35 Burst results for "Rana"

CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

KCBS Radio Midday News

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

"CDC report just out this morning recommends to tactics we could try when using masks to slow the spread of covert 19. One is to use a mask fitter that works to keep the mask in place on your face. The other is to double mask with a cloth mask over a surgical mask for more. We're joined live on the KCBS Ring Central News Line by Dr Abrar Koran. Physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Thanks very much for talking to us today, So let's start with the mask fitters. The ones I've seen are sort of a frame that keep the edges of your mask pushed against your face. Is that what we're talking about? Yeah, That's exactly right. So these fitters basically tighten up the sides of the mask and the nose part of Damascus well, so that you don't have any leakage around the sides or or near the nose when you're bleeding out. That's not with a wire. Well, there's different companies making different fitters. One of them has fixed the mask, which I believe is actually based out of the Bay Area, and they use a sort of plastic material that is comfortable. It's not that tried one myself. Okay. And And what about the double masking with cloth and surgical Yeah, So the idea here is basically that the surgical mask actually is made of a mountain flowed material that actually has a very good job in terms of filtering on filtration, But the fit is not great. So you have fit issues around the side. The ideas the cloth masks. And provide a better fit if it's fitted tightly over your surgical masks. Is it important? Do you think T have two different kinds of fabric? The cloth of the mask and the whatever it is that they make the surgical masks that if I don't wanna call paper, but whatever. Yeah, I do. Because if you're wearing two surgical masks, we're getting the same fit. You're not getting a better fit. Where's with the cloth mask to get a better fit on bats? What was tested in the CDC study that was released today. I so little pleat on the sides of the massive that eliminates many gapping. But you know, I have a sewing machine and console so Not everyone's able to do that. I've seen online some folks who are using three d copiers to make a mask that fits you specifically. Yeah. I mean, there is a lot of innovation in this space and anything that can improve the fit is going to help. And the idea here is twofold. One is that it's going to reduce the amount that you Are emitting from your own mouth into the environment and then also will minimize the amount that you are breathing in from the environment. How much of a difference does it make? Just aware? You know, if you're wearing a mask with these big gaps on your Side of your face versus either the double or the fitter. Well, I'll take you right to the CDC data. So the medical procedure math that was not fitted, blocked only 42% of particles in a simulated cost and across mask blocked only 44% when they combined. Cloth mask and the medical procedure. Massive block 92.5%. You're pushing for us with something called a national high Five Mask initiative. Tell us about that. Yeah, so myself and two of my colleagues wanted Dr Rana Dylan, One doctor, and one is Mr ST Krishna. We've been actually pushing for this since last spring with the idea that Everybody should have access to the best mass possible as doctors means a doctor Dylan. We were at 95, Mass in the hospital, and that's prevented us from getting infected throughout the year. Ondo. Actually, even at my own hospital, there was an outbreak of infections when surgical masks were used, so we are pushing for people in the community to get access to higher grade, higher quality Mass with good fit. I can help prevent transmission and infection. You know some of this stuff just looking through Amazon for mass. What do you suggest folks do to try and find something That's a little more, you know that they would do this more. Yes, This is a tricky situation because we the market that's out there right now. There's a lot of mass on there that are not really tested and trialed and there are some counterfeit as well. What I can tell you is this There are some standards that are gonna be coming out this year that are going to be publicly available for the mask that you buy, which will tell you that fix the filtration and the breathe ability. All right. We'll be waiting for that. Thanks very much for talking to us. Dr. Abrar Correct. Curren, Physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School case.

Brigham And Women's Hospital A Dr Abrar CDC Damascus Bay Area Dr Rana Dylan Mr St Krishna Ondo Dylan Amazon Dr. Abrar Curren
1 tweet from Rihanna on farmer protests gets India incensed

PRI's The World

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

1 tweet from Rihanna on farmer protests gets India incensed

"Ongoing protests tens of thousands of farmers in india are now entering their third month with no end in sight. The farmers are protesting inequality and new laws at further privatize agriculture among other grievances and they have found an unlikely ally. The pop singer rana yesterday tweeted. Why aren't we talking about this. Hashtag farmers protests with a link to an article about an indian government crackdown that included an internet blackout. Her comment went viral environmental activist. Greta tune berg is also chimed in tweeting we stand in solidarity with the hashtag. Farmers protests in

Rana India Greta Tune Berg
"rana" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

09:23 min | 3 weeks ago

"rana" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Just some of the avenue. She entertainment affect t have explored include helping people on the spectrum analyzing reactions to marketing campaigns and creating personalized interfaces and safety features for cars as you would expect of someone who has taught machines to recognize emotion. Rana has what is known as a high q. Something that was obvious from her early childhood one of my earliest memories. Is this blue plastic chair. My dad would block me on there as a toddler and he had these very early video recorders and he would just have me give these speeches right and just record all of that. I remember standing on this chair as if it were thrown really. I always kind of joke. My dad was my first audience of one. 'cause i would just practice all my spills on him but i think it made me realize the importance of human connection and being able to be in front of an audience and be animated. Use your hands and your voice and your expressions which of course ended up being what my career was. all about. Rana's father also helped her learn another important lesson about reading emotions. Although this time he wasn't as conscious of his role he would ask me to do all sorts of chores so he would say rana. They'll stretch the polish for my black shoes. And i figure it out. If i got him the wrong color of shoe polish. I would stop getting asked and he would ask my middle sister or my youngest sister. And i guess you can think about it as being emotionally intelligent. Well it's certainly predicting the incentives and the reactions and these things which are part of the emotional fabric. I thought of it as actually more of a silent rebellion because in the middle east. You don't say no to your parents ever like ever. And i felt like that was my way of saying no rana's fascination with human interaction and emotional behavior grew childhood and adolescence and she decided to make the focus of her postgraduate studies. So the year was nineteen thousand. Nine hundred eighty eight. I had just finished my undergraduate at the american university in cairo. Studying computer science. And at that point i had already realized i was really drawn to human machine interaction more so than computer architecture or hardware. I was really intrigued by the intersection of humans and machines and that discomfort area that discomfort area rana's talking about can take many forms. It could be the elderly relative trying. Use the internet for the first time or the avid mac user. Trying to get their head around windows. We often forget how much we as humans have changed to accommodate the technology. We use for most of us using a mouse is second nature but if you hand the mouse to someone who's never used one before you'll see that in fact it isn't as intuitive as you think. It was during this time that ronald read a book about these issues. That changed her life. It's title was effective computing professor. Rosalind picard who is the author of the book. Posited it that for computers to be truly intelligent. They didn't just need to have cognitive intelligence. Iq they had to also have emotional intelligence. And i was just so fascinated by that. That i pivoted my entire career to focus on that ron not only pivoted her entire career to focus on what you read about in the book co found with its author. Here's professor card. Herself describing what caught her thinking about the subject of human computer interaction. Affective computing is computing that relates to arises from deliberately influences emotion. When i framed the area many actually decades ago. Now the idea was that the most important tenant was to show respect for human feelings. All of the technology developed to honor and show respect for who we are as human beings and that means if there's some technology that noise us or takes us frustrates us. We should think about. How do we do that. So that it gives people a better experience. You'd hear of stories like the sky in texas pulled out his gun and shot his computer three times through the monitor and times through the hard drive for this chef in new york who was so mad at his computer that he picked it up and threw it in the deep fat fryer. It's rare to get so aggravated by your computer that you fling it into a pot of boiling oil and it's rare still to come across an idea that resonate so much with you that you pivot your whole life towards it and when something resonates with you this much you're in a good position to not only crater but it's stewart this is something i discussed with my producers will there's character and there is competencies for being a steward. The character actually doesn't have almost anything to do with a cv has to do with more of a mindset and a disposition like for example. Say you own an asset. It's not that on the asset. I can do whatever i want. But actually i am the custodian of this asset and a central part of that character. Even if you're the entrepreneur and even you're the person who created it is i've created something that is beyond me that it's an important ongoing and public asset and how i hand that off and how that plays in the world and how that plays in society is the important thing and the way that i should be. Judged and benchmark. Handles is how. I play against that. Ronald was not only driven to help realize this idea of emotionally aware interfaces. She wanted to make sure that the idea was used in the best possible way. And she turned her life upside down to pursue it. I started applying for phd programs and centered. My application around building emotionally intelligent machines. I really didn't know how to go about it. But i wanted to build that and got accepted into cambridge university to pursue. That idea actually left my family. And i was a newlywed bride at the time and essentially move to the uk to start on this journey. This would be a hugely unsettling moved to make the best of times but this was certainly not the best of times that was just around september eleventh. it just happened and there was a huge backlash against muslims. I moved to cambridge. And i was wearing the hijab and recognized that i have to accentuate my expressions. In fact i remember using my smile as a superpower because it was like my. Hey guys i come peace and so i just smile all the time and i think that i don't know i i guess expressions can bring us together and empathy is really powerful. Yes so i actually think. The hijab accentuates an amplifies. He's in the same way that now wearing a facial mask like really interesting because i find myself exaggerating expressions. When i'm wearing a mask. Because i want people to see through my eyes that i'm saying hello as well. As finding her way around a different culture. Rana had to get herself up to speed on a new area of study. I'm a computer scientist by training. But i had to delve into the science of emotions right. I had to really get up to speed on how to humans communicate and as it turns out the majority of our communication is nonverbal split equally between your expressions. Your body language. But also your vocal intonation as you can tell from zoom call. I'm a very expressive human being. I can concur. Ron is very expressive even via zoom. And these times a pandemic have made us. Acutely aware of the importance are expressions intonations and body language play in communicating basically. I locked into decided to focus on facial expressions as an expression of social and emotional signals and dove into that. Then i have to figure out. Okay how do you build computers. That can quantify these facial expressions and that became the basis of my doctoral work that work focused on creating software that could use a camera to track expressions on a person's face and then assess them the determine the person's emotions as humans. We've been wired by years and years of evolution to pick up on the teenage nuances in each other's facial expressions. The furrow of a brow narrowing of the is or the blushes of a cheek. Someone which last a fraction of a second but getting a computer to recognize even the most obvious of expressions was painstakingly difficult. I spent the whole year building. This and it wasn't going anywhere. And then i remember this one time i trained ahead knob detector. I can see you nodding your head. That was my very first algorithm because it's a dynamic temporal signal that happens over time and the very first time my algorithm detected ahead not correctly. It was amazing right. It was like a real success with a nod detector finally cracked rana could move on to more complex signals. There's this obsession with what we call the basic emotions. Joy sad surprise disgust fear and anger and contempt and everybody was obsessed.

