17 Burst results for "Randall Carlson"

"randall carlson" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

09:43 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast George George with you back with Randall Carlson as we talk about ancient cataclysm said could happen now Randall you're talking about the great flood I believe yeah that's kind of where we left it we just talked about how Adams says we could been traveling around England insing deposits that he initially believed to be the result of Noah's flood he later though but a decade later he did change his mind and came to believe that this the flood deposits were actually more local regional rather than a global flood but he was one of the founding fathers of of he never by the way never did necessarily abandoned his his lanes of catastrophism if you look at the at the look at the by which he looked at global change then it was Roderick Murchison he was also about contemporary with with Adam sage which he was a catastrophe as we say today after this because they believe that there were great sweeping catastrophes in the history of the earth Georgia could be a considered be the founder of of paleontology he was a catastrophe this then that was mainly because of his studies of the fossil record because he would find that there were you know places in the rock with the words abundant fossils preserved in in an overlying rock was just almost totally Berendt impossible so he would well what happened here why do these problems disappear when they concerned it would happen again all right well I don't necessarily think that they thought that it would happen again in their lifetimes I think that they were you know they were more concerned with the interpreting and back defense of the past and so they were putting in that framework now I don't know maybe saves weight being a theologian maybe he had apocalyptic ideas that there was going to be another global catastrophe I'm not sure about that but what happened was they all a lot of these guys initially looked at this evidence I thought that was great floods then you had locally Agassi was the pride they basically is considered the the godfather of of glacier studies and he came along and showed that a lot of the things that they were looking at that they thought were flood deposits were actually glacial deposits and he came to America post civil war and to help to establish this idea of recognizing glacially created landscapes so what then happened was they kind of geology you see at this point is not an academic discipline it's not being part as such in universities that didn't come until the eighteen nineties and into the early twentieth centuries were geology actually became a scholastic discipline with dogmas C. once this dog was got entrenched the dog was replaced the cat they could be ideas of catastrophe with the ideas of uniformity and this came along with primarily James harden and Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin because Darwin was involved in this too huh well yes because Darwin originally had looked at a lot of the evidence when he was up you're traveling in the beagle who determined that there had to been great sweeping catastrophes to explain the evidence that he was looking at but in the end he abandoned the idea because it was just too extreme form but think about Darwinism it's basically based upon the idea of slow gradual accumulated incremental changes and that's exactly the uniformity idea of geology and soul once they got away from the idea of a young earth a six thousand year old earth and begin to admit error recognized that the earth was you know me actually millions of years old well now it's like okay well the features that are in there that we observe in the ear canal they could be created over many many millions of years and we don't need to compress these advance into a very short span of time about billions of years rental or even billions of years but of course they're not thinking billions of years yet in the nineteenth century they're they're just they're not okay they're still making millions I think it was lord Kelvin it did did some studies in radio activity came up I think it was around seventy million years so then that became part of the the dogma for awhile but then as we get into the twentieth century you know then yeah we've moved certainly into billions of years not six four point six billion years but they kind of throw the baby out with the bathwater because once geology became established as an academic discipline uniformity gradualism became the dominant paradigm in anything outside of that was looked upon with disfavor because all you're trying to bring back in biblical literalism you're trying to bring back no was flawed it's center at cetera so we don't need that anymore so fast forward a couple of decades of the nineteen twenties you now have a geologist for they were J. Harland breasts who is studying landscapes up in eastern Washington and all the evidence that he is amassing and looking at leads him to believe that there was these gigantic floods that swept over eastern Washington when he proposed some of these ideas in the mainstream literature scientific literature of the nineteen twenties he was attacked mercilessly by the defenders of gradualism because they basically said you're trying to take us back to biblical literalism we don't need giant slides to explain the landscapes or the the rock layers that this the stratigraphy we don't need that so he encountered a great deal of resistance to these ideas but he stuck to it for about twenty twenty five years kept amassing more and more data is it just me they overwhelmingly convincing case to decent huge clutch and swept across eastern Washington and it was gradually accepted but not really fully accepted by the geological community until the nineteen sixties at that point one of the principal critics of J. Harmon breasts which actually persuaded to come out in the field for a week which he had never done and he he came out spent a week in the field looking at the evidence before his eyes in the landscape and it's the end of that week he was standing in front of a feature called potholes up no clues falls in southeastern Washington where there is this gigantic horseshoe shaped cataract with a little trickle of water which is the modern pollution river and the accumulated affected this week of looking at day after day this this mega scale evidence he finally comes back to the group after standing looking at this one particular feature for for many minutes comes walking back in he says how could I have been so wrong and that was the beginning of the turning point and just like what happened in the nineteen eighties when it was accepted that the indeed dictated extraterrestrial impact that it had actually occurred that was a turning point with J. Holland brats in the twenties and the thirties that became a turning point although it it didn't really manifested till the sixties you had a new generation geologist coming up in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighties the word now willing to accept the idea that yes these are these giant floods that occurred now what's the explanation and the original objections to the flood theories in the twenties and thirties apartment press was we you can't explain a source of water so great therefore there were no floods like you're talking about so that kind of became the the the modus operandi by the sixties and seventies with the effort to explain what could have caused floods and we're talking about floods that were measured in the hundreds of millions of cubic feet per second these like biblical floods Randall well there I could call a biblical scale floods from this standpoint anyone who managed to survive one by some sheer luck of the draw could easily will be easily believe that the entire world's been distraught course especially in your location that's all you saw I knew yeah not not biblical indication that simple minded sense of the whole world is supernaturally crowned with water all the way top blocks compilation on brought on by god to exterminate the population at the time right but like you just say George if you could a survivor could it could be an important channel rations descendants might grow up live die it's not note that there were other people in the world because if you're talking about in the area let's say the size of several states this completely wiped out yeah and that's all they knew that's all they knew you get yes that's exactly right so we've come a long way since then because now what what has happened is the sister calls this channel scablands are the erosional features in south of southern and eastern Washington generally.

George George Randall Carlson
"randall carlson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"To coast Randall Carlson with this rental what happened assuming there were people around during the ice age what happened to them I mean my god where did they go where did Randall there you go Randall yes I'm here yeah assuming the there were people around during the ice age where did that where did they go George is one of the great mysteries are you know in North America it was the Clovis culture that appear to have shown up rather suddenly around thirteen thousand four hundred years ago they were around for you know what those few those entries in in about twelve thousand nine hundred years ago right there with the onset of the younger drivers the basically disappear and their disappearance coincided with the rapid in sudden extinction of the great megafauna that inhabited the earth throughout most of the ice age periods some in some cases going back hundreds of thousands of years so you know in in North America there were four species of Provo CDNs meaning real elephants essentially okay you had three different species of of mammoths and you had mastodons you had Oct he was huge bears you know the short faced bear you had the the the a saber toothed cats you had huge camels in beavers and the list goes on and on and on the dire wolves they all disappeared very quickly right around the younger dryas boundary well you heard about the mastodon that was discovered in Siberia frozen with food still in its mouth I mean it happens instantly yeah that was the parasol commandments discovered nineteen oh one excavated around nineteen oh four and just like you said it was found to have been very rapidly frozen because it had factors have been eating flowering plants that generally look like they would have been early to mid autumn at the time that the that the mammoth was grazing mammoths were grazers and what was interesting was a couple of things one was that the contents the there was actually mouthful of food that had not yet been swallowed that's right ma'am what had been chewing on was also the contents of the stomach it's not cuter fight so that means that it had to have been frozen the entire mammoth carcass had different frozen somewhere within a period of about ten or twelve hours for the stomach contents would begin to use flash frozen was and flash frozen in the other thing that was interesting was you know the the the mammoth was sitting on his haunches and both of his hip bones were broken like he was back on his haunches very.

