13 Burst results for "Randy sugar"

"randy sugar" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

07:33 min | 6 months ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"My few points magna thing right, and so we were the only two in our unit volunteering to go every chance we could get twice. The Marines told us we're going lasted. They cancelled it and one summer I was off in India, vacationing like my family originally from India, so I was with. Visiting my family summer and he finally ended up finding a unit to go with. And he was a good marine, so he got promoted to corporal as a result, he was in the seat that got hit with an ID and he was killed. So I always felt like man I had no right to be off vacationing. I should've gone there with them. Had I been here. I would have been in that same unit. And you know and I admit like admittedly I get rationally that I could have gone with them. You know he could still dot. I could come back, but emotionally didn't change the fact that I felt like I should have gotten a promotion instead of him and I should have been in that seat. Him. So when I finally got my chance to go to war three months after he was killed, I was like fuck it, man, if somebody s again naive like I understand this a very nice perspective on war, because you can't control where bullets fly, but nonetheless I went out there with the mentality of somebody has to die. I'd rather be knee than anybody else. So I gave away all my shit, I was like. Whatever happens happens. In again, that's not the healthiest way. Obviously. Healthy I wouldn't say. It was suicidal, but it wasn't healthy approach by any means if that makes sense I mean. Do you feel like you're unhappy with with your current life at that point, or was it more just? Hey I have to shoulder this responsibility or on the other hand. Was it a not happy with my life, and this is a great way to go serve and fulfill things and. You know I'm not happy anyway, so if I die like all all's well like no, yeah. No, it wasn't that I was unhappy. I Love I. Love My life. I, had a great great parents. Great Family College was going gray. Good friends like I, didn't I didn't? I didn't hate life. I loved my life, but to I mean even why enlisted in the Marines in the first place again kind of going back and give it's giving some context. I when I when I came to the US. I was about thirteen years old, and got pretty heavily soon into drugs in alcohol right after right after moving here about fifteen years old, I mean I was very self destructive. I slept scars on my arm from cutting myself. Burning cells very self destructive off that come into play. I mean it sounds like. Like you came with your parents I'm assuming right. Yeah, and it sounds like they were great parents to like. Get Him in the wrong crowd or like. How did that? How did that get about you know? When I moved at thirteen I had lived in at this point, I lived in Bombay, Bangalore Singapore and Austin, so four cities at the age of thirteen years old, good life, though, but I was very lost moving around trying to fit in in every place, trying to adapt in every place, not sure who I wanted to be. Be I wasn't one of those kids who you know. Entrepreneur at seven started lemonade stand back kind of like none of that no, who wanted to be no idea of my path, so I was always to some degree, this kind of person who were pushing the winds. You know when I was a kid playing rugby and India every time I will get cut I would like love. My I love my scars. As there was war wounds, I loved my scars or Singapore used to run barefoot on rocks just to cast myself and so when? When I came into the US again, very lost trying to fit in China adapt and I got it again like I responsibly for my behavior today, but as a young kid very impressionable, so I don't blame my friends, but I got into a crowd that you know my parents have asked me. How could what could they have done differently to prevent it and be told probably nothing I mean if I had gotten to a crowd of let's say ultra runner amount nears back then I probably would have gone all in into run it. got into a crowd and I. Being this kind of person who pushes the extremes I was me and this other guy with the first two in our group. Start going into harder stuff and eat is no longer alive today. I lost two friends to drug addiction like very easily could have been me been a lot of self destructive things that could easily kill you. What changed and so yeah, what? What changed was when I watched the movie Black Hawk down. Yet I mean one of you know incredibly powerful powerful movie, and watching that scene where Gary Gordon Randy Sugar Medal of honor recipients who volunteer to go on the ground, the setup that defensive perimeter from Michael Durant and they died, and they sacrificed their lives knowingly that thousands of arms enemy were heading their way. It just triggered something in me that. What kind of human being would have that courage to knowingly put themselves? To sacrifice their lives for somebody else and here, I was living this at this point, very selfish, meaningless worthless existence. And that was the trigger is after watching the movie I read the Book Black Hawk Down, and just started devouring book after book on military life in combat, and now that was right before you went. That was before you went into the Marine Corps then yeah so. That was the trigger to end, so that kind of was giving the context about wild to have this mentality that to me like watching this movie, I mean it was the inspiration. Join with two guys who sacrifice their lives more somebody else you know and that was in reading book after book on I mean I remember reading this book sobbed. As a studies observation group in Vietnam these guys who were Special Operations Soldiers Edmore Medal of honor recipients in that unit than any other unit in history, just seeing A. Men. In combat, sacrificing their locks for others, it was to me war to me and I'm not saying this is what award junkie kind of mentality, but experiencing the edges of the human condition reveal the essence of the human spirit. If you will like, war brings out the. Very best in the very worst. If you manage, we see people do awful shit. Right like atrocities, horrible things we also see people jumping on grenade to save their fellow human beings and I wanted to go on those edges. I want to explore the wines after living like I, mean great life into the kind of kid with my parents today that y'all may be soft by loving me. And giving me a good life but I like again never really suffered in after that is when I started seeking out suffering literally every context within and without. His. Essay you're talking about being soft, but I'm like I. Don't know I. Mean This guy. Running marathons and greater than that, and then doing the silent thing, it's like you're like a glutton for punishment in a way, but it's pretty cool interesting that you found significance and meaning in it because I think. That's what we do is human beings right? We craft meaning around the experiences that we have whether it's accurate or not, and usually it's not It's whether or not it serves us like I think this means this and I think this means that, and then you have to ask yourself. Does that way of thinking or the meaning that you've attached to it? Serve you exactly know a lot of people for example who've gone through pain and hardship, and it will completely cripple. Because, the meaning is, this is happening to me I'm a victim. There's nothing I can do about it. It's it's not empowering versus okay. Here's some negative situations. And sounds like from your perspective. You've taken those outside circumstances and said okay well. I'm going to attach positively positive meaning to it and actually use. This is fuel to enhance and improve my life. Yeah but it took me a minute to get their. Fair share of victim victim mentality. You know I mean even when I joined the marine, so it took me about a year and a half to get in because I have a blood disorder that. Me would kill me in boot camp, so I had this blood disorder had flat feet. I have scoliosis. I'm like a genetic. Fuck Up. You know so so I when I first enlisted now one hand I was I was going to go in the marines. No matter what but I. Remember Thinking back then like Shit I'm never going to be that fit I got his blood. Disorder basically transports less oxygen through my body, so I was kind of victim was me, and I mean obviously I survived who camp, but I ended up graduating infantry school. School was honor graduate. My platoon, so that's when it started to shift towards. Okay, this is not a barrier..