new york Rosalind picard Ronald Ron mac cairo cambridge ronald decades ago texas uk Rana nineteen thousand cambridge university first algorithm rana second nature first audience first time ron
Oshie has 3 points, Capitals open with 6-4 win at Buffalo

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Oshie has 3 points, Capitals open with 6-4 win at Buffalo

"Tom Wilson's third period goal was the difference as the Washington Capitals won for the second time in as many nights over the Buffalo Sabres this time by a score of two to one capitals head coach Peter Laviolette says Wilson came to play we weren't quite on point we need to be assigned to Tom was on point from start to finish also on point with Washington goaltender Vitek vantage check earning his first NHL win making twenty three saves Jacob Rana had the other Washington gold buffalo's lone goal came from defenseman Rasmus Ristolainen Sabres either chances in this game however buffalo went over five on the power play I'm gene Battaglia

Tom Wilson Sabres Washington Capitals Peter Laviolette Vitek Vantage Jacob Rana Wilson Washington TOM Rasmus Ristolainen NHL Buffalo Gene Battaglia
Pence Visits Georgia as Calm Before Potential Trump Storm

San Diego Business with Sully

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Pence Visits Georgia as Calm Before Potential Trump Storm

"I'm him. Who's Oh Fox News Vice President Mike Pence was in Georgia yesterday and President Trump will be there tonight ahead of next month's razor Thin Senate runoff races pitting David Perdue and Kelly Leffler against Democrats. Jonah Soft and Raphael Warnock role of the U. S Senate hangs in the balance that would if Democrats win deliver prison elect Biden a super majority with pretty much unchecked power to undo many of the Things that President Trump has done over the last four years, and no one knows that better than Vice President Pitts, who came here yesterday to rally with senators Purdue in La Flor, Pleading with George is to get out and vote. Fox has quit, Jenkins, Republican National Committee chairwoman Rana McDaniel tells Fox and friends what's at stake. If you want to have a check on Chuck Schumer and Democrats and what they will do to stack the Supreme Court and get rid of the filibuster and embrace the green new deal and destroy our economy and destroy The country We love. We need to make sure we send Republicans to the Senate, Former President

President Trump David Perdue Kelly Leffler Jonah Soft Raphael Warnock Mike Pence Senate Vice President Pitts Fox News Georgia Chairwoman Rana Mcdaniel U. Biden La Flor FOX Purdue Republican National Committee Jenkins Chuck Schumer
Georgians near Atlanta urged to vote in upcoming Georgia runoff election

Fit Positive Confident

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Georgians near Atlanta urged to vote in upcoming Georgia runoff election

"Afternoon and Marietta, Georgia, talking with Republican voters, RNC chair of Rana McDaniel, trying to appeal to voters about the importance of the upcoming Senate runoff elections on January 5th. First of all, even Purdue. Has 100,000 votes lead over John office right now with the certification, So if you lose your faith, and you don't vote, people walk away that that will decide it right

Rana Mcdaniel Marietta RNC Georgia Purdue Senate John
 Man From New York's Staten Island Facing Charges After Posted Online Threats to Kill Democrats, Protesters and Police

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Man From New York's Staten Island Facing Charges After Posted Online Threats to Kill Democrats, Protesters and Police

"Federal charges 54 year old Brian My Rana is accused of making death threats on social media against protesters, Democrats, politicians and law enforcement officials. Investigators say he posted a message Sunday saying, All right thinking people need to hit the streets while these scumbags air celebrating and start blowing them away, unquote. According to the FBI, it is a reference to those celebrating the result of the presidential election. He was arrested by members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force. Many mail in

Rana FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force
Pelosi confident Biden will win presidency

AP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

Pelosi confident Biden will win presidency

"With razor thin margins in key battleground states. It's almost certain there will be recounts in the presidential election. But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was ready to declare Joe Biden the winner. Pretty soon, the heightened will be gone from vice president To President elect Joe Biden is a happy day for our country. But the head of the Republican National Committee, Rana McDaniel, says they expect to file challenges. The RNC has deployed legal teams and four states, including Michigan. To investigate clear irregularities with vote counting and tabulation in those states. Elections officials say there are so many votes to count because 15 million more people participated in this presidential election. And there were more absentee ballots because of the virus

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Joe Biden Republican National Committee Rana Mcdaniel Michigan
Trump and Biden continue on the campaign trail

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Trump and Biden continue on the campaign trail