Randall Carlson George North America Siberia
"randall carlson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:54 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on KGO 810

"Coast Randall Carlson with this rental what happened assuming there were people around during the ice age what happened to them I mean my god where did they go where did Randall there you go Randall yes I'm here yeah assuming the there were people around during the ice age where did that where did they go they George is one of the great mysteries are you know in North America it was the Clovis culture that appear to have shown up rather suddenly around thirteen thousand four hundred years ago they were around for you know what those few those entries in in about twelve thousand nine hundred years ago right there with the onset of the younger drivers the basically disappear and their disappearance coincided with the rapid in sudden extinction of the great megafauna that inhabited the earth throughout most of the ice age periods some in some cases going back hundreds of thousands of years so you know in in North America there were four species of Provo CDNs meaning real elephants essentially okay you had three different species of of mammoths and you had mastodons you had if it was huge bears you know the short faced bear you had the the the saber toothed cats you had huge camels in beavers and the list goes on and on and on the dire wolves they all disappeared very quickly right around the younger dryas boundary well you heard about the mastodon that was discovered in Siberia frozen with food still in its mouth I mean it happens instantly yeah that was the parasol commandments discovered nineteen oh one excavated around nineteen oh four and just like you said it was found to have been very rapidly frozen because it is a fact it'd be needing flowering plants that generally look like they would have been early to mid autumn at the time that the that the mammoth was grazing mammoths were grazers and what was interesting was a couple of things one was that the contents the there was actually mouthful of food that had not yet been swallowed that's right ma'am what had been chewing on was also the contents of the stomach it's not beautiful I so that means that it had to have been frozen the entire mammoth carcass had different frozen somewhere within a period of about ten or twelve hours or the stomach contents would begin to he was flash frozen wasn't flash frozen in the other thing that was interesting was you know the the the mammoth was sitting on his haunches and both of his hip bones were broken like he was back on his haunches very.

Randall Carlson George North America Siberia
"randall carlson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"To coast to coast Randall Carlson with this rental what happened assuming there were people around during the ice age what happened to them I mean my god where did they go where did Randall bill there you go Randall yes I'm here yeah assuming the there were people around during the ice age where did that where did they go they George's one of the great mysteries are you know in North America it was the Clovis culture that appear to have shown up rather suddenly around thirteen thousand four hundred years ago they were around for you know what those few those entries in in about twelve thousand nine hundred years ago right there with the onset of the younger dryas the basically disappear and their disappearance coincided with the rapid in sudden extinction of the great megafauna that inhabited the earth throughout most of the ice age periods some in some cases going back hundreds of thousands of years so you know in in North America there were four species of Provo CDNs meaning real elephants essentially okay you had three different species of of mammoths and you had mastodons you had it was huge bears she you know the short faced bear you had the the the a saber tooth cat to you had huge camels in beavers and the list goes on and on and on the dire wolves they all disappeared very quickly right around the younger dryas boundary well you heard about the mastodon that was discovered in Siberia frozen with food still in its mouth I mean it happens instantly yeah that was the Paris Opera mammoth discovered nineteen oh one excavated around nineteen oh four and just like you said it was found to have been very rapidly frozen because it is a fact it'd been eating flowering plants that generally look like they would have been early to mid autumn at the time that the that the mammoth was grazing mammoths were grazers and what was interesting was a couple of things one was that the contents the there was actually mouthful of food that had not yet been swallowed does right ma'am attachment chewing on was also the contents of the stomach it's not beautiful so that means that it had to have been frozen the entire mammoth carcass had different frozen somewhere within a period of about ten or twelve hours for the stomach contents would begin to beautify he was flash frozen wasn't flash frozen in the other thing that was interesting was you know the the the mammoth was sitting on his haunches and both of his hip bones were broken like he was back on his haunches very.

Randall Carlson Randall George North America Siberia Paris Opera Randall bill
"randall carlson" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on KTOK

"To coast to coast Randall Carlson with us Randall what happened assuming there were people around during the ice age what happened to them I mean my god where did they go where did rental go there you go Randall yes I'm here yeah assuming the there were people around during the ice age where did the where did they go they George's one of the great mysteries are you know in North America it was the Clovis culture that appear to have shown up rather suddenly around thirteen thousand four hundred years ago they were around for you know what those few those entries in in about twelve thousand nine hundred years ago right there with the onset of the younger dryas the basically disappear and their disappearance coincided with the rapid in sudden extinction of the great megafauna that inhabited the earth throughout most of the ice age periods some in some cases going back hundreds of thousands of years so you know in in North America there were four species of Provo CDNs meaning elephants essentially you had three different species of of mammoths and you had mastodons you had Oct it was huge bears you know the short faced bear you had the the the saber tooth cat to you had huge camels in beavers and the list goes on and on and on the dire wolves they all disappeared very quickly right around the younger dryas boundary well you heard about the mastodon that was discovered in Siberia frozen with food still in its mouth I mean it happens instantly yeah that was the Paris Opera mammoth discovered nineteen oh one excavated around nineteen oh four and just like you said it was found to have been very rapidly frozen because it hid the fact is it been eating flowering plants that generally look like they would have been early to mid autumn at the time that the that the mammoth was grazing mammoths were grazers and what was interesting was a couple of things one was that the contents the there was actually mouthful of food that had not yet been swallowed that's right ma'am what's it been chewing on was also the contents of the stomach had not puter fight so that means that it had to have been frozen the entire mmhm mammoth carcass had different frozen somewhere within a period of about ten or twelve hours for the stomach contents would begin to beautify he was flash frozen wasn't flash frozen in the other thing that was interesting was you know the the the mammoth was sitting on his haunches and both of his hip bones were broken like he was back on his haunches very.

