36 Burst results for "Ransomware"

Fresh update on "ransomware" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

KYW 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "ransomware" discussed on KYW 24 Hour News

"Suburban bureau chief Jim Mel Word has more on that Pennsylvania secretary of State Kathy Book forces. The flurry of late court rulings might be confusing to voters, but you don't actually have to track the litigation. It'll just cast your ballot by Tuesday, November 3rd book, Bart asked the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to take up the issue of about signature sheet. Initial instructed County's not to toss ballots based Signature. The Trump campaign asked a federal court to block her instruction. But that judge tossed the trump suit. Republicans argued book bars rewriting existing long changing guidelines for challenging the validity of a ballot. Pennsylvania Attorney General Joshua Pierrot, also a Democrat, says it's the right decision because identities on mail in ballots are verified in the initial application, typically with the driver's licence. Also Pennsylvania Commonwealth court upheld a Philadelphia judge's ruling that satellite voter services cannot be forced to allow in poll watchers. The Trump campaign appealed that ruling trying to argue those officers are effectively polling places. But Commonwealth Court agreed with a lower court ruling that the officers only process and collect mail in ballots. There's no opening or counting At the suburban bureau. Jim Mel worked what W news Radio workers at Amazon are hoping to get time off from work on election day, and they're asking for your help to get it. Thousands of workers are supporting a proposal for all employees to get a paid day off to vote. They're calling on people nationwide to help shut down warehouse is temporarily on Halloween if they don't get election day off before then. Amazon recently told The New York Times that in states with in person voting workers can request time off at the start or end of their shifts to go and vote. Retailers like Wal Mart are offering paid time off November 3rd with others like best by closing for several hours on that day, so employees can vote. In this cove in 19 era of Rutgers. Anthropologists who studies holiday rituals, urges parents to let their youngsters safely observe Halloween This year came on W's Mark Abrams has more on that. Cindy Del Clark, a Rutgers, Camden professor and researcher says Children need to have that one day in the year where they could dress up feel like grown ups and enjoy having a Trick or treat bag filled with goodies. We're going to put a table of treats outside our door so that people don't have to cross the threshold into the house to get the treats and just open our door and make a big fuss about the kid's costumes because that's what's critical. Clark says. Social distancing and protective masks under the mask or the way to go this year, she says. Adults need to be sensitive this year as well about any decorations depicting or mocking covert. 19. Clark cautions. Those who have lost loved ones to the disease could Potentially be hurt by such displays. If you get too close to literally representing Cove it, I think you could unwittingly create some psychological discomfort for people. Mark Abrams, K Y. W News radio authorities have charged the man and a woman in the fatal shooting of a New Jersey teen and his eight year old brother. Police arrested a 29 year old destiny. Ellis of Morris villain took 26 year old Juan Kelly of Ewing into constantly in Hampton, Georgia. Authorities allege Ellis conspired with Kelly, who they say ultimately shot and killed. 16 year old Gustavo and eight year old Johnny Perez in Trenton, New Jersey, on Tuesday night surveillance video shows Ellis and Kelly sitting in an SUV when the brothers walked past An attempt to get into the vehicle. A verbal dispute ensued, According to investigators. Ellis followed the boys and contacted Kelly Kelly opened fire on the brothers as they stood in the window of their family's second floor kitchen. They died at the hospital, Kelly and Ellis or each charged with two counts of first degree murder and weapons offenses. We've got some construction out on the Skakel Expressway. We'll check in with Billy Dawson in the traffic center. Next, it's 7 39. For breaking news alerts. Wherever you are. Get the radio dot com pap and add k y w news radio to your favorites. It's time to face it via some things don't last forever. If your face mask has seen better days, toss it or wash it wearing masks after they're no longer effective could be dangerous to the health of.

Kelly Kelly Cindy Del Clark Ellis Pennsylvania Commonwealth Cour Pennsylvania Supreme Court Pennsylvania Mark Abrams Jim Mel New Jersey Suburban Bureau Wal Mart Amazon Bart Rutgers County Attorney General Joshua Pierro Skakel Expressway
Everyone's messing with TrickBot

Risky Business

06:30 min | Last week

Everyone's messing with TrickBot

"Your last week when we were talking about how someone was interfering with the trick bought bought net and I said something along the lines of this kind of has the feeling of something that came off a whiteboard at Cyber Command. About that about that. Yes. Other news breaking that it wasn't fact Siva combined all up in trick thought. So yeah we well, you totally cold that one it it was the vibe. Yeah. It did feel coordinated that felt a little different than usual doesn't feel like the normal corporate tax downs we do know that the were some corporates involved as well as. Much. necessarily. The same operational whether it's incidence Mike stuff was also taking down some of the stuff in ways that we've kind of seen them do in the past But yeah, this one did feel a little different and yet it was. Yes. So it turns out Cyber Command were interfering with the trick bought botnets under the auspices of protecting the United States election, right the integrity of the election and confidence in the election because you know US security officials have been quite concerned that an adversary could use the deployment of ransomware on or around the election. Is a bit of a spoiler as a wide sue sort of arrived confidence in the US election I've seen some people pushing back on that on twitter. Some people insecurity saying, well, it's just a theoretical risk but look they have been thinking about this one table-topping this one for quite a long time I can tell you that with certainty I've been on this one for quite a long time. So I'm not surprised to see the move against trick much the same way that they moved against the IRA the Russian IRA that is before the midterms or during the midterms. A couple of years ago back in two thousand eighteen. So I'm not surprised to see them do this. Especially when you consider that trick bought has been linked to your all of shady state-sponsored stuff. Yeah. But I think it does make sense and when we talked last week, you know we speak that a bit about the healthcare impact was the trick bottle being involved in dropping the ransomware on the big hospital chain. We were talking about but I was focusing on the elections in a it's a thing that the Americans are particularly concerned about because it is a realistic thing that can happen but also it's A little bit more mandate to you know, go after and deal with things that are election-related and some of the tops with trick bought selling access rather actors on North Korea's one example incited. Does kind of tend to nations day territory. Both of those things are a little bit more in McMahon's wheelhouse than just like straight up criminal stuff and we've seen some people kind of suggesting that even if the technical risk to elections perhaps as pot credible who knows Hang on hang onto picked off. The trick on state and county systems right that could be involved in the election process some house I you know it does it does actually connect up pretty well I. Think and I had brief chat with Bobby Chesney about this he wrote a piece on it. For Law Fair and he says, yeah, if this is squarely aimed at ta protecting the election, then this type of activity would fall squarely within. The parameters of Cyber Command statutory authorities, right. So it which actually makes it less interesting because if they have done this because of the attacks against hospitals that would be crossing a big line but doing it because of the election actually less interesting. Yeah. It's funny. Funny because. It is a really interesting example of them acting against the network like this where election interfering is probably only one thing that trick part could be used where we've seen it being used for. But. Yeah. You're right. It would have been and we don't we taking action against the theoretical attack instead of the actual one which used down hundreds of hospitals. Just seems to be crazy. A place in the side effect right? If I do disrupt right but on that's it's also not particularly here to what extent this really has caused in payment. The operation of trick bought in the short term perhaps some in the long term doesn't really seem that way. You know we've made him a difference. We don't really know but anything that goes after those actors makes their lives more difficult is a good scientific even it wasn't the primary reason and we've also seen you know one kind of pot in public here and may well have been other actions going on and you know we may see ongoing. Activity against trick bottle you hang on hang on that's the part that's the part that comes next but let's just stay with the cyber command bit for now this could be signaling right? They are talking about this. The Washington Post comes out with four sources on this. They clearly talking about it to certain meteorite. Let's they're talking about it for a reason. Sorry. When people say this could be signaling I tend to think the fact that commanders even discussing it. Supports that theory. Yeah. I think that's a pretty straight line to draw. Obviously, Siva combines don a bunch of other things in the last year or two, and we haven't necessarily seen them discussed the same way as this during the previous mid Tim elections. You know he did see them saying you know we did the was some signaling. Russian ACA saying, Hey, we are up in your stuff we are watching you just. You know kind head things off. So the fact that we had some signaling then I think this has signaling now totally make sense it does. Now, where it gets interesting. Naira. As I said this isn't about the hospitals it's about a theoretical. That could could fall on election related systems right in a few weeks from now. But this begs the question couldn't you make the same argument for all botnets couldn't make the same argument for. In that case in that could be theoretically leveraged a state to undermine the election right and if that's the case why not attack them to? Know that there's any good reason not here I. Think it's very yeah absolutely you we've seen plenty of evidence of other Boston. It's being used to drop initial access as cover being used as unwittingly You know by other intelligence agencies to as vectors into places like there's absolutely a line to be drawn from all of the other big operation is such a natural good place to starve deniable they provide access the indeed they less well protected them. The networks are trying to break into our operation themselves. There's no reason not to go after the other ones under the same kind of logic to me. Well, that's the thing. Isn't it? Doesn't even though we're saying it hasn't crossed a line it kind of has. Saying, is that this? Is a national security risk that justifies the involvement of military organization. It's almost like this complicated. It's almost