Marines India US blood disorder Great Family College Singapore Bombay dot Michael Durant rugby Gary Gordon Randy Sugar Austin Marine Corps Bangalore Singapore Vietnam China
"randy sugar" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

08:30 min | 6 months ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"Miss any of our episodes going forward. If they try to pull us down again I guarantee you. We will come back and we'll have those episodes ready for you. You may even missed that original episode on Cove. Nineteen if you listen to save spotify or another platform that got taken down but whatever the case make sure you sign up for the newsletter so you don't miss anything else would. That's our youtube videos whether that's our podcast. Whether that's articles. Whatever else whatever information that you need will be delivered to you in your email address when you sign up for the elite Man News. Some make sure you sign up for that now also on that same token you might as well follow us across the board. Subscribe to our channel on Youtube. If you haven't done that yet follow me on Instagram at Justin Centrum. If you haven't done that yet follow me on facebook just stench if you haven't done that yet and join the facebook group as well. The elite man mastermind. If you haven't that yet follow us across the board on all things because one platform may take us down but another platform is definitely going to have enough all the platforms decide to come together. One day and Ben all of our content. Guess what? We're still gonNA find a way to get you that information that you need the best way to get that information though is to join the newsletter elite magazine. Dot Com slash newsletter. Today our guys would live. It's just incense from from elite man magazine and my guest. Today is off Shea. None of Audie is that right man. How did you say your name last? Perfect little treat on a little tricky Just trying to familiarize myself with before we jumped on but dude. You have an incredible story like you sent me. The information I went through your background dug into some stuff. It's just an incredible story all around doing some fascinating work right now and then the topic we're gonNA cover. Today is a topic that I mentioned a moment ago. That Garza's love on the show. We cover fear and using it to your advantage once you harness the power of fear propel yourself into doing some incredible things in life. And you've done that time and time again for the past few years. I want to dive into that. But can you just take like maybe sixty seconds or so and just kind of talk about what it is you do right now? Yeah what I do right now. Is I wrote this book? Fear of on. I'm the creator of this concept. Fear of on. And the whole idea is leveraging not just fear but at a higher level struggle and pain and suffering of any kind as an access point to bliss and enlightenment so what I currently do. I have the book I do Public Speaking. I do these. Various ultra ones and adventures. All around the world I sell digital information products. And what we're building around the concept of fear. Bona is this movement in a series of products and services in multiple verticals so creating like a fair bonus. Kademi business on a festival if you're on retreats fear Von Journeys. I Have Known nonprofit foundation so really building a movement to help people develop a positive relationship to suffering so they can do three things. Fine live in love their worthy struggle. Nice man love it so was dive into fear? Fear Vonda A in a few moments in of a Marine Corps veteran one. How many years ago was that? And Are you still active at all with that? Like do you still out now. I mean I got in two thousand. Ten did six years in and one torn Iraq. Seven as an infantry non commissioned officer nice cool dive into that or something like you always want to do that or is it something that just kind of I when I moved to the US at thirteen. So when I joined the Marines I wouldn't even a US citizen. I moved in from India and Singapore born in India moved to the move to the US at thirteen. And when I moved to Austin I got very heavily soon after moving here God very heavily into drugs into alcohol. Very self destructive lifestyle. I used to cut myself burn myself. I slept scars on my arm from doing that. From way back when I mean did a lot of things that could have very easily killed me and did in fact lose to France to drug addiction so heading down that path and watching the movie. Black Hawk down was the trigger. That changed my life. You ever seen that movie. I actually haven't seen the movie but I interviewed a guy who's that's based on You ever heard of the Guy Tom Saturday. He's what was the special operations forces did that they had in the movie rangers and Delta Delta Guy. That's what it was he was a Delta Guy. Had Him on the show like a year ago really cool dude bad ass of course He was talking about the whole thing and I actually meant like follow up and watch the movie because I knew I know is good mood before him but never knew about it but actually haven't gotten around to and I probably should but yeah that's a bad ass movie. Yeah powerful movies true story of course and watching that movie and just watching these These men sacrificing their lives for something greater than himself for someone greater themselves. There's one particular where these two medal of Honor Recipients Gary Gordon Randy Sugar Delta snipers who they were in a chopper a relatively safe area but they volunteered to go to the ground. Just two men not knowing when reinforcements arrive to set up a defensive perimeter to protect one of their one of their fellow soldiers Michael Durant and they've an thousands of armed enemy heading their way. They knew what they were getting into in volunteered anyway and they both died but they die protecting Michael Durant. They received the Medal of honor posthumously for their valor. And just watching that man and just triggered something in me about this selfish in meaningless and a off you know what kind of people would do that so after watching the movie. I read the book. Black Hawk down and just started delving into book after book after book on military in life and combat and pretty much overnight decided to stop doing drugs and join the military that self harm and all that stuff too that come from specific insecurity in your mind from the past or did it have to do with some type of issue or trauma that you experience or was it just like you kind of bored and lost in that moment and of course alcohol exacerbate the situation was one of those things or was it something in the past. You think you don't know trauma I've had great parents couldn't have asked for better. Parents Love Me Gray. Gave me a great life but just I if I went out and I've obviously assessed it now and my parents have asked me what they have done differently. Truth be told is like I said great parents moved around so I moved to four cities by the age of thirteen. So I was when I moved to Austin. I was very lost. I was kind of trying to figure out I. I was not one of those kids who knew at like seven. I'M GOING TO DO X. Or whatever no idea what I wanted to do and as a result of moving I became very adaptable so every place I moved and this is this is this can be a very positive quality but if you're not careful and if you're you know it can become negative which it did so. I was very adaptable. Every place I moved made for a lot of friends just did well but when I moved Austin and again I don't blame anybody else. I take responsibility for my behavior but as a young kid. You're impressionable your Moldova. Right so I got into a group of friends that that we started delving down and always have been this kind of person that anything do. I'm going to take to the extreme. So now I do it in positive ways with running ultras and stuff like that but when we got into that I was me and one other guy with the first in our group to start going from a alcohol marijuana into hardware stuff and he's actually no longer alive. Today he ended up dying and like I said we started. I would've I was at appointment. I would have done anything so it was just kind of not knowing who I was just lost and then that became the avenue to prove my worth to show how extreme I am to be this the bad ashtray. Like I'M THE DUDE. Who does all this crazy shit cutting and it just was obviously a very unhealthy avenue to do it. But that's what I kind of became you know an like no sense of direction clearly. Yeah so that's incredible man and I. I can still relate to a lot of that stuff to to be honest and there was a time of my life and I mentioned this in the book I had recently called. Mine wrote in Early actually January. When it's it's appeared in my life where it was a lot of the stuff that you're talking about a lot of struggles insecurities and not really knowing what you WanNa do with yourself and just basically lost and trying to figure out but I was doing boxing for a couple years went really into it like in my mind. I was going to be professional boxing. I was fighting all the time. Spinal time have matches like yeah matches also but long story short. It just wasn't for me wasn't my path like I wasn't one of these guys built to fucking get hit in the face all the time and take all these blows you so I just kept pushing myself and that was like my way of of sort of like self harm and like pushing myself past what was healthy for myself and doing the and I got really lost into that and then after that was like really depressed anxious all the time and had all these problems. But it's like I can so see why you fell into that and why I felt like a lot of people fall into those. Because you just don't know what to do he's trying to figure yourself out and especially as a man you want to be like tough and you want to be masculine. Yeah prove yourself. But it's like a lot of that stuff is like we had this energy inside of us but we put towards the wrong thing and it can be very self whereas if we channel it into something else you've done. I think I've done in the last few years. We can do a lot of good absolutely. Yeah and that's why. Call your worthy find that path. It's it will be hard and I mean there's nothing wrong with having passion for your craft but often when we say things like follow your passion conveys this idea that it will be easy or sunshine and UNICORNS and and people always say you know if you love what you do feel like a day working your life like garbage..