Randall Carlson George North America Siberia Paris Opera
"randall carlson" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on KNSS

"To coast Randall Carlson with us Randall what happened assuming there were people around during the ice age what happened to them I mean my god where do they go where did Randall bill there you go Randall yes I'm here yeah assuming the there were people around during the ice age where did the where did they go there are George's one of the great mysteries are you know in North America it was the Clovis culture that your two cents showed up rather suddenly around thirteen thousand four hundred years ago they were around for you know what those few those entries in in about twelve thousand nine hundred years ago right there with the onset of the younger dryas the basically disappear and their disappearance coincided with the rapid in sudden extinction of the great megafauna that inhabited the earth throughout most of the ice age periods some in some cases going back hundreds of thousands of years so you know in in North America there were four species of Provo CDNs meaning real elephants essentially okay you had three different species of of mammoths and you had mastodons you had it was huge bears she you know the short faced bear you had the the the saber toothed cats you had huge camels in beavers and the list goes on and on and on the dire wolves they all disappeared very quickly right around the younger dryas boundary well you heard about the mastodon that was discovered in Siberia frozen with food still in its mouth I mean it happens instantly yeah that was the Paris Opera ma'am S. discovered nineteen oh one excavated around nineteen oh four and just like you said it was found to have been very rapidly frozen because it affected his been eating flowering plants that generally look like they would have been early to mid autumn at the time that the that the mammoth was grazing mammoths were grazers and what was interesting was a couple of things one was that the contents the there was actually mouthful of food that had not yet been swallowed that's right ma'am what's it been chewing on was also the contents of the stomach it not beautify so that means that it had to have been frozen the entire mammoth carcass had different frozen somewhere within a period of about ten or twelve hours or the stomach contents would begin to he was flash frozen wasn't flash frozen in the other thing that was interesting was you know the the the mammoth was sitting on his haunches and both of his hip bones were broken like he was back on his haunches very.

Randall Carlson Randall George North America Siberia S. Randall bill Paris
"randall carlson" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

09:40 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on WRVA

"With you back with Randall Carlson as we talk about ancient cataclysm side could happen now Randall you were talking about the great flood I believe yeah that's kind of where we left that we just talked about how Adam said we could been traveling around England and seeing the posits that he initially believed to do the the result of no was flood he later though about a decade later he did change his mind and came to believe that that the flood deposits were actually more local or regional rather than a global flood but he was one of the founding fathers of of he never by the way never did necessarily abandoned his his lands of catastrophism if you look at the at the look at the by which he looked at global change then was Roderick Murchison he was also about contemporary with with Adam sage which he was a catastrophe as we say today after this because they believe that there were great sweeping catastrophes in the history of the earth George eight could be a consider to be the founder of of paleontology he was a catastrophe us that that was mainly because of his studies of the fossil record because he would find that there were you know places in Iraq where there was abundant parcels preserved in in an overlying rock was just almost totally parent in fossel so he would well what happened here why did these possums disappear when they concerned it would happen again all right well I don't necessarily think that they thought that it would happen again in their lifetimes I think that they were you know they were more concerned with the interpreting and that events of the past and so they were putting in that framework now I don't know maybe said when it being a theologian maybe he had apocalyptic ideas that there was going to be another global catastrophe I'm not sure about that but what happened was they all a lot of these guys initially looked at this evidence thought that it was great floods then you had locally Agassi was the power of the basically is considered the the godfather of of glacier studies and he came along and showed that a lot of the things that they were looking at that they thought were flood deposits were actually glacial deposits and he came to America post civil war and help to establish this idea of recognizing glacially created landscapes so what then happened was they kind of geology you see at this point is not an academic discipline that's not being taught as such in universities that didn't come until the eighteen nineties and into the early twentieth centuries were geology actually became a scholastic discipline with dogmas see once this dog was got entrenched the dog was replaced the cat the ideas a catastrophe with the ideas of uniformity and this came along with primarily James harden and Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin because not Darwin was involved in this too well well yes because Darwin originally had looked at a lot of the evidence when he was up you're travelling in the beagle who determined that there had to been great sweeping catastrophes to explain the evidence that he was looking at but in the end he abandoned the idea because it was just too extreme form but think about Darwinism it's basically based upon the idea of slow gradual accumulated incremental changes and that's exactly the uniformity idea of geology and so once they got away from the idea of a young earth to six thousand year old earth and begin to admit error recognize that the earth was you know me actually millions of years old well now it's like okay well the features that are in there that we observe in Europe now they could be created over many many millions of years and we don't need to compress these exams into a very short span of time about billions of years rental or even billions years but of course they're not thinking billions of years yet in the nineteenth century there they're just they're not okay they're still thinking millions I think it was lord Kelvin and it did did some studies in radio activity came up I think it was around seventy million years so then that became part of the of the dogma for awhile but then as we get into the twentieth century you know then yeah we've moved certainly into billions of years now I think four point six billion years but they kind of threw the baby out with the bathwater because once geology became established as an academic discipline uniformity gradualism became the dominant paradigm in any saying outside is that was looked upon with disfavor because you're trying to bring back in biblical literalism you're trying to bring back no was flawed its center at cetera so we don't need that anymore so fast forward a couple decades the nineteen twenties you now have a geologist by they were J. Harlan breasts who is studying landscapes up in eastern Washington and all the evidence that he is amassing in looking at leads him to believe that there was the strike can't take floods that swept over eastern Washington when he proposed some of these ideas in the mainstream literature scientific literature of the nineteen twenties he was attacked mercilessly by the defenders of gradualism because they basically said you're trying to take us back to biblical literalism we don't need giant floods to explain the landscape or the the rock layers that this district secretly we don't need that so he encountered a great deal of resistance to these ideas but he stuck to it for about twenty twenty five years kept amassing more and more data that just made a overwhelmingly convincing case that these huge klutz and swept across eastern Washington and it was gradually accepted but not really fully accepted by the geological community until the nineteen sixties at that point one of the principle critics of J. Harlan breasts which actually persuaded to come out in the field for a week which he had never done and he he came out spent a week in the field looking at the evidence before his eyes in the landscape and it the end of that week he was standing in front of a feature called potholes no pollution falls in southeastern Washington where there is this gigantic horseshoe shaped cataract with a little trickle of water which is the modern pollution river and the accumulated affected this week of looking at day after day this this make a scale evidence he finally comes back to the group after standing looking at this one particular feature for for many minutes comes walking back in he says how could I have been so wrong and that was the beginning of the turning point and just like what happened in the nineteen eighties when it was accepted that indeed that they did extraterrestrial impact and a crack head actually occurred that was a turning point with Jay Holland breasts in the twenties and the thirties that became a turning point although it it didn't really manifest until the sixties then you had a new generation geologist coming up in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighties the word now willing to accept the idea that yes these are these giant floods that occurred now what's the explanation and the original objections to the flood theories in the twenties and thirties apartment breasts was we you can't explain a source of water so great therefore there were no flowers like you're talking about so that kind of became the the the modus operandi by the sixties and seventies with the effort to explain what could have caused floods and we're talking about floods that were measured in hundreds of millions of cubic feet per second these like biblical floods Randall well the there I I could call a biblical scale floods from this standpoint anyone who managed to survive one by some sheer luck of the draw could easily will be easily believe that the entire world been distraught course especially in your location that's all you saw a new yeah not not biblical ending in this simple minded sense that the whole world is supernaturally ground with water all the way top broad topic run on brought on by god to exterminate the population at the time right but like you just say George if you could a survivor could could book and and four can rations descendants might grow up live die and not know that there were other people in the world because if you're talking about in the area let's say the size of several states this completely wiped out yeah and that's all they knew that's all they knew you can yes that's exactly right so we've come a long way since then because now what it what is happened is these as their calls this channel scablands are the erosional features in south of southern and eastern Washington generally.

