35 Burst results for "Random House"

Prince Harry's memoir opens at a record-setting sales pace

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Prince Harry's memoir opens at a record-setting sales pace

"The public has not tired of hearing about prince Harry, Penguin Random House, the publisher of prince Harry's tell all memoir has announced that sales have topped 1.4 million copies in its first day. The pace of sales outdid Michelle Obama's book becoming who needed a week to reach 1.4 million when it was released in 2018, the sales figures include hardcover audiobook and ebook editions sold in the U.S. Canada and the United Kingdom. The book entitled spare is an extremely personal account of Harry's life in the royal family and

Prince Harry Penguin Random House Michelle Obama United Kingdom Canada U.S. Harry
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

09:38 min | 2 weeks ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"June gros from Bloomberg radio. Justice Gandhi Brown Jackson, the first black woman on the Supreme Court, is writing a memoir that she says will be a transparent accounting of what it takes to rise through the ranks of the legal profession, especially as a woman of color with an unusual name. Random House the publisher says it will be a testament to how each of us can work toward building an extraordinary future and open doors to change for generations to come. It will be entitled, lovely one, a reference to the African name, that Jackson's parents gave her, with the book deal, Jackson becomes part of what is sort of a club at the Supreme Court, justice is looking to craft their own image and score a hefty payday as well by writing their memoirs. Random House didn't reveal the terms of the deal, but every justice on the Roberts court, who's written a memoir, has gotten at least a million and a half dollars. Justice Amy Coney Barrett reportedly secured a $2 million deal for her as yet unpublished book in 2021. Justice clarence Thomas, who's the first Republican appointed black justice, got a one and a half $1 million advance for his 2007 memoir, and justice Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina justice, collected more than $3 million for her memoir. I've been talking to Bloomberg Supreme Court reporter Greg store. Gregg before the break you were talking about how these book deals have helped to make celebrities of some of the justices. We certainly saw that with justice Ginsburg before she passed away. There's a bit of a cult of personality that surrounds some of the other justices on the court now, certainly justice Thomas is very much a hero and conservative circus. Circles that the Sotomayor very much has developed their own brand. Justice Jackson may be moving in that direction. I don't want to speak prematurely, but certainly she is somebody who has captured the imagination of a lot of people in the public. And a book like this that, you know, sort of tells her story may only further that trend. Now, the chief hasn't written a book, has he? He has not written a book. He is not justice Kagan has not just this Kavanaugh has not. That this Alito has not. So it's not a universal thing, justices are making their own individual decisions about what they want to do. Does this bring up? I mean, there's been a lot of talk lately about the fact that the Supreme Court does isn't subject to a set of ethics the way other federal judges are, and that they should be. Yeah, that has been a really long running criticism of the court that has gotten more headway recently because of all these ethical controversies we've been discussing. This is a case where even if that code of conduct that applies to lower court judges, even if that applied to the Supreme Court, it probably wouldn't the experts to provide any clear statement that says you can't do something like that. But this sort of thing a justice writing a book getting paid handsomely for it might be the kind of thing that we were reopening this issue of should be an ethical code for the Supreme Court. It might be the sort of thing that some folks want to look at. And to add to all the ethical issues, we should talk about the leaked draught, and the article in The New York Times, in which it discussed an allegation that justice Alito had leaked an opinion. Prior to the Dobbs opinion, to a conservative group, and of course justice Alito, and the person who allegedly he gave the information to denied it. But that article brought up the coal connection between conservative groups and conservative justices. Yeah, it really did. And what is alleged primarily through a man named rob shank, who's a minister who had been part of the anti abortion cause in this sense had second thoughts, but what it led is basically a conservative network trying to subtly influence the conservative justice to make donations to this organization and the Supreme Court historical society as a way to get a little FaceTime with justices and sort of reinforce the idea that it's okay to go ahead and vote to over roe V wade. That is exactly what has happened and how. What if any impact that effort has had is hotly disputed, but it is another thing that is sort of calling into question at this highly polarized time at the Supreme Court calling into question whether the justices are acting in the way that they should. Let's turn to the actual business of the court. The justice is turned away a lot of cases today. One involved Bristol Myers. Yeah, this was a patent case, Bristol Myers is trying to revive a $1.2 billion award against Gilead Sciences. Case involving treatments over that you use the body's own immune system to fight cancer. The Supreme Court had already rejected Bristol Myers petition back in November and Bristol Myers tried again using a mechanism that almost never works. Are we hearing petition? And but what they said was, hey, you just granted a case that basically raises the same issue. We're trying to raise the issue of patent law. So you should at least hold our case until you see what you do in that case. Supreme Court was having none of it. None of it, they turned it away. Now, Fannie and Freddie investors were turned away. It wasn't there a similar case involving this issue that the court decided yeah, this was a. Ruling a couple of years ago with a really big one in 2021 where a separate investment lawsuit doesn't Supreme Court rejected the bulk of it. This is this complicated and high dollar arrangement whereby the federal government bailed outstanding and Freddy and part of the deal, the profits that spanning Freddy earn going forward would go to the US Treasury and so investors shareholders that own the standing and Freddie sued in the Supreme Court in 2021. Throughout the bulk of one loss and what Jeff happened was, it was the second lawsuit got less attention pressing a different legal theory these investors said that this arrangement was an unconstitutional taking of our private property and the Supreme Court today made no comment believing intact the federal appeals court decision that tossed out the lawsuit. Finally, Republican states were rejected on their appeal of the public charge rule. Yeah, so this is another complicated one where you probably feel like we've talked about public charge half a dozen times at the Supreme Court. This stems from so the public charge rule is basically a trumpet era test that screen now green card applicants by people who were seen as becoming at risk of becoming a public charge dependent on government benefits. And. A federal trial court said this policy was unlawful. This is back during the Trump years. And Trump administration appealed and then when Joe Biden became president, his administration dropped the appeal and said, well, you know, we have this lower court ruling that this program is unlawful. So I guess that means we have to rescind it. And so what happened at the Supreme Court was a group of Republican led states were trying to intervene in defense of this kind of take over the defense of the public charge rural and lower courts said, no, you can't do that. And the Supreme Court on today on Monday turned away the appeal. It's always interesting to hear what the justice is have not taken. Thanks so much, Greg. That's Bloomberg news Supreme Court reporter Greg store. Coming up next on the Bloomberg launch show. Ready, set, go. It's early in the year, but president Joe Biden is already getting started with judicial nominations and an extra democratic senator should make nominations go even faster. We'll tell you what's at stake. I'm June gros on your listening to Bloomberg. Can catch us live, your favorite Bloomberg radio shows, including Bloomberg surveillance, Wall Street week and Bloomberg sound on are also available as podcasts. Listen today on apple's Spotify and anywhere else you get your podcasts. All 10,000 residents of a coastal California town are evacuating, as rain causes floods and mudslides, the Santa Barbara county town of montecito is seeing its worst flooding in exactly 5 years. A parade of cyclones is

Supreme Court Bristol Myers Bloomberg radio Justice Gandhi Brown Jackson Random House Greg store Justice Amy Coney Barrett Justice clarence Thomas Bloomberg Supreme Court justice Ginsburg Alito Jackson Roberts court justice Alito rob shank Justice Jackson Supreme Court historical socie
"random house" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"random house" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Program support by Penguin Random House, the publisher of bad Cree by Jessica Johns and upcoming horror novel about a young Cree woman whose dreams lead her on a perilous journey of self discovery. More on this and other stories at P R H dot com slash stories of the land. Native

Penguin Random House Jessica Johns
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Get the 6 figure or 7 figure advances anticipated being the key word. These are the ones that publishers bet are really going to sell a lot. And so they're willing to compete for the rights to publish those books and to pay the authors hefty amount as an advance. So the judge accepted the notion that was put forward by the Justice Department's economist that this is a well enough defined market in which you can show that putting these two firms together will result in lowering the price that they pay for their inputs, the authors right. Penguin Random House came out with a statement, they strongly disagree with the decision, and as you said, they said they believe this merger would be pro competitive and they said the Department of Justice is focused on advanced to the world's best paid authors instead of consumers or the intense competitiveness in the publishing sector runs contrary to its mission to ensure fair competition. So they say they'll appeal if they do appeal, does that look like it's where they're going to focus the appeal on the market. Well, just from reading that line, the first focus would be on the market definition is wrong. And they didn't really in a sense to find a market as it's meant under any trust law, what they define was this sort of head to head competition between penguin and Simon and Schuster for rights to a few books, but

Penguin Random House Justice Department Department of Justice penguin Schuster Simon
The Left Is Very Bitter About the SCOTUS Dobbs Decision...

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | 3 months ago

The Left Is Very Bitter About the SCOTUS Dobbs Decision...