Austin US Youtube facebook Michael Durant Man News elite man magazine spotify Delta Delta Guy Justin Centrum professional boxing elite magazine Delta Marine Corps India Audie Shea Garza Ben Von Journeys
"randy sugar" Discussed on Mike Drop

Mike Drop

12:44 min | 8 months ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Mike Drop

"Shrek fucking Halloween costume. I have another thing that like when I got an endoscopy. The doctors told me the villa in my asaf against worn out to my body condoms or nutrients. Well so none of these. Four things are conducive to ultra running none of these things now. I can accept that genetic thing like notes there but I don't let it define me so when I say it's not your fault like yeah. I didn't choose to how that shifts there but what you do with. It is then the value especially on a neurological level in terms of brain pattering. The value is acknowledging that like even with me again. I don't have brain. Scans to prove this. But I would guess I probably have some flaw dopamine wiring in my brain now I can accept that there and everything about my life pattern would kind of validate but now the thing is I can use that as something beautiful like the same addiction that drove me downing a bottle of vodka. A day for a week is driving me to s driven me to write a book build a business run ultramarathons ski across icecaps. And do all this awesome. Shit that I've done so you accept what is but then use it use it to and then that's when you really gotta take like. I mean it's kind of it's paradoxical say while it's not your fault well the way I approach the world. Everything is your fault like I literally. I mean if a plane crashes into a fucking building next to me I'm GONNA be like. How did I make that happen? Even though I didn't write but like the thing is if you take complete control if you're one hundred percent responsibility for how your world is shaped you then get to define it and that's a double edged sword because now if your world is not where you're going guess fucking faulted is it's on you but ultimately like there's only two things you can control your actions or your attitude now unless you're in a war zone where you don't have any freedom like an Auschwitz like people like that like you don't have the freedom to control your actions. You control your attitude. I mean one of my favorite books of all time is man's search for meaning. Viktor Frankl right. The guy was in a concentration camp and he found beauty in that suffering. He found meaning in that suffering and he talks about the last few minutes. Freedoms is our ability to choose our choose our own attitude in any given circumstance so we can ultimately our world is shaped by our actions and attitude though point of acknowledging what is not our fault is too and that's why I section is awareness and acceptance. You you get aware of that stuff accepted. Then it's about taking action and doing something with it. I mean I could sit here be binge-drinking law and be a fucking victim. My whole life right like oh. Woe is me lifeguard hard. Yeah I mean it is. Life is hard on everybody. Do something about it you know so. It's like yeah that's that's kind of. That's why again they both coexist. It's not one or the other nature and nurture. You acknowledge that I- all this shit who cares. I mean I might like from what I understand because I have this. I might take longer to get better at running. But that's not like a barrier you know. That's I run harder. You know and and I'm doing pretty good as an ultra runner out. Have you worked with any Vets having trouble with like opioids and things. Like that has come across your. I've I've worked with people with With addiction with that's having worked on a mass scale I've worked with a few men mention this one who struggled with anger issues and other things around PTSD With not as much around. I mean again. Work with people with addiction issues. But not necessarily tone invests with opioids. You want I mean. I'm assuming it's while there's some variants you know. Person to person and substance substance like the mentality behind it as largely the same. What is the Kind of the approach that you take without the when it comes to addiction so when we got to confront the thing where escaping from right like the usually there's something were escaping from so we gotta go into spaces that she does heart log. People don't do that. Hence we you know and again same thing from my personal experience so kind of confronting the demons around. What are the demons of the darkness? Whatever you WANNA call it that you're that you're running away from because no matter what you're running away from something that's why we're escaping. That's why we're doing the drugs or alcohol. Whatever may be and then a big thing that I've noticed too with addiction. Is You have to fill that void with something. So you've gotta find that worthy struggle. You have to fill that void with something. The few I mentioned to friends who died from addiction. They they came out and they did have a worthy struggle to consume them so that void cannot it cannot be just avoid. Or you're going to go back into the pattern. You're going to go into the darkness. So you know a lot of things we do talk about creating joy triggers. How do you create how do you? How do you activate that dopamine in your life because a lot of addiction? We're seeking dopamine right. So how'd you find healthier ways to do it exercises one of the most valuable things you can do for sure In activating dopamine finding that worthy struggle. It's a it's a really hard battle because life's GonNa get hard again no matter what you do. You had to void that I mean I broke my sobriety. Life gets hard again. You know. And and that so fundamentally than we come back to building a positive relationship to suffering. How do you learn to train and suffering smile and suffering to fall in love with the experience that when she gets hard which it will an you can find beauty even in the pain? That's as an ultra runner. That's the essence of it. I mean I have runs where I'm like this fucking eighty miles around a point to my loop. It was it fucking sucked you know but then as soon as the run is done. I'm planning the next one. You know what I mean. So you're not exactly so you gotta you gotta fill that void with something you've got to fall in love with the sock you got to confront the darkness and that's why the challenge is nothing about that. Process is easy. No nothing about that process easy hill and talking about the myth of free will have you had any conflict with like hardline. Christians about that because free will is such a huge fucking gift from God so to speak. I'm not a religious guy. But is that something that you've dealt with people not fucking call on that at all not personally in terms of but we've had conversations in a philosophical way with friends around it because we've talked about why that would be so hard it's because yeah human beings like to believe? We are autonomous freethinking creatures. And the idea that we are not is hard to hard to together and I mean I talk about the neuroscience. Studies have actually shown that they'll put brain scans on people and they would register in their brain few milliseconds before they actually pick up this water bottle here. My brain has registered that Action MILLISECONDS BEFORE. Actually doing it and so. That's kind of daunting to think about that. It then if I if I'm not choosing this is everything around me is every time I just am just a creature of everything that shaped me who I am. And here's the good news with that. This is going to be smart asking now when you fuck with the Old Lady. It's like I didn't choose to fucking do. Choose exactly exactly. That's fucking great man. I gotTa Tell You you've got a fucking awesome story super interesting fucking Dude The book is fucking great. And I'm GonNa tell you straight up like I'm GonNa have my children read it even to where its negative for him. I'M GONNA make sure that they have a negative impact from it. I'm force it's a book that I'd recommend honestly to fucking everybody you know and I don't. I don't say that lightly like I've had a lot of people with books on and and they're all good like I I don't have people with shitty books on but But you know a lot of the most of them are kind of genre into you know either military or were you know first. Responder law enforcement whatever combat stories or some nutrition stuff. Whatever but to me you know. The the NEAT thing about your book is that. It's it's all encompassing really for everybody you know. And I'm not saying that because I'm getting a percentage of of your book sales like you know it's it really is like I really think fucking anybody you know past the age of probably thirteen or fourteen Younger than that. Maybe is all as a little over over the top over their head for them but may be considered Oona fucking children's version. I don't know of not not being smart ass. I think reducing it to a young adult. You know almost over simplified version it actually probably be good for a lot of adults to Belgian. Yeah but my point is is. It's a fucking really good book. It's very profound but it's but it's very simple to to follow and and just tons of good quotes I love how how many other authors and just people in a lot of different spaces not just in like psychology But but other other people that have pretty profound quotes that are Kinda scattered throughout the book. That just really help around it out. I I did want to ask. Did you right at one hundred percent by yourself. Yeah one percent by myself. It took a minute as it said it took a little while because what happened was I wrote it and then I remember sending my publisher and then as I was editing it I was changing as a person so I almost rewrote it. Probably Trash like a hundred thousand plus words literally not exaggerating hundred thousand plus words to finally get to where it is now but I'm now it's something I'm proud of so I'm glad you know but I wouldn't do it. The same way gamble. Yeah Road One hundred send myself. A lot of research went into it. I mean I read hundred plus Bookstore Research and then it was also very cathartic for myself in an interview and the People Shit you reading it. It's not a light read which I'm not unaware of like interviewing this one young woman who had been raped at six years old and then gang raped by five people at fifteen. You know her story. Like UN fucking believable who? She is in her resilience. You know so just interviewing the kind of people are going through. The whole process was profound took a took a bit. You know you're not asking for my advice to me just from a business standpoint like a kids version and then also like a fucking workbook people just a you know how. How do I? You know because it's it's a lot easier to read and be like fuck that makes sense same thing with dog training like you can read my dog training book and be like Hi. It makes sense. How do you apply it is a whole different fucking animal but But really really fucking good. Thank you both again. It's called fear Von for you. Youtube Bassam holding it up right now. It is available on Amazon. That's where I got it from. And he brought me several copies. Which I'm not going to give away to give away to people that I care about. Not that I don't care about you anyway. The I do care about. Yeah I do want to take a quick second to say you know for those of you listening in the Times that we're in right now as a special. Thank you for everybody. That's listening. I know I've had a lot of people. Ask Me quite a bit over the last week. Ten days two weeks with L. Corona virus. Shit going on. We need more episodes than what happened. So we are trying to crank out A number of them For you in this time to give you some good content this one for sure I think you're gonNA enjoy no you will And I can't can't recommend enough. Go Get that book. It's it's really really fucking good but Last thing speaking of the corona virus stuff. What is your take on This presenting itself as a challenge both individually as a society as Globe And and how do you apply some of the principles from your book from Fewer von as an organization to. What's going on right? Now yeah well. One thing we're seeing is people are being controlled by their fear brain. You know and this. We're clearly seeing all. The some of the madness around is and this brings back to sort of the fundamental concept. There's that space between the emotion and the reason and actually quote Viktor. Frankl which is I think. One of the more Profound quotes in in terms of how to be master. Any environment with their beacon. Corner is or anything else he says. Between Stimulus and response there is a space in that space lies our power to choose. Our response and in our response is our growth and our freedom. How do you remember all the ship quote a lot like Viktor Frankl Carly I probably Viktor Frankl and Carl young more than anybody else? Because there's just one of those profound shit lead I've ever come across but that one is to me the essence of it like there. Yeah I agree. There is some scary shit happening. But let's acknowledge the fear. Let's not fear and then how there's a space how we respond to people aren't in that space and here's the one thing nobody would have wanted corona virus to happen. I'm not saying no but now what we're seeing is. There's a collective offering handed upon us as as a human family is that humanity and so in some sense we're also seeing people come together like they've never come together because we have a common enemy now right like humanities coming together as a common enemy and there's some beautiful things happening here as a result and again I'm not. I'm not saying I would have wanted this to happen or anything like that. Experiences of great adversity reveal the essence of humanity at extremes. It's like war for example managed. You know this I mean like war brings out the very worst humanity. People do fucking awful shit but it brings out the very best people. Jump on grenades Gary Gordon Randy sugar from Black Hawk down who got the medal of honor. People do incredible things self sacrifice for others experiences of great adversity. Bring out the nobility of man the ability of human beings and the worst. Now it's up to you what you do with this. It's here whether we like it or not. Acknowledged the fear understand the fear of not saying it's not it's a situation that warns fear no doubt it does but use it. Use It as an opportunity. I mean little things I've seen people like we've seen some of these basketball players who are paying for the.