United States Siva North Korea Washington Post ACA Twitter Bobby Chesney Mike Boston Mcmahon Naira TIM
Microsoft takes action to combat ransomware

Dennis Prager

00:38 sec | Last week

Microsoft takes action to combat ransomware

"Goes to court in a bid to disrupt a major cyber crime network. Microsoft has taken legal action in an attempt to take down a major cybercrime digital network that uses more than one million zombie computers to loot bank accounts and spread. Ransomware. Microsoft says it obtained a federal court order in Virginia last week by arguing the crime network that uses an infrastructure known as Trick pot is abusing its trademark. Microsoft thus hopes to persuade Internet providers to take down the botnet servers on Friday. Washington Post reported. The U. S Military Cyber Command launched direct attacks against trick bought last month, but the effort was unsuccessful. I might

Microsoft U. S Military Cyber Command Washington Post Virginia
New action to combat ransomware ahead of US elections

Rush Limbaugh

00:13 sec | Last week

New action to combat ransomware ahead of US elections

"Microsoft and a coalition of technology companies have begun dismantling one of the world's most dangerous bought nets. They're acting under a federal court order unsealed today. It's an effort to preempt cyber attacks before the election.

Microsoft
Hospitals hit badly by ransomware

Talking Tech

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Hospitals hit badly by ransomware

"After the show to find out how. There's been a very disturbing trend happening in the world of computing and Hatem called ransomware. Have you heard about it? It's where the hacker gets control of your computer network and then hijacks you and says he or she sees a he has control of your network and you can't get the files back until you pay me money like lots and lots of money I'm Jefferson Graham you're listening to talking tech the hardest hit in the world of ransomware is hospitals hair healthcare organizations. This is according to a new study by checkpoint research which found that ransomware attempts jumped fifty percent just in July. August and September twenty, twenty, one. And why it's because in this land of Kobe hospitals are easy. They got all these patients who are desperate for their data and hospitals apparently are not very good about keeping their computer networks up in running and safely. How many versions of Windows XP have you seen at hospitals windows xp expired of course, many years ago. and Microsoft long ago stopped updating security patches. So as equium Ahmed of checkpoint said to me, hospitals are desperate and they're willing to pay, and once they start paying hackers here about it and they become easy prey the University of California in San Francisco recently paid one point one, four, million to ransomware attackers to get their files back in. Germany. A woman died when a hospital under a ransomware

Ransomware Hatem Equium Ahmed Jefferson Graham Kobe Germany Microsoft San Francisco University Of California
"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Was caught in our collection and it was sort of identified to be A. . Somewhat. . Of A new. . Grant somewhere as a service that we haven't really seen much of A. . Analysis about it you sort of decided to sort of dig deeper into it. . That's yellow keen Kennedy, , and what we found I was a third of a quicksilver report around the initial panel that has been found as part of its <hes>. . Announcement or advertisement on the dark web but we couldn't find anything around of the malware. How . worked thinks that's a now when we actually had a sample. . We could actually take the time. . To. . Find. . Out How it operated what it did if they did something different compared to others over ransomware dose south there, , and then sort of wanted to go ahead and. . Put the whole picture together and do an analysis based on the threat actor was behind it, , and where it sort of is announced on the dark web and what they're stalling sort of potential. . Customers. . Would as we want to say what do you can do with it? ? Well. . Let's go through the research together <hes> first of all in terms of the threat actor <hes>, , who do you suppose as behind this? ? Out Now, , that's a very loaded question <hes>. . Sorry. . No. . Not at all. . That's rory gold. . Unfortunately, , it's quite difficult to really pinned on you know who this person is or where perhaps they come from. . The few flags I mean for instance, , there was a rather within the original post on the <hes> the Russian dark web forum it says that targeting any CIS as in Commonwealth of Independent States is prohibited. . Resulted in media ban. . So that might make one think okay. You . know maybe it's a Russian or it's a Russian speaking actor but to be honest whenever you sort of whenever you dig through the panel and even look at the screen shots that they present you <hes> you can see that there's mountain characters hidden within some of the ransom notes. . So, , to be honest, , count, , really come off the fence on this one and can't really give it any sort of attribution but you know there are certain things that might make you think. . Well and you you suspect that <hes> it's a small team behind this. . Yeah. We . we will be of the opinion that would be a very small team <hes> at least two people can't really put a maximum on it but. . Wouldn't imagine it would be particularly large team our large effort behind him. . Well. . Let's go through it together. . I mean the story SORTA begins, , with, , some forum. . That you all tracked down <hes> take us through the story here. . <hes> to essentially after you came find sort of <hes> some public facing stuff displaying the panel. . Displaying the <hes>. . Displaying around somewhere as a service thought, , it was for sale <hes> I look through some forums that I would know generally used to sell these sorts of items <hes> one form in particular a Russian language one. . So I went through the forum I search tort and it was easy to find actually. . As you can see anybody that looks at the block you can see the original hosting <hes>. . You know it's fairly generic. . They give you a link to the tell you all the things does you how can figure it is <hes> it gives you the price it gives you the service fee. . So Yep. . You know as a starting point that was a good space to go with. . Yeah, , it's interesting to me to see the posts that you share here <hes> kind of the salesmanship that that's on display here also, , a very good use of English. . Yes suspiciously good use of English because obviously this is the this is the initial offering of around somewhere but if you take into the profile. . Of the actor, , well, , we'll just call him coriander because that's what they're using. . If you dig into their user history within the forum. . I think it was maybe four or five months before the smog offering there was a post looking for a front and. . You know they wanted somebody who <hes> was fluent in English and they're willing to pay two thousand dollars in Bitcoin. . This post itself was written. . Rather broken English, , which of sort of contrast with small offering which was in perfect English grammatically. . Then always. . So the the distinction between the two would leave us lead us to believe that there were in fact, , at least two different people you know an English speaking from deaf and then somebody else in the shadows as it were. . Well, , let's dig into the <hes>. . The ransomware offering itself can can you walk us through <hes> someone who engage with them? ? What sort of <hes> thing would they find themselves <hes> able to use? ? Unfortunately for businesses and individuals out there it's actually rather easy to do this. . And the initial offering. . It gives you an onion link to the website that smoke is hosted on. . Once you click through to that. . Url, , and you go to your presented the fairly generic registration you put your email in generate a password confirm your password security code. . Once, , you do that. . You get a confirmation on century mill address pretty quickly. . From there, , you're given a bitcoin wallet address. . Ask you send your point to Bitcoin. . So that address I'm once you're there, , you know your you're. . You're essentially you're good to go from that point. . You can immediately go into the dashboard. . That the developers created. . If anybody looks at the blog. . Photos of it it's actually I would argue it's quite a nice Ui. . It's pretty clean. . Rather. . Sparse. . Does what it needs to do. . and honestly from there, , it's just point and click you don't need to program anything. . Really don't need to do anything at all you just you know come up with a campaign title. . Whatever company you're targeting like the BBC or something you call it BBC. . Sedative business model. . So it'll it'll in fact all the computers with the not network but only needs one decryption code to release all of them or if you really want to be nasty, , you sense it under the regular mode, , which means every single computer needs its own decryption key. . You can generate around some message saying you ha ha you've been postponed semi to this bitcoin address? ? and. . There you go. . You just click the create button I'm not saying you're away. .