"The left is very bitter about the Supreme Court's Dobbs decision overruling roe versus wade. And they're trying to do whatever they can in a desperate, angry way to strike out, to lash out in every direction. Now, the Biden DoJ is arresting pro lifers, accusing them of violating the so called face act, the face act basically by obstructing or by blocking access to abortion clinics. Again, the left does this all the time. They do this on campus. They do it elsewhere. They are either not arrested or they are arrested and released immediately, but these pro lifers are facing long prison terms. So this is the deep inequity of injustice, the deep inequity of our society, and here we see the left in a different way trying to go after justices. Now, we've seen how they have protested at their homes. They've chased them out of restaurants, but now they're trying to get their books canceled. Wow, this shows the extent of it. So Amy Coney Barrett has a book contract with penguin random. This is Random House merger with penguin books. And it's apparently $2 million book advance for Amy Coney Barrett to tell her story and to lay out her judicial philosophy. And but there is a revolt in the publishing world. Several hundred, it turns out the number originally was a couple of hundred now it's over 600 publishing industry staffers. By the way, not just from Penguin Random House, but from all kinds of other publishers, Simon and Schuster, and Harper Collins, McMillan, they've all written a joint letter. Basically asking the publishing house not to publish Amy Coney Barrett's book to cancel the book.

Roe Versus Wade Amy Coney Barrett Dobbs DOJ Biden Penguin Random Supreme Court Penguin Random House Harper Collins Schuster Mcmillan Simon
"random house" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:37 min | 3 months ago

"random house" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Police are not releasing the name of the person killed, only describing him as a black man in his late 20s. No word of any arrests. The man accused in the attack on House speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband will hear the state of California's charges against him in court today, but there are also federal charges as the AP's Sagar Meghani. The documents say David de pat told police, he planned to hold Nancy Pelosi and ask her questions. If she lied, he would break her kneecaps. She was not home, but 82 year old Paul Pelosi was asleep in a bedroom. An affidavit says to pap attacked him with a hammer causing serious injuries, federal prosecutors have now filed two charges, attempted kidnapping of a U.S. official on account of performance of their duties and retaliating against a federal official by injuring a family member. Washington. Britain's interior minister is facing criticism for describing migrants crossing the English Channel in small boats as an invasion, prime minister Rishi sunak has told his cabinet that Britain will always be a compassionate welcoming country. This is a P news. A federal judge in New York has blocked the merger of big publishing companies, the AP's Tim McGuire, with what this is all about. Penguin Random House effort to buy Simon and Schuster has been blocked by federal district judge Florence pan, who agrees with the Justice Department argument that joining two of the world's biggest publishers could lessen competition for top selling books. Penguin Random House denounced the decision calling it a setback for readers and authors. It adds it is seeking an expedited appeal. The Justice Department argued that the $2.2 billion merger would reduce competition and likely damage a vital cultural industry. Stephen King won a Simon and Schuster's top writers testified against the merger in a tweet he writes the merger was never about readers and writers adding in other words. I'm Tim McGuire. You can choose a 2023 health insurance plan on healthcare dot gov beginning today. I'm Rita foley, AP news. This is a 20 a.m. WCT willow springs and streaming worldwide 20 dot com. We are Chicago's progressive chalk, where facts matter. Now, UW CPT 8 20, weather update. Here's the latest Chicago weather update, mostly sunny skies here this afternoon with a high end to the upper

Nancy Pelosi Sagar Meghani David de pat Paul Pelosi Tim McGuire prime minister Rishi sunak AP Penguin Random House Florence pan Britain Schuster Justice Department California Simon House cabinet Washington U.S.
Prince Harry's memoir, titled 'Spare,' to come out in January

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Prince Harry's memoir, titled 'Spare,' to come out in January

"Prince Harry will release his memoir on January 10th I'm Archie's our letter with the latest Publisher Penguin Random House promises prince Harry will tell his story with raw unflinching honesty it will be called spare presumably because he was not the first in line for the throne Harry is expected to detail his perspective on his parents marriage falling apart the death of his mother and his willingness to walk away from royal duties spare will come out in 16 languages Harry himself will read the audio edition financial terms were not disclosed but Harry will donate the proceeds to British charities

Prince Harry Penguin Random House Archie Harry
 Zelenskyy to publish book of wartime speeches in December

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Zelenskyy to publish book of wartime speeches in December

"A collection of wartime speeches by volodymyr zelensky featuring an introduction by the Ukrainian president who will be published on December 6th Crown a Penguin Random House division has announced the book will be called a message from Ukraine zelensky says in a statement released by crown supporting Ukraine is not a trend or a viral challenge It is also not a force to rapidly spread across the planet and then just as rapidly disappear zelensky adds his chosen 16 speeches that he hopes will help readers understand

Volodymyr Zelensky Penguin Random House Zelensky Ukraine
"random house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:13 min | 4 months ago

"random house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Waldman writes about books and culture for The New Yorker and has been covering the case, she says the prosecution based its argument on projections that both writers and readers would suffer. If the big 5 Penguin Random House, Harper Collins, macmillan, Simon and Schuster and hachette shrank to only four. So the idea is that if there are fewer buyers for book contracts, the authors are going to have to lower their prices and they're going to get lower advances. The DoJ's argument is basically that that is going to result in fewer titles being published and also less diverse books being published. The DoJ is basically saying you have particular books that are going to make you most of your money. And you know which ones those books are going to be because those are the books that you pay the highest advances to. It strikes me that if everybody knows what's going to be the bestseller as the DoJ contends, wouldn't that drive the prices of those books up, you can look at the data. You can look at past successes and you can anticipate that something may do well, but you can't know for sure. And so, you know, in a risk averse industry, if there are fewer companies able to take that kind of wager because they're wealthy enough because they're dominant enough. The size of the advances will go down. So the government found an expert witness data scientist Nicholas hill, who's taken part in past antitrust cases. His most memorable contribution to the argument that publishers were focused on a top seller market that you could predict and plan for was something called the guppy index that stands for gross upward pricing pressure index. He was basically predicting what share of the market a combined time going Random House Simon sister colossus would occupy. That is what the guppy is trying to elucidate. And then separately, he made a really big contribution to the government's case that authors behave differently at the 250,000 dollar advance or more cut off point. They buy expensive bottles of champagne. I mean, they may do that too. Although actually, if you think about that in advance paid out over a series of years, I'm not sure that they're living entirely so large. It's really that the type of book that that advanced level symbolizes is the type of book that would benefit from things that only the big 5 or the big four can really provide, which is reputation, breadth of marketing, breadth of distribution, relationships with librarians and booksellers. The works that we embrace as the next big thing, the books that are making publishing houses, most of their money. That doesn't just happen magically. That is because so many. Resources are devoted to helping those books succeed. So the publisher's case, you said they presented their industry in a quote tenderly drawn portrait of gamblers, guessers, and dreamers sung by Chris christofferson, I guess. They argued that it's a business of passion, not numbers. Yeah, I mean, what we were hearing from the executives of the big 5 who were called to testify is that publishing is a labor of love. It's a game of chance. And there's really no such thing as an anticipated top seller because you can't anticipate what will fly off the shelves. It is all just starry eyed adventurers who believe in a project and devote their resources to it and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Marcus Dole, CEO of Penguin Random House, told the judge that they're not going to shudder any of their imprints that he'll allow them to compete with each other. And so they were independent and that competition wouldn't decrease. I mean, it is possible, but I think especially juxtaposed with the very data driven economic consultant presentation of Nicholas hill. It was just hard to believe that that kind of promise that sort of in good faith were all rowing together vision was coexisting with publishers trying to dominate the marketplace. And there was actually a moment when Nicholas hill took the stand. And he was asked about delays promise and he said that is not legally binding and it's somewhat ludicrous to me that we're even talking about it in court. Let's talk about when the big 6 turned into the big 5. It was in 2013 when penguin and Random House merged, leading to the behemoth, it is today Penguin Random House now seems to dominate a quarter or more of the book market. What did we learn from that merger? So in 2013, there were no promises not to shutter any imprints and indeed imprints were shuttered a lot of positions were made redundant. Midlist contracts were canceled. Define the mid list. Sure. Consider like an Avengers movie or maybe like a James Patterson novel. Those are the $1 million advances that were pretty confident are going to sell no matter what. Your move list titles are maybe equivalent to your Sundance winners. Very artfully constructed vessels of craft that have some support behind them, but are not the big crowd pleasers. And those are the places that I think a lot of people in the industry look to hoping for newness and freshness and literary evolution. Dole also said, success is random. Bestsellers are random. That's why we are the Random House. And the

DoJ Nicholas hill Penguin Random House waldman hachette Harper Collins The New Yorker Schuster macmillan Chris christofferson Simon Marcus Dole government rowing Random House penguin James Patterson
"random house" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

They Call Us Bruce

05:42 min | 4 months ago

"random house" Discussed on They Call Us Bruce

"I'm happy. I'm happy that he sold for a bunch of money, but I'm more happy that that's a recognition that it probably is a viable market for the series. That's incredible. I don't know if this was something I'm inventing in my head, but I kind of remember reading that you had to actually convince people that this book was worth writing in some ways. Yeah. Yeah, I think Random House really wanted me to stay in the box. And I just couldn't and so, you know, I wrote about half of this book, I showed it to the folks at Random House. And they basically gave me the fuck off offer and offer so small that I couldn't possibly take it. Like they did not like this book. They did not like the speculative elements, they basically had given up on me as a writer. And to be fair, you're only as good as your last book. An art that is also a business. So yeah, it's the first time in my entire career. I didn't have a publisher or didn't have an editor, didn't have a book contract. And hit the street again of my agent. And I ended up at Simon and Schuster and I incredibly happy there. They obviously embraced the book with both hands and done good things with it.