Randall Carlson
"randall carlson" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:41 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on KTOK

"Coast George nor with you back with Randall Carlson as we talk about ancient cataclysm side could happen now Randall you're talking about the great flood I believe yeah that's kind of where we left that we just talked about how Adam said we could been traveling around England in seeing deposits that he initially believed to do the the result of no was flood he later though about a decade later he did change his mind and came to believe that that the flood deposits were actually more local regional rather than a global flood but he was one of the founding fathers of of he never by the way he never did necessarily abandoned his his lanes of catastrophism if you look at the at the look at the by which he looked at global change then was Roderick Murchison he was also about contemporary with with Adam says with he was a catastrophe as we say today after this because they believe that there were great sweeping catastrophes in the history of the earth Georgia could be a considered to be the founder of of paleontology he was a catastrophe this then that was mainly because of his studies of the fossil record because he would find that there were you know places in the rock with the words abundant parcels preserved in in an overlying rock was just almost totally bearing impossible so he would well what happened here why did these apostles disappear when they concerned it would happen again all right well I don't necessarily think that they thought that it would happen again in their lifetimes I think that they were you know they were more concerned with the interpreting and that defense of the past and so they were putting in that framework now I don't know maybe she said with being a theologian maybe he had apocalyptic ideas that there was going to be another global catastrophe I'm not sure about that but what happened was they all a lot of these guys initially looked at this evidence but there was great floods then you had little Louis Agassiz was the prime a date basically is considered the the godfather of of glacier studies and he came along and showed that a lot of the things that they were looking at that they thought were flood deposits were actually glacial deposits and he came to America post civil war and help to establish this idea of recognizing glacially created landscapes so what then happened was they kind of geology you see at this point is not an academic discipline that's not being part as such in universities that didn't come until the eighteen nineties and into the early twentieth centuries were geology actually became a scholastic discipline with dogmas see once this dog was got entrenched the dog was replaced the cat they could be ideas a catastrophe with the ideas of uniformity and this came along with primarily James harden and Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin because Darwin was involved in this too well yes because Darwin originally had looked at a lot of the evidence when he was up you're travelling in the beagle who determined that there had to been great sweeping catastrophes to explain the evidence that he was looking at but in the end he abandoned the idea because it was just too extreme form but think about Darwinism it's basically based upon the idea of slow gradual accumulated incremental changes and that's exactly the uniformity idea of geology and soul once they got away from the idea of a young earth to six thousand year old earth and begin to admit error recognize that the earth was you know me actually millions of years old well now it's like okay well the features that are in there that we observe in the ear canal they could be created over many many millions of years and we don't need to compress these advance into a very short span of time billions of years rental won't even billion two years but of course they're not thinking billions of years yet in the nineteenth century there they're just they're not okay they're still thinking millions I think it was lord Kelvin that they did some studies in radio activity came up I think it was around seventy million years so then that became part of the the dogma for awhile but then as we get into the twentieth century you know then yeah we've moved certainly into billions of years now I think four point six billion years but they kind of threw the baby out with the bathwater because once geology became established as an academic discipline uniformity gradualism became the dominant paradigm in any saying outside is that was looked upon with disfavor because you're trying to bring back in biblical literalism you're trying to bring back no was flawed it cetera etcetera so we don't need that anymore so fast forward a couple decades the nineteen twenties you now have a geologist for they were J. Harlan breasts who is studying landscapes up in eastern Washington and all the evidence that he is amassing in looking at leads him to believe that there was the strike cantik floods that swept over eastern Washington when he proposed some of these ideas in the mainstream literature scientific literature of the nineteen twenties he was attacked mercilessly by the defenders of gradualism because they basically said you're trying to take us back to biblical literalism we don't need giant floods to explain the landscape or the the rock layers that this the stratigraphy we don't need that so he encountered a great deal of resistance to these ideas but he stuck to it for about twenty twenty five years kept amassing more and more data that just made a overwhelmingly convincing case that these huge klutz and swept across eastern Washington and it was gradually accepted but not really fully accepted by the geological community until the nineteen sixties at that point one of the principle critics of J. Harlan breasts which actually persuaded to come out in the field for a week which he had never done and he he came out spent a week in the field looking at the evidence before his eyes in the landscape in it the end of that week he was standing in front of a feature called potholes no pollution falls in southeastern Washington where there's this gigantic horseshoe shaped cataract with a little trickle of water which is the modern pollution river and the accumulated affect of this week of looking at day after day this this make a scale evidence he finally comes back to the group after standing looking at this one particular feature for for many minutes comes walking back and he says how could I have been so wrong and that was the beginning of the turning point and just like what happened in the nineteen eighties when it was accepted that indeed if they did extraterrestrial impact that a car had actually occurred that was a turning point with Jay Holland breasts in the twenties and the thirties that became a turning point although it it didn't really manifest until the sixties then you had a new generation geologist coming up in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighties the word now willing to accept the idea that yes these are these giant floods that occurred now what's the explanation and the original objections to the flood theories in the twenties and thirties apartment breasts was we you can't explain a source of water so great therefore there were no flowers like you're talking about so that kind of became the the the modus operandi by the sixties and seventies with the effort to explain what could have caused floods and we're talking about floods that were measured in hundreds of millions of cubic feet per second these like biblical floods Randall well there I I could call a biblical scale floods from this standpoint anyone who managed to survive one by some sheer luck of the draw could easily will be easily believe that the entire world had been destroyed course especially in your location that's all you saw a new yeah not not biblical ending in this simple minded sense of the whole world is supernaturally ground with water all the way top brought right on by god to exterminate the population at the time right but like you just say George if you could a survivor could could book and in four generations of descendants might grow up live die it's not note that there were other people in the world because if you're talking about in the area let's say the size of several states this completely wiped out yeah and that's all they knew that's all they knew you can yes that's exactly right so we've come a long way since then because now what what has happened is these as their calls this channel scablands are the erosional features in south of southern and eastern Washington generally.

