35 Burst results for "Ransomware"

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

05:45 min | Last week

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

"So a total of $15 million to anyone who can turn in a member of the Conti gang. And this is U.S. dollars. 10 million 15 million of them. You got to think that this would make anybody associated with Conti quite uncomfortable. There must be others outside of the immediate gang, who are not themselves criminals, so they don't face prosecution. But to whom members of Conti have bragged about, you know, over drinks or. I keep trying to say pillow talk, but no. So in a statement on Friday, State Department spokesman Ned price told us something we already know. That Conti has been behind hundreds of ransomware attacks over the last several years. He said, quote, the FBI estimates that as of January 2022, there had been over one thousand victims of a tax associated with Conti ransomware with victim payouts exceeding $150 million. Making the Conti ransomware variant the cost deal costliest strain of ransomware ever documented. The memo also notes that the group has recently claimed credit for that wide ranging ransomware attack that targeted the government of Costa Rica as it was transitioning to a new president. The attack crippled the country's customs and taxes platforms alongside several other government agencies. And as I noted before, they attack also brought down one coast and Costa Rican towns energy supplier. Conti also attacked as we had documented at the time, Ireland's health service executive, a year ago, back in May of 2021, which resulted in weeks of disruption at the country's hospitals. Ireland refused to pay the $120 million ransom, and now estimates it may end up spending 100 million recovering from the attack. Although as I recall, I think that was the one where they were going to get all new computers as a result. So it was like, nice. Maybe their milk in their insurance company a little harder than they could see old computers. The group similarly crippled dozens of hospitals in New Zealand and the group has made a point of targeting U.S. healthcare and first responder networks. They're not nice. Oh, and they're Russian, by the way. Including.

Conti Ned price Conti ransomware Costa Rican State Department FBI U.S. Ireland New Zealand
 Ransomware persists even as high-profile attacks have slowed

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Ransomware persists even as high-profile attacks have slowed

"Ransomware ransomware persists persists even even as as high high profile profile attacks attacks have have slowed slowed in in the the months months since since president president Joe Joe Biden Biden warned warned Russian Russian leader leader Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin to to a a crackdown crackdown on on ransomware ransomware gangs gangs in in his his country country there there hasn't hasn't been been a a massive massive attack attack like like the the one one last last may may that that resulted resulted in in gasoline gasoline shortages shortages and and long long lines lines at at the the pump pump but but the the problem problem hasn't hasn't evaporated evaporated with with hackers hackers conducting conducting a a barrage barrage of of lower lower profile profile episodes episodes that that have have upended upended the the businesses businesses government government schools schools and and hospitals hospitals that that were were hit hit U. U. S. S. officials officials have have recaptured recaptured some some ransom ransom payments payments crack crack down down on on abuses abuses of of cryptocurrency cryptocurrency and and made made some some arrests arrests yet yet six six months months after after Biden's Biden's cautions cautions to to Putin Putin it's it's hard hard to to tell tell attackers attackers have have eased eased up up because because of of U. U. S. S. pressure pressure I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker ransomware ransomware persists persists even even as as high high profile profile attacks attacks have have slowed slowed in in the the months months since since president president Joe Joe Biden Biden warned warned Russian Russian leader leader Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin to to crack crack down down on on ransomware ransomware gangs gangs in in his his country country there there hasn't hasn't been been a a massive massive attack attack like like the the one one last last may may that that resulted resulted in in gasoline gasoline shortages shortages and and long long lines lines at at the the pump pump but but the the problem problem hasn't hasn't evaporated evaporated with with hackers hackers conducting conducting a a barrage barrage of of lower lower profile profile episodes episodes that that have have upended upended the the businesses businesses government government schools schools and and hospitals hospitals that that were were hit hit U. U. S. S. officials officials have have recaptured recaptured some some ransom ransom payments payments crack crack down down on on abuses abuses of of cryptocurrency cryptocurrency and and made made some some arrests arrests yet yet six six months months after after Biden's Biden's cautions cautions to to Putin Putin it's it's hard hard to to tell tell attackers attackers have have eased eased up up because because of of U. U. S. S. pressure pressure I'm I'm

President President Joe Joe Bi Vladimir Vladimir Putin Putin Putin Putin Biden Julie Julie Walker Walker U.
 Iran-backed hackers accused of targeting critical US sectors

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 6 months ago

Iran-backed hackers accused of targeting critical US sectors

"The FBI and other security agencies are warning companies that hackers linked to the Iranian government have stepped up their ransomware and other malicious cyber activities the advisory warns that in recent months a run has exploited computer vulnerabilities to target entities in transportation health care and public health Microsoft says it observed one of the groups trying to build a rapport with his intended victims before targeting them with spear phishing campaigns the

Iranian Government FBI Microsoft
 Suspected hackers arrested in global ransomware crackdown

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Suspected hackers arrested in global ransomware crackdown

"European security officials say two suspected hackers have been arrested in a global ransomware crackdown the arrests were part of a seventeen country operation involving the U. S. something deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco appeared to foreshadow within eighty P. interview last week in the days and the weeks to come you're going to see more arrests more seizures officials say the two suspects are accused of ransomware attacks resulting in five thousand infections the justice department's been tried to address a ransomware wave that it calls a national security and economic threat Sager

Deputy Attorney General Lisa M U. Seizures Justice Department Sager
 Ransomware gang says it targeted National Rifle Association

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

Ransomware gang says it targeted National Rifle Association

"A ransomware gang known as grief says attacked the computer network of the national rifle association the hacker group grief believed to operate from Russia has published a handful of what appeared to be an array files on a dark web site some of the files relate to grants that the national rifle association has awarded and there are reports there are also minutes from a recent meeting as a way to verify the intrusion a cyber security expert Alan Lisco says it's highly unusual for a politically active group like the NRA to be targeted for a ransomware attack because he says the hackers really go after vulnerable technology not a specific organization an NRA spokesman had no comment on their electronic security I

National Rifle Association Alan Lisco Russia NRA
Ransomware (MM #3866)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Ransomware (MM #3866)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Ransomware is a word that people have been hearing more and more about this year, even though the ability for usually foreign hackers to come in and lock up a computer system and force you to pay them a ransom has been around for a bunch of years. Earlier this year, everybody heard about the Colonial Pipeline and the ransomware they were inflicted with. This past week we heard of Sinclair broadcasting one of the major broadcasting companies across America, having their computer systems inflicted with ransomware, but we finally reached the point where I'm getting upset because it's going to affect candy corn. Ferrara candy company, the company that makes most of the candy corn in America, their computer systems, which do, in fact, impact their manufacturing process, they have been inflicted with ransomware, and these Russian hackers want millions upon millions of dollars. You're going to hear more and more about ransomware and we've got to figure out a way to stop it because they're going to impact and disrupt American business as much as they can. That's one of the ways people are fighting wars right now. It's not about boots on the ground. It's about computers and in the air. And that's kind of scary.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Sinclair Broadcasting Ferrara Candy Company Mason America
Ransomware (MM #3866)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Ransomware (MM #3866)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Ransomware is a word that people have been hearing more and more about this year, even though the ability for usually foreign hackers to come in and lock up a computer system and force you to pay them a ransom has been around for a bunch of years. Earlier this year, everybody heard about the Colonial Pipeline and the ransomware they were inflicted with. This past week we heard of Sinclair broadcasting one of the major broadcasting companies across America, having their computer systems inflicted with ransomware, but we finally reached the point where I'm getting upset because it's going to affect candy corn. Ferrara candy company, the company that makes most of the candy corn in America, their computer systems, which do, in fact, impact their manufacturing process, they have been inflicted with ransomware, and these Russian hackers want millions upon millions of dollars. You're going to hear more and more about ransomware and we've got to figure out a way to stop it because they're going to impact and disrupt American business as much as they can. That's one of the ways people are fighting wars right now. It's not about boots on the ground. It's about computers and in the air. And that's kind of scary.