Viktor Frankl dopamine the Times icecaps PTSD Viktor Frankl Carly basketball UN Gary Gordon Randy sugar publisher Viktor Oona Bassam Bookstore Research Amazon Carl young
"randy sugar" Discussed on Born to Impact

Born to Impact

11:18 min | 9 months ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Born to Impact

"All right as always. We're going to start with a word of per Dan She did do the honors today. Absolutely thank you and name of the father. The Son Holy Spirit their Lord. We ask you one. I thanks for bringing oxygen here to this podcast to share this amazing information. That has an all this information these put into this book. We ask that you please touch all of the podcast listeners. That are out there right now. That are facing some type of fear that are right now. It's holding them back. It's keeping them from being able to go to that next step in their life that freedom that income. They're looking for or that happiness. We ask you to help them. Get over that hurdle. Listen to the information today and take actionable steps to get them to live the life they were born to live. We want to thank you for this amazing day as we enjoy this Brotherhood together. In God's name we pray Amen then all right all right. I'll say let's start obviously yours. Life story has a lot to do with this whole concept of fear. So let's go ahead and start going away back childhood bring us you know what was life growing up and just take us through the story about the Marines and event experience and the aftermath and then how that pivoted into Baltimore. This book a lot of ups and downs throughout your story. Yeah people like to hear that quite frankly because it makes success relatable. Yeah it's not a smooth road ever and we're GONNA talk about why that's so important the entire as I was reading your book preparing for the podcast. Everything about when I look at all the journeys of entrepreneurs all the journeys people's life who have achieved anything successful anyone success in any area Ryan sports whether it be in their career be in their family. You look at people who are married right some be. There's GonNa be some struggling some points in that we've been there all right and if you don't learn to embrace that and come out on the other side like the most beautiful thing is on the other side of working through that right so many people give up on. August. It's tough over right. And they never experienced true bliss which is the whole concept of fear Von. So let's get into your story ahead and start you know way back. When childhood was life growing up I was born India born in Bombay. Good family parents love me. You know they weren't superwealthy at the time now. My parents are well off but kind of middle class born in Bombay moved to Banglore moved to Singapore when I was eight so by the time I moved to the US. I had moved four cities at the age of thirteen so I was pretty lost. I wasn't sure who I was I wanted to be. I wasn't one of those people who you know five years old. I know I wanNA beat entrepeneurship athlete or anything like that. No clue was just kind of figuring a lot of stuff out so when I moved to Austin Texas at the age of thirteen I got into a group of friends and today I take responsibility for my actions but when you're thirteen year old kid mood for cities you don't know who want to be you kind of you're doing what it takes to fit in so soon after moving here. I got with a group of friends and we got very heavily into drugs into alcohol and I was Kinda America. Yeah right exactly exactly thirteen. At this time. I got in soon after moving around. Fifteen sixteen is when I started. I came in moved about thirteen. And then a couple years later started getting into it and I'd always kind of been this person that any path I pursue so even before this you know in Singapore I remember. I used to run barefoot on rocks just to test myself I wanted. I wanted to prove myself. I remember when I was in India and I would get cut playing rugby. That cut was beautiful. It was a battle scar that I had earned. You know so. Drugs suddenly became my vehicle to push the line. I we just got an marijuana alcohol and then me and one other friend of mine. We started going into harder stuff and pushing the line. I mean I have cut some my arm to this day scars on my arm scars right here from Burning Myself. I was in a very self destructive place cutting myself burning myself and I mean sometimes. I don't know how I made it out. I did a lot of things that could have easily killed me from speeding down back like symphony. No suburban roads and was just in a very destructive way. And there's one other guy in me he you know who we started going down the path of drugs. He's no longer alive today. So I lost two friends to overdosed and that could have very easily been me. I got caught doing everything to got arrested into jail. This that and the other thing and I was heading down and backtrack onto one day when I saw the movie. Black Hawk down. You're seeing that movie war movie based on a true story rape and watching that movie. Specifically there's a scene in the movie where there are these two delta snipers they're up in the chopper and a relatively safe area and one of the Blackhawks one of the choppers had crashed and Michael. Durant was in there and they volunteered. Just two men volunteered to go on the ground to set up a defensive perimeter against thousands of armed enemy personnel heading their way with no idea when reinforcements would arrive and they volunteered to go down there. And they ultimately got killed they. They received the Medal of honor. Which is the highest award for Valor and the US military? They received the Medal of honor posthumously for their courage but the guy they died saving. Michael Durant is still alive today because of what they did and watching that I mean what kind of human being would have that kind of courage to sacrifice their lives knowingly for somebody else and. I still remember to this day after watching the movie. I went to my friend's house who who I saw the movie with. He had the book Black Hawk down. Read the book devoured. The book started reading book after book after book on military life in combat and pretty much overnight. Stop doing drugs and said this is my path and I wanted to join initially the army and go army Rangers Delta Force just like in the movie and ultimately switched to the Marines but Overnight stop doing drugs insider joined the marines morale incredible. Let me ask you this. What do you think being introspective caused you was? Was It really just environment? Type thing you've got around on the wrong people into became real easy to just get caught up in this or were you kind of try to mess something else or maybe a little bit of both you know yeah thought about. My parents always asked me to well. Could we have done differently because again? They weren't abusive. My parents love me to death. Couldn't master better parents right and looking back. I do think a big part of it is part of it is kind of what I was touching on that I had moved around a lot so I wasn't sure F- you know I was trying to fit in and he's soon as I came in I was I mean I wasn't confident by any means you know so whatever my environment was. I wanted to be the cool person environment. So that's why I was pushing the line. I'll do the harder drugs now. I mean I was known to be the extreme guy cutting myself. I was this crazy guy you know so I was known for that so I wanted to thrive in that that was my vehicle to push the limits now obviously do similar things but in a positive way but that was my vehicle at the time and so that's why I started doing the harder stuff I mean I was at a point I would have done any drug. They came my way thankfully. More did not come my way. 