George Randall Carlson
"randall carlson" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

09:41 min | 8 months ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on KNSS

"Coast to coast George Laurie with you back with Randall Carlson as we talk about ancient cataclysm side could happen now Randall you're talking about the great flood I believe yeah that's kind of where we left that we just talked about how Adam said we could been traveling around England in seeing deposits that he initially believed to do the the result of no was flawed he later though about a decade later he did change his mind and came to believe that that the flood deposits were actually more local or regional rather than a global flood but he was one of the founding fathers of of he never by the way you never did necessarily abandoned his his lanes of catastrophism if you look at the at the look at the by which he looked at global change then was Roderick Murchison he was also about contemporary with with Adam says with he was a catastrophe as we say today after this because they believe that there were great sweeping catastrophes in the history of the earth George eight could be a considered to be the founder of of paleontology he was a catastrophe this then that was mainly because of his studies of the fossil record because he would find that there were you know places in the rock with the words abundant parcels preserved in in an overlying rock was just almost totally Berendt impossible so he would well what happened here why did these possums disappear when they concerned it would happen again all right well I don't necessarily think that they thought that it would happen again in their lifetimes I think that they were you know they were more concerned with the interpreting and that events of the past and so they were putting in that framework now I don't know maybe said with being a theologian maybe he had apocalyptic ideas that there was going to be another global catastrophe I'm not sure about that but what happened was they all a lot of these guys initially looked at this evidence thought that was great floods then you had who will Louis Agassiz was the prime they basically is considered the the godfather of of glacier studies and he came along and showed that a lot of the things that they were looking at that they thought were flood deposits were actually glacial deposits and he came to America post civil war and to help to establish this idea of recognizing glacially created landscapes so what then happened was they kind of geology you see at this point is not an academic discipline that's not being taught as such in universities that didn't come until the eighteen nineties and into the early twentieth centuries were geology actually became a scholastic discipline with dogmas see once this dog was got entrenched the dog was replaced the cat they could be ideas a catastrophe with the ideas of uniformity and this came along with primarily James harden and Charles Y. el and Charles Darwin because Darwin was involved in this too well well yes because Darwin originally had looked at a lot of the evidence when he was up you're travelling in the beagle who determined that there had to been great sweeping catastrophes to explain the evidence that he was looking at but in the end he abandoned the idea because it was just too extreme form but think about Darwinism it's basically based upon the idea of slow gradual accumulated incremental changes and that's exactly the uniformity idea of geology and soul once they got away from the idea of a young earth to six thousand year old earth and begin to admit error recognized that the earth was you know me actually millions of years old well now it's like okay with the features that are in there that we observe in Europe now they could be created over many many millions of years and we don't need to compress these advance into a very short span of time about billions of years rental or even billions of years but of course they're not thinking billions of years yet in the nineteenth century there they're just they're not okay they're still thinking millions I think it was lords held and it did did some studies in radio activity came up I think it was around seventy million years so then that became part of the the dogma for awhile but then as we get into the twentieth century you know then yeah we've moved certainly into billions of years now I think four point six billion years but they kind of threw the baby out with the bath water because once geology became established as an academic discipline uniformity gradualism became the dominant paradigm in any saying outside is that was looked upon with disfavor because you're trying to bring back in biblical literalism you're trying to bring back no was flawed its center at cetera so we don't need that anymore so fast forward a couple decades the nineteen twenties you now have a geologist by the name of Jay Holland breasts who is studying landscapes up in eastern Washington and all the evidence that he is amassing in looking at leads him to believe that there was the strike cantik floods that swept over eastern Washington when he proposed some of these ideas in the mainstream literature scientific literature of the nineteen twenties he was attacked mercilessly by the defenders of gradualism because they basically said you're trying to take us back to biblical literalism we don't need giant floods to explain the landscape or the the rock layers that this the stratigraphy we don't need that so he encountered a great deal of resistance to these ideas but he stuck to it for about twenty twenty five years kept amassing more and more data that just made a overwhelmingly convincing case that these huge klutz it's wept across eastern Washington and it was gradually accepted but not really fully accepted by the geological community until the nineteen sixties at that point one of the principle critics of J. Harmon breasts which actually persuaded to come out in the field for a week which he had never done and he he came out spent a week in the field looking at the evidence before his eyes in the landscape in it the end of that week he was standing in front of a feature called potholes up no clues falls in southeastern Washington where there is this gigantic horseshoe shaped cap arrest with a little trickle of water which is the modern pollution river and the accumulated affected this week of looking at day after day this this make a scale evidence he finally comes back to the group after standing looking at this one particular feature for for many minutes comes walking back and he says how could I have been so wrong and that was the beginning of the turning point and just like what happened in the nineteen eighties when it was accepted that indeed it did it extraterrestrial impact that it had actually occurred that was a turning point with Jay Holland breasts in the twenties and the thirties that became a turning point although it it didn't really manifest until the sixties then you had a new generation geologist coming up in the nineteen seventies and nineteen eighties the word now willing to accept the idea that yes these are these giant floods that occurred now what's the explanation and the original objections to the flood theories in the twenties and thirties apartment breasts was we you can't explain a source of water so great therefore there were no flowers like you're talking about so that kind of became the the the modus operandi by the sixties and seventies with the effort to explain what could have caused floods and we're talking about floods that were measured in hundreds of millions of cubic feet per second these like biblical floods Randall well the there I I could call a biblical scale floods from this standpoint anyone who managed to survive one by some sheer luck of the draw could easily will be easily believe that the entire world had been distraught course especially in your location that's all you saw a new yeah not not biblical ending in this simple minded sense of the whole world is supernaturally ground with water all the way top brought topic run on brought on by god to exterminate the population at the time right but like you just say George you could a survivor could it could be and in four generations of descendants might grow up live die and not know that there were other people in the world because if you're talking about in the area let's say the size of several states this completely wiped out yeah and that's all they knew that's all they knew you get yes that's exactly right so we've come a long way since then because now what what has happened is these as they're called this channel scablands are the erosional features in south of southern and eastern Washington though generally.

George Laurie Randall Carlson
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"So is this do you think this is the reason that because there was s commission going on in the eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds is this the reason the laws were passed the stop digging the stuff up because it brought up potentially a differently history than we were taught. Maybe maybe you know, I puzzled over that. Clearly, you know, the idea that there may have been seven and eight foot people wandering, but you know, hey, here's the thing. We know we we talked about mega fun, right? Huge or larger great fun. And when we look at some of those, you know, you talk about the Irish L it had a ambler span of up to twelve feet. You look at the the giant short faced bear Toda's Seimas, Matthew here was a creature who that that stood six to seven feet tall at its shoulder was twice the size of a modern grizzly bear, right? Right. And you could go on and on with this, you know, the mammoth this imperative or imperial mammoth stood up to sixteen feet high. It's shoulder was place as big as a modern elephant. And so you think you know, the the way it was put to me by a person, you know, that runs in your circles is well, yeah. Animals were a lot bigger. Then why wouldn't the people have been bigger? Why? I couldn't there have been right athlete. So it does make perfect. It does make perfect sense. Yeah. It does. Here's another Quayle. Just historical collections of Ohio in two volumes and encyclopedia of the state with published in eighteen eighty eight. But it was a collection of things that went back to the seventeen hundreds. So when the settlers first arrived in this one particular sediment along Yojairo river there were twenty or thirty Indian cabins there were amount situated in eastern part of the village and then extensive burying ground near the Presbyterian church, which appeared have had no connection with the bearing places of the Indian. So when they excavated among the human 'bout bones found in amounts were some belonging to men of gigantic stature, some of the skulls were of sufficient capacity to admit the head of an ordinary man job owns that might have been faded on over the face with equal facility. The other bones were proportionately LA. Large. Now, imagine a skull. That's big enough that you can put it on like a helmet. That's a big person that that's probably somebody who's nine feet tall. You know? So I mean, and so the the archives are full of this kind of stuff bat. And so what are you gonna make it willing for anybody that anybody that doubts? It also you have to do and spend some time around some Samoans and you'll realize it's not that unthinkable. Samoan's? Okay. Right. Why does Samoans now? I don't I don't know how to say it because they're massive. If you've ever if you've ever stood in a group of giant Samoan men care. Their heads are literally as big as my torso, their massive human beings. And these people were even much bigger than them. Yeah. Apparently. So it's it's mind blowing. But well, sir, we have to let you go here. Pretty soon. You have been a treat to have on in. It's I mean, it's always an education just to read just to listen to you. I listen to you on a lot of different shows. And do you have any social media that people can follow you on get more educated on some books, and please. I'm ninety thousand words into my book. I'm going to try to have it finished. By this summer. I'm gonna touch on a lot of this stuff. We're talking about all with all the references and sources so people can, you know, follow this stuff stuff up for themselves if they're so fine. But yeah, GIO cosmic. Wrecks dot com. Just like it. Sounds geo mix wrecks dot com and sacred geometry international dot com. And he'd be out there listening and also any social media that people can follow you answer. I haven't been too active on social media lately..