"Complaints by hunting the park officials that there were not enough local voting centers for the city of about 60,000, the officials here in L. A county have a grade To provide tomb or the original two sides that were planned or both. Actually opening today, TTO handle the early voting for the Times says to mobile voting centers will also be set up on election day itself. Busy busy for Donald Trump and Joe Biden, campaigning in the Midwest Today, president has rallies in Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Biden in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. Republican National Committee Chairperson Rana McDaniel told Fox of the GOP ground game is ramping up. Republicans were waiting to vote in person They didn't want to send in their absentee ballots. So now his early vote starting across the country were seeing strong, strong turnout for Republicans. Democrats also say they are seeing great enthusiasm. VP nominee Kamala Harris will be campaigning in Texas. You took part in a Twitter event last night, talking about improving the pay of low income Americans raising the minimum wage is about the floor, not the CIA. Feeling when we just increased minimum wage to $15 an hour, one in three women will benefit one and three Latinos will benefit for in 10. Black workers will benefit the Democrats, obviously hoping to get Texas and early voting totals for the election already exceed the total number of ballots cast during 2016. By the way. The last time the Texas went for a Democrat Jimmy Carter back in 1976 L A Times Washington columnist Doyle McManus tell Scan X what he thinks of the main early results to look for on Election Night War and North Carolina and Ohio is another one. We're going to be able to look at those and see which way the trend is going and if it's a landslide in either direction that is going to tell us a lot, so, he says. If it's still close attention will turn to Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and George In which all are very slow in counting votes are

Wisconsin Texas Joe Biden Doyle Mcmanus Michigan Republican National Committee Minnesota Kamala Harris Donald Trump Twitter Jimmy Carter GOP Rana Mcdaniel The Times Midwest CIA VP North Carolina
RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel says "corrupt" commission canceled debate to shield Biden

Love and Relationships with Joyce Littel

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel says "corrupt" commission canceled debate to shield Biden

"The chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, accuses the commission on presidential debates of interfering in the election. Americans are frustrated that this election commission interfered with our ability to see these two candidates debate on CBS's face The nation, Rana McDaniel also called the commission corrupt and ripped them for canceling the second presidential debate set to take place this week. She claims the commission is in the pocket of Democrat nominee Joe

Republican National Committee Rana Mcdaniel CBS JOE
2nd presidential debate in doubt

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

2nd presidential debate in doubt

"President Trump says he's out of the next presidential debate. After the commission on Presidential Debates announced the October 15 debate will go virtual RNC chair Rana McDaniel tells Fox News. The commission is hurting the election instead of trying to keep debate safe. We just had an in person debate last night. So why are they changing the rules and not following the science? No talking to the candidates? Why aren't they talking to the candidates and saying Hey, if you test negative Let's go in person. This is not good for the voters. That's what I care about. Voters deserve to hear these candidates in person debate.

President Trump Rana Mcdaniel RNC Fox News
"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

03:04 min | 5 months ago

"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"So you know <Speech_Male> that's my takes a few months. <Speech_Male> So you know <Speech_Male> it it <Speech_Male> it was <hes> <Speech_Male> it was A. <Speech_Male> No more challenging <Speech_Male> than I guess <Speech_Male> anything of I've <Speech_Male> done my life. It's a process <Speech_Male> basically, right? You <Speech_Male> put together <Speech_Male> and then <Speech_Male> the key really <Speech_Male> is once you're <Speech_Male> listed, what are you GonNa do <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> we were out I. <Speech_Male> was out all the time <Speech_Male> looking to see <Speech_Male> how can I increase <Speech_Male> shareholder value all <Speech_Male> ultimately, <Speech_Male> you know shareholders come <Speech_Male> in. <Speech_Male> At X. and <Speech_Male> they want to exit <Speech_Male> an X. plots <Speech_Male> year right goes <Speech_Male> and the. <Speech_Male> Only, way you can <Speech_Male> do that right <Speech_Male> as a as <Speech_Male> as management is the CEO <Speech_Male> of the company is by. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Increasing the. <Speech_Male> Shareholder <Speech_Male> value. But the only way you <Speech_Male> can do that is by <Speech_Male> executing on <Speech_Male> a plan and making sure <Speech_Male> that you are <Speech_Male> a growing, <Speech_Male> whatever you're doing, what <Speech_Male> you're businesses growing, <Speech_Male> and in this case <Speech_Male> growing our property <Speech_Male> portfolio. So <Speech_Male> United <Speech_Male> Three acquisitions <Speech_Male> in ten months <Speech_Male> very focus <Speech_Male> right acquired <Speech_Male> other projects <Speech_Male> but I still looking for <Speech_Male> you know a <Speech_Male> bigger one and <Speech_Male> you know when we were looking everywhere <Speech_Male> in Brazil <Speech_Male> Colombia. <Speech_Male> In gold sort <Speech_Male> of known gold <Speech_Male> regions and <Speech_Male> came across <Speech_Male> this Dome Mountain <Speech_Male> a project. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> so yeah, it's <Speech_Male> it's it's challenging <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> but certainly not <Speech_Male> <hes> not impossible <Speech_Male> and You <Speech_Male> know I'm I'm living proof. <Speech_Male> You know that <Speech_Male> right among young <Speech_Male> young <Speech_Male> Mr Immigrant <Speech_Male> when I came here in the <Speech_Male> seventies. <Speech_Male> Never, finished <Speech_Male> my schooling <Speech_Male> never finished my <SpeakerChange> degree and <Speech_Male> here I am <Speech_Male> Hey. Thank you <Speech_Male> very much now importantly, <Speech_Male> I'm. <Speech_Male> Getting that point in <Speech_Male> in the coal where we <Speech_Male> start talking about <Speech_Male> <hes> tickets now <Speech_Male> if somebody wants to. <Speech_Male> Find <Speech_Male> you on the exchanges. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> is the ticket <SpeakerChange> that they will be <Speech_Male> using? <Speech_Male> Sure. So in Canada <Speech_Male> we trade <Speech_Male> under the symbol B, <Speech_Male> L L G <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> in the US <Speech_Male> we trade under <Speech_Male> be <SpeakerChange> eight G. <Speech_Male> F. Testing. <Speech_Male> Thank you. So every marsh <Speech_Male> now <hes> also <Speech_Male> Rana <Speech_Male> annoyed that you have a <Speech_Male> personal websites <Speech_Male> peak it <Speech_Male> maybe share a little <Speech_Male> bit about if people WanNa, <Speech_Male> find you <SpeakerChange> both <Speech_Male> personally and professionally, <Speech_Male> where are they going to find <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> The best places <Speech_Male> to go to a <Speech_Male> blue lagoon resources, <Speech_Male> DOT COM <Speech_Male> <hes> on it <hes> <Speech_Male> they'll find an email <Speech_Male> <hes> link <Speech_Male> and it'll. <Speech_Male> Email <Speech_Male> will eventually make its way <Speech_Male> to me I'm on among <Speech_Male> very engaged CEO. <Speech_Male> I I <Speech_Male> take my responsibility <Speech_Male> to talking to <Speech_Male> shareholders potential <Speech_Male> shareholders <Speech_Male> very very seriously <Speech_Male> whether they're larger <Speech_Male> smaller doesn't matter <Speech_Male> to me I. Think <Speech_Male> IT'S A. <Speech_Male> It's a very important <Speech_Male> responsibility. <Speech_Male> So I'm <Speech_Male> yeah I'm happy to engage <Speech_Male> in conversations via <Speech_Male> either email <Speech_Male> or get on a call <Speech_Male> and <hes> an answer <Speech_Male> any of <Speech_Male> course, trying to be very transparent. <Speech_Male> So any <Speech_Male> questions <Speech_Male> you know that I can <Speech_Male> answer I'm happy to <Speech_Male> answer <SpeakerChange> the <Silence> an address them. <Speech_Male> When amazing <Speech_Male> coach thank you. Again, <Speech_Male> Ryland effort <Speech_Male> is on the co <Speech_Male> today as <Speech_Male> is normally the case <Speech_Male> open making the links <Speech_Male> back to runner <Speech_Male> at blue <Speech_Male> lagoon resources. <Speech_Male> Anyway <Speech_Male> you find this call <Speech_Male> you will find those links <Speech_Male> Rana <Speech_Male> in closing I've had <Speech_Male> just such a wonderful <Speech_Male> experience spending <Speech_Male> some time with you <Speech_Male> on the my future business <Silence> show today. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Rick has been a pleasure. Thanks <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for having me. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Male> for joining us today. <Speech_Male>