Commonwealth of Independent St BBC A. Analysis Kennedy ransomware rory gold Ford
Smaug: Ransomware-as-a-service drag(s)on

The CyberWire

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Smaug: Ransomware-as-a-service drag(s)on

"Was caught in our collection and it was sort of identified to be A. Somewhat. Of A new. Grant somewhere as a service that we haven't really seen much of A. Analysis about it you sort of decided to sort of dig deeper into it. That's yellow keen Kennedy, and what we found I was a third of a quicksilver report around the initial panel that has been found as part of its Announcement or advertisement on the dark web but we couldn't find anything around of the malware. How worked thinks that's a now when we actually had a sample. We could actually take the time. To. Find. Out How it operated what it did if they did something different compared to others over ransomware dose south there, and then sort of wanted to go ahead and. Put the whole picture together and do an analysis based on the threat actor was behind it, and where it sort of is announced on the dark web and what they're stalling sort of potential. Customers. Would as we want to say what do you can do with it? Well. Let's go through the research together first of all in terms of the threat actor who do you suppose as behind this? Out Now, that's a very loaded question Sorry. No. Not at all. That's rory gold. Unfortunately, it's quite difficult to really pinned on you know who this person is or where perhaps they come from. The few flags I mean for instance, there was a rather within the original post on the the Russian dark web forum it says that targeting any CIS as in Commonwealth of Independent States is prohibited. Resulted in media ban. So that might make one think okay. You know maybe it's a Russian or it's a Russian speaking actor but to be honest whenever you sort of whenever you dig through the panel and even look at the screen shots that they present you you can see that there's mountain characters hidden within some of the ransom notes. So, to be honest, count, really come off the fence on this one and can't really give it any sort of attribution but you know there are certain things that might make you think. Well and you you suspect that it's a small team behind this. Yeah. We we will be of the opinion that would be a very small team at least two people can't really put a maximum on it but. Wouldn't imagine it would be particularly large team our large effort behind him. Well. Let's go through it together. I mean the story SORTA begins, with, some forum. That you all tracked down take us through the story here. to essentially after you came find sort of some public facing stuff displaying the panel. Displaying the Displaying around somewhere as a service thought, it was for sale I look through some forums that I would know generally used to sell these sorts of items one form in particular a Russian language one. So I went through the forum I search tort and it was easy to find actually. As you can see anybody that looks at the block you can see the original hosting You know it's fairly generic. They give you a link to the tell you all the things does you how can figure it is it gives you the price it gives you the service fee. So Yep. You know as a starting point that was a good space to go with. Yeah, it's interesting to me to see the posts that you share here kind of the salesmanship that that's on display here also, a very good use of English. Yes suspiciously good use of English because obviously this is the this is the initial offering of around somewhere but if you take into the profile. Of the actor, well, we'll just call him coriander because that's what they're using. If you dig into their user history within the forum. I think it was maybe four or five months before the smog offering there was a post looking for a front and. You know they wanted somebody who was fluent in English and they're willing to pay two thousand dollars in Bitcoin. This post itself was written. Rather broken English, which of sort of contrast with small offering which was in perfect English grammatically. Then always. So the the distinction between the two would leave us lead us to believe that there were in fact, at least two different people you know an English speaking from deaf and then somebody else in the shadows as it were. Well, let's dig into the The ransomware offering itself can can you walk us through someone who engage with them? What sort of thing would they find themselves able to use? Unfortunately for businesses and individuals out there it's actually rather easy to do this. And the initial offering. It gives you an onion link to the website that smoke is hosted on. Once you click through to that. Url, and you go to your presented the fairly generic registration you put your email in generate a password confirm your password security code. Once, you do that. You get a confirmation on century mill address pretty quickly. From there, you're given a bitcoin wallet address. Ask you send your point to Bitcoin. So that address I'm once you're there, you know your you're. You're essentially you're good to go from that point. You can immediately go into the dashboard. That the developers created. If anybody looks at the blog. Photos of it it's actually I would argue it's quite a nice Ui. It's pretty clean. Rather. Sparse. Does what it needs to do. and honestly from there, it's just point and click you don't need to program anything. Really don't need to do anything at all you just you know come up with a campaign title. Whatever company you're targeting like the BBC or something you call it BBC. Sedative business model. So it'll it'll in fact all the computers with the not network but only needs one decryption code to release all of them or if you really want to be nasty, you sense it under the regular mode, which means every single computer needs its own decryption key. You can generate around some message saying you ha ha you've been postponed semi to this bitcoin address? and. There you go. You just click the create button I'm not saying you're away.

BBC Commonwealth Of Independent St A. Analysis Kennedy Rory Gold
Judge Dismisses New Mexico Lawsuit Against Google Over Children’s Data Privacy

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Judge Dismisses New Mexico Lawsuit Against Google Over Children’s Data Privacy

"A Federal Court has dismissed a privacy lawsuit against Google. The suit brought by the state of New Mexico had alleged that Google knowingly spied on students and their families through its suite of cloud based products for schools. Here's a reporter Sara needle men with more according to the lawsuit. The state alleged that Google collected troves of personal information, including students, physical locations, the websites visit. What they searched for on the Internet. Even videos that they looked on youtube and the state also said that students in even though students the parents can opt out of allowing google reader data. The lawsuit alleges that that option is buried in settings where parents will likely never see it. In her ruling, the judge wrote that even though Google had buried that option to opt out the law does not require that the notice be written in terms that a child would understand. The judge also pointed to recent guidance from the Federal Trade Commission which says that schools can serve as intermediaries for parental notice and consent. New Mexico's Attorney General's that he disagrees with the outcome of the case and that the State would continue to litigate to protect children's privacy.

Google New Mexico Federal Trade Commission Federal Court Sara Needle Youtube Reporter Attorney
The Amazon Flying Security Cam - What Could Go Wrong?

Security Now

05:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The Amazon Flying Security Cam - What Could Go Wrong?

"Under our rhetorically named. What Could possibly go wrong. Section we have Amazon rings announcement Thursday. Of Their Thomas Home Security Flying Webcam. The thing that surprised me when they announced this Lisa has forbidden cameras in the House for us. Rightly. So you know she doesn't know where that video is going. I said Yeah look at this. You wouldn't want this. What are we gonNA get it like? Oh It cameras hidden in the base until it takes off. Drew Right. But in order to use it, you have to map your home. You actually have to take it around say. This is the garage. This is the kitchen if the teacher the layout of your, house? Yeah. Like the first thing you do. It's named the always home cam. It will cost two hundred and fifty dollars and is slated to start shipping next year. It is self docking to allow it to recharge and it's able to fly around its owners home on preapproved paths. As you mentioned you know and it's supposed to allow homeowners to check to see if they left a window open forgot to turn the stove off. Or to check to make sure robbers are breaking in presumably. Because they're billing it as a security feature. And perhaps, not surprisingly announcement has been met with mixed feelings. It's. Rick Holland the CIS, Oh mvp of strategy at digital shadows in an interview he told threat post for privacy advocates the concept of an untethered IOT device. Sir veiling the house is a little disturbing coupled with rings controversial privacy practices. The adoption of the drone could be low. However, those that have already embraced. The concept of in-house security cameras are likely to be excited the prospect of having A. Single drone monitor your house instead of multiple individual cameras would be alluring, and this is exactly leases position is like, Hey, instead of having, you know cameras like steadily looking out into our various rooms. You know this thing gives you total coverage potentially as long as it's you who are flying around and looking at things because you know consider the idea of it getting taken over and someone in Russia. Taking a stroll around your house using this thing. Main really that's what's going to happen. ring for its part said they has it has built in privacy into the physical design noting that when the drone is docked in its charging based, the camera is physically blocked the cameras down on this. It's sort of a like a think of it as a as a big T. shape where the top of the tea is a big square. So it's square with a with a square post that drops down from the center of this, the tea and the camera is down at the bottom of that. So in this thing descends into its doc, the post is going into a into a square shaped hole bus. Preventing this thing from seeing anything. So it's clear. The camera cannot be seen. But it's funny too because they said. The device also has been designed to hum at a certain volume. So it's clear that the camera is in motion and recording and I thought wait Are you kidding me has anyone here? Ever heard drones a micro drone fly You can't hear yourself theta. Generating the lift required using four tiny designer approved props of course, has to look cute and right. That requires that they spin at thousands of revolutions per minute. At least I suppose we don't need to worry about the thing. Creeping up on anyone and surprising them. and. Then what occurred to me is what I WANNA know. No one who designs and test these things has a dog or cat at home because this thing would drive. would. Day would dive under the bed and never be seen again. This clarify down the hallway thought about that. Wow

Lisa Amazon Rick Holland Russia MVP
Ransomware Attack Hits Universal Health Services

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ransomware Attack Hits Universal Health Services

"What appears to be a major ransomware attack on the computers of universal? Health, services one of the largest hospital chains this affects hundreds of locations. Marketplace's Nova Sappho has more a network outage at universal health services, hospitals, and clinical facilities across the country began overnight Sunday forcing employees onto paper backup systems cybersecurity experts say the incident is likely a ransomware attack in which hackers lockup. Computer networks often stealing information and demand payment to restore access. There were anecdotal reports of disrupted operations at various hospitals from Wi fi based patient monitors not functioning to emergency room wait times growing exponentially and canceled surgeries. Universal Health Services released a short statement saying it's network is offline due to an IT security issue and that no patient or data appears to be compromised

Universal Health Services Nova Sappho WI
Ransomware Attack Hits Universal Health Services

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ransomware Attack Hits Universal Health Services

"Chain with more than 250 facilities may have been the target of a ransomware attack that threw the chain into chaos yesterday. A universal health services blamed the outage on an unspecified security issue. But the Associated Press, said a senior cyber security adviser to hospitals suspected ransomware, where criminals essentially hold computer systems hostage and demand money to release the data. Microsoft office 3 65 and some of its other online services saw interruptions lasting several hours before being resolved. Yesterday. Office 3 65 packages popular Microsoft software such as Word Power Point and Excel into an online subscription.