LA Yojairo river Quayle Matthew Ohio Presbyterian church sixteen feet twelve feet eight foot seven feet nine feet
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"You know, the Cheyenne Mountain in Wyoming where they were going to take refuge to survive. That's the thing. That's the thing that I think. Talk about you know, there was a certain sector of society who prepared for this sort of stuff they were educated enough, they prepared and they survived. I look at it. It's the exact same thing. Now. I mean, if there's a massive meteor or any kind of anything headed towards earth. I very much doubt that they're going to announce it on the nightly news that next Wednesday earth is going to get destroyed. You know, they're just not going to say it. I just don't see him saying it because the government and the people that run everything are going to be underneath underneath those mountains because we know that we have those facilities. So it's it's the same thing today, in my mind, Yeah. I think. I think you're right. The thing is though it it may not work. So well because of the fact that there's too many amateur astronomers out there and a lot of the professional. Astronomers they're focused on, you know, other galaxies deep space objects and stuff to discover an earth impacting asteroid or comet you've got to be looking in near earth space, and you don't need, you know, a five hundred million dollar telescope to do that, you know, you can just do that from your backyard, and so just like well like shoemaker Levy nine it's called shoemaker Levy because it was actually discovered by David Levy who was an amateur. Astronomers say so. I think the we're we're would leak out that way. But, but you know, and again, it depends on the lead time if you've got five years. Hey, a lot of people could get ready. If you've got five months, not so much. Right. Right. So the the the people that I'm gonna go back to the builders of the structures here in North America. And we don't we don't have here for much longer. So I'm going to get get to this. You know? At fifty five hundred years, you know, dating the oldest one that they've found so far who who built those are we talking who who we would envision as the native Americans who are, you know, in our history books or was it another another, you know, civilization. Okay. I didn't think that it was the native Americans. Okay. I think there was the indigenous peoples I think they let me put it this way. I think they provided the labor pool, but not necessarily the architectural design, very interesting. Okay. So so and there's all these mysteries. And and, you know, talk of giants that roam the earth and all this sort of stuff is there any proof of that. Well, you know, I can't say proof. But there is a very strong circumstantial case, you know. In in a lot of the mound excavations of North America. There were particularly in the nineteenth century. There were numerous giants. I'm saying giants. I'm talking about seventy eight feet tall. Right. And you know that tended to get lost. Now, I have in my collection. I have you know, I have access to Emery university here where I live, and they have an extraordinary collection of of documents historical documents and all of that been going through phone. I just was this has been years ago now, but going through a lot of the old stuff from the nineteenth century, you know, like archives of the various states and stuff, and there will be accounts of the excavation of various mound. Structures and so forth. And there are frequently accounts. You know, you know, Reverend so and so and his people out there excavating and they discover an eight foot skeleton. So, you know, this was in today's there, you know, no internet for people to post things to go viral. There wasn't any. There was nothing really to be gained by coming out and proclaiming that you've found. What timeframe would these people have been dated these giants? Well, I'm thinking we've got to go back several thousand years for that. Yeah. I would I would think so. So they were so they were would you say that they were a subset or part of the native Americans or they were just a different group altogether. I think they would have been a different group altogether..

shoemaker Levy North America Cheyenne Mountain Wyoming Emery university five hundred million dollar fifty five hundred years seventy eight feet thousand years five months eight foot five years
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"Math skills and math. Yes. Exactly. Cartography mathematics, engineering astronomy, even geology there somewhere. There seems to be a source of knowledge that's out of context with with the conventional models of prehistory. So think about this suppose, we got faced with the devastating catastrophe. Then basically pull the plug on civilization. And in the aftermath of that. There might be two categories of survivors. Those who knew it was coming and took great went to great lengths to preserve to prepare to preserve as much as they could they survived because the intended to survive they planned to survive, they prepared to survive. Then you have other survivors who just essentially survive because they happen to be in the right place at the right time. They. The luck of the draw they survived they wherever they were. They didn't get wiped away by floods. They didn't get wiped out by the fires the explosive events. Those people now are going to be thrown back into the stone age existence, and there's evidence now that in the aftermath of the younger dryest. There was a pretty extreme population collapse worldwide. That probably was the counterpart to the mass extinction of the great megaphone. In other words, you know, we lost the woolly mammoth we lost the sabertooth cats. We lost the giant ground flaws the Irish elk the the cave bear, the you know on and on and on right over one hundred species. Well, those animals died in a catastrophe to me, there's no doubt the way when we examined the fossilized evidence. It's not consistent with human hunting. It's consistent with being wiped out in catastrophic events. So it's also now becoming more acceptable consider that well, maybe the human population went through a precipitous decline as well. Right. So the survivors who survived because of the luck of the draw their whole preoccupation is going to be just the day to day existence. Where are we going to get food to survive tomorrow right now if you had somebody else? That actually went to great lengths to prepare in survive. Just like, well, we see an analog here. You know, particularly would go back to the Cold War. We had you know, what they call the continuity of government, which the idea was in the aftermath of a Cold War. Everything would be basically, I mean in the aftermath of a nuclear war. You know, we'd be civilization my succumb, but they had their strongholds..