CEO Rick Canada Dome Mountain US Brazil Colombia.
"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

03:01 min | 5 months ago

"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Right some sort of a you know whether it's whether I'm on my roar or my lip nickel or some some weights in not just to break up the routine and and and make sure that you know the the the blood is flowing and I think it's very, very important. We we've basically covered off on adaption and innovation. Because of this pandemic that we're experiencing right now. I think people have started to lend it. They can a debt and they can't innovate one some of the positive things that you're saying. In your. World. In relation to adoption innovation. I think that you're absolutely right I. Mean People Panic Right Desert. Something happens and everybody's just suddenly panicked like Oh my God what's GonNa? Happen but you're right I mean, Hey, Invention is is What are they saying mentioned is the Mother of necessity, yes? Yes. Right. Right. So I mean it. It things you you figure it out as you go along. And Yeah I mean I think the biggest sort of adoption has been these these meetings in the lack of vestment I. Think the greatest challenges is not being able to actually go personally to meet people or if you do you know you're nervous you know are you are you outside you meet her you know indoors and I don't know how how it's been in Australia and we've actually been fairly fairly lucky here in NBC Eastern Canada not so much but in western Canada ym it's been pretty good though we are sort of. Increasing again but yeah. I. Mean you know you the lessons you learn are that you can overcome anything I mean really at the end of the day and it goes back to our conversation about entrepreneurism right? I mean you know you every challenge you face it's a learning opportunity, right? I mean you know the mind is like an elastic ban, right? I mean, if you you the more you stretch it right the more it gives them more. You know you have to you have to stretch it in order to be tested to work into. To to sharpen it right and doesn't do any good if it just if you don't do that. So all these challenges are simply opportunities to learn and to to attack and to figure out If you if you can't go over, you go under the began, go under, go this this side, that side, right I mean these are just different opportunities I think Cova D-. Is is no different. We've been very privileged to be able to digress a little bit with Iran and I do appreciate this away from the gold compensation for the moment. But on that I'm wondering what is the process of? I guess approvals and how difficult was it to get I guess Balloon Lagoon Resources listed? On the stock markets. It's it's a challenge I mean, you know you you have to be able to prove to the regulators that you have a project that's worthy of the public to invest..

Canada Balloon Lagoon Resources Cova NBC Iran Australia
"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"rana" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"This is an environment that gold and silver and precious metals thrive on because people are recognizing that their dollar there might their currency is becoming worthless. So how do you preserve that and the only way to do that is by being in in precious metals because they hold their value particularly goal Welcome to the my future business show where we get you in front of your best audience and kp not only are we interviewing.

Trump in video from Walter Reed says he's feeling good, next few days will be 'the real test'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

02:17 min | 5 months ago

Trump in video from Walter Reed says he's feeling good, next few days will be 'the real test'

"President Trump seemingly in good spirits tweeting a video from Walter Reed Medical Center, where he's undergoing treatment for covert 19. I just want to tell you that I'm Starting to feel good. You don't know over the next period of a few days. I guess that's the real test will be seeing what happens over those next cup next couple of days. The four minute video, the president also said quote, I'll be back. I think I'll be back soon. This was something that happened and it's happened to millions of people all over the world for more on the president's condition. Here's correspondent Steve Portnoy, the president's doctors, briefing reporters at the Walter Reed Military Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, today. Say they're pleased with Mr Trump's progress this morning. The president is doing very well. Dr Sean Conley, the White House physician, says Mr Trump has been without a fever for more than 24 hours Thursday, he had a mild cough and some nasal congestion. Fatigue. All of which are now resolving improving. The president has been put in an I V drip of the drug Ram Desa fear, which has been shown to shorten hospital stays in some patients. The course of that medication we're told, will last for five days. He's also been given an experimental antibody cocktail. A source familiar with the president's health says his vital signs over the past 24 hours were very concerning. And that quote we're still not on a clear path to full recovery. Doctors say it is likely Mr Trump will remain hospitalized, at least for the full five day course of rendez veer. The first lady also tested positive and is recovering at home. Several others in the president's circle have tested positive for the virus, the first being hope Hicks, a senior adviser, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, campaign manager Bill Stepien, former New Jersey governor Chris Christie, RNC chairwoman Rana McDaniel and just in the president's personal assistant. Nick Luna has tested positive for covert 19, the vice president and second lady tested negative as to the rest of the Trump family. The White House says the president still plans to work from all to read for the next few days. Well, wishes for the president have come in from leaders in the US and from around the world. Near Post reports, The president phoned Rudy Giuliani this afternoon and told him he feels so well he could get out right now. He also spoke with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. McConnell tweeting the president. Sounds

President Trump Mr Trump Vice President Walter Reed Medical Center White House Mitch Mcconnell Walter Reed Military Hospital Rudy Giuliani Dr Sean Conley Bill Stepien Steve Portnoy Nasal Congestion Senate Kellyanne Conway RNC Nick Luna Chris Christie Maryland Bethesda
With Trump hospitalized, more Covid cases emerge in White House and campaign

Lawn and Garden Show

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

With Trump hospitalized, more Covid cases emerge in White House and campaign

"In chief is staying in the presidential suite at the nation's top military hospital as he undergoes treatment for covert 19. The president was sent to Walter Reed National Medical Center for treatment of Covert 19, and it was out of an abundance of caution. According to the White House. It's known as Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and is a military treatment center. It's located in Bethesda, Maryland. He will be staying at the medical center for a couple of days. Now in the hands of some of Americas top doctors, Fox is Ashley Strohmeyer. Besides the first couple, others who have had recent contact with the trumps have also come down with the disease. Republican senators Mike Leigh and Thom Tillis, Ho picks RNC Chair Rana McDaniel Kellyanne Conway, the president, Notre Dame as well as the president's campaign manager. Bill Stepien. Fox is Lucas Tomlinson. America is is listening listening to to Fox Fox News. News.

Walter Reed National Military Fox Fox News Walter Reed National Medical C President Trump FOX Chair Rana Mcdaniel Kellyanne Top Military Hospital Bill Stepien Ashley Strohmeyer Thom Tillis Lucas Tomlinson Mike Leigh White House RNC Bethesda Maryland Americas America HO
Trump Campaign Manager, More People in Inner Circle Test Positive for Coronavirus

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Trump Campaign Manager, More People in Inner Circle Test Positive for Coronavirus

"Of people in President Trump's circle who have contracted the coronavirus continues to grow. President Trump's campaign manager, Bill Stepien, has tested positive for the Corona virus, Political said Stepien received his diagnosis yesterday and as experiencing mild flu like symptoms. Former Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway has tested positive for covert 19 and is experiencing mild symptoms, according to a tweet. Conway says she is in quarantine in a consultation with her doctors. And says, as always, my heart is with everyone affected by this global pandemic, Republican Senator Tom Tillis said. He also ask over 19 Rana McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, also announced Friday that she tested positive joining Trump the first lady. Top Trump ate whole picks and numerous others. Stepien, who joined Trump at Tuesday's first presidential debate, plans to quarantine until he recovers.