Microsoft Associated Press
Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting a major hospital chains computer systems were down Monday universal health services incorporated which operates more than four hundred hospitals and other clinical care facilities appears to have been hit by a ransomware attack that shut down its computer systems in a statement on its website UHS said its network was offline Monday but no patient or employee data appear to have been accessed copied or misused UHS operates in the US and Britain according to the cybersecurity firm EMSA soft seven hundred sixty four U. S. health care providers were victimized by ransomware attacks last year Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Crossey UHS United States Britain Emsa Mike Rossio Washington
Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Cyberattack hobbles major US/UK hospital chain

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting a cyberattack hobbles a major hospital chain a health care system that operates in the United States and Britain says it had an unspecified technology security issue Monday universal health services incorporated posted a statement to its website saying its computer network was offline and doctors and nurses were resorting to backup process sees including paper records people posting to an online reddit forum identifying themselves as UHS employees said the UHS network was hit by a ransomware attack overnight Sunday UHS based in king of Prussia Pennsylvania operates more than four hundred hospitals and other clinical care facilities Mike Rossi at Washington

Mike Rossi United States Britain Washington UHS King Of Prussia Pennsylvania
Breach at software provider to local governments, schools

AP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | Last month

Breach at software provider to local governments, schools

"Software company that provides services for local governments and schools across the country, says it has been hacked Tyler Technologies, which has helped municipalities like Hartford, Connecticut, Des Moines, Iowa and ST Louis County, handle things like taxes, Bill collection and even jail management services. Has notified them that an unknown intruders broken into its phone and information technology systems. It's possible ransomware is involved. Tyler says It's contacted law enforcement and enlisted cybersecurity help. CIA security, which is assisting says it's concerned that hackers may have obtained access to passwords and could bridge customers systems. The cyber security company says any customer who may be affected should reset At all passwords.

Tyler Technologies Des Moines Tyler CIA St Louis County Hartford Bill Connecticut Iowa
Breach at software provider to local governments, schools

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Breach at software provider to local governments, schools

"A software company that provides services for local governments and schools across the country says it has been hacked Tyler technologies which is helped municipalities like Hartford Connecticut des Moines Iowa and St Louis county handle things like taxes bill collection and even jail management services has notified them that an unknown intruders broke in into its phone and information technology systems it's possible ransomware is involved Tyler says it's contacted law enforcement and in listed cybersecurity help CI security which is assisting says it's concerned that hackers may have obtained access to passwords and could preach customer systems the cyber security company says any customer who may be affected should reset all passwords I'm Jacki Quint

Tyler Jacki Quint Hartford Connecticut Moines Iowa St Louis County
Ransomware attack on hospital may have led to death of patient

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last month

Ransomware attack on hospital may have led to death of patient

"For someone's death. It happened in Germany, where authorities say the attack ended up affecting the computer system of a major hospital in the city of Dusseldorf Theatre Act caused the failure of the hospitals I T systems, which meant the hospital could not access data. That force of emergency patients to be transferred elsewhere in the process, a woman who needed urgent care as it up dying after she had to be taken to another city for treatment. Police are still trying to find out who was behind that attack. New York State is suing Johnson and

Dusseldorf Theatre Act Germany New York Johnson
DOJ Charges Chinese Nationals With Hacking Of More Than 100 Companies

WBZ Midday News

00:41 sec | Last month

DOJ Charges Chinese Nationals With Hacking Of More Than 100 Companies

"Have been indicted for their role in hacking into more than 100 companies in the U. S Deputy Attorney General Jeff Rosen, making the announcement on behalf of the DOJ unsealed three indictments. Collectively charge five Chinese nationals with computer hacking and charged to to Malaysian Malaysian nationals nationals for for helping helping some some of of those those hackers hackers target target victims victims and and sell sell the the fruits fruits of of their their hacking. hacking. Now, Now, the the FBI FBI says says the the hackers hackers were were part part of of this this group group called called a a PT PT 41. The group was accused of deploying ransomware attacks and then demanding payment from victims. The industry's targeted here, including defense, education, telecommunications and manufacturing. In time, the top spokesman

FBI Deputy Attorney General Jeff Rosen DOJ
Los Angeles - Newhall School District Cancels Classes Tuesday After Ransomware Attack

KNX Evening News

00:24 sec | Last month

Los Angeles - Newhall School District Cancels Classes Tuesday After Ransomware Attack

"No cyber school today for students in the New Hall school district yesterday, either after the district was hit with a ransomware attack over the weekend, administrators announced on Instagram early Monday that the attack had shut down its network, forcing it to cancel student instruction and then Last night, The district reported that the issue had not yet been fixed, and it would have to cancel classes again Today. The district's email server also was shut down.

New Hall School District Instagram
Chinese Ambassador Liu Xiaoming ‘Likes’ an X-Rated Video

The CyberWire

02:14 min | Last month

Chinese Ambassador Liu Xiaoming ‘Likes’ an X-Rated Video

"The twitter account belonging to Liu Xiaoming China's ambassador to the United Kingdom was apparently hijacked earlier this week, the BBC reports. Mr. Lose Account displayed likes that included tweets highly critical of Beijing's repressive policies towards several of its domestic groups and regions. The false tweets also linked to what we must call for Seo reasons, and also because we're a family show saucy adult content video. None of this has figured an ambassador lose social media presence. So the claim that his account was hijacked seems pretty clearly to be true. China's embassy in London yesterday denounced the hijacking they called it the work of anti-china elements and called for twitter to investigate. The embassy tweeted quote recently some anti-china. Viciously attacked Ambassador Lucia means twitter account and employed despicable methods to deceive the public. The Chinese Embassy strongly condemns such abominable behaviour and quote a follow on tweet said sounding a bit like a shadow broker bucking for employee of the month quote the embassy has reported to this twitter company and urged the latter to make thorough investigations and handle this matter. seriously the embassy reserves the right to take further actions and hope that the public will not believe or spread such rumor and quote. Some of the tweets, Mr Liu was representatives. Liking were straightforward political attacks on Beijing's record with respect to the repression of. Hong Kong Tibetans and so on. The tweeted responses to the embassies denials harrumphing calling for redress of grievances tended to be at least literally sympathetic offering support for Mr, Lose leisure-time appreciation of adult content evidently something to do with feet it seems. They urged the ambassador to own it and not to feel pressure to deny a hobby that some of the tweets implied they themselves might be given to enjoy. On twitter did express concern looking at adult foot content may be fine as an avocation but doing so on government time with government equipment is problematic to say the least and should be looked into by HR or. Somebody.

Twitter Chinese Embassy Liu Xiaoming China Beijing Ambassador Lucia Mr Liu United Kingdom BBC Hong Kong London
Ransomware slows down many students return to school, even virtually

The CyberWire

01:30 min | Last month

Ransomware slows down many students return to school, even virtually

"Number of US school district's already stressed by the unfamiliarity of distance learning systems whose used the covid nineteen pandemic has imposed on them are recovering from a range of cyber attacks. A few like distributed denial of service attack. The Miami Dade Public Schools sustained last week were essentially cyber enabled truancy. So easy a teenager could do it. W. P. L. G. sniffed haughtily a lot of teenagers we should note have experienced with bouterse some of it gained in their play of online games. But somewhere seems to have been more common. The case of the Hartford Connecticut Public Schools is representative a ransomware infestation forced delayed opening. Schools in Toledo Ohio and Clark County Nevada were among the larger systems. Similarly affected schools are reopening as they're able but Tuesday's planned first day was for many students disrupted. It's not difficult to see why schools have been appealing targets. ransomware operators are attracted to targets during periods of heightened vulnerability and schools attempting to operate either fully remotely or in some hybrid combination of distance and in-person instruction, present criminals and opportunity they depend upon high availability. They have a large number of users and difficult to control attack surface, and as we mentioned above, remote instruction remains an unfamiliar Process Complex and fraught with unfamiliar Challenges Planning and execution.