sabertooth
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"All this all this other stuff. That's you know, that I could theorize on. But what do you think really is is the cause of of the misinformation we were fed? I mean Klein towards the second I would be less inclined to think that it was conspiracy in the old days. I just think it was part of the model, you know, sort of Judeo Christian model of of earth change, and then how that how that transition into sort of the modern concepts of of global change and prehistory, you know, for one thing there was an objection. You know, there was sort of a what we say type of AB cultural chauvinism going on not to give credit to various indigenous peoples around the planet that may have. Had a much more sophisticated understanding of of strana me and geometry and mathematics and engineering than they've been given credit for. But it certainly does seem now like there is sort of a conspiratorial element to it. Because what seems to be emerging out of the, you know, the evidence of history and prehistory is that. Yeah, there probably been multiple civilizations. That have arisen and become lost in the vagaries of time and have left almost no trace, you know, because the human presence on earth keeps getting pushed further and further back. I mean, we're finding now evidence of modern humans going back two hundred fifty to two hundred thousand years, that's the and that's the thing that is blowing everybody's minds and a lot of the people that are protecting. You know, the the old textbook way of thinking are freaking out about that. Well, yeah. And they don't because it's gonna require basically. Here's what we're looking at the the models of of historical, change and geological change and so forth. Have heavy fall over one hundred two hundred and fifty years, right? Most of the twentieth century was the the development of the academic models of prehistory. The ideas of long slow gradual change, you have the uniform a- -tarian concept in geology, which is one grain of sand. One drop of water at a time. If you've got millions and millions of years that's gonna -ccomplish, you know, and be able to shape the world into what we see today, and alongside of that came Darwinian evolution which is kind of the the biological counterpart to uniform geological uniformity which says, you know, that species of all one small incremental change at a time over long periods of time. These changes accumulate and eventually once. She's becomes a new species. But you know, we're still back to the problem that you know, when we look at species, we're looking at the end members of continuum, but where the hell is the continuum? You see where is it? But then and this is why in the early eighties. It was such resistance to the idea that the dinosaurs were exterminated by an asteroid impact. Because suddenly you've got a mass extinction event. You've got a mass mortality events that wipes out a majority of the species existence at the time. Right. And then that's followed by a hiatus the fossil record where there is a an extreme impoverishment of of diversity in the species. And then suddenly. All these new species appear, they call it the the the the zoologist and paleontologist and things looking at this. We'll call it a rapid specie Asian event, but what causes that no one really knows at this point. But so now the models of of you know, evolutionary change are gonna have to take account of these rapid extinctions in these rapid species Asian events and figure out how how do those going? How do those get worked into the model? I think part of it is this. I think part of it is that when you haven't mass extinction event, it's triggered by some type of a cosmic encounter. I an asteroid or a comet delivers all kinds of very exotic materials into earth's biosphere during an impact event, and a lot of the research that I'm really interested in right now has to do with how those materials such as the platinum group metals in particular might act as catalysts. Trigger rapid evolutionary change over very short period of time. It's it's very possible path at the same event that wipes out a whole bunch of species on one end is then stimulating or catalyzing..

Klein two hundred thousand years fifty years one grain
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"It's just that we look into direction of Taurus to see those meteors coming back in from from out in the Jupiter's orbit. Right. But the the radiant point, which is like the bullseye. Imagine this that you're that you're walking you walk down railroad tracks. As a kid, right? And you remember how the parallel tracks converged to a point in the distance? Yes, sir. Now picture instead of two dimensional railroad tracks you've got like a tunnel. And and that's the best way to visualize. A meteor stream is that you've got this stream of debris. It's coming in a tunnel. And so if you're looking up the tunnel if it's going to give the the allusion of perspective, it's gonna it's gonna look like everything is converging on a point. It's not really because these these objects are all flying in parallel past. They're all orbiting also, correct? Or are they? Yes, in the thing is though the orbit is big enough that by the time, it intersects, the earth's orbit for all practical purposes, those pieces are flying in parallel lines. Okay. See? Yeah. I know if you've ever had a calculus course at any time in your life. But the idea of hit a lot since then though. That's true. I guess so so all that calculus stuff kinda got left there in the ring two plus two now, buddy. Okay. Hey, that's better than some people. Right. Right. So let let me ask you. I mean, if we were to have one of these events now with seven eight billion people on this planet one that caused massive flooding. I mean, what are we looking at as as far as cost to human lives or just human existence? Well, it depends on the magnitude of the event now. Sure, but one that say one that's happened before. So I for instance, let's start with the tin goose command event the energy released was about a quivalent to a fifteen megaton hydrogen bomb. Now, a fifteen megaton hydrogen bomb is generally considered to be a city BUSTER, it it could one hydrogen bomb of fifteen megatons could wipe out any urban area on earth has gone. Elliott has gone. Yes. LA is gone. So fifteen megatons is fifteen million tons of TNT equivalent, right? So the hero Shema object was ten thousand tons. So a fifteen hundred megaton bomb had Houston bomb would be the equivalent of one thousand five hundred here Shema sized atomic bombs. So that's pretty damn devastating. Now when we're talking about a ten Guca object. We're looking at an object. It's estimated to be somewhere between one hundred and two hundred feet in diameter tiny in the in the really in the spectrum of things. Yes. In the cosmic spectrum. It's it's a piece of cosmic dust. Basically. Now, if you get up to something much much bigger than that, say six miles in diameter, which is the estimated diameter of the dinosaur killing asteroid. We would be lucky to survive as a species. Right. We probably could if we had enough lead time, especially if we had like a lunar base that we could relocate to for a few years on her base while. Yeah, that's my. That's mind-blowing. Yeah. But that's not likely. What's more likely is something along the the scale of ten goosey object? But that in itself would be pretty dramatic event. Because we're talking about imagine. Oh, I mean like Hurricane Katrina hitting New Orleans that was that was a big deal. Right. But now take that multiply that times. Ten say raised by an order of magnitude. That's kind of the scale we'd be looking at with a ten goose ca scale event, if if it happened over a fairly densely populated part of the earth like the eastern seaboard..