Kevin Mason Sinclair Broadcasting Ferrara Candy Company Mason America
Sinclair Broadcast Says It Was Hit by Cyberattack

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Sinclair Broadcast Says It Was Hit by Cyberattack

"Sinclair broadcast group says it suffered a data breach and is still working to determine what information the data contained the company said it started investigating the potential security incident over the weekend and identified certain servers and workstations that were encrypted with ransomware it also found that certain office and operational networks were disrupted data was also taken from the company's network the Maryland based company owns and or operates twenty one regional sports networks and owns operates and or provide services to a hundred and eighty five television stations Sinclair said it currently can determine whether or not the data breach will have a material impact on its business operations or financial results I'm

Sinclair Maryland
Cyberattacks concerning to most in US: Pearson/AP-NORC poll

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Cyberattacks concerning to most in US: Pearson/AP-NORC poll

"A poll finds most Americans are seriously concerned about cyber attacks on U. S. computer systems the survey from the Pearson institute anti piano worse the center for public affairs research comes amid a wave of ransomware attacks and cyber spying campaigns that compromise sensitive records and led to shutdowns of energy companies hospitals and others the poll finds about nine in ten Americans are at least somewhat concerned about hacking and about two thirds of very or extremely concerned roughly three quarters view China and Russia as major threats the broad consensus could boost government efforts to force critical industries into increasing their own cyber defences Sager AMAG ani Washington

Pearson Institute Anti Piano Center For Public Affairs Rese Russia China Sager Amag Ani Washington
Who Are Ransomware Gangs Targeting?

Cyber Security Today

01:45 min | 9 months ago

Who Are Ransomware Gangs Targeting?

"Which organizations are ransomware gangs looking to target. According to israeli cyber security firm kayla they primarily want firms based in the us canada. Australia and europe who on average earn more than one hundred million dollars in annual revenue and are not in the education health. Care government or nonprofit sectors. That's according to an analysis of forty five conversation threads on criminal forums. these forums are where initial access brokers claim to have hijacked into a company and are now selling that access to ransomware groups. Attackers are looking to buy specific types of access to victims so it and security administrators should pay attention to this. Highly desirable are companies. That have vulnerabilities in their microsoft remote. Desktop protocol set up which is used my employees for remote access as well as those with vulnerable virtual private networks setups using products from six palo. Alto networks vm-ware fortinet and cisco systems now in the last several months all of these products have issued patches for vulnerabilities. So you shouldn't be caught off guard for such access. Ransomware attackers are willing to pay up to one hundred thousand dollars and remember if your company earns less than a hundred million dollars a year. Don't be complacent. That's an average of the requirements of some attackers and only for messages seen during a narrow timeframe

Care Government Kayla Alto Networks Ware Fortinet Australia Europe Canada Cisco Systems Palo United States Microsoft
Ransomware Gang Threatens to Leak Data if Victim Contacts FBI

Cyber Security Headlines

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Ransomware Gang Threatens to Leak Data if Victim Contacts FBI

"Ransomware gang threatens to leak data if victim contacts. Fbi or the police in an announcement published on ragner lockers. Dark net leak site this week. The group is threatening to publish full data of victims who seek the help of law enforcement and investigative agencies following a ransomware attack or who contacted data recovery experts to attempt decryption or to conduct the negotiation process this announcement puts additional strain on victims considering that governments worldwide have strongly advised against paying ransoms but have suggested turning to law enforcement instead

FBI
Ragnarok Ransomware Gang Closes up Shop, Leaves Master Decryptor Key Behind

Cyber Security Today

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Ragnarok Ransomware Gang Closes up Shop, Leaves Master Decryptor Key Behind

"Gang behind the ragnarok ransomware has shut operations and released a free decryption utility that victims can use to get their data back at least one expert speculates. The operators will take their profits in return to ransomware with a new scheme. Meanwhile those behind the bought net distributing the four px now where seemed to want out of the business. They're selling the source code. However if a threat actor buys the code the button it can be reactivated.

Wanted: Disgruntled Employees to Deploy Ransomware – Krebs on Security

Cyber Security Today

02:08 min | 9 months ago

Wanted: Disgruntled Employees to Deploy Ransomware – Krebs on Security

"Ransomeware. Gangs usually try to compromise. Victims computers by secrecy tricking employees into downloading. What they think is legitimate file but one attacker is blatantly appealing to employees greed. He sending emails to employees asking them to infect their companies system with ransomware in return they get a piece of the ransom according to security company abnormal security which is seen emails like this received by its customers. The crook says the employees would get one million dollars in bitcoin. That's assuming the employer pays a two point five million dollar ransom and how does this attacker. Fine potential victims by searching through link them in fact this attacker started out by sending poisoned email attachments to senior executives but when all of his attempts failed turn to finding greeting employees two i good for executives for spotting the initial phony messages and second employees. Need to be warned that they might get a pitch inviting them to be criminal. Cisco systems is investigating what it calls it medium severity vulnerability that could impact some of his routers and edge platforms. The problem is in the server. Name identification requests filtering in cisco's web security appliance and firepower threat. Defense devices it also affects all open source project releases of the snort intrusion detection engine prior to release two point nine point eighteen now. The current version of snort is three an attacker could exploit the vulnerability to compromise a host machine. At the moment there are no work arounds for the cisco products and earlier version of snort. Those with affected secure cisco devices should watch the company's security website for mitigation or patches

Cisco
"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

07:22 min | 9 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"Very interesting. Yeah and make sense why you would choose. Those architectures were those. Broadly speaking inspired by other techniques. Or did you really have to come up with something novel for this use case v new like in the past people have used basically vinoo. People are using hardware performance. Come best for the male vegetation and saw they have been some techniques in the past but when we would win this so we came up with the like the i mean. We knew the hardware performance. Congress is important became with the team based model but at the same time there was another paper published. Also used the ellis team biz twin quotas for medved addiction v and that kind of published at the same time so that was interesting. Yeah very interesting. Great minds think alike. I guess sometimes. Well let's talk about the results. We've mentioned already that you were framing it in the context of false positives and negatives. Could you share some numbers with us. What sort of statistical achievements to the model turn out getting. This was a preliminary results right so because the does his small right and it has to be done on. A large scale like be adopted by industries right like antibiotics companies that need to be very lost. Data set and the mar- does need to be retrained with variants and so on each day right because they need to learn so with us even with a small data set viewer able to achieve around eighty to ninety percent accuracy in terms of classification. At this point the model is purely supervised classification. We also envisioned that this could actually be upgraded to floor casting as when for example by understanding the micro Events off program for the certain amount of time you can fly cast like how minecraft Events look like in the future and based on that the model will be able to play that vendor. It is a benign or ransom. So that is like a next part of the research or again. Even with a limited amount of data we were able to generate and everything so on average we were able to achieve eighty to ninety percent accuracy. The false positives with seventy percent training. Data were unknown twenty to fifteen percent for most of the branches like for most of the performance groups and false negative. Were around one to us. So basically allow thank you. Very few ransom biz to be classified as benign. But it was able to take most of them. So we've been talking about these lower level features things like essentially measuring. What the us doing. Even though i understand intuitively like okay. Ransomware is going to maybe be encrypting more than other programs. It doesn't obviously follow for me. How a model would work what it would look at in those features and what it would consider in making its decision. I guess you're closer to the data. Though do you find the resulting model interpret. -able can you understand the mechanism of it or is it just kind of black box. So machine leading is usually kind of a black box right so we tried to see the eight percents right. I mean to me like the naked ice. The data's it kind of looked similar for the benign and ransomware. But obviously if you try to separate mushin learning is obviously seeing something as which humans obviously cannot see and they were able to identify something. Because you see like the lsu is doing in this case is keeping track of the past features as were right so basically the process that is scheduling different processes. It's not like ransom on visit. Executing on the cpu go right. The processes can also come in so basically the events His noisy right. But let's tim. Model is having a fast memory of some events and combining all of these. It's creating some thick new features which obviously the human is not able to perceive. And that's how able to classify between nine and ransom. This if i were an administrator or maybe i oversaw datacenter. Something like that. I would be chomping at the bit to get your software into my industrial application because the features you're looking at they don't invade privacy. They're fairly agnostic to what the program is. And that sort of thing. I would love to get this on all those machines and then have some indicators about whether or not you know the seems to be a ransomware infecting my system. How far away do you think we are from this being an industrial application in that manner. So there was a conference in other university and intellectually presented the paper and work on exactly similar things so they are looking into using this microsoft addiction events which they have already embedded different sensors into the cpu and collecting data from that to provide the security. So industries honor the doing research impetus philan- soon probably will have some real life application coming out and when that comes of course there'll be a cat and mouse game. Maybe hesitate to ask this. Because i don't want you to give them too good of advice. But once the malware ransomware creators learn about these techniques. Do you think there are avenues by which they can avoid them so obviously i was smart right. So they're like law is one or two steps forward than the verification of the security engineers because what they need to find this one loophole and as security verification engineer behalf night close on the dopes right for them to come into. I mean. I'll say it will be a a raise. You know where we are trying to protect him on the need to find this. One loophole and systems are very complex. And they're getting complex complex. So that i will in this crossed for sure. You've mentioned a couple constraints on this like having the setup with vm's and doing this properly secured way. Has you know. An overhead resulted in a small but still promising data set. So there's lots of ways. This could be scaled up if the right investment was put into it. What do you think are the most fruitful directions. This should move in the future. That's right actually. Because this data collection and everything if you see when it comes to providing machine leading based solutions the major constraint So you need to have a really good data said to make sense of the industries like you know the the current antivirus industries the companies. I think they are already investing into does died. Action who riding machine lending solutions but yes if they invest more and collaborate with universities. And so i mean we could have a really good data increase like ramp of the development of such candy. Sums of the frameworks. Bear can protect against ezekiel attacks. Because i think machine learning is the only thing which can kind of forecast classify for something which is not depressing and provide protection against cd decks. Absolutely this a very modern real threat to the world that we need solutions for. Well where can people find you online. If you go to the university of florida and search for fix research. Mitch's shortfall florida institute for cyber security research..