Hartford Connecticut Public Sc Miami Dade Public Schools Us School District Clark County Nevada Representative Ohio W. P. L. G. Toledo
"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

06:54 min | 2 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

", the primary thing that we focus on is is trying to learn what the current trends are in attacker tactics and techniques <hes> how the shifting from targeting specific type of enterprises to targeting other types of enterprises. . What is more popular less popular? ? What is the collaboration between different attack groups look like and how they leverage each other's resources and capabilities, , and really the the method in which we we operate is to not assume in advance what we're going to find in that honeypot. . We basically create the facade of an appealing target in a particular segment of the market, , and then we cast a fairly wide net. . We. . Make it very apparent. . That the target is there we try to make it very apparent that it is an appealing target to a specific sector of attackers, , and then basically keep it up and running for a while usually a couple of months in wait and see what comes our way we deploy network of sensors within the honeypot. . So we can always understand what is happening in that environment. . But we try to first and foremost they hands off in terms of not making it extremely difficult for an attacker to set initial access into the environment we sort of even invite the men to a certain extent. . But once they're in, , that's when we start focusing on what they're doing in an exam understanding exactly how they're going through the motions what are they after? ? How are they doing this? ? Cowardly the operating and how they're running the operation what happens outside of the honeypot are they using data that they're taking from the honeypot? ? Anyway are the interacting with other groups based on that data and their observations? ? Are they bringing in other parties they're collaborating with? ? And so during that process, we , are not completely passive. . Sometimes, , we would try to mimic the response of that enterprise. . We would try to stop their attack to a certain extent, , but really not sufficiently good enough to actually stop what they're doing just to give them the feeling that they're you know in a real world environment, , it's a theater of cybersecurity. . A think would be a great <hes> great name. . I understand that you manage to fool some attackers at least what were they doing in the network once once the Entered it. . I think the the clearest trend that we saw in this research was around. . More attacks. . What we saw was that. . In especially when you compare it with honey pods that we ran in previous years, , significantly more of the ransomware attacks on the honeypot use the tactic that has referred to as they <hes> multi-stage ransomware attack, , and that specific tactic can have a major impact on large organizations <hes> basically <hes>. . I would say is as part of this tactic, what , the attacker would do is they would. . Gain access into a network, , and then they would start moving into network. . Before we go on on with multi-stage attack, , I think we should probably create you know a baseline for our listeners. . What is a single stage ransomware attack? ? A single state ransomware attack is essentially when the user clicks on fishing email and and the machine on which that user is is working is is you know has a ransomware infection and in multiple files usually data files get encrypted, , and then that user is presented with a a ransom, , a ransom demand note but those usually impact just does are we often refer to them as detonate on impact type ransomware? ? So the second you click on that thing, , it starts running it in crypts whatever it Finds on that machine, , and then at posts that ransom demand, , those were classic ransomware attacks and I think over the course of the past year, , we've seen a certain peak in them probably around <hes> late two, , thousand, , eighteen, , early, , twenty, nineteen, , , and during late, , twenty, , nineteen, , two into two, , thousand, , twenty where seeing certain decline in the amount of those single stage. . ransomware attacks are still very high numbers, , but there's a certain decline answers a trend. . So in your experiment, , you're seeing a different tactic multi-stage ransomware. . Correct. . What we saw there the multi-stage attack tactic basically involves <hes> a situation where the attacker is is operating a hacking operation. . It's a when they first start by making sure that they have access into a network that can be a user that clicks on a file, , an attachment it can be in some of the ways, , but once they have access to the network, , they put the rent some more in there, , but they don't detonated they. . I, , tried to maximize the impact of their attack on the target. . So they can be at a place where they can have maximum leverage to gain get as much ransom payment out of that activity as possible. . The way they do that, , and that's why it's called. . multi-stage attack is that. . The first stage involves trying to. . Move in the environment from that single point of entry they discover user credentials, , basically passwords then they tried to use these passwords to move around the network and impact. . Other systems gained control of other systems on each system that they get to. . They go through the same process of they take data and they exfiltrated, , they take user credentials. . They put the rent some more on that impacted asset, , but they don't detonate and then they keep moving in the network until they've exhausted their capability to spread across the network and the idea is to reach as much as as as important assets as possible as critical assets as possible in the network. . Once. . They've exhausted their capability to move around the network the detonate the ransomware that they deployed in the environment across all these impacted us at the same time. . Once the ransomware has needed and there's A. . Large scale denial at service, , usually as as as a result of that, , the follow up very commonly with a ransom demand that involves threats to expose the data that they've stolen user credentials that they've stolen, , and again the ideas at that point in time to gain maximum leverage on the victim. . To pay usually a ransom, , some that ranges between the five and six digits in dollars.

writer Israel Barack Levy Israel J. Ganers Elliot Silas Nukus
"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

06:20 min | 3 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

"We're GONNA talk in this. You know short conversation that we're going to have about one particular topic which I found as I said very interesting. And that's the shift from ransomware to blackmail a very new development in in ransomware, so let's start from the basics. What's the basic difference between ransomware or a ransom and blackmail? So it's a very good question, so we'll start with some definitions <hes> a nuances in the English language before we dive into our world of <unk> ransomware. So a ransom is a sum of money that is paid to in order to release the captive which could be a person. It could be an encrypted file for that matter. Right whereas black male is. A criminal offence where there's a payment or benefit that is. Paid in return for the criminal, not to reveal compromising damaging information about the victim, so that's an interesting nuance to keep in mind now when it comes to our world of of ransomware. What we've been seeing that the ransomware operators, the several criminals are facing <hes> some problems, sometimes with the getting the money getting paid, not that could be because of a legal or ethical reservations or restrictions. Some organizations are prohibited from paying a ransom to cybercriminals cyberterrorists. The mental agencies I'm guessing. For instance, there's a lot also ethical issues <hes> some organizations believe that these they pay <hes> you know it doesn't stop the attackers from coming back and demanding more ransom, so it's no never ending of vicious cycle of. Payment plus you're never totally sure that. Even if you do pay the money, you'll get information back so. Excellently. and. Also in recent years since the <unk> surge of <hes> ransomware out, we see a lot of <unk> organization actually. Implementing good backups and disaster recovery plans, so a lot of the organizations can partially or even fully recover their data without pain. So ransomware operators needed to find a clever way into making the victims pay in a way to twist the victim's arm into pain, and here comes the black man part, so what they're. Is Not only their encrypting the data, but before the encrypted, or even after they xl trait, ridiculous amounts of sensitive data about the company about the <unk> financial. <hes> statements <hes>. <hes> employees customers data super sensitive information. That is under almost every regulation. A you know a company like that would be fine if if the if the information got out. Right and also, there's a reputational damage. There's a lot of collateral damage there, so what we've been seeing. Is that <hes> a lot of <hes> ransomware operators such as <unk> rebel group. Maize and other type of prominent to ransomware are doing this shift in day <hes>, they now have like blogs into dark net such as that happy blog of rival where they each day almost dare auctioning data of other victims basically <hes> starting price ranges US usually between like. Twenty thousand dollars to fifty thousand dollars, and it goes up and up and up and up so you mean they're auctioning data from companies which refuse to pay the blackmail, and now they're making money off of auctioning that same black male data. Yes this is so clever? <unk> variously clever but very clever. So if you didn't WANNA pay us at the beginning to recover your files. NO PROBLEM WE'RE GONNA auction it. We're going to offer it to the highest bidder so way. They're twisting. They're victims are into paying so a lot of the companies will do it covertly like there. There's also the question of whether you pay or or don't pay and a lot of companies. Even if they paid, they tried to make it very hush hush. And that way you know, it's very hard not to pay <unk>. You have all this data about your customers about your <hes> intellectual property about your financial statements, all of that if it's know out there up for grabs for for the highest bidder. You WanNa. Make sure that you pay. That ransom were black. Mufi, do we know? Oh, can we estimate what percentage of the companies choose to pay versus those who choose not to pay the blackmail? while. It's very difficult to estimate because as I mentioned before. Is probably not the proudest moment of a company when they have to. Pay a ransom some of them. Even if they're paying the rent some eventually <hes>, they wouldn't admit it do it. <unk> hush-hush manner because of searing legal <unk> event reputational damage so even if companies do pay. Very little will actually admit it. So we can't really really know what's going on out there. But we can now is that a lot of people are a lot of organizations do pay and just because if you track down, you know bitcoin wallets, and you see you know <hes> crypto currency currency transactions. You can see that you know. The wallets of the cybercriminals <unk> especially ransom where operators is is increasing. Their annual revenues exceed even billion dollars in some years. So amazed that someone has to pay. This money cannot all come from individuals. Usually the bigger pay-outs come from companies and organizations is where the real money is

ransomware senior director twenty twenty Threat Research Asaf Jim Hung
"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