Random House Schuster Simon
"random house" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

My Seven Chakras

05:16 min | 5 months ago

"random house" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

"Speaking of dreams, you did receive the four pathway model for healing in your dreams. Like we talk a bit about that. Yeah, yeah, okay, so this was many, many years ago, like 1820, whatever years ago. My first book on chakras, you could just look up the word chakra. Most of my books have the word chakra in it, whatever. So I've written my first book, and I had a contract to write a second book. And I was almost done. I was almost done. And I had a dream, you know, is that real dream. It's the lucid, real interactive dreams. Christ showed up and said, that's not your second book. I said, yes, it is. It's almost done. He was like, no, that's not the book. That's not the book you're supposed to write. Right. That's not the book. And then he proceeded to show me these four pathways of reality. And it was all kind of around my refrigerator, which is why you know you're not making it up because who would reveal all of reality around, you know, a single mother's refrigerator. I mean, honestly. Well, the boys rotated around the refrigerator. In fact, everybody did in that household. So, and so what was shown to me were these four levels of reality that it appeared that Jesus kind of was kind of going between them or wanting us to be aware that we can work in these four different layers or levels simultaneously one at a time. You know, it's a way of organizing how to become more powerful and how to be filled with more grace. At the same time. So that became the second book. Now what was interesting and it was 500 pages at that point, by the way. So it got published and was immediately bought by Random House and killed. They killed the book, never really sold. Except, except it became an indie fan favorite, right? You know, those like Rocky Horror picture show kind of favorites. It was like that. People were buying it for a $150 to $200 off of the Internet. You know, when I was like, they were like, this is the most amazing book. People were writing me from everywhere. You know, going, like, this is the most amazing book. And I'm like, well, it's dead. It makes me no money. Right. It was nothing. I got the rights back about three, four years ago. I added to it. And I still believe the book is very unreadable. Yeah. It is. It is. And so it's part of why I teach classes out of it. It's a frame. It's a model for getting, you know, it's a model for organizing the mind for healing. But almost everything over the past 18 years I've taught much of it has come out of that modeling. It just truly has. And as part of this framework, you talk about also about the two universes, right? You found that we tend to spend time in these two universes. Could you talk about these two universes? The original universe and then the shadow universe. Yeah, yeah, well, and we've been talking about energy on and off through this whole time. So we can still perceive the effects of the pre Big Bang. Whatever the whatever the Big Bang really was. The big crunch that this, that, the other thing. The many worlds exploding all at the same time, whatever. But we see this sort of absolute light. The echoing from before we had energy that was oppositional or energy that would be kind of weak nuclear for a strong nuclear force. All this even gravity, right? That which was still lingers. It's kind of an absolute light. And the second universe is the one that's expanding. I call it the shadow universe or the polarity universe. Because we tend to mainly identify in it. The very few particle waves that are oppositional. You know, that are like every electron is matched with a positron. So an electrical charge with a positive charge or we have matter and antimatter. That's what we almost only identify with. And honestly, there's a reality that is here, this comparable to heaven, this comparable to a spiritual universe that all the great teachers, gurus, spiritual people, have come to say, don't you see it? It's here. It's here. You even go back to genesis, there's two creation stories in genesis. Two of them. There's one in which God made Adam, you know, and it was the yahweh, the Jehovah, the male God, made Adam, and then saw that Adam needed companionship, so he made the woman out of the rib, but then there's another creation story where the God is the elohim, which is a plural term. A plural term. And everything is equal. And we have two trees. We have the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, which here we are. Karma.

Random House Adam
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:42 min | 6 months ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Biden signed an executive order in July of 2021, promoting competition in the American economy. It directs the federal government to enforce the nation's antitrust laws and prevent companies from taking advantage of labor and potential competitors called promoting competition in the American economy, it includes 72 actions targeting anti competitive practices in tech healthcare and other parts of the economy while boosting workers wages and consumer protections. Rather than competing for consumers, they are consuming their competitors. Rather than competing for workers, they're finding ways to gain the upper hand on labor. And too often, the government is actually made it harder for new companies to break in and compete. I expect the federal agencies and they know this. To help restore competition. So that we have lower prices, higher wages, more money, more options. And more convenience for the American people. And a key task for the Biden administration's push to expand antitrust enforcement is a trial going on in Washington, D.C.. The Justice Department is suing under antitrust laws to block the largest U.S. publisher from buying the fourth largest, contending the merger with thwart competition hurt authors and ultimately readers. I've been talking to Jennifer ree, Bloomberg intelligence senior litigation analyst. This is an industry that's already undergone consolidation Penguin Random House that name shows consolidation. Right. You know, I think that's one of the most important points here. In particular, the Department of Justice has said, they really want to broaden out the kinds of deals that they challenge. And broaden out the antitrust approach to mergers. And one of the things they want to think about more are just industries that have trended toward consolidation. That as you see a trend toward consolidation you kind of want to nip it in the bud before it gets too far and too consolidated under your nose. And you're exactly right. This is an industry that's had loads of consolidation in the last couple of years. And not only that, this top 5 companies that the DoJ is talking about have been accused of colluding in the past. And that's another theory that DoJ will have. Hate the fewer you have, the more likely it is that they can collude in the future. Now, this has been described as a key test for the Biden administration's push to expand antitrust enforcement. Do you see it that way? You know, I do, because as I said, this concept that we're going to look at the merger's impact on labor is fairly untested and new in court to rest the entire theory of harm just on that theory and go to court with it is fairly new and untested. So we'll see how they can prove that and how the district court judge views that and it could lay the groundwork for future challenges to mergers that are based on the impact on labor. So it is very new in that way. And I think also with respect to what you just talked about, that it's an effort to sort of stem the tide of consolidation in an industry that's been trending in that direction. And it will be interesting to see how much the judge takes that into account as well. So Biden signed an executive order in 2021 promoting competition in the American economy, has the Justice Department been following through with more antitrust, lawsuits. Oh, I absolutely think so. Yes, I think both the Department of Justice and now also the Federal Trade Commission now that there is finally a full slate of 5 commissioners and a three commissioner democratic majority

Biden administration Washington, D.C. Jennifer ree Penguin Random House Biden DoJ federal government Justice Department Bloomberg government U.S. Federal Trade Commission
"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

"Liz Harris joins us now with some news to the publishing world hey list. Hi Pamela. So as we've discussed, Penguin Random House, which is the biggest publisher in the country by far, is trying to buy Simon and Schuster, which is one of its rival publishers, which is a lot smaller than Penguin Random House, but still one of the 5 biggest publishers in the country, the group that's often called the big 5. The Justice Department has sued to stop this merger saying that it would be bad for competition. And what's interesting about this case is that instead of saying it would raise prices for consumers so like books and bookstores will cost more, which is usually how these things are argued. The government is saying it would be bad for authors, particularly authors that sell the most books and get the biggest advances. And the argument is that those books tend to be published by the biggest publishing houses because they're expensive. So that market would go from 5 publishers to four, which could mean lower advances for big authors. And so some industry groups have also opposed the merger, the American booksellers association, which represents independent bookstores and the authors guild which represents authors, both have express support for what the Justice Department is doing. And this week, Penguin Random House in Simon and Schuster filed a response in federal court to the government's lawsuit saying, predictably, that the government is wrong. They are arguing that basically the Justice Department fundamentally misunderstands how publishing works. They say that it's not just 5 big publishers. It's this big vibrant ecosystem, which includes other major companies that publish books like Disney and scholastic and Amazon and hundreds of small and mid sized publishers as well. And they say that on any given deal, at least one smaller publisher will often compete and that some of the biggest authors in the country are not published by the big 5, like someone like Jeff Kinney, for example, who writes diary of a wimpy kid series..