vinoo ellis Congress lsu us microsoft ezekiel university of florida Mitch florida institute for cyber se
"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

08:53 min | 9 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"And we look into security solutions which can utilize machine learning so basically. We tried to love machine learning biz harbor security solutions where you said european students. Have you picked your thesis topic entitle yet so basically. I know what i'm supposed to do. The topic is not finalized yet so basically. I'm working on developing machine learning based a secure physical design solutions for side channel attacks. But that does not dispute but is about. This is about something but yeah. My dissertation will be on using machine. Learning to enable the physical design that can allow pre silicon based verification for the guide companies like intel synopsys and for the goldman chips and so on a. Let's very interesting. Maybe we could take a moment there before we get into the paper. That's not something i'm familiar with. Is this new cutting edge stuff for you. Just pushing it forward. So it's a new cutting edge stuff so you must be Fight channel bloomberg is like power side. there was a spectre and meltdown. Right which create a huge buzz because all the interlock addictions wounded. So basically what happens is like all the chips of john manufactured that is like a lot of engineering effort before it gets fabric. It right because once you get a chip. It's like fine lies. You cannot make any modifications to the hardware. So there's like a huge deal verification going on in the background like even before the chip gets fabricated by dmc global foundries right so doing that verification efforts. They tried to make sure that there are no hardware abilities in design right. Such that designers not vulnerable to power side china lizard fault injection attacks and so on but what happens is cutting verification afoot allegedly metered right because you need to have the physical characteristics to big show. Your design is not vulnerable. Because we're trying to say is after fabrication your Leaking any of these sites and wonder abilities chip is not fabricated yet right. It's just in the silicon area so my effort comes into that. So basically providing on this cat industries with these verifications frameworks where you can kind of emulate the boasts silicon environment in europe recently test framework to make sure that your design on your chip layout is not vulnerable to these side general vulnerabilities and that's where my dissertation is more focused towards. We'll exciting important stuff for sure. Well the main paper. I wanted to invite you on to talk about his titled the stop a hardware assisted. Runtime crypto ransomware detection technique for anyone. Who's not familiar. I think most listeners will at least be aware of crypto ransomware attacks. How could you not. But could you give a high level summary for what's happening there. What are the security holes that allow such a massive takeover to happen in an organization. Basically what happens. Is these kinds of attacks like very prominent right. Everyone has heard of and recently in florida. They attacked the pipeline right. And then tyler thank database for sabotage and asking money like ransom like bitcoin and everything right. So what happens is like the attackers kind of exploit someone like loopholes in your system and they get access to your system right once they get access to your system to start encrypting your files and databases everything and in done like injury. Darn to give back access to those files. They asked for some money in terms of Currencies which are like untraceable in everything. So since these Kind of rich sabotage are like me hostage on your data files like critical spatially in government agencies like the pipeline and even in hospitals because these areas where like most but because these people don't come from like the cybersecurity background and so on so systems kind of more expensive and more critical data to save right. So that's where the and some will and everything is very critical when it comes to all these institutions which handling on the critical user data. Right absolutely a lot of organizations have turned to software solutions for this and it kind of fits with the way people are thinking right. We've had virus checkers for longtime that are all software. Based why is a hardware assisted. Run time a good solution for this problem if you talk about the solutions right like all. The antivirus is innovating. They're softer conditions right. So basically how. The book is the already know the malvern. The ransomware Tried to extract the software been signatures out of this. I am based on that kind of perform the signature verification. You tried to run something on your system and say hey this is kind of template matching and then they say hey. This signature belongs to virus. It should not be right but what happens is all these attackers. They're also very smart right. They apply changes to they are malware in such a way that signature changes and all of these anti-viruses and everything they're not able to detect those and so basically if you see in overall all these Software based verification methods. Dan not applicable zero day attacks right like new variants of as cripple transom whereas if attack a change those and just sprinkled in the network maybe this software based applications won't be able to deduct them and time so basically what we plan to do that. We aim to extract the hardware features. Basically like a signature. So it will be like analyzing someone's handwriting and then analyzing different ways he writes email and so but the key characteristics of that person at the handwriting remains the same so basically that way by analyzing the harvey based micro events of this ransom bills. We can protect against the at tax. Which will be really helpful. What i think of hardware approach in my mind. I'm thinking of something very low level. You know the code i wrote. Maybe it's in python perhaps somehow got converted down to see and then do assembly language or there's operating system libraries involved and then on the hardware just bits going through integrated circuits. It seems very low level and almost like you would be difficult to recognize mauer from ransomware. You were talking about the handwriting. What does handwriting look like at the binary level. Then i say the hard bit events of as you said we are literally going to the lowest level awesome but right so what we exploited in this case like took advantage of a all these hardware performance registers counters provided by the architecture itself right to these performance counters are actually used by the developers to see the efficiency of the goal right like this particular section has a bottle neck or something right in terms of kashmir Mrs under branch executions and so on right so we took advantage of those hardware performance counters and extracted this metric so some of these hardware metrics include like brian trade branch miss prediction rate gash. Mrs elvin misread and so on. So they're like punch of these micro architecture events which are like out there and could be utilized very interesting the branch rate if i understand that correctly at the assembly level branching is really like an if statement i guess at a higher level. It's you know if this is true. Do this otherwise branch to some other location and it seems like coach should be free to branch or not branch whenever at once going into it. What lead you to believe that. Could be an insightful metric. That would help. Tell the difference between some of these different types of software basically when we were planning on developing some of these features right say features but the technique which could explain the hardware. Michael architecture events to what we had in mind was that a program is not changing Over events basically. If you see a trip to ransomware right what's basic characteristics right so it's going to search for all the data files in that the user data on the system. Start encrypting it right. So that is a very basic characteristic and if you try to extract the micro architecture events of this behavior putting somewhere you will find some similarities. Making of dissimilarities by naked is will be like very difficult right. So that's why we try to exploit machine. Dining in this case very happy bunch of this mike events captured from different ransom views into benign programs. And then we say hey this..

dmc global goldman bloomberg intel tyler china john europe florida Mrs elvin misread mauer Dan kashmir brian Michael mike
"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

02:04 min | 9 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"Hi kyle thanks for having me. My name is nathan monday. I'm appears candidate at university of florida. I worked in the floridians dude for cybersecurity. Research under professor mocked on uber and my specialization is in hardware security and we look into security solutions which can utilize machine learning so basically. We tried to love machine learning biz harbor security solutions where you said european students. Have you picked your thesis topic entitle yet so basically. I know what i'm supposed to do. The topic is not finalized yet so basically. I'm working on developing machine learning based a secure physical design solutions for side channel attacks. But that does not dispute but is about. This is about something but yeah. My dissertation will be on using machine. Learning to enable the physical design that can allow pre silicon based verification for the guide companies like intel synopsys and for the goldman chips and so on a. Let's very interesting. Maybe we could take a moment there before we get into the paper. That's not something i'm familiar with. Is this new cutting edge stuff for you. Just pushing it forward. So it's a new cutting edge stuff so you must be Fight channel bloomberg is like power side. there was a spectre and meltdown. Right which create a huge buzz because all the interlock addictions wounded. So basically what happens is like all the chips of john manufactured that is like a lot of engineering effort before it gets fabric. It right because once you get a chip. It's like fine lies. You cannot make any modifications to the hardware. So there's like a huge deal verification going on in the background like even before the chip gets fabricated by dmc global foundries right so doing that verification efforts. They tried to make sure that there are no hardware abilities in design right. Such that designers not vulnerable to power side china lizard fault injection attacks and so on

dmc global goldman bloomberg intel tyler china john europe florida Mrs elvin misread mauer Dan kashmir brian Michael mike
How to Detect Ransomware