Hurricane Katrina Shema TNT LA New Orleans Houston Elliott fifteen million tons ten thousand tons two hundred feet
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"I mean, they've found some obviously. But the the fact that there was a couple miles of ice over the top of everything and a crater being formed wouldn't necessarily happen as easily. I guess if that were the case, right? That's exactly right because the crater I mean, the ice is going to absorb a lot of the energy of the impact. Now, of course, there's so many variables there, it's a complex thing to think about, but you know, you're talking about obviously, first and foremost would be of the impact or the second thing would be the velocity of the impact or the third thing would be the density of the impact or in its composition. The fourth thing would be the angle of approach all of these things are going to affect what happens in terms of the post immediate post impact phenomena and the resultant cratering effect. So if you had a mile. L and a half or more of ice. And the object was say only half a mile or less than diameter. You're probably not going to have a typical crater bowl like crater form under the ice. If it's a little bigger. So then it can penetrate the ice it most likely will blast a crater out. But the problem is is now in the process of that impact, you generated enough heat to melt an enormous amount of ice sentiment sentiment and everything else flows back in probably flows back, and that's exactly right, and in effect to Dr very few analogues for impacts into ice sheet of the things I have looked at primarily to try to get an understanding would be an impact into the ocean, right. Which is very distinct from an impacting the lamp now an in the ocean, dude, aloft, huge amounts of water, vapor into the atmosphere, and that water vapor water, vapor is a greenhouse gas. So it's going to form a canopy that causes temporary. Short. Live runaway global warming until until the water vapor precipitates out an impact onto land is going to loft enormous amounts of dust into the atmosphere, and it's also going to trigger a lots of wildfires. As a secondary effect in those wildfires will put more soot and carbon into the atmosphere that will increase the opacity of the atmosphere reflecting a lot more son back into space and therefore caused global cooling. So there are those two different effects. Now what happens though, if you have a multiple impact event, and you have impact into Oche both ocean and land. Well, now, you're gonna get such a complex set of of offense that it's going to be difficult to to sort them out. But that I think is the challenge in front of us because the evidence is there that there was some kind of an impact from something from space, the radium is there, the platinum is there. Manno diamonds, the the micro Speros. The magnetic grains, all of these things taken together really point pretty much directly to an impact of some kind right now in Australia. There's if correct me if I'm wrong, but is there a debris field of meteoric of meteor material where there is not necessarily a crater. Yes. In fact. Which was hitting the mass of layer of ice. Right. Yeah. Now, that's probably from low density objects entering the atmosphere and exploding in. Okay. Okay. See which is which is essentially what happened in nineteen. Oh, eight with the tin goose go cosmic event over Siberia, which you're probably familiar with. Right. That's the big the big explosion near that level. Trees for hundreds of miles. Yeah. Yeah. Level trees over eight hundred and some square miles incinerated about one hundred one hundred fifty square miles right under the epicenter of the blast. That just turned it into nothing. How far above the earth?.

Oche Australia Siberia one hundred one hundred fifty
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"That is exactly. Right. And you know, I don't know if you remember this, but you know in the seventies. The concern was about an. Nice age not global warming. The concern was about global cooling, and the reason for that is because you see nor whole models of like climate change, particularly with reference to the glacial and interglacial ages that were you know, had been well established by the by the late eighteen hundreds. But the timeframes were always considered to be extremely long. You know? In other words, we might have a hundred or hundred and fifty thousand years to get into an ice age and just as long to get out of an ice age. Right. Right. So what changed that was in one nineteen? Fifties was the development of radiocarbon dating as a method of dating organic material that's less than say forty or fifty thousand years old, and what had happened was that the the the method of radiocarbon dating was developed nearly fifties. But it took a decade or two to to build up a. Database of dates where one could look and go. Okay. So we were assuming that the great ice sheets over North America were pretty much intact consistently for maybe a hundred thousand years or longer problem was is that they'd be into do radiocarbon dating and discovered that well right in the middle of where the big ice sheet was where it might have been a mile and a half thick there were forest growing and those forests were growing their thirty five forty thousand years ago. So clearly if there were forest growing there there couldn't have been a mile thick ice sheet. So the question becomes as well, what was the extent of the ice sheet during this this period? And and it must have shrunk considerably from its its most massive extent. So what? And then the other thing was is that realizing that most of the ice was still there at fourteen or fifteen thousand years ago and the assumption was. Up to this time is that the ice disappeared because there were changes in earth's orbital geometry and the connection with the son right so earth, you know, sometimes there's a little farther away from the sun. Sometimes it's a little closer. You know, the earth is tilted sometimes the northern hemisphere is tilted more towards the son sometimes the southern hemisphere is and of course, the northern hemisphere is mostly land in the southern hemisphere is mostly ocean. So you have the potential of of of this great ice accumulation in the northern hemisphere more so than the southern hemisphere..

North America fifty thousand years thirty five forty thousand yea fifteen thousand years hundred thousand years
"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"randall carlson" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the conspiracy far where we don't start to conspiracies. We just had the water in now your hopes of the most state of the art Malkin four, five cast on the inter-web I present to you fat. Jeffrey will sit ladies and gentlemen. News. In delays Dunham and locked and loaded another episode. The conspiracy farm, Jeffrey Wilson as always right here with you doing another show this evening with my hall of fame partner, Pat military you doing sir. Doing great. And I gotta say I fully engaged and ready to have my mind blown by. Intelligent man, this that we'd got guest tonight. Yeah, as a my, I mean, beyond huge fan of his work, you know, it spans many years going back to my days of listening to like art bell and just even just books fingerprints of the gods cherry to the God, Eric Vandana get. I've always been fascinated by by just research, which kind of turns the conventional thought on things like ancient civilizations and the origins of who we are on its head in the gentleman we have today is very, very good at doing that very thing. Where's many hats architect master builder teacher geological explorer, independent scholar in all around just really, really cool human being from my show research laze in general. Mr. Randall Carlson has joined evening this evening. How are you sir? I'm doing well Geoffrey. Well, thank you so much for for taking the time. I show. Oh, well, yeah, I, I was kind of I hit yesterday. It usually takes a long time to kind of get people locked Dane, and you're like, hey, I've, I've seen the conspiracy farm familiar kind of which you do a little bit or you became familiar with what we do, and I appreciate you lending your expertise to our program this evening. Well, I hope I can live up to your expectations. Try. I'll try to do my best impression of an intelligent person. No, come on. We, like I said, my my show prep has been three pretty thorough and hours and hours and hours of been have transpired of gone by just listening to you and all of the just amazing information that you have to dispenser and I find it again, so very fascinating. But if you don't mind before we get into the nooks and crannies of all of this, what sparks your interest, why this particular field, why this path of geology, etc. What was the bug that bit you, sir? You know, Jeffrey. I've been asked this question before, and usually my response is just I think it's just it was a conspiracy from the time. I was born and raised in rural, Minnesota with all the effects of the great ice age, right in my backyard basically and getting really interested. You know, I've always liked the outdoors of always been interested in in, you know how things work. So when I look around and I see hills and lakes and big boulders, big boulder sitting in our backyard that didn't belong there. Things like that. Just kind of piqued my interest. You know, I've really tried to pin it down, say, okay, here was the moment where this whole thing started, and I have not been able to do that. You know, there was things we would go to see one place. We used to go regularly when we were kids was called Saint Croix falls. It's under Saint Croix river that forms the border of Minnesota and Wisconsin and one of the places we used to go to. I'm sure a lot of the locals if you have people from that area, they'll they'll know exactly what I'm talking about. There's I'll interstate park there and on the west side of the Saint Croix river. There's a basaltic outcrop, maybe forty or fifty feet above the river. It's got a flat area on the top and drilled into that basaltic bedrock are these gigantic potholes that are maybe twenty to thirty feet wide the big ones and up to eighty feet deep. And those potholes were were drilled, like I said, they're they're well above the modern day river, Saint Croix. River. But those potholes were drilled by what is called cokes, which coking is

Saint Croix river Saint Croix Jeffrey Wilson Minnesota Malkin Dunham Eric Vandana Mr. Randall Carlson Geoffrey Dane partner Pat Wisconsin eighty feet thirty feet fifty feet