10:24 min | 7 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

"We've seen an overall shift over the last few years from focus on widespread consumer focused attacks too much more targeted. Business organizational focused attacks. That's Alan Liska. He's a senior analyst at recorded future and Co author of the book ransomware. The research were discussing today is titled Five ransomware Trends To Watch in two thousand twenty with that. We've also seen a huge increase in ransom demands from a few hundred dollars to one hundred thousand million dollars etc so we're seeing a lot of six and seven-figure ransom demands now so that's kind of where we see the biggest trend and then you add to that that the ransomware actors. The more advanced ones are figuring out other ways to monetize their attack. So that's where we start to see more of these extortion attacks. Where if you don't pay the ransom than their alot published the files. They've stolen from your network and keep them up on a web page somewhere until you pay that extortion fee. It's interesting to me that you know I wanna say a year ago or so. Maybe a little longer than that. We thought we were going to see a shift. To crypto mining in that ransomware was going to die down. That didn't play out. No so in two thousand seventeen. We saw a huge dip in ransomware attacks. And then there's acceleration of crypto mining attacks and that continued to your time line Through a good part of two thousand eighteen it turns out. It's really hard to make money crypto mining. Unless you're able to command literally hundreds of thousands and maybe even millions of devices to do the mining for you. It's actually really hard to make any kind of substantial money from Krypton mining even as Bitcoin and other crypto currencies for rising. It was just that much more difficult to actually Do the calculations or at scale. What other trends are you tracking here when it comes to rent somewhere? So we're seeing a big rise in ransomware is a service which is really interesting. Because some of the top ransomware actors so the teams behind rebel. Also known as sort of being key and empty mega cortex all rely on a ransomware service model and of course famously before they were shut down. Gand crab relied on that. That model is well what that does is it. Becomes a force multiplier for the threat actor instead of having to worry about a dozen threat actors? We now have to worry about hundreds of threat. Actors still only dozens of ransomware. That are that are really a threat but there are a lot more people behind them using a lot of different methods of activity. Which means that. It's harder to pinpoint where the entry point for the ransomware will be so if you take a rebel for example primarily. What we used to see is they would be delivered through phishing emails and we still see a lot of that. But some of the some of the people that use their ransomware service will also gain access through a managed service provider and then they'll jump from that managed service provider to target customers. We saw that in Texas for example last year with Twenty two towns and cities that were infected from a managed service provider. We've also seen some of the rebel affiliates who are going after Citric smaller abilities or remote desktop protocol etc. Which means that that again data attack surface grows because there are so many different threat actors that are using that same ransomware given where we stand today with rent somewhere. What are your recommendations for organizations to set up shop to be protected against it? I in this environment as things have evolved. How do you think folks should go about that? Well one of the things that you need to worry about We've always advocated for good backups. Right good backups. And checking those backups. And making sure that you have offline access to your backups that they're not directly connected the networks. 'cause we know attackers ransomware actors. Liked to go after those backups. But the other thing that you now have to worry about is you have to identify the attack as soon as possible so before what you'd have is you'd had when I say before I'm talking all the way back in two thousand sixteen seventeen you know the ancient times You'd have the ransomware actor who would gain access to a box and then they'd infect that box and then the attack would be over with the more advanced ransomware actors that that we're seeing a lot of activity from now. They're sitting in the network for a couple of weeks. They're learning the network through understanding it and they're deploying the ransomware after they've studied the network which means that early detection is much more important because in addition to studying learning the network they're also stealing a bunch of data. So if you wait. Until the first system is encrypted to stop the ransomware attack even if you affectively stop that gigabytes hundreds of gigabytes and terabytes of your data have already been stolen. And you're GONNA get an email from that actor and a few days saying hey you haven't paid the ransom twenty two. No I've thrown your files up on this website A Oh and I'm going to release them to everybody if you don't give me that extortion. Fee which is actually an interesting trend that we're seeing. That was one that I hadn't expected where lawyers are now getting involved in the process. So the problem is if you're GONNA throw company's data up on a website you can't necessarily do it on like an underground forum or dark web where nobody can see it. You have to throw throw it up on a public website. Wove the moment you do that. You're now we all in sort of the realm that companies are used to operating the where the ransomware actors. Aren't you stop writing in that realm so we saw this with the Maze ransomware? Where they were one of the first to lead the extortion campaigns. They put all of the customer data up on a website hosted in Ireland. Which obviously all of that ran afoul of GDP are the website provider got sued by a company in Georgia whose data was exposed and not only did the website taken down but the whole hosting company got shut down so this is GonNa be an area where where we may see more lawyers involved in this type of activity as the courts. Get Smarter about this Another example in the UK where a company paid a ransom and the court stepped in and demanded that the exchange actually returned the ransom money. They said the court said it was illegal activity and the bitcoin exchange had to actually give back some of the bitcoin that had already been taken off and laundered and other places but again. This is a surprise to me. Is We will see more quote activity as you as the money gets You know is the Branson Man's get higher as the extortion demands get higher these operators these ransomware operators act with more impunity. They're going to come up against you. Know not just law enforcement but legal enforcement now in terms of the ransom irs. Getting a hold of my data as you describe there there in my network. Can there exfiltration that data that they're then going to put on a public server? Somewhere is a possible solution to that for me or prevention for that that I encrypt that data on my system so that they can't get access to it even though there in my network absolutely I you know I highly recommend that that any data sitting on a sitting on a desktop or server being crippled wherever possible. Now where that may be a problem is if the if the attacker has the credentials to that machine then they may be able to on encrypt that so it depends on how the encryption process works. But wherever possible if you can encrypt that data at rest. It makes it that much harder for the taxpayers to expose that that that's Allen Liska from recorded future. The research we discussed was titled Five Ransomware Trends. To Watch in two thousand twenty. We'll have a link in the show notes. Thanks to juniper networks sponsoring our show you can learn more at juniper dot net slash security or connect with them on twitter or facebook and thanks to unveil for their sponsorship. You can find out how they're closing the last gap and data security at unveiled dot com cyber. Wha Research. Saturday is proudly produced in Maryland out of the startup studios of data tribe. Where they're co- building the next generation of cybersecurity teams. Technologies are amazing. Cyber team working from home is Elliott Peltzman Peru. Precaut- Stefan Zero Kelsey Bon. Tim No Dr Joe Kerrigan Carol. -Tario Benny Elon Nikki. Tina Johnson Bennett. Mo- Chris Russell John Patrick Jennifer Ivan. Rick Howard Kilby. And I'm Dave Bittner. Thanks for listening..

extortion ransomware Bitcoin Alan Liska senior analyst Maryland Mo- Chris Russell John Patrick Texas Precaut- Stefan Zero Elliott Peltzman Peru juniper networks Rick Howard Kilby Tina Johnson Bennett Dave Bittner
"ransomware" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on The Signal

"This is an ABC podcast. They were twenty three hospitals in Victoria right now locked out of their computer systems appointments have been cancelled we've been delayed and two weeks on it still not sorted. I'm Stephen Stockwell Dimanche Lovelock's and on the signal what happens when not just a hospital but sorrenstam notes have come a long way since the days when they were made from magazine letters the the Halcyon days of ransom right because now it's all give us bitcoin old late everything on your computer system also known as ransomware which is a specific kind of virus designed to hold you hostage basically so lately a string of ransomware attacks on hospitals in regional Victoria of all places some of which are still locked out of this systems and even though they might seem weird target it's a really deliberate strategy and one that's already been extensively pioneered in the US yes oh since the start of this year more than fifty cities and towns in the nights have been held hostage by ransomware attacks which walking governments police stations hospitals even schools so we wanted to know what does attacks really look like I leave our first sign from the newsroom perspective was when the Baltimore Department of Public Works posted a tweet saying that e mail service was down and that really alerted us into thinking that there was something that wasn't working within the government as a whole so this is Christine Song she's a journalist at the Baltimore Sun who was at work win they realized that something was wrong they think there was another message that said that its customer phone lines also were not working and then we checked a website for paying water bills which quite a standard thing for people to do and that was also out of order so then that really made us think if these basic things aren't working maybe there are other things within the city government that are not working either so it's just like these dorning realize ation is he more and more and more things and go oh my goodness this is actually system-wide yeah of course so the story actually that we posted on line started with saying okay some email services are down and then other people kept saying to us well no actually the phones were down to these these are also down and we were checking and so on that story was just continuously updated throughout the entire day and by the end of it it was like okay this was ransomware attack on the Baltimore City computer network it wasn't like everything had ground to a halt a lot of the sort of outside activities that people were doing like out of the Office for example you know police people patrol playing or things like that I mean that was still definitely happening but things that were very noticeable or simply trying to get a hold of government officials via email you know that just didn't work anymore right calling people at everyone has a call cell phones instead of US phones but even like you know as a person living in Baltimore right getting your water bill that didn't happen until August really for people who were trying to sell houses the real estate system for a while had also ground to a halt so definitely Li like there were tangible things that could be identified as a result of ransomware so it's just disruption but they were able to carry on so they asked in France some clutter for a payment in bitcoin which I believe at the time of mounted to I want to say about seventy six thousand dollars for the data back so right so the mayor immediately said that the city would not pay the ransom and I think later he actually backtracked and said something like I would consider it but in the end they didn't pay the ransom and just restored access based on the backup system which is different from many other cities who maybe smaller cities who have paid.