Penguin Random House Liz Harris Justice Department Simon Schuster Pamela American booksellers associati government scholastic Disney Amazon Jeff Kinney
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bend shot joins us to explain Explain when it's time for brands to rename themselves when they do it That's an excellent question There are many reasons why brands would rename Numbers don't be as you can think of as a merger So when penguin and Random House merged the well held its breath because they were hoping it might be penguin house or even random penguin but obviously they chose them also that Penguin Random House But there are also brands that renamed for other reasons So there are certain brands that get tainted by very bad publicity or doing very bad things So you can think of Blackwater the mercenary company that changed its main or Philip Morris the cigarette company that changed its name There are brands that want to reject that section So for example weight watchers became WW because they didn't want to have the association with weight if only Duncan donuts became Duncan because people were not really eating donuts They were buying coffee and they didn't want to be tied to the donuts name And we've seen a whole suite of brands including aunt jemima and uncle Ben's who have rebranded or read on logos in order to basically react to changing fashions and changing styles of what we now consider to be acceptable So there's a whole reason why brand change their names or rebrand or rename But it doesn't always work does it I'm thinking of weight watchers everyone that I know still calls it weight watchers and Dunkin Donuts everyone still says Dunkin Donuts Well I think this takes time I mean there are brands that change their name and it doesn't work And our brand that changed their look montrose went through various logos and has now no long term I think it's interesting I do think it takes time And I do think you can nudge people into having a different perception of your brand over time This is a ten 15 year plan I imagine for something like weight watchers it takes time and you know it is the brand that people want over time My favorite is the brand the British from the car turned warehouse that for years now this old car phones and more had a warehouse but it still had that name So now what is Mark Zuckerberg trying to do with the name change Because what comes to mind at this particular point where Facebook or meta has so many critics and is facing some problems it seems like they're trying to run away from that Well there are a myriad of explanations I think one of them is this notion of brand washer Obviously Facebook is a deeply unpopular company for very good reasons But what's interesting is the company is associated with the social platform app For Facebook contains multitudes on the one hand you've got Facebook the app which monetizes social and political dissent and Instagram that monetizes fomo But on the other you've got WhatsApp And what that is the backbone for hundreds of millions of people all around the world I think 94% of Kenyan use WhatsApp Facebook is a complex company some very very bad elements and some very good elements I would argue including for example WhatsApp So Facebook is clearly trying to find a way to distinguish elements of its company It's on the one hand you can say it's trying to run away from its difficult press But you can also say if it really is serious and Mark Zuckerberg is serious about the meta verse then having a name like meta is not a stupid idea it may be cynical but cynicism often works So every time you say the word matter it makes you think of the matter It makes Facebook own the metaverse a little bit more I think we can be skeptical but brand words matter So if you think about for example Starbucks Starbucks says trademark dozens of words of Anthony Grande Frappuccino puppetry no affogato Now every time you use that an Italian may shudder but it makes you more of a Starbucks customer By putting their words into your mouth they win What's your take on the new logo Is it impressive It's not And I think the logo is not unlike the name I think both of them are absolutely fine Before it was launched I was asked what I thought would be success And I think success for Facebook in this particular instance is not failing I think it will deliver the brand that instantly was a disaster in 24 36 hours It didn't insult some country wasn't horrifically rude in some language It wasn't egregiously copyright or trademark infringement So these survived in incentives the bar was low and they managed to clear it In terms of the look and feel I think it's incredibly sort of straightforward and unimaginative But that may be the point to be using the in-house typeface that they used in 2019 for the capital Facebook or in capital letters and they've made it capital in and meta I think it's very straightforward It doesn't scare the horses It's very bland The sort of infinity that squashed infinity shape keeps the Facebook blue It has a gradient It actually looks sort of old fashioned It almost looks sort of a form of brand ten years old And actually I think that might be part of the strategy They want to sneak in under the radar Have something that's easy on ejection and to try and move the conversation forward If that works well that remains to be shared Thanks Ben That's been shot a Bloomberg opinion.

Facebook Penguin Random House Duncan donuts penguin Mark Zuckerberg Random House Philip Morris Blackwater jemima Dunkin Donuts Starbucks Duncan Anthony Grande Ben Bloomberg
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Complaint actually makes no a number of other people associate so he was doing direct messages with basically coordinating to say that hey you know I'm going to talk about the stock and you should talk about it too in private messages So there's a lot of speculation about whether some other people are also going to be seeing the Justice Department show up at their doors anytime soon Because what makes this case particularly interesting is that what the SEC has gone after people for stock touting on Twitter most famously Elon Musk a couple of years ago right When he said that the stock was going to go to four 20 I think was the controversy back then Which seems kind of quaint now given where the stock is trading But this is the first time that the SEC has gone after sort of a Twitter personality as opposed to like a known personality You know they went after John McAfee a couple of years ago they went after some other radio guy but this is the first time where there's like a real Twitter person talking about stocks all day and the SEC is going after Thanks Michelle That's Michelle letter a columnist for Bloomberg opinion Let's turn now to another social media platform Facebook The company's recent name change to meta garnered a lot of attention and left many to wonder why meta Why now Bloomberg opinions brands and advertising calmness Ben Shaw joins us to explain Explain when it's time for brands to rename themselves when they do it That's an excellent question There are many reasons why brands would rename numbers don't be as you can think of as a merger So when penguin and Random House merged the well held its breath because they were hoping it might be penguin house or even random penguin but obviously they chose them also Penguin Random House But there are also brands that renamed for other reasons So there are certain brands that get tainted by very bad publicity or doing very bad things So you can think of Blackwater The mercenary company that changed its name or Philip Morris the cigarette company that changed its name There are brands that want to reject that section So for example weight watchers became WW because they didn't want to have the association with weight if only Duncan donuts became Duncan because people were not really eating donuts They were buying coffee and they didn't want to be tied to the donuts name Are we seeing a whole suite of brands including aunt jemima and uncle Ben's who have rebranded or read on logos in order to basically react to changing fashions and changing styles of what we now consider to be acceptable So there's a whole reason why brand change their names or rebrand or remain But it doesn't always work does it I'm thinking of weight watchers everyone that I know still calls it weight watchers and Dunkin Donuts everyone still says Dunkin Donuts Well I think this takes time I mean there are brands that change their name and it doesn't work And there are brands that change their locomotive went through various logos and has now no long term I think it's interesting I do think it takes time And I do think you can nudge people into having a different perception of your brand over time This is a ten to 15 year plan I imagine for something like weight watchers it takes time and you know it is the brand but people wouldn't have the time My favorite is the brand the British brand the car.

SEC John McAfee Twitter Ben Shaw Bloomberg Elon Musk Michelle penguin house Penguin Random House Justice Department Duncan donuts Random House penguin Philip Morris Blackwater Facebook jemima Duncan Dunkin Donuts Ben
"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

"Liz Harris joins us now with some news in the publishing world hey list. My Pamela, so there was big news this week that surprised many most people in publishing. Penguin Random House, which is the largest publisher in the United States by far, wants to buy Simon and Schuster, which is another one of the really major publishers. And because of the size of the deal on the market share, the companies would have the Department of Justice has been scrutinizing the deal really carefully. And on Tuesday, they sued to block it. And aside from the implications for publishing, that has really broad implications for how the Biden administration is going to approach antitrust concerns in general. Because for years, antitrust has sort of focused on whether or not a deal would harm consumers, which generally means whether it's going to lead to higher prices. But there's this growing movement among lawmakers and academics that that approach is too narrow. And the government should also look at potential harm to people like competitors, suppliers and workers, which in this case means authors. And specifically, authors of the biggest and bestselling books and the focus of the department of justices argument is that because pain and Random House and Simon and Schuster are often the last two bitters standing for the biggest books, combining the two companies will harm authors. And lower their advances. And they also say they're will eventually be fewer books because of the deal. Payment Random House is playing to fight this and they push back very hard on both of those arguments. First, they say that the rationale for the acquisition is to find savings on the back end and that they have no plans to publish your books, haven't modeled it are going to do it. And in September, they announced that if the two companies were combined, they would still be able to bid against each other when their auctions for book projects, and they'd be able to bid against each other as they do now. They did say that at a certain threshold like well above a $1 million for an advance, there would be some oversight, but it's not clear exactly what that would mean. So there are a lot of people in the industry who are quietly or not quietly celebrating this move. But one group that's pretty nervous about it are many of the authors and staff at Simon and Schuster. Because that company is for sale, no matter what. It's owned by Viacom CBS, which put it up for sale last year. And if PH doesn't buy it, somebody else will..

Liz Harris Penguin Random House Biden administration Simon department of justices Schuster Pamela Department of Justice Random House United States Viacom CBS
"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Major publishers in the country and the federal government wants it to stay that way So it's suing to stop the number one publisher Penguin Random House from buying the number four publisher Simon and Shuster in a more than $2 billion deal Joining me is Jennifer ree Bloomberg intelligence senior litigation analyst Well first of all what is the goal of this merger Well the goal of the merger according to what the companies are saying now is to become more efficient I mean essentially it's what most big merging parties would say But in order to provide better cloud or better leverage as against Amazon which is a big seller of books out there and also just to become more efficient as some of the advances that go to the really big top selling authors have gone up The Justice Department is suing and it says if the merger went ahead the deal would give Penguin Random House nearly half the market for publishing rights to blockbuster books While its nearest competitors will be less than half its size Tell us about why the Justice Department is suing here Well it's an interesting theory because usually when two companies come together what the Justice Department is looking at is whether they are two competing sellers of products and as a result of the merger the price of those products they sell will go up because they'll have more market power and they'll have the ability to increase the price This is what's called a monopsony case They are buyers of products So essentially they are paying authors for the rights to publish those authors work Their books And the concern here is that if they come together and they have that much leverage they're that much bigger than all the other publishing houses that could be bidding for these top selling books that authors will start getting paid less And as authors start to get paid less fewer can afford to write in the upshot would be fewer books for consumers to buy less innovation less variety So the concern here is the fees that get paid to authors to write books and they're mostly focusing on big top selling authors They're arguing that a top selling author the competition will be less because it will be down to four large publishers instead of 5 Is that a good argument Yes So it's four rather than 5 which a 5 to four merger it depends on the industry It depends on market shares sometimes these kinds of cases have been successful for the DOJ and sometimes not 5 to four is sort of borderline But in this case it looks like the market would be very way toward the merged entity What the DOJ is saying here they don't give exact market shares but what they're saying is that together they be far larger than the other three that are left So even unilaterally they'd have disability to depress the wages being paid to authors And they do actually June have a lot of examples in the complaint of bidding that occurred that drove these advances way up that was just bidding between these two companies Penguin Random House and Simon and Schuster that ultimately up some of these advances by sometimes even in the millions of dollars So they do have examples of where the two of them go head to head and compete to increase those prices So theoretically as a result of this merger that might not happen anymore because the other three that are left just may simply not be able to play in the same ballpark Does any part of the Justice Department's intent here concern the fact that one of these companies is German Oh no I don't think so at all If there was any kind of concern about a German buyer it would actually be dealt with the committee on foreign investment in the U.S. over the Department of Justice that they'll look at foreign buyers and ask whether there's a U.S. national security issue In this case I don't think that is of concern or even being contemplated by the DOJ I think the main issue here is a new interest particularly pushed by Merrick Garland and promoted by Biden's July executive order to look at the impact of mergers on labor and on prices that are paid It's always been a theory of harman antitrust but not used often and rarely is there a lawsuit brought based on this theory So it's kind of novel I just say kind of because it is a valid antitrust theory There have been mergers that have settled in the past and not gone to litigation on the basis of this kind of depressing the wages or monopsony type theory particularly in agriculture but what we haven't seen is a lawsuit on this basis So it's going to be very interesting to see what happens in court here The authors guild which supports the DOJ's complaint said the DOJ statements recognize the burden book authors currently face and we hope that today's decision is a signal that the DOJ may be finally expanding the definition of antitrust to consider the impact on creators Do you think that's what's going on here Well I think it's meant to describe what I just talked about I have seen a lot of references to the concept that they're expanding ideas in antitrust and expanding the harms I don't so much see it as an expansion because impact on creators or not just creators but impact on any kind of a wage earner let's say Has been an issue in antitrust in the past It's just doesn't come up a lot and we haven't seen a lawsuit So I think to some observers this seems very novel But in the agriculture markets for example the Department of Justice will always look at the prices paid to the small farmers by let say meat processors that are trying to merge And in fact there have been antitrust price fixing lawsuits in the past related to the fixing of wages paid to creators in Silicon Valley So it's not the first time that this has been considered an antitrust harm It's just the first time we're going to see a merger that is challenged in court on the basis of that theory Coming up where is the Biden administration been focusing its antitrust enforcement efforts This is Bloomberg.