Data Skeptic

02:04 min | 9 months ago

How to Detect Ransomware

"Hi kyle thanks for having me. My name is nathan monday. I'm appears candidate at university of florida. I worked in the floridians dude for cybersecurity. Research under professor mocked on uber and my specialization is in hardware security and we look into security solutions which can utilize machine learning so basically. We tried to love machine learning biz harbor security solutions where you said european students. Have you picked your thesis topic entitle yet so basically. I know what i'm supposed to do. The topic is not finalized yet so basically. I'm working on developing machine learning based a secure physical design solutions for side channel attacks. But that does not dispute but is about. This is about something but yeah. My dissertation will be on using machine. Learning to enable the physical design that can allow pre silicon based verification for the guide companies like intel synopsys and for the goldman chips and so on a. Let's very interesting. Maybe we could take a moment there before we get into the paper. That's not something i'm familiar with. Is this new cutting edge stuff for you. Just pushing it forward. So it's a new cutting edge stuff so you must be Fight channel bloomberg is like power side. there was a spectre and meltdown. Right which create a huge buzz because all the interlock addictions wounded. So basically what happens is like all the chips of john manufactured that is like a lot of engineering effort before it gets fabric. It right because once you get a chip. It's like fine lies. You cannot make any modifications to the hardware. So there's like a huge deal verification going on in the background like even before the chip gets fabricated by dmc global foundries right so doing that verification efforts. They tried to make sure that there are no hardware abilities in design right. Such that designers not vulnerable to power side china lizard fault injection attacks and so on

University Of Florida Kyle Nathan Goldman Intel Bloomberg Dmc Global John China
"ransomware" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:50 min | 9 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Business by an illegitimate business with the wrinkle the illegitimate business is almost entirely overseas. So this comparison of ransomware to a protection scheme. I think is one. We hear a couple other places and implies a certain type of relationship and a certain type of exchange that ransomware perpetrators kind of offering the people affected by ransomware alvar. Just in case we have anybody watching or listening who may not be as intimately familiar. How ransomware operates can you give us a quick overview as to what it is how it tends to affect people maybe one or two prominent examples recently about that highlight the broader impact. It's been having and why it's been such an issue of public concern yet to begin. It's a nuanced issue. Due to the fact that a lot information we don't know about the payments Recent fbi hearings at the senate talked about how twenty five to thirty five percent of all ransomware payments aren't disclosed to authorities so even just knowing the grand scope and scale of this is still unknown to the public but generally what what generally occurs is a company will receive some type of notification and then seeking demand from the non-state actor affiliate and they will request a certain amount of money usually in cryptocurrency. Bitcoin predominantly us from currency. And they're the last other to decrypt the the piece of information they have and kind of extort money out of them and from there A lot of the big main incidence. We've seen in recent recent couple of weeks. i've been targeting other supply chains or very vulnerable organizations either. Have some type of legacy system or inadequate cybersecurity measures and from there the company will hopefully talk with law enforcement and get some type of tracking the payments and then usually do porn forcing to pay while there's split currently now between whether if that's a good business practice or not because some situations payment is not necessary but others. We've seen hospitals who are kind of tied to the downtime related to these incidents and can't afford luxury of not paying so they're they really are pressured into paying and we've seen demands up to seventy million recently with it software providers and as low as four million regarding meatpacking industry. So you guys kind of come up with what in some circles. I suspect will be a little bit of a controversial solution. Which is you should ban mean. Criminalize released penalize people were caught in this from actually complying with the ransom demand and therefore liberating their information access to the computer systems. Whatever is being held hostage. Why is it that you all think. A prohibition of ban is the right approach for congress and for the broader federal government the united states to take in this particular circumstance. And what is this set of conditions which should apply. Are you talking about an absolute ban or are there certain circumstances. Were you think there needs to be some flexibility around the margins and then if there is that how do you prevent that exception from kind of swallowing the whole. Yeah so First of all the issue is not an easy one and no solution is going to be out. You're looking for the The least bad solution here. Most ransomware victim companies or entities are not innocent victims. They are negligent. That's not to say that there are no purely innocent victims but most of the time ransomware attacks work because companies have not been a specialty forward leaning in keeping systems up to date. They've left systems and so the question becomes whenever one of these company pays a ransom. They are effectively encouraging future attacks. They're feeding a market place and unlike human ransoms where the cost is human life. I in most of these situations the cost is data Which may be catastrophic for the effected entity catastrophic for the society and so the question is whether we should encourage discourage or prohibit people from feeding the market for future ransomware attacks by participating in these markets and a bye. Bye bye making these payments Our view is the generally speaking right now the current. Us government position is to discourage but not prohibit. The government takes the view that they strongly discourage companies from paying ransom. For exactly the reason that. I just articulated however they don't actually prohibit and this is quite different from other corrupt payments. Where you're generally prohibited for making corrupt payments however There are situations as with alvarado mentions attack on a hospital where the loss of data may actually. You know shutdown respirator or you know 'cause life loss or or you know disastrous consequences for people and in those situations i. It's probably better to make the payments than not and so the question is who gets to decide that and our basic view is that companies should not be deciding that on their own they should be generally prohibited from making these payments with the exception of circumstances in which they apply for and receive permission from federal authorities to do so and the federal authorities should review those applications with a on. I toured larger public policy considerations like is there a imminent loss of human life at issue is there are going to be catastrophic damage to the economy generally rather than simply to a company that you know failed to do cyber security due diligence. There's no perfect solution to this. Dr general view is dry up the market and the best way to that is to make it harder much harder and make it presumptively illegal for companies to line. The pockets of of these criminal gags so give us a sense about what the legal landscape looks like already. 'cause y'all spend a fair amount of time articulating i the comparative prohibitions that exist in law regarding other torts of problematic payments opposed public policy problems. But then you also know a couple of authorities that already get real close to this question. But none necessarily encompasses the whole ransom. Wear the whole universe of ransomware circumstances elder. I know you did a lot of this. Research is trying to you first and we can bump it over to ben to supplement a little bit yeah Through to the biggest development occurred last. October when the department of treasury's office of foreign assets control issue to advise An advisory relating to the involvement in crypto currencies ran somewhere in the sanctions regime. And they're the advisory while it's nonbinding described the the current approach would adopt and the current approach is that anyone who materially assists sponsor provides any financial material took a logical support to the actress on the.

ransomware alvar fbi senate federal government congress alvarado united states Us department of treasury office of foreign assets contr
Accenture Claims ‘No Impact’ in Apparent Ransomware Attack

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Accenture Claims ‘No Impact’ in Apparent Ransomware Attack

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting Accenture claims there was no impact in an apparent ransomware attack global consulting firm Accenture says a cyber attack on IT systems has been identified and isolated Accenture did not specify when the incident occurred or identified as a ransomware attack but the lock that ransomware gang announced the attack Tuesday night on its dark web leak site in chat images shared with the Associated Press by the cyber security intelligence firm sizeable walked it was demanding fifty million dollars from Accenture and said of Thursday evening deadline walked it is a Russian speaking ransomware syndicate hi Mike Rossio

Accenture Mike Rossi The Associated Press Mike Rossio
"ransomware" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

02:36 min | 10 months ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

"Think that i got my start at the middle school newspaper. The hopkinson buzz. No but really. I started telling stories in middle school and how to really great journalism teacher. And as i you know as i got older and was considering what i wanted to do what i really love to do is right and learn new things and so this is a great field for me. I have been a local government reporter in rural washington state. And since then i have mostly been a business reporter largely reporting on tech mostly in the pacific northwest and i relocated to continue covering tech in san francisco just about two years ago. So i was at the seattle times than the associated. Press and now the post did you imagine when you were a middle schooler. They're being inspired by your teacher that someday you'd be under the masthead of an organization as well known as the post. I never thought that would happen. I'm still honestly a little bit shocked. That i work here. It's a great place. Well congratulations i mean. It's particularly you know in these challenging times for journalists Hats off to you. It's quite Quite a career path. And you you've You've worked your way up quickly so good for you much. Yeah it's it's you know. It is a challenging time for the industry. But i think we have some really good like industry newspaper leaders. That are still strong. Which is fantastic. And so yeah. You know the more information about our right. We'll let's dig into the article. We're going to discuss today. This is Article that you co authored with some of your colleagues at the washington post is titled the anatomy of a ransomware attack What prompted you all to take on this topic. What would what prompted the creation of this article. You know it's interesting. I honestly think it was the colonial hack. The colonial pipeline ransomware attack. That kind of eventually spurred this on because we had been covering ransomware attacks up until that point of course as kind of one offs. You know There were the healthcare attacks last fall and and we have covered some of these big groups and things but we had never done this kind of huge comprehensive approach but as we saw some of these more high profile tax light colonial and j b s and people were hearing more and more about these. We thought oh you know it's the time is finally right to take a big step back and actually explain to people. What actually are these weird they coming from. And how do they affect you. You know like you. A normal person. Living in our society

seattle times pacific northwest middle school washington post russia san francisco conti washington curtis minter Curtis breast cancer
taking a closer look at Ransomware