Stephen Stockwell Dimanche Lov ABC Victoria seventy six thousand dollars two weeks
"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

"We're going to do <hes> and all the details so i'll have that for you later on in the show steve back to you so the ransomware epidemic. We don't have anything super definitive not yet even now from texas. Although nine of the reported twenty two affected state municipalities powys have been identified <hes> and i'm still struck by the surprisingly different feel that these attacks have from those that we've covered before four so i continue to think that an attack on a common service provider is the most likely explanation for everything. We're seeing though evidence to support. Court opinion is still scant. Meanwhile we have a bunch actually thirteen new ransomware attack victims which have come to surface in the last week while most of them are school districts which of course the timing of that it is unfortunate because school is just starting up again <hes> we also have accounting in indiana a hospice in california in a newspaper <hes> in watertown new york <hes> armor that the cloud security firm whose data generated our picture of the week <hes> has tracked the following being new ransomware infections <hes> lake county indiana has been infected with ransomware the rockville centre school <music> district in rockville centre new york the moses lake school district in moses lake washington that act that attack actually occurred back in july but was only reported to be ransomware recently <hes> many all of public schools in mineola new york the stevens institute of technology in hoboken new jersey new kent county public schools in new kent virginia that nampa idaho school district an nampa idaho middletown school district middletown connecticut audit there were five in connecticut because you also had the wolcott public schools <hes> the walling ford school district new haven public schools all in connecticut so maybe there again is some common common linkage we have the watertown daily times in watertown new york and the hospice of san joaquin in san joaquin california -fornia so again lots happening in ransomware and we may be starting to have a clue as to what's going on and why that we will get to a second a we still don't know what's going on in texas <hes> but we do know that our old friend <hes> riach <hes> are y u._k. Has has which we now know is pronounced ree euch and this week we have a few other pronunciation challenges challenges will get to in a second <hes> has been identified as as the culprit and at least three of these additional recent attacks newsday reported that the rockville centre school district in new york initially received a ransom demand of one hundred seventy six thousand dollars colors the the.

rockville centre school distri new york moses lake school district idaho middletown school distri nampa idaho school district rockville centre school texas watertown connecticut walling ford school rockville centre ransomware moses lake washington indiana kent county lake county steve san joaquin california san joaquin stevens institute of technolog
"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

"As we are continuing to plow into our fifteenth year with no sign of anything leading up in fact this week's podcast is titled the ransomware epidemic because a security firm anchor armor has <hes> been tracking what's been going on with ransomware. We of course have been talking about it more over the last few months than we ever have. <hes> and in a number of things have happened that sort of bring this to the floor <hes>. We have a little bit of news from texas. That's been surprisingly quiet thirteen. We knew victims last week the emergence of a well okay. There's a new ransomware awesome where known by two names. I posted to my twitter feed this morning. How do people think i should pronounce this for the podcast s. Oh d. i n. O. k. i. b. i. and the consensus kibi well yes after we decided it was so cheap so it's probably it looks like his japanese so often what we thinking yes so anyway rather than looking at lots of small bits of news as we sometimes do when i've talked about like what what we're gonna do and it just goes on and on and on we're gonna take a longer look at a few larger topics we <hes> examine several pieces of welcome <music> news from the bug bounty front will also take a look at google's project zero revolu revelation of a comprehensive multi-year campaign aimed at i._o._s. visitors to specific websites and then probably we were we'll conclude but with probably at least half of the podcast talking about this distressingly large array of ransomware news which suggests that we're in. We're heading into a new era. I mean we've sort of been teasing at this for the last few months while we've been looking being at these municipalities that have been hit by major ransom demands that have been met thanks to them being insured which of course cert- changes the dynamic of all of this so i think of another great podcast for our listeners and a rather sobering picture the week which will get to a minute yeah yeah <hes> our show today brought to you by cachefly when i say brought to you by cachefly. I think many of you know <hes> <hes>. That's quite literally brought to you by cachefly. It's our content. Delivery network are c._d._n. And we've been on cash light pretty much as long whereas the show has been on the air as long as twit spin around in the early days of security now and the other talk shows <hes> we just you know you could download it from our website. <hes> <hes> then when the audience numbers started going up and up and up and i couldn't afford to do that. We tried bittorrent for a while. That didn't work out all that well finally. I was very grateful. Matt levine cachefly heard about our woes was a fan of the shows and said let me help and this is a relationship has been going on ever since you need a c._d._n. And if you deliver content to customers if <hes> if your website is directly tied accompany.

cachefly Matt levine cachefly twitter google texas
"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

"Org. If you or anyone, you know or care about is hit by ransomware, the there's a chance, you know. The first thing is you don't want that to happen. You want to be safe about it happening by somehow arranging to have really really current backups. And you know, although I'm annoyed for example, fried another processor this morning. I am not the least bit worried about any loss of data. My backups backups have backups and the images images have images. And so I am like after having been caught by X P machine dying last year. That's not I'm not going to ever be in that position again. So I'm I'm good. I even have drives that are not online, but briefly come online and then disappear. So that if anything did get me, it would have no way of knowing that there was a dry. That technically was accessible that cannot know cannot otherwise be accessed. So I I mean, I'd take this dangerous. Seriously. This is in my opinion. This is the the biggest concern that exists now is the threat from software that encrypt them, basically, it's like, you know, potentially losing all of the I mean, like not just a drive crash that we can recover from. We've got spin right or the motherboard dies. That's fine. You still have your drives. But, you know, this the idea of something trying to get into your system and to maliciously encrypt your data. No one wants that to happen. That's the worse than a virus? So. But remember this only works on poorly implemented ransom crypto if the crypto is done, right. And the v the first ransomware before this became a fad two first ransomware as we discussed at the time was done, right. A high entropy symmetric key was obtained. It was used with a ES fifty-six cipher with a a varying initialisation vector, which was stuck on the front of all of the encrypted files in order to do proper encryption of the the the byte stream that the file represents. And then that's symmetric key was completely wiped and removed from the system. There was no trace of it left behind you had to pay the ransom in order to in order to get your data back. So it's understan-. Band that? This isn't universal decryption ransomware. It's only if the ransomware that you happen to get bit by. Is was you know, not done properly knock done correctly that you are able to back yourself out. But it's worth knowing. I mean, it's cool that we now have no more ransom dot org as.

ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Right and i'm glad you you gave such a detailed synopsis there because there's a lot of different things that i would love to explore with you obviously the contemporary aspect of hacking in terms of ransomware ransomware is i think somewhat new brand of malware there in moved on a show on ransomware in the past people can listen back to that if they want a detailed explanation but ransomware is essentially mel wear that locks your computer up and demands that you pay money to a certain address oftentimes paid in bitcoin or some other crypto currency and once you pay you get to unlock your computer and this attack vector is pretty strong and there's a lot of different brands of ransomware that are attacking people throughout the world wannacry was particularly painful because it was so widespread and it hit facilities like hospitals the other aspects that i wanted on explorer side from ransomware of course marcus hutchins himself he's quite an interesting character and i'd like to unpack the character of marcus hutchins and it also like to talk about journalism because i think the world of journalism and software there's increasing overlap there and there's a disconnect between those those two areas and i encountered this disconnect all the time because i'm kind of a software journalist myself maybe we can start with the topic of journalism why did you write the story what drew you into the story of marcus hutchins and wannacry.

marcus hutchins ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Ransomware is software that can infiltrate your business through email enabling cybercriminals to hijack sensitive information as ransom for your own data's release leveraging barracuda email security with advanced threat detection can stop a ransomware attack in its tracks as an added measure barracuda backup allows you to recover your data without having to surrender to extortion crime doesn't pay when you protect your business data with barracuda go to barracudacomransomware to learn more please walton podcast this is the baseball can i five get warmed monday october thirty two thousand seventeen novocur only by producer is josh maccari in josh be honest how much of that crazy game five did you see come on you gotta tell me honestly all of it don't believe me oh my goodness well you know what again i'll say the same thing i said after game two one glad that you've got sleep i'm glad you didn't have to deal with the post game in journal and because you know we talked about how gained two was the greatest not elimination game in baseball history will guess what game 5 was it least is crazy with even more twists and turns all kidding aside jess you saw the highlights this morning when you read this morning what happened last night i mean it was your head spinning the way mind was during the course of the game yes without question buster i mean it's it's borderline absurd the twists and turns that these games are taking the number of home runs that are being hit the number of lead changes the are it's unfathomable.