President Trump Bill Stepien Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway Senator Tom Tillis Republican National Committee Rana Mcdaniel
Transforming Infused Biologics into Injectables

The Bio Report

04:09 min | 5 months ago

Transforming Infused Biologics into Injectables

"Rene, thanks for joining us. Thank. You Danny a pleasure to be here. We're GONNA talk about how It's enhanced drug delivery technology and how the company has rebuilt its business strategy around this, let's start with enhanced though what is enhance? That's a great question. Enhance is based on the proprietary enzyme recumbent Human Highly Rana Days Ph twenty. There is a human enzyme on human, highly Rhonda's enzyme and on accommodate version of that. I'd be happy to go into a little bit more about how it works if you'd like. What's the normal function of the enzyme in the body? Okay. So a little bit of biology then. So if you think about the Subcu-, if you think about the skin, there are three layers, the epidermis, the Germans, and then subcutaneous stays. The subcutaneous space is primarily composed. Of fact, some structural components like Alaskan in college, and then a sugar call highly Ronin. Hiring Ronan Forms Gel like substance in the subcutaneous as and this is what's important when it comes to enhance that that GEL like substance creates a resistance to injecting omnium into this up you space the typical volumes you can inject are usually wanted to amounts of subcutaneous. And so. What the enzyme does is it is it breaks down the highly Raanan as as you're jetting drug and the Enzyme Co formulated together. If rates out highly on, she can actually deliver large volumes of injections subcutaneous slow. And that's how drug. Works. So, when we think of That are infused into a patient is volume the issue of why those drugs get infused as opposed to inject it exactly most of the biologics are large lions and they can be sixty, nine, hundred miles. It depends on the concentration if a partner if a company wants to coach with smaller injection buying that could be administered subcutaneous -ly they we co formulated with our enzyme and that formulated product is injected. subcutaneous league are typical products. are in the range of five to twenty EML's. which is allow a lot more than the standard one to two that you can deliver without the enzyme. And what is it actually doing wants it's formulated with a biologic. So, it doesn't do anything to the biologic. But when you inject the CO formulated product into the subcutaneous face, the enzyme breaks down the highly are mentioned that the skin it's a sugar that's naturally in the skin. It breaks it down and opens the state think about like opening the secure space that larger volume have be dispersed, and some of the drug can then be absorbed into the. Circulation. So it facilitates fat sub Q. Injection Large on fluids. What does it take to actually formulate a biologic with enhanced? Does it actually? Does it require doing something to bind it to it or is it just a matter of exciting it into the liquid? It's more than mixing. So typically what we do when we work with a partner on their therapeutic, is we I WANNA, make sure that the enzyme is compatible with their drug at there's no effect of the drug on the vice versa. So we test for compatibility. Then we would test for stability making sure that the two men combine the enzyme on the drug are. Stable a long period of time so that the drug can be manufactured I'm sitting on the shelf for a period of time. One says diamond than simply mixing the two together and the amount of enzyme relative to the amount of drug is extremely small the environment in the order of micrograms of material verses, the drugs which are usually in milligrams. So thousand fold differences.

Enzyme Co Partner Rene Danny Rhonda Ronin Ronan
Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

Between The Lines

03:09 min | 6 months ago

Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

"Well, you'd have to be living under a rock not to notice that Australia, is radically different security environment than walls just two years ago. The Prime Minister he's locked into the situation to the nineteen thirties, and in the last six months, we've seen a massive increase to the budgets for defense and our intelligence agencies. Now, the external threats are undeniable. You just think of the rising power of China, but are we at risk of undermining our political freedoms by expanding the powers of security agencies too much. Hell big and powerful. Should we let security agencies get? And what kind of oversight exists to ensure that the intelligence is not collected or used for political purposes? What do you think we'll pay the redwoods is the former official historian and the author of several award winning books. He's most recent one is called law politics and intelligence a law of Robert. Hope. Welcome back to the show painter. Thanks very much tom thanks for having me and just into carol she's a visiting fellow and senior research fellow at the national. Security, college it you good to be with you again just enter right to be thanks Tom. Now let's start with the hope commissions in the seventies and eighties Peter. This is your faces take us back to that time. Why are those commissions so important well between the mid seventies in the mid eighties over ten year period three successive Prime Ministers Whitlam Fraser and Hoke commissioned the same man just as good hope to conduct major inquiries into the intelligence agencies What he set up was not just not just any inquiry into a agency in Asia was the declared one and quite controversial that he set up a whole system for the agencies. Sitting out what each what agencies Australia needed, what each one should do, and what should not do how they should interact with each other, how they should interact with departments with individual ministers with the cabinet and cabinet committees and with the international partners Those we now know is five is and he emphasized a number of things. He particularly emphasized the intelligence system should serve the whole of government and not be unduly influenced as it was when he started by one or two very powerful departments, and towards that end, he said that should be a central coordinating agency which would only be invoked with assessment and he allocated collection assessment and dissemination different agencies. this one would be only concerned with assessment on like the American CIA and with its the independence of its. Assessments guaranteed by legislation. To, be independent from ministerial oh departmental. Precious. and. He said a of other things about the relationships between intelligence and lure enforcement agencies. Keeping Intelligence and policy making separate keeping intelligence and law enforcement separate were among the the basic

Australia TOM Prime Minister CIA Visiting Fellow Whitlam Fraser China Senior Research Fellow Official Peter Asia Hoke
Can Barcelona Keep Messi?

ESPN FC

01:34 min | 6 months ago

Can Barcelona Keep Messi?

"Don You've been all over this on twitter calling it a poker move a bluff. So messy gets his wish then right Just, think seven shambles I mean I'm not quite sure actually what's going to happen in my heart of hearts I? Think Messi will end up staying at Balsa full million reasons all old hundreds of millions of reasons because who can actually afford him what's the scenario with these contracts do Balsa demand anywhere between two hundred, seven, hundred, Million County of free that will probably end up in the low colts, which again is ridiculous. Extremely Messy but I don't know if it's it's it's one of those Insa in you've I can afford them. I think to Rana's if messy seriously thinking about winning things and that's what he's allegedly. Being quoted as saying, it's a won't jump Zeke him in nine years is obviously not enough. So ruler probably China is probably got enough money wouldn't will not move. So there's only psg in Muncie to choose from. Now it's all full of predictions for the reasons. Shula inches said if messy is playing a and move on, he wants the president, the current president how false loan it's bringing a new president who will lead bring in potentially joppy who messy will obviously want to walk with WanNa Roll Kumon you know he's been their mantra days nothing is hasn't even stepped foot in the training ground jet is equal to be. Removed if you president and comes in in a short period of time, Chevy then comes in. So I've got no idea what's going to happen, but I'll tell you as a as a fan. It's all that the shambles, the marriage between. Messy on boss'll on the way potentially could be coming to an end or really exciting if you're a PSG or months it you find.

President Trump Messi Twitter Don You Zeke Rana Muncie Shula China Chevy
Republicans re-elect Trump on first night of RNC

Dan Proft

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Republicans re-elect Trump on first night of RNC

"Big day for President Trump in Charlotte, North Carolina, as Republicans tallied up their votes as the party's convention. Kicked off 2550 for President Donald J. Trump. The tally from Republican National Committee chair Rana McDaniel came just minutes after President Trump surprised the crowd by appearing in person making a one hours, according chair announces that Donald J. Trump, having received the majority of these votes entitled to be casted the convention. Has been unanimously elected as the Republican Party nominee president of the United president will officially accept the nomination and his keynote address to wrap up the convention Thursday night.