Penguin Random House Justice Department DOJ Jennifer ree Bloomberg Shuster Simon committee on foreign investmen federal government blockbuster Merrick Garland Amazon Schuster U.S. harman Biden Silicon Valley Biden administration Bloomberg
"random house" Discussed on Borne the Battle

Borne the Battle

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on Borne the Battle

"Got there are so many positive things I got out of my military experience that helped me literally every day in the business that I'm in. It has helped me build a business that helped me create my first book, my second book. It's helping me every day that I'm working right now on my third book, I'm under contract with Penguin Random House, which is like a phenomenal that's a dream come true. Top of the pyramid there. So I'm working on that third book. But all that I learned in the military I'm leveraging and have been, ever since the day I got out. And so that's been a powerful testament to I'm so grateful for the experience. You know, what I learned about myself, what I've learned about self discipline about organization skills about communication, making hard calls, dealing with fear, there are so many different aspects that led me to this point. And like I said, I've been using it since the very beginning. I mean, I started this business and it's still one of those pinch me moments. I started this business with a kinko's business card and a sky pager. Literally. You know, literally. Those are my two assets that I had. And then my business and all the things. Yeah, that's it. This is two things. But we tend to discount all the stuff that we bring to the table. You know, we are walking one man one woman army, you know, in that moment. Even though I'm air force I'll use that analogy. But I'm just saying we discount our talent ability experience education, life lessons, all the conversations we've had, the trainings we've been through, I mean, we tend to discount that. We are an amazing fountain of good stuff. And the military helped me leverage mine. And so that's why I've always been grateful for that experience because it really got me to see things in myself that I didn't know were there. And got me to use things in myself that I hadn't been able to use or leverage before. So it was a very empowering. I think you never forgot it. And I'm still growing it. Yeah..

Penguin Random House kinko
"random house" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Hard this ball. The cupertino streamer issued a press release wednesday announcing not one not two but three kids series set to premiere by the middle of october first. Stop wolf boy and the everything factory. The release says the ten episode animated epic follows wolf boy an imaginative on ball who discovers a strange realm at the center of the earth where fantastical beings called sprites create things for the natural world on the surface. Clouds trees. rabbits dreams hiccups memories time everything with his newfound sprite. Friends wolf boy learns that not only can he use the creative energy of the everything factory to make his wild imagination come to life but he is destined to play a central Friends wolf boy learns that not only can he use the creative energy of the everything factory to make his wild imagination come to life but he is destined to play a central role in the age old battle between the forces of creation and destruction will boy soon comes to realize that being different is what makes them special and ultimately that it's the oddballs and dreamers. Who changed the world. I know spoilers still. You're gonna sit your kid down in front of this. You might want to know what you're setting them down in front of all ten episodes of the show drop on friday. The twenty fourth of september next in line get rolling with otas based on the penguin random house book series by lauren. Long the release says the show welcomes young viewers. Too long hill. Dairy farm. Home to otis the tractor and all his friends. Otis may be little but he has a big heart whenever he sees a friend. In need he hits. The brakes asked how they're feeling and rolls into action to help you and yours can get rolling with owed us on friday. The eighth about tober then last in line puppy place based on the bestselling books from scholastic the release as puppy plays chronicles the adventures of dog-loving siblings charles and lizzy peterson and the puppy. Pows they foster in search of forever homes. Each of the eight live action episodes tells the story of a puppy who finds his or her way to the peterson. Family charles and lizzy.

penguin random house tober otis lauren Otis lizzy peterson charles peterson lizzy
"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

"His next project is his first audio original. it's also his first work of fiction. It's coming out in september and it's called. no one goes alone. So this is really eric larsen. Who of course is well known as a historical nonfiction writer branching out into new territory in multiple ways. This is a project he's been working on for more than a decade and it's very spooky. When it's time to halloween. It looks at the ghost. Hunting exploits of the psychologist philosopher. William james who was a very avid seeker in terms of spirituality. But he was also interested in the occult and so when eric larsen was researching james for project. He was working on another book. He became curious about james's belief in ghosts and created this spooky story where james and some of his colleagues go to a haunted house on a on an island and their plan is to study what these occurrences could become from and of course it takes a very deadly surprising. Turn into the supernatural. So something very different for eric larsen and also something quite different for penguin random house audio to see a major publisher releasing a work in audio. Not only i. But exclusively is interesting. Because i think the general consensus among publishers until now has been the more formats. You have a book out in the better. Your often dependent on that print edition being in stores as kind of a advertisement for the audio book. So when you don't have the print edition and you don't have people seeing it in the usual places. How are they going to discover it. It does help to have an author with a pretty avid fan. Base like eric larsen. But it's interesting to think that audio is being separated out and treat it. Does its own john..

eric larsen james William james penguin random house john
"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"random house" Discussed on The Book Review

"Over-sized illustrated edition. So okay. i have to ask the money question. Now that you've brought up the cover price on this. You mentioned earlier that can afford to spend huge advances and duke or former duke harriers it prince harry. What's his title. Is he former prince or is he still a prince. So the press release from house says prince harry. I believe he's keeping the title. Although they have distance themselves from the royal family. All right. i'll call him prince harry so prince. Harry probably doesn't need the money. And neither just former president brock obama and neither does bruce springsteen although you mentioned that period can pay these big advances have they respectively pledged to give the proceeds to charity prince. Harry has said he'll be donating the proceeds from his memoir to charity and penguin. Random house did not reveal the financial arrangement that they reached with him as is typical. They don't usually announce these kinds of things and in terms of the obamas deal with penguin random house. That's been widely reported to be a record-breaking deal that they reached for their memoirs collectively which was more than sixty five million dollars astonishing figure. of course it's proved to be lucrative partnership for both of them in their case they also do quite a bit of their profits to charity and they also have a charity that they're working on with random house to distribute books to communities that need them in the united states. When are both books coming out. So the prince. Harry memoir is more tentative is scheduled for lee. Twenty twenty two remains to be seen whether they'll be another oprah interview and the obama springsteen book is scheduled to come out this fall holiday season. Yes although i thought it would be a very good father stabach..

prince harry duke harriers Harry penguin random house bruce springsteen prince obama obamas united states lee oprah
Prince Harry Working On 'Intimate and Heartfelt Memoir'

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Prince Harry Working On 'Intimate and Heartfelt Memoir'

"Prince Harry will soon release his memoir, maybe sees Deborah Roberts has the story just months after his stunning Oprah interview was reportedly angered the royal family, the Duke of Sussex, announcing plans to pin his own life story. Saying in a statement. I am not writing as the Prince I was born. But the man I've become. My hope is that in telling my story the highs and lows the mistakes, the lessons learned. I can help show that no matter where we come from, we have more in common than we think it's really going to focus on the people that have helped shape his life. And really come to discover the experiences that he's had made him the man. He is today the untitled memoir in the works since last year and will span Harry's entire life from his childhood in the spotlight to present day living outside the palace. The book reportedly a surprise to his father, Prince Charles. Tensions between Harry and the royal family have been high since he stepped away from his duties to make a life in America. So when I asked the question, why did you leave? The simplest answer is lack of support. And lack of understanding the publisher Penguin Random House, saying Harry will give the definitive account of the experiences that shaped him one of those becoming a husband and a father. But she also discussed with Oprah, I guess Highlight for me. Is Sticking him on the back of the bicycle. And his little baby, see? And take him on his boat rides or something which I never was able to do when I was young. This is the first time in modern history where a senior royal has written his or her own memoir, Usually other people write those books. The publisher says it will be released in 2022 Harry says proceeds will go to charity. But as you can imagine, there are strong opinions across the globe, many asking why others saying good for him?