'cause we might not have been sitting here today but I would have done anything ask you. Do you feel that? Your parents gave you a lot of attention. They they coming from an Indian background. They were probably more overprotective than We've talked a lot about this stuff now right especially now what I do with fear. Vodka is about seeking out struggle so they were probably more over protective. But you know they didn't know what they don't know for example. I've always told them like. Let's say had gotten a group of friends who are ultra runners or rock climbers. I would have gone full on into that path. But they didn't even know that was a thing they didn't know people rock climb for fun. You know they didn't know half the things I do today. They didn't know that was. I didn't know that was the thing you know. And so they didn't. They didn't have a way to channel this energy. This outlet that I looking back. I always kind of knew I had and so it went into this negative spaces and had been channeled again. No regrets and it's certainly not their fault. You know we all. We don't know what we don't know but I think had I gone into a group like that I would've gone all in and I would have gone full into push the line of climbing or whatever You know sometimes you find your way into a negative outlet instead of a positive and you kinda stuck there. It's a wrong place wrong time type situation. You know I've done it you know it's Sh- we will be in jail right now. Dan has some some similar parts of his upbringing. I was more straight laced. My brother went down a totally different path to me when heavy into drugs and totally different life. I was a straight A student. I I Individuals go to college all that stuff but like other you know yeah I look back. I'm I'm I'm in my in my thirties going to therapy and trying to unpack my childhood and so for me you know. I just remember being straight a student and I remember striving for that just perfect report card and then all of a sudden my mom and dad divorced and they put me in the middle. I'm not blaming them. But they put me in the middle and the stress couldn't handle it and before you know it everything to start spiraling opposite way and I think is just as a kid. I just couldn't handle understanding how to handle it. Yeah you know and so that was looking at the wrong things right so can happen quick. Yeah sure let's let's get into your experience as in in the army and the Marines. Yeah so when I when I joined it took me about a year and a half to get into the marines because I have a blood disorder that to doctors told me would kill me in boot camp so I had a blood disorder and flat-footed have scoliosis all these genetic flaws if you will so I had to get medical waivers. It took about a year and a half and I think the only reason I got in because it was post nine eleven. So young kid wants to go Marine Corps Infantry. We'll find a way to get him in. You know so finally about a year and a half later got in went to boot camp and not only just sort of not only survived. Obviously but thrived. I loved it. I graduated infantry. School is the honor graduate in my platoon and the Marines when I first started to find the beauty and adversity because obviously Marine Corps. Boot camp was hard. There's fear there's a lot of struggle. There's a lot of pain and I hadn't necessarily experienced a lot of fear before this good family all that kind of stuff right so ding ding go through a traumatic childhood. Except what I sort of pursued consciously or at least at that time I was in that consciously got into drugs and everything so now I started to find the beauty and engaging purposeful struggle so once I joined though as soon as I joined I was trying to go to war every chance I could get. I mean I had seen Black Hawk down. This was my inspiration and I know it sounds today looking back. It's a little naive. I don't mean to sound sort of award junkie but to me when I read all these books and when I saw these war movies the war is this experience where you get to taste the humanity at its extremes. It brings out the very worst of humanity. We see people do awful things awful atrocities but it also brings out the best. We see people like Gary Gordon Randy. Sugared sacrifice their lives for other people jumping grenade for others and I wanted to experience humanity at the edges of the Human Condition. So every chance. I could volunteer to go and when I joined my unit. Got Really close to this friend of mine and we both were the only two in our unit volunteering every chance we could twice the Marines told us we would go last minute. They would cancel it and him and me you know the Corp Jacob. Neil we are very close and we used to do everything together train together. We can my brothers but always beat him by like on the run and beat them by a few seconds or in the rifle range at being beaten by a few points. One.

Michael Durant Bombay India US Singapore blood disorder Valor Austin Texas marijuana America army Rangers Delta Force rape Baltimore Ryan Marine Corps Gary Gordon Randy rugby Neil Marine Corps Infantry
"randy sugar" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

"Grow up in A was a battle with my parents when that when that happened they were not too pleased about it and we try understand. It was a challenging decision. Because I enlisted post nine eleven so it was inevitable that I would be going to Iraq or Afghanistan and of course I did go to Iraq. Yeah so So tell me about that. You know we're at an interesting time in our country around discussion of immigrants. And I'm trying to broaden the discussion around immigrant entrepreneurs because I think it's not a discussion we're having and as I'm apt to underscore Eric Yuan founder of zoom the created over twenty billion dollars in value in about seven or eight years was denied entry to this country. Six or eight times. Wow I did not know that. That's why it's so you know there. There's there's a broad conversation I guess on immigration but yell at said how is it that an immigrant to this country decides to put his life on his line for this country. You know when I so I decided to join us. I moved here when I was thirteen so I didn't come here by choice in you know like the way he did. My parents moved My Dad's job and so I came then kind of you know school and I was. I loved me here but a would've gone into darker spaces for a little pretty heavily got into drugs for about a year and a half drugs alcohol. I mean I used to like I still have scars on my arm. I used to cut myself. I burn my arm. Earning myself was Houston this very self destructive way. I even lost to France to drug addiction and that like that was going to be me. I was the guy the first one me and one of the first group to start going into harder stuff and he's no longer alive today so that victory well-connected me but the movie Black Hawk Down Change My life. I watched that movie and Have you seen it? Of course. It's it's a stunner? Yeah it's a very very very powerful movie right and watching that movie especially when they're so powerful scenes in it but there's the scene where these two snipers rent Gary Gordon Randy Sugar Delta Snipers they volunteer from the chopper to go under the ground. Set.