President Donald J. Trump President Trump Republican Party Republican National Committee Rana Mcdaniel North Carolina Charlotte
Republicans Make Their Case for Trump at RNC

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 6 months ago

Republicans Make Their Case for Trump at RNC

"Convention. Gavaldon from Charlotte, North Carolina this morning, but is NPR's same Greenglass reports primetime events will continue this evening from an auditorium in Washington, D. C. President Trump's Son Don Jr and Senator Tim Scott, the lone black Republican in the United States Senate. Will headline the convention's first night. Former U. N secretary Nikki Haley will also get top billing. At the GOP gathering in Charlotte. RNC chair Rana McDaniel called the Democratsconvention depressing. Our party is unified. Our supporters are energized, and now we will go forward confident and our cause of re electing president trap. And vice president Pence in 70 days from now President Trump made a surprise appearance in North Carolina, speaking for nearly an hour at the indoor gathering of delegates who made his nomination. Official Sam bring GLASS. NPR NEWS. New York's

D. C. President Trump North Carolina Charlotte Vice President President Trump NPR Npr News Nikki Haley Rana Mcdaniel RNC GOP Tim Scott Senate Don Jr Senator United States Washington Pence Secretary New York
"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"You know their their issues of self harm arm sometimes when people use these technologies addictive so I think that that's that's a big issue to me. It's very similar to cigarettes You know those were regulated regulated. There was a different narrative. And then behavior's changed and I think that that's one area to consider policies Maybe time for one or two more questions. Okay sorry over here and then over here hi. I'm Kinda curious what you think about the fact that most most of these conversations around technology or even democracy tends to focus on institutions and systems and structures which is great because they are so powerful and ubiquitous. My background is in teaching critical thinking and in conflict management. Am I what I worry that. So little attention is being paid to the intelligence and maturity of the citizenry injury. I'm from India. AFTER SEVENTY YEARS OF DEMOCRACY WE'VE lost it. I think it's simplistic to blame the right-wing leaders and the government I believe we as people have not developed the maturity to be effective intelligent citizens. We don't have the values be futile still extremely hierarchical. We don't have democratic values in India and we didn't cultivate door seventy years. I see a parallel to being susceptible to the selections off technology Whether it be news or the Click baiting or anything that the big companies seduce us with that even as we need as you said the an FDA kind of a technology we seem to be absorbing ourselves selves of the responsibility. You're being you know waking up and I hear I hear what you're saying and it's interesting to two things come to mind First of all as I say I just got back from Europe. The debate is much more nuanced there and and further along and I think think that's in part because there was not quite as much pendulum shift in the last forty or fifty years from the public sector to the private sector as there was here. I think I'm not quite sure if I agree entirely with your point about institutions I think in some ways part of the problem one of the reasons why we have concentration Asian levels that are same as they were in in the nineteenth century. Is that you know. We have a generation of business leaders that grew up in the eighties thinking that the government was only good for cutting taxes. And there's hyper individualism that's that's Throughout the entire economic model and in some ways I think that facebook is maybe the apex of the Neoliberal Economic Model If you think about the problems of globalization were capita you know it was supposed to be globalization supposed to be about capital goods and people crossing borders. Turn out the capital could cross a lot faster than either goods or people if if you take that into the world of data that's even more true and so I think that you have a group of companies now that have really turbocharged it a lot of the problems that have given us the politics that we have now and a company like facebook and I think at every time burgers on the hill. It's like there's this attitude that they are supranational supra-national you know and kind of flying thirty five thousand feet above national concerns and I think that that's part of a larger shift and probably going to be a big part the twenty twenty debate right. Are we going to now have a pendulum shift back away from private power to some public power some different sharing of that which is a values question which I think gets at some of what you're talking about Long winded answer anyway. I think we have time for maybe one more question. Yeah Two quick question okay. One is Some of the tech companies especially the platform companies. Have you know why should we not Consider looking at them. MM as utility companies I mean we've had phone companies and as far as I know they don't data mine are conversations maybe mistaken eh right. I mean that's they could easily just it's different different doesn't fall. Yeah Yeah so so. That was one the other thing is you mentioned that eventually. Really we need tech policy around this and the issue at least my issue. Is that the people who make these decisions. The policymakers They just his most of them. Don't have the technical background to properly assess the different choices and make those decisions. I mean I think one of them sucker Burger. Someone testified. The questioning was just awful. I mean more our tech support. This terrible yeah exactly so anyway. Whatever thoughts you have no? That's a great and that's like maybe a great place to sort of wrap up. I think the utility model is completely viable. Well and it's interesting one of the bits of pushback you'll sometimes get from folks in the valley about that as well if we're if we're split in this way or if The capacity to innovate is sort of compressed. As the profit margins would be compressed in a utility model. That'll be bad for innovation not really. I mean the statistics assistant show for starters that companies innovate more when they're smaller. they tend to innovate more when their private and breakup. In the past you can argue have actually created more innovation so a lot of academics would say that even the the the the antitrust is the threat of antitrust action against Microsoft was one one of the reasons that Google was allowed to to blossom as it did. You can go back to the break-up of of the bells and say maybe that created space for the cell phone industry to to move ahead so I think there's a lot of examples that a more decentralized model is actually a good thing and I think that that is actually going to be a really important thing because right now there's this I think very perverse debate in the US that is bringing together parts the far right and parts the far left that are we need these companies to stay big because they're the national champions in the coming war with China. That is complete bunk Ah that is not shown out First of all I mean. These companies would love to be in China if they could get into China You know I think decentralized is the advantage wantage in all respects in the US economically so. Yeah I'm have no problems with a utility model anyway. I think my time is up but I'd be happy to sign books and answer any questions the table and.