Deborah Roberts Duke Of Sussex Prince Harry Harry Oprah Penguin Random House Prince Charles America
Prince Harry Working on 'Intimate and Heartfelt Memoir'

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Harry Working on 'Intimate and Heartfelt Memoir'

"Britain's prince Harry is riding with his publisher Random House schools an intimate and heartfelt memoir expected in late twenty twenty two on Monday Harry the Duke of Sussex said in a statement he's writing a book north as the prince I was born but as a mom I have become I think that at thirty six he's worn many hats over the years but eventually I'm figuratively and his hope is that in telling my story the highs and lows to mistakes the lessons learned he hopes he can show that no matter where we come from we have more in common than we think financial terms have not been disclosed but Random House says prince Harry will donate proceeds to charity I'm Charles de Ledesma

Duke Of Sussex Prince Harry Britain Harry Random House Charles De Ledesma
Cheetos Star Is a Flaming Hot Liar

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Cheetos Star Is a Flaming Hot Liar

"This story was originally spread by the guy Richard montanez, who's told this story for the last decade about how he invented flaming hot Cheetos. And the world has been eating it up. And if you haven't heard the story, look, the guy was working as a janitor at Frito lay and Rancho cook among at the plant out here in California. And he dreamed up this chili covered Cheeto. And his version of the story is he believed enough in himself to call up the chief executive to pitch his idea. And, you know, people tried to sabotage it, he said, but he said he out hustled him. Because he had a hundred to succeed. And of course, flaming hots became a runaway hit, and montez, rose through the ranks, and became this icon. He had a lot of speaking engagements, the guy has a lot of, what's the word? A lot of pizazz, and it's easy to see why this story is taken off. The road is charisma. It's got some charisma. And he tells this story of a Mexican American underdog who conquered the corporate world. I was a rag to riches story. People love that shit. Problem is it's not true. That's not true. And I told this story because it's becoming a Hollywood movie. And I thought, wow, this is fun. This is a really fun story. What a great no, it's all bullshit. It's all bullshit. Believe this? So this guy basically built this second career out of telling and selling this story. And he would get fees of ten grand or 50 grand per speaking engagement. He wrote a book called flamin hot the incredible true story of one man's rise from janitor to top executive. It's coming out in June. I didn't publish it himself. Random House is publishing it. There's a biography based on his life that's gonna be directed by Ava Longoria, produced by the super producer Devon Franklin. They're filming this summer. I mean, the book and the movie, there were bidding wars for this shit. And none of it's true. He didn't invent flaming hot Cheetos. The people at Frito lay said none of our records show that Richard was involved in any capacity in the flaming hot test market. We've interviewed multiple personnel who were involved in a test market and all of them indicate that Richard was not involved in any capacity in this market. It doesn't mean we don't celebrate Richard, but the facts do not support this urban

Richard Montanez Rancho Cook Frito Montez Ava Longoria California Devon Franklin Hollywood Richard
Norton Juster, 'The Phantom Tollbooth' author, dead at 91

TIME's Top Stories

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Norton Juster, 'The Phantom Tollbooth' author, dead at 91

"The celebrated author who fashioned a world of his own in the classic the phantom top off and went on to write such favorites as the dot and the line and stark naked has died at ninety one justice. Death was confirmed tuesday by a spokesperson for random house. Children's books who did not immediately provide details gestures friend and fellow author mo willems tweeted tuesday that juster ran out of stories and died peacefully the night before norton's greatest work was himself a tapestry of delightful tales williams road as juster wrote in the introduction to a reissue of phantom told us he i thought of the book when he was in his late twenties and working at an architectural firm and new york city. He found himself wondering the way a child might about how people relate to the world around them and eventually turned it into a story published in nineteen sixty one. The phantom tollbooth followed the adventures of young milo through the kingdom of wisdom a land extending from the foothills of confusion to the valley of sound drawings were provided by his roommate at the time. Jewels pfeiffer who would later collaborate with gesture on the odious ogre published in two thousand ten. Eric carl of the caterpillar fame illustrate adjusters. Utter nonsense with came out in nineteen eighty

Juster Mo Willems Norton Phantom New York City Jewels Pfeiffer Confusion Eric Carl
A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | 2 years ago

A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

"Biggest news to hit the publishing industry this year. Possibly several years happened last wednesday. And we're betting that you missed it after all. You were probably contemplating cooking a turkey for two and planning zoom thanksgiving dinners with relatives right so just in case here. It is again the parent company of penguin random house's buying simon and schuster for two billion dollars penguin random house or pr h has already america's largest book publisher according to the new york times. Should the acquisition go through and there are some caveats which will get to pr. H will be. The industry's first mega publisher. The times claims. Let's delve into this just a little bit as we've talked about here before simon and shuster is among the oldest of today's big five publishing houses and one of the most distinguished dick simon and schuster founded the company in nineteen twenty four. The partners first product was hardly a literary masterpiece. It was a book of crossword puzzles. And according to simon and schuster's corporate historian it was a runaway bestseller today. Almost one hundred years. After the lowly crossword puzzle got the entrepreneurial venture off the ground simon and schuster or s operates in a different stratosphere. Today it is america's third largest publisher over the years it's published scads of famous even legendary authors including ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald also political figures from both sides of the aisle including jimmy carter hillary clinton and donald trump and contemporary authors. Like bob woodward stephen king and anti prue as well as judy blume s prints and authors have won fifty seven pulitzer prizes and innumerable other literary awards including several caldecott medals one of the highest honors given to children's books the company now sells about two thousand titles annually all told s and s takes in close to nine hundred million dollars a year but early this year. Parent company viacom. Cbs decided to go all in on streaming video in sports looking to cut close to a billion dollars in operating expenses ceo. Bob bakish announced that s wasn't what he called a core asset hence the sale in march the rumored price for us and s was one point two billion dollars a bidding. Were hike the final price to two point. Two billion dollars among other contenders america's second largest publisher harpercollins also vivendi. A french company. That owns a stake in. American publisher has yet and rupert murdoch's news corp clearly penguin random house's parent german media giant bertelsmann was willing to pay top dollar for s and s one reason in addition to the competition between publishers for blockbuster bestsellers the big five face. A formidable rival in certain amazon and when it comes to fighting off amazon size matters since two thousand nine amazon has been a publisher. Not just the world's largest both retailer today. It has sixteen imprints that publish everything from thrillers. To romance novels it signs. Top selling authors like dean koontz patricia. Cornwell taking them and their millions of sales away from traditional publishers in two thousand seventeen amazon published more than twelve hundred titles according to the wall street journal if those numbers have grown in the last three years amazon could well already rival simon and schuster for the volume of new works. It's producing what makes amazon such a tough competitor is a book publisher of course is it status as a bookseller. Moreover it has a number of marketing weapons that traditional publishers. Do not such as the ability to easily promote low priced e books to millions of amazon prime members and kindle owners. The wall street journal reports that along with oodles of cash to lure away big name authors as the largest american publisher penguin. Random house has the clout and logistical network to compete successfully with amazon. The merged company would have annual revenues of three billion dollars according to book industry bible publishers. Weekly but we should note here. The acquisition faces obstacles worthy of an epic novel authors and agents represented by the authors guild. Say such a deal will make it even harder for new authors and so called mid list writers to get published meaning. If you haven't written a blockbuster or a solid backlist title your chances to get published and your earnings could shrink. Pr h says. Simon and schuster will remain editorially independent and both publishing houses say they remain devoted to readers and writers still publishers weekly reports that by blending s. npr h german-owned. Bertelsmann would own about one third of the us book market. That's the number that could trigger antitrust. Investigators to closely scrutinize the deal. According to the new york times but those market share numbers are in dispute in both directions. The authors guild which causes tie up says a combined. Pr h. s. would wind up publishing half of all trade books in the us. Meaning not textbooks penguin. Random house's leadership argues not true and says future market share would be less than twenty percent and that an antitrust investigation is unlikely what happens next will likely hinge on which of these numbers comes closest to reality

Penguin Random House Schuster Amazon Dick Simon Simon F Scott Fitzgerald United States Bob Bakish News Corp Random House Shuster Judy Blume Bob Woodward Dean Koontz Patricia
Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster

Slate Money

07:04 min | 2 years ago

Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster

"We now have a two point two billion dollar deal which i guess by the standards of emanate manet transactions is quite small but by the standards of book publishing. It's absolutely enormous webuye. Random penguin or penguins house. I never know which one those two. I prefer which is owned by this. Massive german publishing house called bertelsmann is going to buy or his said they wanted has agreed to by simon and schuster which is the third-biggest publisher in america. Four point two billion dollars and according to a statement from news cool which. I don't know if i take this at face value. But i haven't seen anyone say that it's not true. This will create a publishing house with seventy percent of all literary fiction. They basically have seventy percent of all these novels in america and they have about a third of the entire book market. If this this looks to me like a monopoly and it looks to me like bertelsmann's trying to create a monopoly and does anyone disagree. And if they are. Shouldn't this be looked. I don't agree. I think this could be very bad for book publishing in general especially for authors. There's one bless house to compete for authors and titles so that means lower advances that means bigger titles. There's already all this consolidation in the book business and there's a tendency now the trend. Is you know big blockbuster. Titles simon and shuster made a lot of money this year because of they they had the john bolton book and the mary trump book penguin random house made a lot of money this year because they had the obama book and the other obama book and so the consolidation isn't really good news for people care about you know interesting books getting published. It's just more bad news and it is a monopoly but at the same time i sent around this piece of franklin four wrote in the atlantic. About how this is actually not about book publishing per se or book publishing companies but is actually about amazon because while this combined company would have a third of the book publishing market amazon has about half of book publishing distribution. So it's like maybe a counterweight to that. I don't know how convinced are very like amazon's position in book. Sales is clearly monopolistic. And as if you remember back a million years to the episode. We talked about when they go into a big fight with has shed You know they basically stopped shipping shit bugs and they will mock is unavailable in this kind of thing in this big fight. They are not afraid to play t when it comes to fighting with book. Publishers and it is color ripley possible. I suppose that a combined penguin random house and simon and schuster is going to be so big that they will be able to stand up to amazon's bullying a little bit about better. And i kind of by that but everything else that frank wrote in that piece is just like. Oh my god. You're such a fogy. And he was like. I'm plus he was like we need to do something about this amazon monopoly without ever saying what it is that we need to do is very hard to break up that monopoly at this point. Is you know full of us trying to like bookshop to amazon. Like it's not going to move the needle verify thousand just has that monopoly that monopoly incidentally is so entrenched in people's minds. The people simply assume that amazon has a monopoly everywhere else as well and it doesn't and this is one of the weird things about amazon. Is that because his daunted is a bookstore and because it has such a powerful position in books every time it makes an announcement like it did last week saying oh we're moving into pharmaceuticals and prescriptions. Oh my it's going to have napoli in prescription. Of course it's not gonna have a monopoly and prescriptions. Books are unique. There were very very unique. Market it does seem absolutely obvious that the big loser here is authors and especially authors of fiction. Because what always used to happen. Is you'd have an auction. Your agent would like send out your manuscript to a bunch of different publishers and then highest bidder would win but now when all of those different publishers owned by the same company they basically just agree between each other which one of them is going to make the bed and then they don't need to worry about what the other one's going to because they all know that they're not going to receive a competitive bid from one of the others so it's very bad for author advances. I is that enough for the doj to try and stop this anti monopoly of i. Don't yeah it's a good question. I mean i think from what we've seen recently. It seems like it's definitely more likely than anyone probably would have said like five years ago. I mean he had like the mcgraw hill. S- engagements textbooks but still that was merged that with stopped on antitrust grounds. So i i think this will definitely be scrutinized quite a bit whether or not they consider the consider it a obviously a less competitive market whether the considerate monopolistic is definitely up for debate. The other losers here are going to be. You're gonna have a lot of people are gonna lose their jobs if this goes through about specifically what they said in terms of where you get you know your your synergies is that they're gonna cut a bunch of sales and marketing jobs and they. I've got more importantly they're going to cut a bunch of like weird back in like you know that whole infrastructure of printing and distribution now can be like diedhiou placated which we east coast media types. Don't like to think about like the truck is driving the books around to bookstores. Whatever books a big heavy physical objects which way like a lot of physical. Wait if you add. The mola something like the obama but with seven hundred pages and sold two million copies already. That's a lot of just logistics of moving around the country and those logistics or get centralized and that's a bunch of savings right there and one of the interesting things about the book industry right now is the covid. Pandemic has her book printing clients at exactly the same time as everyone is reading more books especially things like mary trump. and so. There's this incredible crunch all of the publishers who who were meant to be publishing books right now which have been sheduled for months or a year pushing them back because there's just no capacity to print them because you have people like barack obama mary trump just dominating the printing presses so we're gonna have a lot of books really crowding onto the book shelves in the next year or two which have been pushed back. Thanks to cove it. Yeah he also had a lot of books pushback because authors weren't gonna be able to tours and so publishers. Were concerned about that. So they push a big names as well

Amazon Bertelsmann Random Penguin Simon Schuster Barack Obama America John Bolton Shuster Mcgraw Hill Franklin Atlantic Frank DOJ Mary Trump
Penguin snaps up Simon & Schuster, creating mega publisher

Glenn Beck

01:09 min | 2 years ago

Penguin snaps up Simon & Schuster, creating mega publisher

"Random House Canada employees confronted management about the company's decision to publish a new book by controversial Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson. At an emotional town hall Monday, and dozens more have found anonymous complaints, according to four workers who spoke to Vice World News. On Monday. Penguin Random House, Canada, Canada's largest book publisher and a subsidiary, a Penguin, Random House, announced it will be publishing beyond order. 12 more rules for life by Peterson to be released in March, 2021. The book will be published by portfolio in the US and Penguin Press in the UK, both part of the Penguin Random House empire. Four Penguin Random House candidate employees who did not want to be named due to concerns over their employment, said the company held a town hall about the book Monday during which executives defended the decision to publish Peterson why employees cited their concerns about platform ng Someone who was popular in far right circles. How

Jordan Peterson Random House Penguin Random House Canada Four Penguin Random House Penguin Press Peterson UK United States
Barack Obama memoir off to record-setting start in sales

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Barack Obama memoir off to record-setting start in sales

"Obama has his sights. Set on a mark for presidential book sales. Ah, promised land sold nearly 890,000 copies in the U. S and Canada in its 1st 24 hours of being on sale that puts it well on his way to being the best selling presidential memoir in modern history. Publisher. Penguin Random House, says the Obama sales numbers included printed copies, preorders e books and audio versions of the book.

Barack Obama U. Penguin Random House Canada
Obama Memoir Sells More Than 887,000 Copies on First Day

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Obama Memoir Sells More Than 887,000 Copies on First Day

"Obama's new book is on its way to becoming the best selling presidential memoir in modern history. Penguin Random House announced that the first volume of a promised land sold more than 887,000 copies in the U. S and Canada on the first day of release Tuesday. That figure also includes preorders Bill Clinton's My Life sold around 400,000 copies on its first day and George W. Bush's decision points around 220,000. The book follows the former press. But its path to the White House up to 2000 and 11 and the killing of Osama bin Laden. That's correspondent Lisa Matteo.

Penguin Random House Barack Obama U. Bill Clinton Canada George W. Bush White House Osama Bin Laden Lisa Matteo
Obama Memoir Sells More Than 887,000 Copies on First Day

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Obama Memoir Sells More Than 887,000 Copies on First Day

"Memoir is an overnight success. Penguin Random House reports that 88. 7000 copies of the promised land have been sold. That includes sales from the United States, Canada and pre order sales. Before the book released on Tuesday, the company says that this book is the most that they've ever sold in their company. On the first day. This is making records for them. Okay. And

Penguin Random House United States Canada
Bookworms Are Loving Ebooks, According To OverDrive

The Tech Guy

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Bookworms Are Loving Ebooks, According To OverDrive

"Reading more books I'm so glad. We're reading more books? Did. You know your local library. Yeah you have one still. Your local library. Hope you have a library card because they have e books and audiobooks there did you know that? And increasingly people are taking out the e books. There's two big programs that are widely used. For for this and it's you know it's it's because the publishers don't want you to get free books. So they actually sell these books to the library and they put limitations on them. How many can be loaned at any given time for how long and how many years they have access to it. They pay on average according to this article in wired. Forty Bucks, the libraries do for these books. So take advantage of this. There are two different programs. What you should do is check your local library. Make sure you have a card first of all I. Hope you do and then check to see which of the two programs. they used one call. they have four, hundred, thirty, nine library systems well, no I'm sorry they have four, hundred, thirty, nine new library systems since March. Twenty percent increase the other one is called overdrive. They actually have fifty thousand libraries worldwide. overdrive says the checkout of e-books fifty, two percent since last year. Sure. You'RE NOT GONNA go library and take out a physical book but an e book you can do online and why not? They do that with audio books to. Is a bit of really nice free to you. Library it's not free to and I wish that publishers weren't so. I duNNo. finicky. Since twenty eleven Penguin. Random House has shet Harpercollins, Simon Schuster McMillan. They they either limit library lending of books by time two years, for example, or the number of check-outs. Twenty six or fifty, two since two bad you in the library buys a book. They'll have to spend extra money on it and they can check it out. You know you can check as many times you want. But the publishers you know how nervous they are getting. Robbed or whatever. Twenty dollars to sixty five dollars a copy of the book, and they have limits on how often they can. But still so they buy them. So do it let us take advantage of it? Get that library card. You might even be able to do that without going in. That would be nice. Get that library card in. And take advantage of this. Nice. Thank you libraries. Thank. You and we talk a lot about technology. But the book is a book is a book and even if you get an e book form, that's still that's reading. That's good.