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

02:36 min | 10 months ago

taking a closer look at Ransomware

"Think that i got my start at the middle school newspaper. The hopkinson buzz. No but really. I started telling stories in middle school and how to really great journalism teacher. And as i you know as i got older and was considering what i wanted to do what i really love to do is right and learn new things and so this is a great field for me. I have been a local government reporter in rural washington state. And since then i have mostly been a business reporter largely reporting on tech mostly in the pacific northwest and i relocated to continue covering tech in san francisco just about two years ago. So i was at the seattle times than the associated. Press and now the post did you imagine when you were a middle schooler. They're being inspired by your teacher that someday you'd be under the masthead of an organization as well known as the post. I never thought that would happen. I'm still honestly a little bit shocked. That i work here. It's a great place. Well congratulations i mean. It's particularly you know in these challenging times for journalists Hats off to you. It's quite Quite a career path. And you you've You've worked your way up quickly so good for you much. Yeah it's it's you know. It is a challenging time for the industry. But i think we have some really good like industry newspaper leaders. That are still strong. Which is fantastic. And so yeah. You know the more information about our right. We'll let's dig into the article. We're going to discuss today. This is Article that you co authored with some of your colleagues at the washington post is titled the anatomy of a ransomware attack What prompted you all to take on this topic. What would what prompted the creation of this article. You know it's interesting. I honestly think it was the colonial hack. The colonial pipeline ransomware attack. That kind of eventually spurred this on because we had been covering ransomware attacks up until that point of course as kind of one offs. You know There were the healthcare attacks last fall and and we have covered some of these big groups and things but we had never done this kind of huge comprehensive approach but as we saw some of these more high profile tax light colonial and j b s and people were hearing more and more about these. We thought oh you know it's the time is finally right to take a big step back and actually explain to people. What actually are these weird they coming from. And how do they affect you. You know like you. A normal person. Living in our society

Seattle Times Middle School Pacific Northwest San Francisco Washington Washington Post
Hackers Rebrand After Colonial Pipeline Attack

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Hackers Rebrand After Colonial Pipeline Attack

"I wanna take you back to may six this year. It's a day. That's come to mark a significant moment in america's awareness of cybercrime in just over two hours on that thursday nearly one hundred gigabytes of data was stolen from the network of colonial pipeline. The biggest fuel pipeline in the us early the following morning when colonial workers found a ransom note on a control room computer it would lead the pipeline to shutdown and create gash shortages and higher prices across the southeastern. Us colonial would end up paying seventy five. Bitcoin's worth about four point four million dollars at the time for decryption code the fbi later recovered sixty four of those coins and identified the hackers as a group known as dark side likely based out of russia but the criminals themselves. They were able to slip away now. It looks like dark side might have returned analysts say they found similarities in the operations of dark side. And a new group calling itself black matter. So what does this mean for cybersecurity How much of a threat is this. New group joining us to discuss is our cybersecurity reporter. David bertie. Hi david zoe. So this new group black matter has emerged apart from the kind of similar name dark side. What do these groups have in common. So there's a couple of things. Cybersecurity analysts have noticed over the last week or so one is that there are overlapping crypto currency wallets between some of the members tied to these two groups so the actual wallets were receive bitcoins from companies paying digital ransoms. Secondarily you also see these ransomware groups using similar strains of rants worthy actual malware deployed company systems bears similarities between those two groups and then finally the keys that these two groups actually give victims to eventually unlock their files if they should pay ransom bear similarities as

America Bitcoin David Bertie David Zoe FBI Russia
SEC Chief Says Crypto Is Rife With Fraud, Scams and Abuse

The Dan Proft Show

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

SEC Chief Says Crypto Is Rife With Fraud, Scams and Abuse

"Commission, said that investors need more protection in the Cryptocurrency market, which he said is rife with fraud, scams and abuse. Gary Ginzler listed several areas where crypto needed to be reined in or regulated. There are areas which are particularly susceptible to money laundering, sanctions, tax collection and extortion via ransomware. Councilor has been viewed as receptive toward crypto currency and other new financial technologies after a stint as a professor at MIT, where he focused research and teaching on public policy and digital currency correspondent Jeremy Ellis

Gary Ginzler MIT Jeremy Ellis
Information Stealing Malware Solarmarker Reemerging on the Malware Scene

Cyber Security Today

02:02 min | 10 months ago

Information Stealing Malware Solarmarker Reemerging on the Malware Scene

"Ransomware attacks are soaring. That's the conclusion of security vendors. Sonic wall in its analysis of recent trends in threat attacks. The volume of ransomware around the world hit just over three hundred and four million attempts in the first six months of this year that was equal to the number of attempts for all twenty twenty in the second quarter alone. There were almost one hundred and eighty nine. Million attempts report argues that the more organizations that pay ransoms the greater the incentive ransom groups have to launch attacks organizations may be paying through their cyber insurance with the goal of containing the cost of the attack but the report suggests that only shows threat groups that ransomware pays and paying doesn't eliminate the chance at a ransomware group was strike of victim again. The report adds the united states is by far the country. That's the biggest target of ransomware attempts and for some reason most of them are aimed at organizations or residents in florida. Cyber security teams are being warned that these solar marker password information stealing now wear which is aimed at window systems has been improved according to cisco systems callous threat intelligence service the unknown threat attack actor developing this now where has made some changes to hide his activity. It's still asks victims to download and infected. Pdf or microsoft word file. One example is a file for application developers or it departments with the title changes in hardware software documentation one way to limit the spread of this now whereas to educate employees on the risks of downloading files and software sent to them from unexpected sources.

United States Florida Cisco Microsoft
"ransomware" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Fbi and <Speech_Male> hash out a plan for <Speech_Male> going after these groups <Speech_Male> but that's an impossible <Speech_Male> thing to do <Speech_Male> when the russian government <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> at very best <Speech_Male> turning a blind eye to these <Speech_Male> groups but often <Silence> protecting <SpeakerChange> them <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so these these cyber <Speech_Female> gangs ransomware. <Speech_Female> This is criminal <Speech_Female> activity <Speech_Female> even if the russian <Silence> intelligence <Speech_Female> is collaborating <Speech_Female> with them. In <Speech_Female> some way. It's <Speech_Female> not official. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And i don't know <Speech_Female> if the us <Speech_Female> could prove that <Speech_Female> russian <Speech_Female> intelligence <Speech_Female> is working <Speech_Female> with them at all <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> can biden <Speech_Female> use something <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> like the <Speech_Female> military cyber <Speech_Female> command <Speech_Female> to go after <Speech_Female> the ransomware <Speech_Female> attackers <Speech_Female> or would that be <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> considered an <Speech_Female> inappropriate use of the military. <Speech_Female> Because it's <Speech_Female> a criminal <SpeakerChange> action <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> right that <Speech_Male> the sort <Speech_Male> of gray <Speech_Male> area that we find <Speech_Male> ourselves in i think <Speech_Male> the administration <Speech_Male> is pretty reticent <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> use <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> military <Speech_Male> like you said <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> for involvement <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> what is generally <Speech_Male> considered a law enforcement <Speech_Male> issue. <Speech_Male> I think it's <Speech_Male> it's no <Speech_Male> surprise to <Speech_Male> see that the it was the <Speech_Male> fbi <Speech_Male> that was involved <Speech_Male> in extracting <Speech_Male> these bitcoins <Speech_Male> from the dark side <Speech_Male> affiliates wallet <Speech_Male> and not <Speech_Male> some other <Speech_Male> entity <Speech_Male> within the us government. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> it's a very difficult <Speech_Male> thing to <Speech_Male> unleash. <Speech_Male> The us military <Speech_Male> even in the <Speech_Male> realm of cyber <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> the citizens <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> a country with which <Speech_Male> you share an adversarial <Speech_Male> relationship or <Speech_Male> anywhere right. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> potential <Speech_Male> for escalation <Speech_Male> is just unknown. <Speech_Male> And i think <Speech_Male> the administration <Speech_Male> is rightly <Speech_Male> treading <Speech_Male> carefully. <Speech_Male> And there just isn't <Speech_Male> a playbook <Speech_Male> for dealing with <Speech_Male> this and part <Speech_Male> of that reasons because <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know there's a <Speech_Male> hazy line <Speech_Male> between criminality <Speech_Male> pure criminality <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> russian government <Speech_Male> sanctioned <Speech_Male> actions <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> the administration. <Speech_Male> And i think everyone <Speech_Male> is trying to figure <Speech_Male> out in this world <Speech_Male> of cyber <SpeakerChange> criminality <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> michael schwartz. I <Speech_Female> want to thank you so much <Silence> for talking with us. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> really appreciate it. It's been <Silence> an honor. Thank you <Speech_Female> michael. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Schwartz is an investigative <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> reporter <Speech_Female> for the <SpeakerChange> new york times. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fresh air's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> executive producer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is danny miller. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Technical director <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and engineer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is audrey bentham. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our interviews and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> reviews produced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an edited <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by any salad. Phyllis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> myers san <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brigger. Lauren transall <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> heidi simone <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to recent madden <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and rebuilding auto <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> challenor. <Speech_Music_Female> Seth kelly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> kayla lattimore intro <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wolfram <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our associate <Speech_Music_Female> producer of digital <Speech_Music_Female> media. Is molly seavy <Speech_Music_Female> nesper. <Speech_Music_Female> Roberta shorrock <Speech_Music_Female> directs the show. I'm terry gross.