Houston Iraq Gary Gordon Randy Sugar Eric Yuan Afghanistan founder France
"randy sugar" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"And I read your book in the company of Heroes and that came out in two thousand three a couple of years after the movie Were you approach to write the book or is that something that you had planned on doing what was the genesis. Have you coming out with your book so I I really respected the whole secrecy of the Special Operations Community and and I wrote down some notes about the mission drafted some thoughts right after it happened and then I put it away because I didn't feel like it was appropriate to even consider writing something about operations that were so recent that you know to me that just wouldn't right thing to do well after the movie came out. I I realize well I mean basically the whole mission stories on the street at this point and now I have sort of an individual story that has not been told and I think I can't tell it and not worry about you know ten years years ago and by and and there's really not a lot of operational specificity that matters at this point you know ten years in the future so I thought you know what I think he's probably going to be okay to do it at this point and I I saw it out some mentors that were senior leaders in the community and they said you know what I don't think anybody's GonNa give you any any any grief for writing a book at this point so that's when I reached out to to find a publisher and an agent and it was great a great experience it turned out really well and very proud of it and I have no regrets about doing it at this point for sure yeah. It's definitely a book. I think just about about everybody. Every American should read. He tells a wonderful story and I did any of your kids ever take up flying or helicopters or any other type of flying at all so we have talked about it and my my theory is this. I retired when they were all pretty. Young in the world they know really really is Huntsville Alabama. which is an engineering town? I mean it's it's compared to Raleigh North Carolina or the beltway I mean the there's just a lot of engineers here. There's a lot of aerospace but it's not on the it's not on the flying side. It's on the technology side so we've got their their interests have been more in that direction and we haven't necessarily want to hold them back from flying serving in the military but there's not really been a lot of interest from any of them in doing that and that's fine. I wanted to do whatever they're interested in. you know it's funny our youngest who's now L. Fifteen. I went to a parent child. space camp which people are familiar with the it's. SORTA sister course at the same facility what he called aviation challenge listeners out there not heard about this look it up because it's a tremendous opportunity for a parent child relationship building you go there. Can you bunk together and it's basically aviation challenges a mini flight school. I mean we learned about aerodynamics. We did evasion. We we flew simulators. Oh you plan missions all of that lasts about four days total and I did this with our younger. I did it with one of the girls and then I did it with our youngest Michael also and he wrote I guess it's now six years later in a in a an essay for school. Now these high school what influences decision to want want to pursue the career he wants to pursue and my wife and I were trying to speculate about what he would pick you know he he would pick because she's a pilot also he would pick well. You know my parents both pilots so I I got I was interested in aviation or you know this or that but what he wrote about was I went to aviation challenge with my dad and I got interested in being an aerospace engineer and that's what he wanted to be now for since we started talking about career decisions and just it's really rewarding. I suppose is the right word to to realize years down the road that that is the event in his life when he thinks back that that pushed him in this direction and again great program. There's lots of you know. Similar programs like that out there but that one in particular is really a good one and gives you a chance to really spend some quality time with the kids yeah very cool. I'll throw a link to that in the description of this podcast episode so malices I just have to like they want to find out more about it. What about like as far as you know becoming a night stalker. I it's usually now today especially with the Navy seals being in the public. Everyone writing books books like years ago not many people knew about a lot of these special operation forces like seals like the night stalkers and all this stuff. When did you first become aware of what a night stalker was. Was it when you were a child. How long did you really want to beat out or that. Come after you joined the service and found out it's kind of funny I was just thinking about this the other day and and and this is the actual moment when I found out about this unit. I was in Korea already on the flight school I wanted I wanted to fly and I went when I was pretty pretty young graduated flight school at twenty two so I think that I look at twenty two year olds now and I don't mean to sound condescending or whatever but it just it seems is young to be in charge of a military aircraft flying missions you know in a foreign country but but I was and I was I loved it. It was the fulfillment the dream I'd have since I was about fourteen and I was sitting in a bar with this guy who just come from Fort Campbell and he's talking about this special unit there. Nobody's supposed to know about that is is looking for people that you want to do these classified missions and work with these special units and and I'm like wow I mean. I know that kind of thing existed. I really really like to know more about that. So when I got assigned to Fort Campbell the first thing I did this figure out where in the heck these guys weren't located over there and feel about an application and and I guess you could say the rest is history so you're right at the time there was not a lot of information nation of people knew about Special Forces and people knew about Navy Seals in general but they didn't know about some of these sort of subsets within within those groups that were you you know even you know a tear tear up in terms of the secrecy and the sensitivity of missions and all that and it's a it's certainly something something I'm proud to say I was a I was a small part of in a really exciting part of my professional life and there's no doubt that there's you know on number of kids is that have been inspired to become pilots based on your book and the movie and Obviously Gary Gordon and Randy sugar both were awarded posthumously the medal of honor honor after they were killed into Somalia incident there. Gary had a couple of kids. I'm not sure about Randy. Do you still stay in touch with those families or anybody else that was connected to the raid so I I've seen the families every now and then I saw them again. it's Fort Bragg I think it was about a year ago. Now I was down there for a memorial and No rainy did not have any kids Gary Gary did have to and they were both there and they're they're both doing yeah well as far as keeping in touch you know we tend to stay in touch more with the folks that were in our part of the operation so I'm I'm almost in daily. Contact with the with the guys not so much. you know some of the other units that we support it although like I said when we do a reunion reunion or or whatever I've I've tried to all those I think I made them all and it's it's always great to see those folks and see see how well everybody's doing. Unfortunately we're all getting a little bit older but you know it's life and we just gotTa enjoy every moment that weekend yeah and I know that right. Now are political atmosphere atmospheres a total nightmare but anything that you've ever considered throwing your hat into the political arena at all or is that off the radar for you off. The radar just doesn't consumed my personality. I just can't do it and I know that's probably the kind of people we'd say well. That's what we want and doing it but unfortunately I don't think in our system works I I think you have to be you know of a certain personality and and value system to do it and and do and win you know in the end you have to win you could be you know the most honest down to Earth good intention person in the world but if you don't win it doesn't accomplish anything thing and and I just don't see how I could possibly do it. I really don't you know I don't even I tell people. I don't even like the politics business. I can't imagine the politics of Politics Yeah right on with that. What type of goals are playing. Do you have your for yourself but if you might well you know finish it up the job at hand Dan. Which is the family. you know we have one left at home and he's doing well. He's the one I was just talking about that. We went to challenge together. he's been the easiest so far. Mar in I hope we stay on that. Trend the you know he's he's. GonNa be off to college in about two and a half more years. You know here here professionally. I'm SORTA targeting that same timeframe to start throttling back a little bit. It's you know I've been. CEO here for eleven years and there's a lot there's is a lot to that. It's it's it's it can be all consuming. I don't think I've let it be all consuming but it can be and it is somewhat stressful and you gotTa build a you know find that work life balance and I think my family would say that I've done that. I've tried pretty hard to do that but you know I also If you WANNA have a little bit more time to enjoy the things that I like. We've purchased a place in Colorado. We're playing expensive time out there. Just loved the mountains I grew up in the mountains in New England and the the winter in Colorado's a little bit more tolerable than the winter in New England and and so we plan and to spend you know maybe half the year up there and quite a few mountains and keep skiing and those sorts of things and.