Ransomware producer josh maccari extortion
"ransomware" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on WTMA

"I want to talk about the i decided what i would do it just pick one or two and with if you want to comment or giving any questions on what we're talking about he'll free to call in say hey tammy how about expanding that little bit more some questions around and it let me know at eight four three five five six twelve fifty and our break you down a little bit deeper 40s but the two topics i want to try to cover today as i wanna talk about ransomware ransomwear is becoming so prevalent out there and we get so many calls around way ransomware and that i wanna cover that and i also want to say we have time today we'll see if we can get into something called to factor authentication if you've never heard of to factor authentication or multi bactor authentication this something that you really really need to get a handle on and utilize at in your everyday life is really kind of becoming one of the only real ways to try to minimize the chance to cheer accounts get hacked who we'll get into some detail on that as well but let's start out with ransomware i if you haven't heard ransomware before it's probably just going to be a matter of time before you experience it ransomwear is basically where the bad guys will encrypt the hard drive on your computer now they can either encrypt jess the data only like you word documents your pictures and so forth or they may encrypt the entire harddrive and what happens is they will then present a message to you on the screen and that message will say that they want you to pay a ransom usually like one bitcoin hume your half of bitcoin or something like that and they will then give you the decryption code or key that is used to get your data back so they will give you code that can be used to decrypt the data on your machine it is growing like wildfire it said that one of the reasons why is growing i it is fast as it is is because it's easy money for the bad guys is instant money for the bad guys you wanna that guys go out in the hack a big database yeah they break into somebody like at target or somebody like that it it takes a while for them to be able to sell.

ransomware ransomwear
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"If you cannot retrieve your information because a ransomware attack you can bite the bullet wipe your system installed operating system again go to backups and restore from your backups now that probably means that you're going to lose some stuff as chances are you generated some data since the last time you did a backup unless you're doing backups very frequently as always going to be the case but it's better to lose some data rather than lose everything or be forced to pay into a ransomware attack because every time someone pays the hackers you are sending the message this is a way you can make money and your inspiring other people to take the same pathway as the hackers dead whether they're designing their own or using an off the shelf ransomware as a service approach so don't negotiate with the hackers instead used backups patch your security have uptodate antivirus software running practice good web browsing and email a hygiene so that you're not uh inviting these sort of attacks into your life and if you do that you really minimize the chance that you will fall victim to this kind of attack it not know system is ever going to be perfect no system is ever going to be foolproof but you reduce those odds drastically and if you are make backing up your information than you can at least you know again wipe your machine and start over again without worrying about enabling some hackers into an an inspiring future generations of hackers to do the same thing further down the line.

operating system antivirus software
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"And on that day they were able to infect the ticketing and bus management system for muny with a ransomware attack uh they demanded one hundred bitcoin for the antidote for the the key to decode everything of and at that time a hundred bitcoin was worth about seventy three thousand dollars but instead of paying the ransom muny decided to offer free rides to passengers while they worked on a solution so for two days you could ride muny absolutely free you didn't have to have a ticket or anything you can just get on uh but then once they were able to reboot the system and restore from backup the it was back to normal operations so it was only a temporary downtime for munity was very now is still damaging because that's two days without any revenue but it showed that the city of san francisco and mutiny and diculeng was not willing to play ball by the hackers uh standards another dozens of other variations live appeared over the years but i think it's a good time to now look over at the wannacry virus because that is the most recent version of ransomware as the recording of this episode and i'm going to jump right into that topic ratra we take another break to thank our sponsors i you've reached the high fashion hotline i sweetie i told you not to call me at work but any style advice just got old navy ullevi gap all men science are on sale now up to fifty percent off with shorts from twelve dollars active from agencies from five bucks at old navy and oldnavycom five box less the whole stores have to fifty percent off so you can get amazing styles for everyone even me coned old navy now only make sure you get something for father's day my treat a thanks highfashion old navy balance aquatic twenty excludes clearance gift cards westerly items jewelry today entering only deals wannacry is an aggressive coordinated ransomware attack one of the biggest ransomware attacks in history.

san francisco muny fifty percent two days seventy three thousand dollars twelve dollars
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"You see these big stories about companies that had their systems compromise and people stole a lot of information that's databreach the big sony databreach from a few years ago is a great example uh not that it's great but it serves as a great example ransomware actually happens way more frequently than those big data breaches because again you don't have to care about what information is in the system you just want to make it unreachable so all you have to do is fool someone into executing some malicious code and depending upon the nature of the mall where you might be able to infect an entire system just through one point of entry you don't have to try and navigate a complex and potentially very secure system of computers in order to look for specific information because again you don't care what the information is you just want them to have no access to it now in the mid to thousands there are a lot of different types of now wear and the ransomware category that debuted included stuff like gp code arch of as croston cries zip may archive an trojan dot ransom dot a and these were using tougher algorithms that were harder to crack a arc of as was one of the first and it used our essay encryption and demanded that users visit specific websites to make purchases in order to buy a password to remove the lock on their files so you would get a message saying you need to go to this pharmacies website and you need a by ex amount of drugs from this pharmacy and after you do will give you the password.

malicious code sony
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"The key is like a secret dakota ring so if you get hit with ransomware what the hackers are actually offering you is the decryption key in exchange for money you pay them they give you the seek supersecret dakota rings so you can decode all that stuff that's on your computer and you can use it again these days the money is typically demanded in the form of digital currency like bitcoin or in prepaid cards like money pack which by the way and while the stories i was reading was smith spelled with a typo calling it monkey pack and i wish it was monkey pack but monkey pack is a brand of backpacks it is not a method of cash transfer unless you word a stuff a monkey pack filled with money in that handed the somewhat then technically it is cash transfer but i'm pretty sure that the the author of the article meant money pack moore's the pity so using bitcoin or these prepaid options it allows hackers to maintain their anonymity as opposed to giving you an address like a physical address to send money to which you know you could just hand over to authorities who had been stake it out and try and catch the people who are responsible using the digital approach it's a lot harder to do that since 1980 nine ransomware has become more popular method to attack computers than it really took off once the world wide web matured and upon the launch of the smartphone industries well the internet crime complaint center or ice three says that between two thousand five and two thousand sixteen they receive reports of more than seven thousand six hundred ransomware attacks and by comparison the i see three says it received more than six thousand reports of data breaches so ransomware actually outnumbers data breaches the information you tend to see in the us at least.

decryption key moore bitcoin world wide web smith
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"What they want to do is affect as many critical computers as they possibly can with ransomware because if it's a critical device of it's something that's very important for the operations of a larger organization or company then that puts a huge amount of pressure on the company to pay the ransom so they can get access to that critical hardware again on that's the whole point of ransomware they don't they don't care if it's bill what the nature of the stuff is as long as it's important because they're not after the data itself thereafter money they just want to lock down those computers as much as they can and then convince people to pay them so that they can unlock them now the first recorded instance of ransomware was called the aids trojan and it was designed by joseph l pop p opep that particular attack falls under the category of the trojan horse which is of course named after the legendary gift to the city of troy that secretly housed invading soldiers that were from greece a trojan horse is mel wear that at that looks like a regular programme had fool someone into thinking they're using some benign piece of software but in reality there essentially handing over some critical part of their computer systems to the whims of a hacker so a lotta trojan horse programs these days are programs that look like they're innocent you run them and then it allows a hacker to get a backend i'd like a back door entry into your computer usually administrative level control and from there they can do lots of different things they can lock you out of a system uh they can allow you to continue using a system so that you don't know that they're even there they can spy on what you're doing they can even redirect your computer descent traffic to a target machine as part of a distributed denial of service attacks so this is a very common ploy that hackers will use noory to build botnets or computer armies.

trojan horse troy joseph l greece
"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on TechStuff

"That can end up causing your computer to be useless or at least give make it a your information in accessible the goal is to get the victim to fork over some cash and in return the hackers will decrypt the computer they'll give whatever the password is uh or the the methodology to decrypt all that information and turn it back to the way it was before it was attacked now uh there's the second variant of ransomware the doesn't encrypt a computer instead way does is locks people out of a device this is the locker version of ransomware its most frequently seen an android based devices so mostly mobile sets like handsets tablet second of thing and essentially hackers fool of victim into downloading and installing a malicious app and then they apple then activate the software that locks the victim off from accessing their device they won't be able to use it cyncially brexit until you are to pay up a ransom you might get like a little screen that demonstrate that shows you you know until you pay x amount to why you won't have access to this device so you are told that jet pay the hackers nor to regain access to your device in in either case ransomwear is not pretty now this is similar to but distinct from another scheme that some hackers employ over the last few years which is blackmail a hacker groups like rex mundy have targetted large corporations with a goal of infiltrating their systems and stealing as much data as possible including customer data that's one of the big targets so having that customer data is a very powerful tool companies do not want their customers to lose confidence in them so if a hacker group is able to get hold of a huge amount of customer information from a company and then say hey if you don't pay up we're going to release this information organised selling off up it's bad news and it's very hard to recover as the company if you've suffered that kind of databreach so it's similar to blackmail but not exactly the same because with ransomware the hackers might not even be interested at all in what's on the computer systems they target they don't care if there's customer information or if its internal systems that that doesn't matter.

rex mundy android apple