2 Burst results for "Rania Mustafa"

"rania mustafa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 4 months ago

"rania mustafa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. It's on W and my C just ahead on all things considered. Palestinian activists have been organizing rallies in our area for a long time. But they say there's been a difference in the past year since George Floyd was killed and how people perceive them. We'll hear all about it just ahead after the break. Nine schools in Duval County, Florida face a big decision. How will they choose to remember America's history of slavery? I've roamed the halls with a Confederate slave owner general on the wall. But nobody cares because in Jacksonville to graduates of Robert E. Lee High School on opposite sides of a name change debate on the next morning edition from NPR news. Weekday mornings on W. N. Y C. Support for W. N. Y. C comes from the acting company. Presenting a streamed audio production of Nilo Cruz is Anna in the tropics in a mix of Spanish and English. Directed by Alejandro Rodriguez available to all June 3rd 3 13 at the acting company events, daughter Warg. One degrees. Partly cloudy it right now in Brooklyn is going to stay that way. Tonight. We'll have a love about 56. It'll be partly sunny tomorrow a little bit warmer than what we've seen. It will feel a little more summer like I'm your 76 in the afternoon move about 61 tomorrow night And then Wednesday, we'll have a high of about 77. Chance of rain Late on Wednesday night into Thursday. It's w and my C at 5 50. It's all things considered on W when my C I'm Shawn Carlson. Pro Palestinian groups have been organizing rallies around the region for years, but the activists say they've noticed a difference in the crowds over the last year since George Floyd was killed and how people perceive them. W M I C racing justice reporter Joseph Jedi and reports only influence of George Floyd on the protests. Rania Mustafa has been participating in pro Palestinian rallies since she was a child in North Jersey. She could always recognize the faces in the crowd because only a couple 100 people demonstrated and most of the Arab American, so we always called any protest that we had in Paterson. Kind of like talking to our echo chamber. Mustafa is now the executive director of the Palestinian American Community Center in Clifton, New Jersey. And she says that after George Boy's murder sparked thousands of protests last year that all changed. So this is the first time that I saw a lot of people coming out in large numbers from many different groups from many different walks of life to support in solidarity, she says. A recent protests was the largest in Paterson for Palestinian cause. At least 4000 people gathered the biggest crowd they had before that wasn't 2014 when 1000 people marched to protest the war in Gaza. What happened after the killing of George Floyd really woke up a lot of people specifically the youth and had them start thinking critically about their position. Al it e and their privilege. Kendall Thomas is a Columbia law school professor. He says the George Ford Rally's put a spotlight on human rights issues inspired people to engage with events around the world. We saw demonstrations in Paris and Berlin in London. We saw the name of George Floyd and the story of what had happened to George Floyd. Literally travel around the globe, he says. People watching began connecting the black lives matter. Marches with conflicts in their own communities could make sense of what's happening to me as someone who lives in New York City. Or someone who lives in Ramallah that I couldn't make before because I can watch and listen to stories about events that are similar to and resonate with my own experience. The horror is eases a lot professor and Middle East legal expert at Rutgers University in New Jersey and, like Palestinian organized Iranian Mustafa, she says the faces in the crowd are telling. Ones showing up to rallies and protests in the last year are no longer just the familiar faces. It's not simply people who are of Arab heritage or people who are Muslim, she says. It's African Americans, Latino Americans. White Americans and Jewish Americans. Joseph Jerry in W. N. Y C news..

George Floyd Alejandro Rodriguez Rania Mustafa North Jersey New York City Joseph Jerry Mustafa Kendall Thomas Paris Berlin Ramallah George Boy Jacksonville Shawn Carlson 2014 Robert E. Lee High School Joseph Jedi Brooklyn New Jersey 1000 people
"rania mustafa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"rania mustafa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on W. N. Y C. I'm Michael Hill. Pro Palestinian groups have been organizing rallies around the region for years, but the activists say they've noticed a difference in the crowds over the last year since George Floyd was murdered. And in how people perceive them. W in my Ci's race and justice reporter Joseph Jenny, Um reports on the influence of George Floyd on the protest. Rania Mustafa has been participating in pro Palestinian rallies since she was a child in North Jersey. She could always recognize the faces in the crowd because only a couple 100 people demonstrated. Most of the Arab American, so we always called any protest that we had in Paterson. Kind of like talking to our echo chamber. Mustafa is now the executive director of the Palestinian American Community Center in Clifton, New Jersey. And she says that after George Boy's murder sparked thousands of protests last year that all changed. So this is the first time that I saw a lot of people coming out in large numbers from many different groups from many different walks of life to support in solidarity, she says. A recent protests was the largest in Paterson for Palestinian cause. At least 4000 people gathered the biggest crowd they had before that wasn't 2014 when 1000 people marched to protest the war in Gaza. What happened after the killing of George Floyd really woke up a lot of people specifically the youth and had them start thinking critically about their position. Al it e and their privilege. Kendall Thomas is a Columbia law school professor. He says the George Floyd rallies, put a spotlight on human rights issues and inspired people to engage with events around the world. We saw demonstrations in Paris and Berlin in London. We saw the name of George Floyd and the story of what had happened to George Floyd. Literally travel around the globe, he says. People watching the gang connecting the black lives matter marches with conflicts in their own communities. I could make sense of what's happening to me as someone who lives in New York City. Or someone who lives in Ramallah that I couldn't make four because I can watch and listen to stories about events that are similar to and resonate with my own experience. So Horace. He's is a lot professor and Middle East legal expert at Rutgers University in New Jersey and like Palestinian organized Iranian Mustafa, she says, the faces in the crowd are telling. Ones showing up to rallies and protests in the last year are no longer just the familiar faces. It's not simply people who are of Arab heritage or people who are Muslim, she says. It's African Americans, Latino Americans. White Americans and Jewish Americans. Joseph Jerry in W. N. Y C news. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King and I'm Steve Inskeep. The military that took power in a coup and Myanmar early this year has used force to keep that power. The military has killed more than 830 civilians and put thousands in detention, including the democratically elected leader, Aung San Suu, Cheap. Resistance to the coup continues to grow, and social media images now show Ah military force training to defend the shadows, civilian government. Reporter Michael Sullivan has been following the story is on the line. Hey there, Michael. Steve So is looking at these images. They show people drilling in a clearing in the jungle somewhere. They don't have visible weapons, but they've got uniforms. They're marching in formation. What's going on? We think that they are along the border with Thailand, and as you said, there were dozens of them, but they didn't have any weapons. And this group was formed by the shadow National Unity government made up mainly of those lawmakers sacked after the coup is this people's Defense Force for real, though, is a gaining traction. I don't think so. Not yet anyway. People don't seem all that impressed with the national unity government or its people's Defense Force. But that doesn't mean people aren't fighting back. They're just doing it on their own. And.

Rania Mustafa New York City Michael George Floyd North Jersey Joseph Jenny Michael Hill Joseph Jerry Steve Inskeep George Boy Noel King Kendall Thomas Berlin Paris Mustafa Steve Michael Sullivan 2014 Ramallah Aung San Suu