Roberta shorrock michael schwartz Seth kelly heidi simone michael Schwartz kayla lattimore audrey bentham molly seavy Lauren transall new york russian myers san brigger.
"ransomware" Discussed on 7 Layers

7 Layers

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on 7 Layers

"Ransomware attack response plan a backup files and educating employees on password hygiene how to spot suspicious emails our links and how to report suspicious activity. The three to one rule is a common strategy for file backups. The strategy is as follows. Three have three copies of data available to have two copies on a device separate from the original copy think flash drives or an external hard drive one. Have one copy off site. The cloud would work for this by following the strategy in the event of an attack. It can wipe the infected device and restore the backup the fbi recommend organizations. Keep all software up to date as another prevention technique. And of course the recommend having a solid antivirus system. I'm sure some you are thinking. Yeah i know all this what to do of me or my organization has ransomware attack. And unfortunately there isn't a lot you can do infected devices. Have we wiped more often than not to remove the ransomware as far as paying the ransom. The fbi recommends you don't but it's ultimately a cost benefit analysis losing the files or having them leaked may cost more than the ransom itself. Paying also doesn't guarantee you get the files. Of course you should also report. The ransomware attack. Ransomware is considered a crime in the us and attack should be reported to the fbi and now a word from our sponsor after the break. We'll discuss the impact of ransomware attacks. The recent rise of ransomware. And why exactly these attacks are occurring. It infrastructure is under more demand more scrutiny than ever the way we build networks has fundamentally changed with new technologies constantly evolving to solve new challenges at the same time the role of it departments and of individuals within the department is changing while vendors an executive strategize around new technologies. Those in the trenches scrambled to keep up. Sgx central's definitional guides cover topics from sdn one..

fbi Ransomware Sgx central executive us
"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Was caught in our collection and it was sort of identified to be A. . Somewhat. . Of A new. . Grant somewhere as a service that we haven't really seen much of A. . Analysis about it you sort of decided to sort of dig deeper into it. . That's yellow keen Kennedy, , and what we found I was a third of a quicksilver report around the initial panel that has been found as part of its <hes>. . Announcement or advertisement on the dark web but we couldn't find anything around of the malware. How . worked thinks that's a now when we actually had a sample. . We could actually take the time. . To. . Find. . Out How it operated what it did if they did something different compared to others over ransomware dose south there, , and then sort of wanted to go ahead and. . Put the whole picture together and do an analysis based on the threat actor was behind it, , and where it sort of is announced on the dark web and what they're stalling sort of potential. . Customers. . Would as we want to say what do you can do with it? ? Well. . Let's go through the research together <hes> first of all in terms of the threat actor <hes>, , who do you suppose as behind this? ? Out Now, , that's a very loaded question <hes>. . Sorry. . No. . Not at all. . That's rory gold. . Unfortunately, , it's quite difficult to really pinned on you know who this person is or where perhaps they come from. . The few flags I mean for instance, , there was a rather within the original post on the <hes> the Russian dark web forum it says that targeting any CIS as in Commonwealth of Independent States is prohibited. . Resulted in media ban. . So that might make one think okay. You . know maybe it's a Russian or it's a Russian speaking actor but to be honest whenever you sort of whenever you dig through the panel and even look at the screen shots that they present you <hes> you can see that there's mountain characters hidden within some of the ransom notes. . So, , to be honest, , count, , really come off the fence on this one and can't really give it any sort of attribution but you know there are certain things that might make you think. . Well and you you suspect that <hes> it's a small team behind this. . Yeah. We . we will be of the opinion that would be a very small team <hes> at least two people can't really put a maximum on it but. . Wouldn't imagine it would be particularly large team our large effort behind him. . Well. . Let's go through it together. . I mean the story SORTA begins, , with, , some forum. . That you all tracked down <hes> take us through the story here. . <hes> to essentially after you came find sort of <hes> some public facing stuff displaying the panel. . Displaying the <hes>. . Displaying around somewhere as a service thought, , it was for sale <hes> I look through some forums that I would know generally used to sell these sorts of items <hes> one form in particular a Russian language one. . So I went through the forum I search tort and it was easy to find actually. . As you can see anybody that looks at the block you can see the original hosting <hes>. . You know it's fairly generic. . They give you a link to the tell you all the things does you how can figure it is <hes> it gives you the price it gives you the service fee. . So Yep. . You know as a starting point that was a good space to go with. . Yeah, , it's interesting to me to see the posts that you share here <hes> kind of the salesmanship that that's on display here also, , a very good use of English. . Yes suspiciously good use of English because obviously this is the this is the initial offering of around somewhere but if you take into the profile. . Of the actor, , well, , we'll just call him coriander because that's what they're using. . If you dig into their user history within the forum. . I think it was maybe four or five months before the smog offering there was a post looking for a front and. . You know they wanted somebody who <hes> was fluent in English and they're willing to pay two thousand dollars in Bitcoin. . This post itself was written. . Rather broken English, , which of sort of contrast with small offering which was in perfect English grammatically. . Then always. . So the the distinction between the two would leave us lead us to believe that there were in fact, , at least two different people you know an English speaking from deaf and then somebody else in the shadows as it were. . Well, , let's dig into the <hes>. . The ransomware offering itself can can you walk us through <hes> someone who engage with them? ? What sort of <hes> thing would they find themselves <hes> able to use? ? Unfortunately for businesses and individuals out there it's actually rather easy to do this. . And the initial offering. . It gives you an onion link to the website that smoke is hosted on. . Once you click through to that. . Url, , and you go to your presented the fairly generic registration you put your email in generate a password confirm your password security code. . Once, , you do that. . You get a confirmation on century mill address pretty quickly. . From there, , you're given a bitcoin wallet address. . Ask you send your point to Bitcoin. . So that address I'm once you're there, , you know your you're. . You're essentially you're good to go from that point. . You can immediately go into the dashboard. . That the developers created. . If anybody looks at the blog. . Photos of it it's actually I would argue it's quite a nice Ui. . It's pretty clean. . Rather. . Sparse. . Does what it needs to do. . and honestly from there, , it's just point and click you don't need to program anything. . Really don't need to do anything at all you just you know come up with a campaign title. . Whatever company you're targeting like the BBC or something you call it BBC. . Sedative business model. . So it'll it'll in fact all the computers with the not network but only needs one decryption code to release all of them or if you really want to be nasty, , you sense it under the regular mode, , which means every single computer needs its own decryption key. . You can generate around some message saying you ha ha you've been postponed semi to this bitcoin address? ? and. . There you go. . You just click the create button I'm not saying you're away. .

