arrested. A single day recor illegal immigration was running higher and higher every year. That's Doris Meisner. Starting in Nineteen ninety-three and all through. President Clinton's tenure. I was the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service undocumented immigration became a big political issue in the early nineties Arizona California and a bunch of other states actually sued the federal government. They thought it wasn't doing enough to patrol. The border. Nicholas was a hot spot. So as El Paso where the border patrol chief decided to try an experiment. He had put into place something called Operation Blockade and it was an effort to take all of his resources and moves them all up right along the border in El Paso so that it was not possible for people to cross and he was strongly strongly lauded. Many people in El Paso felt like operation. Blockade made crime down that it helped clean up their city and his Doris Meisner prepared for her Senate confirmation hearings. The perceived success of Operation Blockade was front page news. And so this operation blockade gone a lot of press and it just happened that that's when my hearings were and I was asked explicitly. What sure and says? Can you give us that? You will take this evidence seriously. Will you put this strategy into place in other places along.

"raphael carranza" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"raphael carranza" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Year. Federal authorities arrested Scott Warren for allegedly providing food water and shelter to undocumented migrants near Arizona's Sonoran desert. Then they charged him with harboring and conspiring to transport the immigrants charges. They could have led up to twenty years in prison, Morin, however asserted, that he did not break the law that he was upholding religious and international compacts to aid persecuted people. He was put on trial in Tucson, federal court and yesterday that trial ended with a deadlocked jury. So what impact could this case have along the southern border? And we want to hear from you. What do you think about a trial against a person providing aid to immigrants in along the southern border? Joining us now from Tucson, Arizona, as Raphael Carranza. He covers the US Mexican border for the. Zona Republic and was at Scott, Warren's trial, Rafael, welcome to one point. Thank you so much for having been begged. So first of all, tell us deadlocked jewelry. I'm not sure a lot of people expected, that out of this trial, how much of a surprise was that it was as much of a surprise. I didn't you know, these were issues that came before a jury. But the evidence that was presented during the trial from the government was not very far there wasn't a lot of direct or indirect evidence that, that showed a Scott war in had committed a conspiracy, or had made any sort of green or plans to help lease to migrants. However, you know, the deliberation took about three days and on the second day at the very end. The jury sent a message to the judge that they were deadlocked in that they can come up with the verdict and at that point, the judge brought them back into the courthouse and ask them to try one more time. So they did that on the third day and then after about half a day of deliberation. There about four hours. They sent the same note again. To the to the judge who brought them into the courthouse once again. And at that point after asking them individually if they've felt that giving them additional time would help them reach a verdict all of them said. No. So he ended up dismissing them declared his trial. I see. So Warren belongs to a group called no more deaths, right? At what is it that this, this group does, and what was the basis for Warren's arrest last year? So this group has been around in southeastern Arizona for about fifteen years. And their main work is dropping off a water gallons and food as well in some of the most transited areas that migrants have used and in particular, they're, they're they've been targeting the an area. Call the APO corridor, which is, you know, a stretch of very remote and rugged desert, where there's very, little very little civilization there, you have a highway, basically that leads from the Mexican border to a whole, which is a town about forty miles north of the border. But in between it's protected wilderness. So there really isn't any way for migrants were crossing to these remote areas to find water unless they come across one of these water drops. And then also, you know, upset of other humanitarian aid groups also do, but that's, that's their main tasked with providing water for stranded migrant special. Rafael as you just said, this group has been doing this for fifteen years, and yet, what was the argument that the government was making that Warren had committed a felony last year. What was the argument they made in court? So they the, the arrest happened on January twenty eighteen and it was a result of a surveillance operation that border patrol had fed up on this. There's building call the barn. They, they were looking for to undocumented immigrants that in tracking them they have them to this location. I'm they had arrived approximately four days, prior, and Scott Warren was the person who had received them and he's in court. He's, he said that he had followed a no more deaths protocols, and you're doing a medical assessment and calling a doctor who recommended they say off their feet because they had a blisters on on on them. So he says, he's just he had followed that protocol, but the, of the argument from the government is that war and had conspired with a director of a shelter in. In the nearby border city of Asia, and that they had to work together or come to an agreement to help these two migrants. Kind of further themselves into the United States by just, you know, concilium from border patrol for few days. Okay. Well, let's listen for a moment to what Scott Warren himself.

Scott Warren Arizona Tucson Raphael Carranza United States Morin Sonoran desert Rafael APO Zona Republic Asia director fifteen years twenty years four hours three days four days