Simon Schuster Mcmillan Shet Harpercollins
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | 2 years ago

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

The Book Review

03:20 min | 2 years ago

Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

"When I wrote this I my first book was basically a Beautiful Ahmad to those two ladies, and then I, did cover some of the things about upgrade my background, but I do not go into the depths of what I have gone into this you find trenches initial find trenches in his epistle of love to the important narrative of my life getting. Under upbringing North Carolina all the way to twenty twenty. I go to the decades of when I was at the top of my career vote. In sitting in the front row in. Daily experiencing racism, sexism ageism, all of that and I decided to I had to be very very raw, an honest within a degree, and I told the truth about many things that I never spoken before one being my sexual abuse in childhood. Then I told things that had never been told before about how I experienced racism in the world of fashion. As the there are two different books. occas of sort of a a jewel of book and I'm very proud that I is well because. Of How these two women shaped my life, and became very important factors in my life how they overlaps, it's women, one of African American domestic made for fifty years of her life at Duke University, the other woman a mentor. Editor. Chief evoke in the sixties, and then she went onto the museum. The Metropolitan. When she created the modern fashion exhibit is thanks to her that people now have major fashion exhibits in museums globally. There's not one that has not been influenced by the work of the. So, is there a point in that seventeen year interim between these two books where you thought to yourself, you know I've left something out, or I need to go back and tell a fuller story now. That was never a point like I always just say I had an uncle, said just keep getting up everyday. Just keep getting so I never thought about it in seventy years. I've gotTA write my second memoir. My Document Jerry came out in twenty eighteen the Gospel according to Andrei benefits by the second memoir, because the response of people the outpouring of love. From that documentary was so beautiful. The response I got from People Street. Some people would see the film in the audiences. Remarkable so wonderful, and he gave me the confidence to write the Second Watch. The second while was born from the document. Jerry and I saw the duck return. I loved it by the way I loved what Kate Novak did what we did as collaborators, and then I decided well I. Think I. should not my memoir a second I only. But it never headed for seventeen years I left out. I never thought that I was GONNA. Write another one. My agent David Vigilante took me around, and it'd be had meetings with different companies, different companies, and we got to Pat Buchanan at Random House, and that was one on Friday and Saturday what he called me and he said. Random House is ready to preempt all offers an idea and said well I'm GonNa do it I did it and I have never looked back

David Vigilante Jerry Random House North Carolina Duke University Kate Novak Editor
The Late George Curry

In Black America

10:56 min | 3 years ago

The Late George Curry

"The reason I do what I do because I grew up in Alabama and the first black journalists avenue with me. Get A job and couldn't get a job in my hometown newspaper so you will never be able to say you never met a black killed 'cause campuses around the country and some reading they always WanNa know what you think. What topic Us Don't ever have one called anybody who knows me knows that comes comes out but I actually have seen. I actually have a challenge tonight and I hope you make a decision tonight and my topic is in the form of a question. Do you want to be eight of Mamata or do you want to be a thermostat? Let me put it another way. Do you want to measure the temperature? The temperature the late George E curry former editor in chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association New Service Former Editor in chief of emerged magazine author and syndicated columnist. Curry died on Saturday August twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. He was sixty nine considered the dean of black press columnists his weekly syndicated column appeared in more than two hundred. African. American newspapers. Curry was a journalist journalist. He began his career. Sports illustrated magazine. The Saint Louis Post dispatch and then the Chicago Tribune where he became the New York girl. Cheap two thousand three. The National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year he is also in a BJ's list of most influential black journalists of the twentieth century. Curry was unapologetic. Stewart and champion for the Black Press and frequent need for it in the civil rights narrative. He was deeply committed to fostering the next generation of journalists of color. They became the founding director of the Saint. Louis Minority Journalism Workshop in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven. I'm Johnnie O. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late. George E curry in Black America emerged was a news magazine that was published for ten years up the year. Two thousand I was editor to the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July called the best of emerge at Ballantine books a publishing in your arm of a random house and it has the best collection of Of Our stories over the years so it's very different and quite frankly one day soon. I expect this starbucks. We got the most attention. Because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas. Random as the amount of his head and they me ram two years later. The lawn jockeying for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen. Single Clarence comes today. People mentioned that though. That's that's not the stores I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith who was arrested. Twenty four give a twenty four year. Mandatory sentence been Amman. Mine are basically going with drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she needed sold or used drugs But she was very attached as ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on and ran a couple of other stories. In addition to that a couple of years ago she was pardoned by bill. Clinton I'll Office Delay George. E Curry is best known for his heir to ship of the former emerged magazine. Most recently for his work as Airdrie and cheap for the National Newspaper Published Association from two thousand to two thousand seven and again from two thousand twelve until last year. Warren George Edward Curry on February. Twenty third nineteen forty seven in Tuscaloosa Alabama is mother worked as a domestic and his father was a mechanic. His father abandoned fan when he was just seven years old leaving him to step into the role of the man of the house assisting his mother in raising three younger sisters and nineteen sixty five. He graduated high school where he was a member of the football team and sports energy to other school newspaper and nineteen sixty six curry moves in New York City way worked for the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He earned his bachelor of Arts degree in history from Knoxville College. In nineteen nine hundred seventy fulfilling a lifelong dream. He began his professional journal. Career as reporter for sports illustrated magazine in nineteen seventy. He was the second African American hired by the publication. Curry died on August. Twenty two thousand sixteen. He was sixty nine. I met curry back in. Nineteen eighty one and N. A. B. J. National Convention in Louisville Kentucky. The following excerpts of interviews from two thousand one and two thousand and three well up up in totally segregated tuscaloosa hours can Segregate my feelings tell people that In terms of the so called gration after drink from separate water fountains right back to the bus go to separate schools and I have very strong feelings about that But at the same time when I look at my black community those black teachers black people who were supportive There's nothing in the world like it and I wouldn't trade if anything you a pretty good athlete. Bet Did all right for the country boy. I play football. Play quarterback When a quarterback call plays from the attendant Knoxville College in Tennessee? I'm Alma Mater and I'm still in the blue. I'm on that board of directors there and what sparked their initial interest in journalism and The newspapers Emma wouldn't do the newspaper hometown the only time they wrote about black people when they were suspected of crime committed crime plan football it being an entertaining and I thought they were so many other stories out there. It'd be told and since they won't go and tell them. I decided I had to be the person to tell them now. What is interesting is that I could get a job my first job out of Knoxville. What is that sports illustrated so I can get a job at Lodges Sports magazine in the world but couldn't get one in my hometown. Newspaper reminded me that every time I go should be sending a thank. You note saying thank you for not hiring me so I can go out and see the world but that meant that meant a lot. I mean that could not get heart my hometown paper and And whenever I go back I remind them how Tuscaloosa be. I was back a couple years ago and they gave me a key to the city then told me it was fine but you didn't open anything. And secondly I wanted to the bank and combination to the vault. But they haven't done that yet. Former editor in chief of emerged magazine. Tell us about that. Publication well merge was a news magazine that was published for ten years up to two thousand. I was editor of the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July call. The Best of emerge at Ballantine books are published in the New York arm of Random House and it has the best collection of Of our stores over the years so it was very different and quite frankly one day soon expected starbuck and what was some of the highlights of of that publication well We did a lot of things and we're proud. We got the most attention because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas Random as the amount of not hit and they may ramp two years later. The Lawn Jockey for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen single Clarence Thomas. Today people mentioned that though. That's that's not a lot of stories. I'm I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith. Who WAS ARRESTED? Twenty four and give it a twenty four year mandatory sentence. I've been Amman mine of exit. Basically go over to the drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she neither Seoul nor use drugs but she was very attached ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on it and ran a couple of other stories in addition to that and Couple of years ago. She was pardoned by bill. Clinton in office and So we're real proud of that story. I'm proudest of is One of my staff members. I fortunately I feel vegetable about young since college lower. Hit a little little experience. Laurie Robinson was all right how she was on my staff and And it really shouldn't be up the whole Staffan certainly are and she's a graduate of Spelman in Atlanta and There was a allegation at Morehouse being raped. Spelman woman and only because laureate toby. She wanted to write a book about her experience. I suggested that she go back there to her alma mater right about that and then we've been home person experience with it and it was just one powerful story and those are the story. I mean a lot of store them reattached. But those are those are the real special with you on the immediate past. President of the American Society of magazine editors in the first african-american Elia and also not from New York. Right right they kinda you gotta be from New York and got to be life. Magazine's the worst newspaper in terms of diversity but They did in all fairness did let me president and it was indeed a Han and You know in fact. I'm coming from a black magazine representing the magazine industry so I was so pleased with that. Your current position as editor in chief of the National Newspaper Published Association. Give us a brief history of that organization and your responsibilities with black presses. About one hundred seventy six years old gotten around fighting against niches slavery and everything else. I have been here. Two years. Essentially is a federation of more than two hundred African American newspapers Most of them weekly and essentially what I do is provide news out of Washington and and National News as well For a member newspapers. And so we've pretty much such service. Washington bureau founders for audience. That aren't really familiar. That are not African Americans. Why has the black press particularly organization the two hundred or so Weeklies still viable in this country today. Well I wish having spent thirty three years journalism most of not into black press. I wish that the media was doing this job. And there'd be no need for the Black Press a Hispanic Women magazine but it but it is not doing. It does a terrible job and still a worse job. I think when I came to business thirty three years ago. So if you're going to get in order to be well informed you have to read from a variety of sources in the first place you know you just can't read just to Austin space when you just read just you know Dallas Weekly. Just can't you gotta read from different sources and so So would ask an American perspective gives you a different look at some of the same national issues and then he's going to be really inform. You need to reap the black newspapers and go out website. black press. Usa DOT COM

Black Press Editor In Chief New York Warren George Edward Curry Clarence Thomas Curry National Association Of Black Sports Illustrated Magazine Emerged Magazine National Newspaper Published A Alabama Knoxville College Starbucks Random House FED Editor Kemba Smith Tuscaloosa George E Curry Amman