Commonwealth of Independent St BBC A. Analysis Kennedy ransomware rory gold Ford
"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

", the primary thing that we focus on is is trying to learn what the current trends are in attacker tactics and techniques <hes> how the shifting from targeting specific type of enterprises to targeting other types of enterprises. . What is more popular less popular? ? What is the collaboration between different attack groups look like and how they leverage each other's resources and capabilities, , and really the the method in which we we operate is to not assume in advance what we're going to find in that honeypot. . We basically create the facade of an appealing target in a particular segment of the market, , and then we cast a fairly wide net. . We. . Make it very apparent. . That the target is there we try to make it very apparent that it is an appealing target to a specific sector of attackers, , and then basically keep it up and running for a while usually a couple of months in wait and see what comes our way we deploy network of sensors within the honeypot. . So we can always understand what is happening in that environment. . But we try to first and foremost they hands off in terms of not making it extremely difficult for an attacker to set initial access into the environment we sort of even invite the men to a certain extent. . But once they're in, , that's when we start focusing on what they're doing in an exam understanding exactly how they're going through the motions what are they after? ? How are they doing this? ? Cowardly the operating and how they're running the operation what happens outside of the honeypot are they using data that they're taking from the honeypot? ? Anyway are the interacting with other groups based on that data and their observations? ? Are they bringing in other parties they're collaborating with? ? And so during that process, we , are not completely passive. . Sometimes, , we would try to mimic the response of that enterprise. . We would try to stop their attack to a certain extent, , but really not sufficiently good enough to actually stop what they're doing just to give them the feeling that they're you know in a real world environment, , it's a theater of cybersecurity. . A think would be a great <hes> great name. . I understand that you manage to fool some attackers at least what were they doing in the network once once the Entered it. . I think the the clearest trend that we saw in this research was around. . More attacks. . What we saw was that. . In especially when you compare it with honey pods that we ran in previous years, , significantly more of the ransomware attacks on the honeypot use the tactic that has referred to as they <hes> multi-stage ransomware attack, , and that specific tactic can have a major impact on large organizations <hes> basically <hes>. . I would say is as part of this tactic, what , the attacker would do is they would. . Gain access into a network, , and then they would start moving into network. . Before we go on on with multi-stage attack, , I think we should probably create you know a baseline for our listeners. . What is a single stage ransomware attack? ? A single state ransomware attack is essentially when the user clicks on fishing email and and the machine on which that user is is working is is you know has a ransomware infection and in multiple files usually data files get encrypted, , and then that user is presented with a a ransom, , a ransom demand note but those usually impact just does are we often refer to them as detonate on impact type ransomware? ? So the second you click on that thing, , it starts running it in crypts whatever it Finds on that machine, , and then at posts that ransom demand, , those were classic ransomware attacks and I think over the course of the past year, , we've seen a certain peak in them probably around <hes> late two, , thousand, , eighteen, , early, , twenty, nineteen, , , and during late, , twenty, , nineteen, , two into two, , thousand, , twenty where seeing certain decline in the amount of those single stage. . ransomware attacks are still very high numbers, , but there's a certain decline answers a trend. . So in your experiment, , you're seeing a different tactic multi-stage ransomware. . Correct. . What we saw there the multi-stage attack tactic basically involves <hes> a situation where the attacker is is operating a hacking operation. . It's a when they first start by making sure that they have access into a network that can be a user that clicks on a file, , an attachment it can be in some of the ways, , but once they have access to the network, , they put the rent some more in there, , but they don't detonated they. . I, , tried to maximize the impact of their attack on the target. . So they can be at a place where they can have maximum leverage to gain get as much ransom payment out of that activity as possible. . The way they do that, , and that's why it's called. . multi-stage attack is that. . The first stage involves trying to. . Move in the environment from that single point of entry they discover user credentials, , basically passwords then they tried to use these passwords to move around the network and impact. . Other systems gained control of other systems on each system that they get to. . They go through the same process of they take data and they exfiltrated, , they take user credentials. . They put the rent some more on that impacted asset, , but they don't detonate and then they keep moving in the network until they've exhausted their capability to spread across the network and the idea is to reach as much as as as important assets as possible as critical assets as possible in the network. . Once. . They've exhausted their capability to move around the network the detonate the ransomware that they deployed in the environment across all these impacted us at the same time. . Once the ransomware has needed and there's A. . Large scale denial at service, , usually as as as a result of that, , the follow up very commonly with a ransom demand that involves threats to expose the data that they've stolen user credentials that they've stolen, , and again the ideas at that point in time to gain maximum leverage on the victim. . To pay usually a ransom, , some that ranges between the five and six digits in dollars.

writer Israel Barack Levy Israel J. Ganers Elliot Silas Nukus
"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Malicious Life

"We're GONNA talk in this. You know short conversation that we're going to have about one particular topic which I found as I said very interesting. And that's the shift from ransomware to blackmail a very new development in in ransomware, so let's start from the basics. What's the basic difference between ransomware or a ransom and blackmail? So it's a very good question, so we'll start with some definitions <hes> a nuances in the English language before we dive into our world of <unk> ransomware. So a ransom is a sum of money that is paid to in order to release the captive which could be a person. It could be an encrypted file for that matter. Right whereas black male is. A criminal offence where there's a payment or benefit that is. Paid in return for the criminal, not to reveal compromising damaging information about the victim, so that's an interesting nuance to keep in mind now when it comes to our world of of ransomware. What we've been seeing that the ransomware operators, the several criminals are facing <hes> some problems, sometimes with the getting the money getting paid, not that could be because of a legal or ethical reservations or restrictions. Some organizations are prohibited from paying a ransom to cybercriminals cyberterrorists. The mental agencies I'm guessing. For instance, there's a lot also ethical issues <hes> some organizations believe that these they pay <hes> you know it doesn't stop the attackers from coming back and demanding more ransom, so it's no never ending of vicious cycle of. Payment plus you're never totally sure that. Even if you do pay the money, you'll get information back so. Excellently. and. Also in recent years since the <unk> surge of <hes> ransomware out, we see a lot of <unk> organization actually. Implementing good backups and disaster recovery plans, so a lot of the organizations can partially or even fully recover their data without pain. So ransomware operators needed to find a clever way into making the victims pay in a way to twist the victim's arm into pain, and here comes the black man part, so what they're. Is Not only their encrypting the data, but before the encrypted, or even after they xl trait, ridiculous amounts of sensitive data about the company about the <unk> financial. <hes> statements <hes>. <hes> employees customers data super sensitive information. That is under almost every regulation. A you know a company like that would be fine if if the if the information got out. Right and also, there's a reputational damage. There's a lot of collateral damage there, so what we've been seeing. Is that <hes> a lot of <hes> ransomware operators such as <unk> rebel group. Maize and other type of prominent to ransomware are doing this shift in day <hes>, they now have like blogs into dark net such as that happy blog of rival where they each day almost dare auctioning data of other victims basically <hes> starting price ranges US usually between like. Twenty thousand dollars to fifty thousand dollars, and it goes up and up and up and up so you mean they're auctioning data from companies which refuse to pay the blackmail, and now they're making money off of auctioning that same black male data. Yes this is so clever? <unk> variously clever but very clever. So if you didn't WANNA pay us at the beginning to recover your files. NO PROBLEM WE'RE GONNA auction it. We're going to offer it to the highest bidder so way. They're twisting. They're victims are into paying so a lot of the companies will do it covertly like there. There's also the question of whether you pay or or don't pay and a lot of companies. Even if they paid, they tried to make it very hush hush. And that way you know, it's very hard not to pay <unk>. You have all this data about your customers about your <hes> intellectual property about your financial statements, all of that if it's know out there up for grabs for for the highest bidder. You WanNa. Make sure that you pay. That ransom were black. Mufi, do we know? Oh, can we estimate what percentage of the companies choose to pay versus those who choose not to pay the blackmail? while. It's very difficult to estimate because as I mentioned before. Is probably not the proudest moment of a company when they have to. Pay a ransom some of them. Even if they're paying the rent some eventually <hes>, they wouldn't admit it do it. <unk> hush-hush manner because of searing legal <unk> event reputational damage so even if companies do pay. Very little will actually admit it. So we can't really really know what's going on out there. But we can now is that a lot of people are a lot of organizations do pay and just because if you track down, you know bitcoin wallets, and you see you know <hes> crypto currency currency transactions. You can see that you know. The wallets of the cybercriminals <unk> especially ransom where operators is is increasing. Their annual revenues exceed even billion dollars in some years. So amazed that someone has to pay. This money cannot all come from individuals. Usually the bigger pay-outs come from companies and organizations is where the real money is

ransomware senior director twenty twenty Threat Research Asaf Jim Hung
"ransomware" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on WJR 760

"Detector meeting and surpassing all audience expectations every day you know cyber hackers they use a lot of tools one of the things that you're ransomware use ransomware as a money making scheme and they are constantly on the lookout for online targets big and small they get a hold of your computer and they freeze you out they find a way to change the key the password to your entire computer and don't tell you what it is they sell it back to you that's the ransomware and used to be that these guys would charge thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars they would charge more money than people could afford and they ended up not getting much ransom because people just they couldn't pay it then they didn't want to go borrow what they didn't want to admit this it happened so ransomware became much cheaper seven hundred dollars here five hundred they're much easier to get somebody to pay that and do it to a lot of people then to try to make a big score somebody with ten grand and they decided to go after governments big in large cities city councils and freeze their computers so instead of ten grand now five hundred some of these ransomware attacks are focused on big companies now the Honda became a victim of a huge ransomware attack just a couple weeks ago they had to temporarily shut down some production facilities are financial services operations were closed for days and tens of thousands of employees all were affected now there's one way around this and that's having your data safely and securely backed up on another computer another server imagine that so here you get a ransomware attack somebody somehow gets in your computer locks it and creates a new password all you gotta do is go to your most recent back out before that happened go get a new machine and restore that backup and voila you are up and running and that way you don't need to pay a computer hacker to get it back his wife your computer clean you don't even have to get a new one just to raise the current computer that's got the ransomware I'm just just wipe the hard drive start over is one of the reasons why we encourage people to rely on I..