Gary Gary Fort Campbell Colorado Randy sugar Special Operations Community New England publisher Raleigh Korea L. Fifteen North Carolina Huntsville Navy engineer Michael CEO Gary Gordon Somalia Alabama. Dan
"randy sugar" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Lace Waltham too. I glass fatherhood. got a Black Hawk down. We've got a Black Hawk down. Welcome everybody to so to forty three of the podcast. I am happy. There's always to be here with you. Thank you for stopping by. If this is your first time listening to a podcast please get over. There and back not subscribe button. Do Not WanNa miss all the action that it's coming your way right here on first-class first class fatherhood all right. That's very special guests with me here today. If you have ever seen the movie Black Hawk down then you're in for a real treat night stalker pilot Mike Durant was shot down some all your back in nineteen eighteen ninety three when he was flying a Black Hawk helicopter he was taken prisoner for eleven days before being released and he retired from the army as Chief Warrant Officer for Black Hawk. Helicopter Master has there aviator in the legendary one hundred sixty at sore. It is a huge honor for me to have him on the podcast with me here today. Mike durant will be here in just a few minutes so please stick around for the interview and this interview is very special for me. Not only because I've seen the movie at least one hundred times I have read the book Black Hawk down by Mark Bowdoin and I have also read Mike. The Rams Book in the company of Heroes which which is just a phenomenal read. Mike Durant took part in several major operations including operation just cause in which the Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega was captured and Mike goes into great detail in the book about what it's like the night stalker pilot and they are the best of the best in the special operations aviation game and it goes without saying that I highly recommend the book in the company of Heroes and the link to it will be in the description of today's podcast episode and I do remember watching the drama of the battle of Mogadishu unfold on TV back in nineteen ninety-three when I was just thirteen years old which is the age of my oldest son now and I remember seeing the bodies of Delta Operators Gary Gordon and Randy sugar are being dragged through the streets bolt of them responsible for saving Mike the Ranch life and they died heroes. I also remember seeing the video of Mike durant himself being held captive and as a matter of fact you guys know just how much I admire the navy seals and read all their books. I Navy seal book that I ever read was. Howard widens seal team six book. He was part of a four man seal team. That was present in the battle. Mogadishu and I'm going to have another navy seal with me here. For a frogman man Friday edition of First-class Fatherhood Former Navy seal Chris Gomez will be here with me on Friday so lock in for that and tomorrow. We're going to go back to the football field with eleven year. NFL wide receiver ever TJ Huffman's Outta all right so let's go dad's please shared his podcast with every the India neighborhood or.

Mike Durant Mogadishu Chris Gomez Helicopter Master Manuel Noriega NFL Mark Bowdoin TJ Huffman football Rams Officer Gary Gordon Howard India Randy sugar thirteen years eleven days eleven year
"randy sugar" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"The guys who served the actual true story of those, you know, Gary, Gordon, Randy sugar, the medal of honor recipients, Ridley Scott, the maker of the movie all the actors in the movie everybody in associate with the movie, all of us like everything was connected to lead me to a new space in my own life that got me out of drugs, and had joined the marines and so only in my recent experiences of this duality of. Faith that I did that I was more conscious about again. I didn't think about this at the time, but it was like the dots are aligning. And there's this transcendent connection beyond the self and it's like we have to look without in order to seek what can happen within. And we have to go, there consciously it doesn't just happen automatically like everything. I think Fe duality of mastery is a practice legend, just happen. It's on you to engage it with will and a relentless will that does not stop. Okay. How do you practice? Practice like duality the faith or all fit yet the awareness, you know, the, the working to be tapped in connected. Yeah. I think it's actually have a note on my phone. That reminds me an I announced become more just a bitch a-all, what I know the note says relentlessly think the meta so meta is rising above the thing to look at the thing. So like meta learning would be learning how to learn meta awareness would be awareness off awareness, so constantly, and you have to like I'm getting better at this, and not perfect, but choosing when you want to be so immersed in the moment that you are lost in the now versus choosing when I want to go meta to actually rise above the experience to look at the experience, and I'm getting better at doing it at will to say okay, at this moment, now, I don't want to rise above the experience. I want to be fully lost in the in the emerging of the experience and then like anything once you do it enough it becomes implicit it becomes habitual. But you have to I like any habit. And you consciously engage the will in order to turn it into a habit. Right. To, to. So you, you consciously. Gauge to then make it automated and it requires over me and just a relentless factors self-awareness the constantly go mad at about above what's happening. I mean, most of us living on autopilot rightly live, our lives, completely on autopilot just going about our day because we're not like we've talked about, you think you've touched on ideas, like free will and agency I mean, there's kind of this myth, Afri will because we're very we're all at the effect of our brain patterns that had been shaped by genetics by everything's brought us into who we are today and only by recognizing that we are in this machine like state, can we then cease to be a machine and actually create that agency? So there's a sort of acceptance that, okay, my brain is going to go into certain patterns. I'm not going to let myself be defined by those patterns and I can rise above it to then choose who I want to be outside of sit in create agency. This is how I was able to reframe Mitee as my guilt. A my survivor's guilt, that I felt about the war because I still have that, but today it works for me. It's just by engaging it rising above out, in, in conscious about it. So today, for example, have a picture of my friend that I lost the war up on my wall, and it says this should have been you earn this life and my guilt is one of the most. Beautiful things that drive me. Okay..