India China facebook US Europe FDA Microsoft Google Long twenty twenty
"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"Some responsibility. Is Building now the question is do. We want Mark Zuckerberg being the Minister of truth. And that's that's that's a really tough question. What I would prefer is is for the government to actually for democratically elected governments to come up with rules about what is and isn't appropriate and to not have individual companies making making those choices? I think we're in a period right now where you know you've got twitter. You've got google to a certain extent coming out and saying okay we recognize. We need to do things differently. That's putting pressure Asher on facebook but at the end of the day. We're going to have to have. I think an entirely new framework not just in this area but also in taxation in You know an antitrust which. We've already talked about this. Is the shift that we're going through. Is I think the new industrial revolution. It's a seventy year transition and it's going to require a lot out of different frameworks relative. What we already have so the answer is no? I don't see any particular company that has come up with the right framework yet. Oh no I'd like to go back to anti-trust for minute. The Washington Post put up an article just this afternoon. About how apple is changing its business model title and it's different as you know. It's differentiated itself in the market. By saying they care about privacy well now they are moving from a a device company to a services company more into the article and they are used and they are using privacy as a lever to to provide services that there that other smaller companies like tile. which is the example in the article? has used to create a market for itself and so it says in the article that the feds are considering looking at antitrust. I trust measures against apple but I think it raises a bigger question that you pointed to which is that. The models of of anti-trust don't work anymore So in terms of privacy lots of people have talked about monetize ing privacy getting paid data. But how do you think from an economic point of view. We as a society need to look at the role of privacy and the role of antitrust together to somehow change the way we think about these companies because in addition we've got consolidation in the marketplace so so there's no longer fair competition. You can't become another Amazon right easily because there are so many big so ma- because the players are big and there are so few of them in each part of the economy. Yeah a right. So there's a lot in what you've just said For starters I think you're hitting on something really important which I get my my solutions chapter that this is such a huge shift and it's touching so many different areas and we've talked about privacy. We've talked about antitrust. We haven't even got into national security civil liberties I mean there are so many different areas and when you one of the things I noticed when I sat down to write the solution sections you know when you do you think book you always have to have the solution section and the publisher wants like that silver bullet thing and you look at this and you notice that when you pull a lever here. It affects something in this other area. So I think that's one reason why we should have a national Committee to actually look at. What are all the questions it's when I speak to folks particularly typically in DC policymakers? There's the antitrust camp here the Privacy Camp here this early folks there. That conversation needs to be happening at three sixty way and it is happening much much more. So that way in Europe I will say I just came off two weeks of Book touring in Europe and the the conversation there I think is much more developed and they seem to be to go to your point about the ecosystem and how you share it one of the things that seems to be Folks to be headed towards is a public digital Commons a kind of a database. Let's say all right if you decide as you know. The cat seems to be out of the bag that we're going to allow surveillance capitalism. I mean there are certain folks like Sean. I would love to see the dial turn back. I'm not sure if that's possible. Let's have a public database in which not just one corporation or handful of corporations nations but multiple size players as well as the public sector as well as individual citizens whose after all it's our data being harvested and everybody gets access and then you can figure out how you WANNA share the Pie and one interesting example recently. Is the Google Sidewalk Project in Toronto. it sounds like you're up on these issues so you probably wear but Google had taken over sort of twelve acres on the Toronto waterfront and put sensors everywhere and the idea was to create a smart city in which you'd be able to manage traffic patterns and energy usage and things like that but until recently Google was going to own all that data and have access access to end. Finally the Toronto government got a clue and said well. Actually you know what. Let's put this in a public database so other smaller mid sized local firms can come in and be part of that economic ecosystem but also as a public sector. We can decide. Well maybe we WANNA share data for energy issues shoes or for health issues. But maybe we don't WANNA share it for certain other kinds of things and perhaps there would be some way in which individuals could take back some of that value so California is thinking about digital dividend payment from the big tech companies. There's also been talk of a digital sovereign wealth fund if you think about kind of data as the new oil whatever the value is judged to be it would be putting the sovereign wealth fund in the same way that Alaska Wyoming give back payments or use that out for for the public sector. That could be done with data too so I think something like that is probably going to be the best solution. I'll tell you I have many examples in the book of ways in which the bigger players have been able to squash small and mid size firm and now that's a major issue and a lot of venture capitalists. But I speak the two. Were actually becoming concerned about that. Because they say that they're sort of black zones of innovation Where if Amazon is there or Google is there? You really can't start a the business there's just been too much that's been been ring-fenced question over here. Yes while your book maybe the the best one on the subject. They've certainly been other books before talking about individuals privacy and their their data and everything about them. Why is it that you think people are so unconcerned about handing over all of the data to these companies when they are perhaps very concerned about handing it over to the government? Why why do they feel these guys or the good guys and the government is necessarily the bad guys? It's such an interesting question and that really varies from country to country. I find that that that sort of An interesting cultural dynamic that can shift depending on what market YOU'RE IN I. I have really been puzzled as to why people are so first of all. Why everybody? But he just clicks the box and says no I think part of that is is the opacity of the market. I mean if you kind of go back to Adam Smith basic economics. You need the three things to make the market function property properly that would be equal access to data transparency in the transaction and a shared moral framework. And you could argue that it. None of those things are in place. When we're making these transactions I think as that that very fact becomes better explained and people began to kind of understand that narrative light the insurance example? I just gave that all right. You're getting something but you're giving up a lot I'm beginning to see pushback already and I suspect in recent weeks as some of the big players have moved into health care You know into into the commercial banking gene business. I just think that we are going to begin to see more people Being reluctant to give up that much value of what they're getting. You're also interestingly seeing when there are other options people will go elsewhere. So Jimmy Wales who started wikipedia. Just a I think. A couple of weeks ago Oh came up with a new social networking site. He's already got three hundred thousand users there and it's a non they don't do targeted advertising. It's run on the wiki model where you can donate if you want. I think once the antitrust pieces in place and you actually have space for new competitors to come in and to offer up different kinds of services that perhaps czar more respectful of privacy. That you could see a shift there but I'm curious actually. Can I pull the audience for minute. Because I want to ask how many people think in the next five years individuals are going to become more worried about giving up information. That's going to change their behavior online two-thirds but not. Yeah that's interesting. Okay go ahead sorry or sheep deep. I got curious. If you see the administration's suggestion that it the California can't chance said its own rules for gas mileage. And so on and he mentioned as having a parallel in this area. You know I hadn't thought about that question before I always think about California as really being very leading what is eventually going to become the national standard and I think in data I feel like that is going to happen you know. Even the Europeans in fact are saying that the California for new model is probably the better model for for data data protection and privacy and Sheringham value so the Europeans have. GDP are which was kind of the first step in the privacy easy direction but it doesn't take into account that economic ecosystem so perversely you have the big companies maybe being able to do better with the GDP our model all and smaller ones getting cut out of the loop because they don't have the legal muscle to kind of deal with all the the rules. So I do think the California model is going to become a defacto standard. We also haven't talked about China China which is of course going. Its own way I have. I have a chapter in the book where I look at that. I look at the current trade tech war kind of through the lens of surveillance capitalism. And that's going to be very interesting. I think one of the big probably the biggest mid to long-term economic question for me is are we going to see a Transatlantic Trans Atlantic alliance around digital trade and coming up with some standards because China's going its own direction. It's going to develop its own ecosystem. It has its own big players. The US is in another category. But where is Europe going to be. Is it going to be a tripolar world. Is it going to be a bipolar world In terms of how all this works that that's a major conomic and actually foreign policy question. I think over here. Yeah hey thanks for coming yanking. I'm wondering We the Department of Agriculture. We have a department of Energy. Will there be a department of Technology ever in the US and which other countries already have that kind of thing going. Yeah England is talking about that. Actually I think kind of an FDA of technology is probably a very good idea. You know I see going back to the example about about my son. They're they're the research is nascent and causality is is difficult to prove but there there's You know a new body of research since twenty eleven in two thousand twelve. When smartphones really became ubiquitous showing that levels of anxiety and depression and younger people are rising?.

google California Europe apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Asher facebook Washington Post US FDA England publisher Toronto government Adam Smith Jimmy Wales national Committee depression China Alaska
"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