Honda ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Truth detector meeting and surpassing all audience expectations every day you know cyber hackers they use a lot of tools one of the things that you're ransomware use ransomware as a money making scheme and they are constantly on the lookout for online targets big and small they get a hold of your computer and they freeze you out they find a way to change the key the password to your entire computer and don't tell you what it is they sell it back to you that's the ransomware that used to be that these guys would charge thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars they would charge more money than people could afford and they ended up not getting much ransom because people just because they couldn't pay it then they didn't want to go borrow what they didn't want to admit this it happened so ransomware became much cheaper seven hundred dollars here five hundred they're much easier to get somebody to pay that and do it to a lot of people then to try to make a big score somebody with ten grand and they decided to go after governments big in large cities city councils and freeze their computers so instead of ten grand now five hundred some of these ransomware attacks are focused on big companies now the Honda they came victim of a huge ransomware attack just a couple weeks ago they had to temporarily shut down some production facilities are financial services operations were closed for days M. tens of thousands of employees all were affected now there's one way around this and that's having your data safely and securely backed up on another computer another server imagine that so here you get a ransomware attack somebody somehow gets in your computer locks it and creates a new password all you gotta do is go to your most recent back out before that happened go get a new machine and restore that backup anvil while lock you are up and running and that way you don't need to pay a computer hacker to get it back his wife your computer clean you don't even have to get a new one just to raise the current computer that's got the ransomware I'm just just wipe the hard drive start over is one of the reasons why we encourage people to rely on I. drive the computer backup company that has been recommending we've been recommending for years they offer you the best protection I store a backup of your data in an offsite.

Honda ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Surpassing all audience expectations every day you know cyber hackers they use a lot of tools one of the things they are ransomware use ransomware as a money making scheme and they are constantly on the lookout for online targets big and small they get a hold of your computer and they freeze you out they find a way to change the key the password to your entire computer and don't tell you what it is they sell it back to you that's the ransomware I used to be that these guys would charge thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars they would charge more money than people could afford and they ended up not getting much ransom because people just because they couldn't pay it then they didn't want to go borrow what they didn't want to admit this it happened so ransomware became much cheaper seven hundred dollars here five hundred they're much easier to get somebody to pay that and do it to a lot of people then to try to make a big score somebody with ten grand and they decided to go after governments big in large cities city councils and freeze their computers so instead of ten grand now five hundred some of these ransomware attacks are focused on big companies now Honda they came victim of a huge ransomware attack just a couple weeks ago they had to temporarily shut down some production facilities are financial services operations were closed for days I am tens of thousands of employees all were affected now there's one way around this and that's having your data safely and securely backed up on another computer another server imagine that so here you get a ransomware attack somebody somehow gets in your computer locks it and creates a new password all you gotta do is go to your most recent back out before that happened go get a new machine and restore that backup anvil while lock you are up and running and that way you don't need to pay a computer hacker to get it back you just wipe your computer clean you don't even have to get a new one just to raise the current computer that's got the ransomware I'm just just wipe the hard drive start over is one of the reasons why we encourage people to rely on I. drive the computer backup company that has been recommending we've been recommending for years they offer you the best protection I store a backup of your data in an offsite.

Honda ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on KTOK

"And surpassing all audience expectations every day you know cyber hackers they use a lot of tools one of the things that you're ransomware use ransomware as a money making scheme and they are constantly on the lookout for online targets big and small they get a hold of your computer and they freeze you out they find a way to change the key the password to your entire computer and don't tell you what it is they sell it back to you that's the ransomware and used to be that these guys would charge thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars they would charge more money than people could afford and they ended up not getting much ransom because people just they couldn't pay it then they didn't want to go borrow what they didn't want to admit this it happened so ransomware became much cheaper seven hundred dollars here five hundred they're much easier to get somebody to pay that and do it to a lot of people then to try to make a big score somebody with ten grand and then they decided to go after governments big in large cities city councils and freeze their computers so instead of ten grand now five hundred some of these ransomware attacks are focused on big companies now Honda became a victim of a huge ransomware attack just a couple weeks ago they had to temporarily shut down some production facilities are financial services operations were closed for days and tens of thousands of employees all were affected now there's one way around this and that's having your data safely and securely backed up on another computer another server imagine that so here you get a ransomware attack somebody somehow gets in your computer locks it and creates a new password all you gotta do is go to your most recent back out before that happened go get a new machine and restore that backup and voila you are up and running and that way you don't need to pay a computer hacker to get it back you just wipe your computer clean you don't even have to get a new one just to raise the current computer that's got the ransom run just just wipe the hard drive start over is one of the reasons why we encourage people to rely on I. drive the computer backup company that has been recommending we've been recommending for years they offer you the best protection I store a backup of your data in an offsite.

Honda ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Truth detector meeting and surpassing all audience expectations three day you know cyber hackers they use a lot of tools one of the things that you're ransomware use ransomware as a money making scheme and they are constantly on the lookout for online targets big and small they get a hold of your computer and they freeze you out they find a way to change the key the password to your entire computer and don't tell you what it is they sell it back to you that's the ransomware and used to be that these guys would charge thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars they would charge more money than people could afford and they ended up not getting much ransom because people just because they couldn't pay it then they didn't want to go borrow what they didn't want to admit this it happened so ransomware became much cheaper seven hundred dollars here five hundred they're much easier to get somebody to pay that and do it to a lot of people then to try to make a big score somebody with ten grand and they decided to go after governments big in large cities city councils and freeze their computers so instead of ten grand now five hundred some of these ransomware attacks are focused on big companies now Honda they came victim of a huge ransomware attack just a couple weeks ago they had to temporarily shut down some production facilities are financial services operations were closed for days I am tens of thousands of employees all were affected now there's one way around this and that's having your data safely and securely backed up on another computer another server imagine that so here you get a ransomware attack somebody somehow gets in your computer locks it and creates a new password all you gotta do is go to your most recent back out before that happened go get a new machine and restore that backup and voila you are up and running and that way you don't need to pay a computer hacker to get it back you just wipe your computer clean you don't even have to get a new one just to raise the current computer that's got the ransom run just just wipe the hard drive start over is one of the reasons why we encourage people to rely on I. drive the computer backup company that has been recommending we've been recommending for years they offer you the best protection I store a backup of your data in an off site.

Honda ransomware
"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"ransomware" Discussed on Security Now

"Org. If you or anyone, you know or care about is hit by ransomware, the there's a chance, you know. The first thing is you don't want that to happen. You want to be safe about it happening by somehow arranging to have really really current backups. And you know, although I'm annoyed for example, fried another processor this morning. I am not the least bit worried about any loss of data. My backups backups have backups and the images images have images. And so I am like after having been caught by X P machine dying last year. That's not I'm not going to ever be in that position again. So I'm I'm good. I even have drives that are not online, but briefly come online and then disappear. So that if anything did get me, it would have no way of knowing that there was a dry. That technically was accessible that cannot know cannot otherwise be accessed. So I I mean, I'd take this dangerous. Seriously. This is in my opinion. This is the the biggest concern that exists now is the threat from software that encrypt them, basically, it's like, you know, potentially losing all of the I mean, like not just a drive crash that we can recover from. We've got spin right or the motherboard dies. That's fine. You still have your drives. But, you know, this the idea of something trying to get into your system and to maliciously encrypt your data. No one wants that to happen. That's the worse than a virus? So. But remember this only works on poorly implemented ransom crypto if the crypto is done, right. And the v the first ransomware before this became a fad two first ransomware as we discussed at the time was done, right. A high entropy symmetric key was obtained. It was used with a ES fifty-six cipher with a a varying initialisation vector, which was stuck on the front of all of the encrypted files in order to do proper encryption of the the the byte stream that the file represents. And then that's symmetric key was completely wiped and removed from the system. There was no trace of it left behind you had to pay the ransom in order to in order to get your data back. So it's understan-. Band that? This isn't universal decryption ransomware. It's only if the ransomware that you happen to get bit by. Is was you know, not done properly knock done correctly that you are able to back yourself out. But it's worth knowing. I mean, it's cool that we now have no more ransom dot org as.

ransomware