Afri Ridley Scott Gary Randy sugar Mitee Gordon
"randy sugar" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"It's an empty hole that can never be filled in. But if we're doing it to give to others win out. A desire to be looked at in a certain way, then it can actually be. Really? Beautiful and kind of transcendent. Yeah. So the desire to join the marines. How old are you? I was nineteen when I finally went to boot camp, but it took me about a year and a half to get in. How are you today today? I'm thirty three. Okay. Yeah. So I got I got the movie Black Hawk Down. Actually was the trigger point to get me out of drugs. Have you seen it? Yeah. Powerful war movie that was the trigger for me to start using drugs. Very big movie. It's intense. It's. Yeah. It's very intense. And there's a scene in the movie where those two to delta snipers. Gary, Gordon Randy sugar. They volunteer to go on the ground to set up a defensive permit or to people knowing that thousands of armed enemy personnel are headed their way to set up to protect Michael Durant. One of the down pilots, and they did, but they both died and they received the medal of honor posthumously for their valor. Which is the highest award in the us military, and Michael Durant is still alive today. Because of what they did. And that triggered something in me. Just you know, like how does a human being do that? They knew what they were getting into the courage to do that to sacrifice your life or somebody. I mean, it just made me all right after watching the movie into this. They're still remember that day because we were actually about to go do a bunch of drinking and LSD and stuff one friend wanted to go watch Black Hawk Down, my friend Louis, and so I would go with him. So I said I'll go watched it. And after that Lewis had the book Black Hawk Down read the book like this is finished it almost a million less than a day or two and then read book after book on military and combat and just realized that I was living such as selfish in meaningless existence. You know this. Drugs. And there was nothing to it. And in separate from all the politics of war on the ground. There's this experience of intensity of camaraderie of service for something greater not for the country or flag. But for the people you fight beside. And when I got to we're almost overnight to stop doing drugs and decided this was my Pat, this is what I had to do. So kind of like there's a bond I can get behind. Yeah. Because in the marines, the your personal well-being doesn't mean anything because this shit about how good you feel. What matters is the men in the mission. Right. And there's a beauty to that that you have to rise above your feelings in order to accomplish the task at hand. I mean to this day that's valuable in my business, and in my personal life that idea right? But in the marines, it's this tangible way with the Karachi the brotherhood that was beautiful, and I wanted to experience that so it took me a while to get in because I have a blood disorder, the two doctors told me Marine Corps boot camp would kill me. So I had to sort of getting bunch of medical waivers. Get you know, what's the blood disorder? It's called tau you it's essentially like less haemoglobin in your blood which name. Glenn transports oxygen. So they said that I would be able to handle boot camp fucker you along distance runner. It's crazy. I not only do I have flat feet. I have scoliosis. I just found out a few weeks ago have seal EAC and the villa in. My software is not all is like basically destroyed. So my body's not able to absorb nutrients, so I've got these four things that make me biologically, not ideally suited to be running. That is amazing. So when you saw a Black Hawk Down and read the book was there a light bulb that went off that here's a way that I can funnel my crazy into a way. That's just not getting attention for me. But is more noble or was that not a conscious thought, I don't think he was asked conscious back. Then also I wasn't so much about like when I realized I mean, the big reason to drive to drive me into the marines was it was almost a shattering of that sense of getting attention..

Michael Durant blood disorder Louis us EAC LSD Lewis Karachi Gordon Randy sugar Gary Marine Corps Glenn
"randy sugar" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"Something else cinch in quite posted it sounds actually like you using a lot of the different techniques at deutsche mentioned i note out specifically year visuals eishin in the book but it seems like you're also kind of using some of the things like feld and cross i believe his name was and some of the other guys would like music and taught shin kind of integrating all them together is that is that accurate lay ripe britt will offer early invoking two elven pike ari pain relief i uh gonna down uh pain uh at the high on that that the modality here among meek uted that they meet you hate she they you know another warm up the air gortat there were not part of it moon we're kalugin meet their grand gulia having a newly only on i'm unnato you the it it goku achieve where our two coptic thing more normally eh i got an abnormal pathway where it in a sense agreeing body adults group each other up um no tr randy sugar up water at agreement backed up a normal is so that we got i hope you do things where we're doing that and asking the member that they're working on china cheats arraigner engine it to be focused on changing the way to a gradual are their specific modalities he use for specific pains or is it more of dislike a trial american at going down the line and seeing because i know this like the brain different parts of the brain are probably more connected to different modalities like say light or sound like doesn't the berate process i different ways like different parts of the brain earlier on.

deutsche feld
"randy sugar" Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on The Art of Charm

"Amazing experience with the marines that you may or may not have ever had before so i understand i just wanted to put that in context because i think a lot of people say you know i have no regrets it i'm just thinking you spent twenty years in prison not you of course but other people i'm thinking really you don't regret that i mean you kinda miss your whole children's childhood they don't talk to you i i would regret that i do i feel like that's a lie but you didn't have that type of experience of course just to be clear for healthy the audience are you did not go to prison for twenty years different story but i always like to put this in context because i think there's a lot of people that also feel some shame because they go oh well i was have done drugs for three years and i regret a lot what's wrong with me for feeling bad about that and i wanna separate that from what you're saying because i would assume that if you could do it all over again you wouldn't be like okay step one skit into some hard drugs step to get into the military and turn my life around it's not really a common thread what got you then to the point where you decided to fix things like you went into the military because why you just decided enough was enough it was actually watching the movie black hawk down view ever seen that jordan of course where a bunch of guys get their butts kicked unfortunately because of bad intelligence and bad luck in it's just really sad in fact i feel a little bit disrespectful even phrasing it that way it's really just a bad sad story where when i watched it i just thought it's not a feel good war movie were rambeau kills everybody know like yeah justice you just think wow where wasting tons of human life over there you must be a different kind of guy that did not inspire media ago i got to get out there too it is a sad it's a very intense movie it would really inspired me was the scene in the movie were gary gordon randy sugar the two guys in the chopper and helicopter.

gary gordon randy twenty years three years
"randy sugar" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast  – RHAP

Rob Has a Podcast – RHAP

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast – RHAP

"But coach didn't listen to me at all the next day he was doing touchy and had feathers in his hair with his suit jacket thrown over his shoulder so he like went the full opposite coach doesn't take advice right no hill ask for a but he won't take yeah he just wants to engage you a conversation but not listening now just waiting for his turn to talk radio and that's what makes of so lovable yup speaking of surgery did you run into surrea during the pre jury in survivor heroes villains or you were just with robin james now i because i voted out before rob i went and spent a couple of days with the pre jury was surreal and tom west men and stephanie and randy sugar was not there she was already should already laughing and yeah i spent a good couple days with them tom westland i just tie him about life do you taught about life yeah he likes my my views on life in general i think the entire all searching after being out of the game i think so and then three i i have always loved three we got along well it ponderosa at the heroes villains finale in new york we also got along she was one of the women that i knew was going to be out there that i wanted to work with a thug her and i would get along well our styles of play would would work well together and no one would see is coming right right and so you guys got along well upon rosa yet a guy we disappointed you didn't get the stay with those guys when they split up your group yes yeah be because i didn't know i didn't know if rob was going to be next he still had the numbers at that point so i thought that he wouldn't be next.

robin james new york rosa rob tom west stephanie randy sugar
"randy sugar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"randy sugar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Leads the league hit the ground in about sixteen seconds we we were hit of that about seventy seat when i regained consciousness i realize that we were in basically one of the por parts of the city and there surely it was not a lot of activity but ten to fifteen minutes after to tell to force commander was came into come to our good but we realize that the the enemy had determine our location and then he started to try to override us aware of this that went desperate attempts by the americans to reach both downed helicopters this allegedly she's we're fighting and left every is based they can see all should coming things that were fighting i'm going back to in the midst alone so almost eighteen now with new rescue cone fully made it to the second down helicopter when mike your rent lay with the broken leg an injured back was a huge done battle i have no idea on the shots were fired i was relatively certain that probably was my life again i was only survivor lost the whole crew in both so randy sugar it injury gordon the ultimate of they did not realize i was there initially as on the opposite side of the aircraft from where them majority the shooting was occurring and one they over ran the site it's almost as though they stumbled upon me initially begin to beat me to death but there was an individual among the some ahlers who recognize the fact that i had value as a lot of prisoner and he got the situation of control by firing shots in the air pushing some people aside and and stopping the the chaos that list long enough to get me into kept of it during the night the you when for swing ten to extract the american troops still fighting around the first crash side in the morning they began fighting their way out back to base which is went up the disease ventured out i went out i'm not a hof seeing but this coverage old blood some monday skate in contending man when you know couldn't have them and we couldn't given his talk to vetted them properly because nobody knew of last next to come.

commander american troops gordon fifteen minutes sixteen seconds