16:22 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"Prose bookstore in Washington. DC featuring some of today's best writers and top thinkers very excited to introduce. Ron Ron is a is the global business columnist and associate editor for the Financial Times and CNN's global economic analysts previously. She's been the assistant managing editor in charge of business and economics at time as well as the magazine's economic columnists and spent thirteen years at Newsweek as an economic foreign affairs editor and correspondent and in her a new book. Don't be evil which I think is a great title Rana. Chronicles how far big tech has fallen from its original vision of Free Information and digital democracy drawing growing nearly thirty years of experience reporting on the Technologies Sector Rana traces the evolution of companies such as Google facebook Apple Amazon into behemoth monetize People's data spread misinformation and hate speech then threatened citizen's privacy. G also shows how we can fight back by creating eating a framework that both fosters innovation and protects us from threats posed by digital technology. Her Book is already garnering. Widespread praise with the Guardian calling it a match early early critique of the Internet pioneers do now donate our world so without further. Ado Please tell me. In welcoming Ron. Ah for hard to politics and prose the thank you. I am so honored to be here. It's really a pleasure. This is one of my favorite bookstores. Probably my favorite bookstore in Washington. And so it's just a huge pleasure. I thought I would start by just talking a little bit about how I got the idea to write this book. It's actually my second book my First Book Doc. Makers and takers was a look at the financial sector and how it no longer serves business. So I like to kind of take on these big industry-wide Maybe take down so we got the word but kind of look at an ecosystem and economic ecosystem. See how it's working or not working I. We got the idea for this book. Probably two months into my new job at the Financial Times I was hired in two thousand seventeen to be the chief chief. Business commentary writer so my job was to sort of look at the top World's business stories economic stories and try to make sense of them and commentary. And when yeah I do that I tend to try and follow the money in order to narrow the funnel of where to put my focus and I had come across a really really interesting statistic that eighty percent of the world's wealth corporate wealth was living in ten percent of companies and these were the companies that had the most data personal data and intellectual property. And so the biggest of those were the big tech platforms that my my book kind of tries to make Icons of we're using all the candy colors here The fangs facebook facebook Amazon Apple Netflix Google so that was a pretty stunning statistic and it was interesting because I was thinking about how wealth since two thousand and eight had transferred I from the financial sector into the big tech sector and that had happened really quietly without a whole lot of commentary in the press now at the same sometime I was starting to kind of dig into the story. Something else happened a much. More personal Episode I came home one day and there was a credit card bill waiting for me and I opened it up and I started looking through and there were all these tiny charges in the amount of dollar ninety nine three dollars five dollars. Whatever and I noticed that they were all from the APP store and I thought Oh my Gosh I must have been hacked and then I thought who else has password might ten-year-old son Alex I see nods from parents and others so I go downstairs and I find Alex on the couch with his phone which is as usual after school position and I say you know what what's up? Do you know anything about this. And he sort of stunned and Oh yes oh that. Yeah and turns out. Alex's gotten very fond of a game called fee for mobile which is an online soccer game. And it's one of these games that you can download it for free but once you get into the game and start playing. You have to buy stuff in-app purchases. It's called her luke boxes. There's another another name so if you want to move up the rankings and do well in the game you have to buy virtual Rinaldo or some new shoes for your player and nine hundred dollars. In one month later Alex was at the top of the rankings but I was horrified. I was actually horrified and fascinated. In in fact I mean as a mother. I was horrified. His phone was immediately confiscated. Passwords were changed Limitations were put into place by the way he now officially is allowed only one hour a day on his phone. He's thirteen years old. The average for that age is seven hours a day national average average now. He'd snakes an extra. I think he probably gets about ninety minutes because I can't police him all the time on the way to the on the way to school. But it's I mean to me. That is a stunning fact. That the average American thirteen year olds spend seven hours a day on their phone anyway so I was horrified as apparent but I was fascinated as a business writer because because I thought this is the most amazing business model I have ever seen and I have to learn everything about it and write about that time someone. Someone had come to see me a a man named John Harris. WHO's one of the characters in my book and Tristan is a really interesting guy? He was formerly the chief ethics officer it Google and he was trying to bring goodness and not evil to the company and make sure that all the all the products and services were were functioning sort of human interest in any realized he was not having any luck doing that within the company so he decided to go outside and start something called the center for humane humane technology and Tristan have become really really worried about the core business. Model that is is particularly relevant For Google and facebook but is also a big part of Amazon's model and it's really the model that another author Shoshana Zubov Who recently wrote a wonderful book on this topic would call surveillance capitalism? And so it's the idea of companies coming in and tracking everything you are doing online and increasingly offline. You know if you have your if you have an android Freud phone it might know where you are in the grocery store if you're in a car with smart technology Your your location coordinates can be tracked so all of this. This is serving to build a picture of you that is then used to to be sold to advertisers. And then you can be targeted with. What's it's called hyper targeted advertising? Which is essentially why for example? If I go online to look for a hotel in California I might get a certain price vice but someone else might get a different price so this is a really important thing. We are looking at different Internet's right There are subtle differences but there and this data profile that is being built up is splitting us as individual consumers but I would argue that. It's also splitting us as citizens and all when I get to the readings all kind of flesh that out a bit more but Tristan Kind of turned me onto this business model and he also helped me. Connect the dots between this business model and what had happened to my son because it turns out the technologies these sorts of nudges that that take you down a game or or that bring you to certain places on Amazon or that give you a certain kind of search result or purchasing option on google are part of the entire field called cap policy which is kind of an Orwellian word and these these technologies actually come largely out of something called the Stanford persuasive persuasive technology lab so there is an entire industry that is designed to track your behavior and pull in things like Behavioral Psychology Eh Casino Gaming Techniques and layer those onto apps that will push you towards making purchasing decisions or tops even other kinds of decisions political decisions that might be good for certain actors And it's interesting because when I started to think about all this one of the things I really wanted to do in this book was to try and create a single narrative arc To Take folks through this twenty year evolution of this industry from the mid nineteen nineties which is really when the consumer Internet was born till now and at the time I was writing and and and still probably today. You could argue that facebook was The company that was getting the most negative attention for a lot of the economic and political ramifications of of its business model. But if you go back to the very beginning Google is the most interesting interesting way to track this because Google really invented the targeted advertising. Business model they really invented surveillance capitalism and one of the things that is fascinating and and sometime asked. What's the most surprising thing that you've found when rain? This book and really the most surprising thing is it was all hiding in plain sight. So if you go back to the original paper the Larry Page and Sergey Brin who were the founders of Google did in nineteen ninety eight wall at Stanford as graduate wit students they actually lay out they lay out what giant search engine would look like. How would function but then how you might pay for it and if you go down to page thirty? Three there's a section in the appendix called advertising and its discontents and it essentially says that if you monetize a search engine in in this this way with hyper targeted advertising the interests of the users and the interests of the advertisers companies or who knows what public entities are. You'RE GONNA come into conflict. And so they actually recommend that there be some kind of academic search engine and open search engine in the public interest so this to me first of all is fascinating that it was just there all along and fascinating that very few people have read that entire paper even though e- even even those that right about it. which in some ways kind of goes to the point that in the last twenty years we all do a lot less reading not folks here but but in general we do less US reading there was actually a fascinating study? That came out recently from common sense media. Which is gyms dyers group in California that tracks Children's behaviors online teenagers. Only one third of them read for pleasure more than once a month. Long form articles doesn't matter if you're reading on an e book or device but long form articles books only once a month for pleasure so all our entire world has been changed economically these companies have huge monopoly power politically. We're we're all kind of living with the ramifications of this. New World of social media. Disinformation fake news and cognitively. Our brains are changing. Our behaviors are changing so connecting. All of those things was really what I was trying to get at in this book. And so I'm going to read she. She were three. Maybe short excerpts and then we can leave a lot of time for questions so that people can kind of dive into as much of this as they want. And I'll start. Perhaps with my very first meeting with the Google Irs Larry Page and Sergey Brin who I met met not in Silicon Valley but in Davos the Swiss gathering spot of the global power elite where they had taken over a small chalet to meet with a select group of media. The year was two thousand and seven. The company had just purchased Youtube a few months back and it seemed eager to convince skeptical journalists that this acquisition wasn't yet another death blow to copyright paid content creation and the viability of the news publications for which we worked unlike the buttoned up consulting types or the suited executives from the old guard. Multinational corporations that roam the promenades. Davos there tasseled loafers. Slipping on the icy paths the Google Earth with a cool bunch. They were fashionable sneakers in their chalet was sleek white and stark with giant cubes masquerading as chairs in a space. That looked as though it had been repurpose that morning by designers flown in from the valley in fact it may have been and if so google would not have been alone in such excess. I remember attending a party. Wants `Davis hosted by Napster founder and former facebook president residents. Sean Parker featured giant taxidermy bears and a musical performance by John. Legend back in the Google Chalet Brennan page projected a youthful earnestness earnestness as they explain the company's involvement in authoritarian China and insisted they'd never be like Microsoft which was considered the corporate bullying monopolist at the time. What about the future of news? We wanted to know after admitting that page read only free news online whereas Bryn often bought the Sunday New York Times in print. It's nice. He said cheerfully. The duo affirmed exactly what we journalists wanted to hear. Google they assured us would never threaten our livelihoods..

Google facebook Amazon Tristan Kind Ron Ron Financial Times Alex I Washington California writer John Harris Davos Technologies Sector Rana Sergey Brin assistant managing editor CNN editor associate editor
"rana" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

Politics and More Podcast

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Politics and More Podcast

"Politics and more podcast. I'm David Ramnik. Dexter filkins spent a lot of time in conflict zones with Ritz worn worn Afghanistan. The American occupation of Iraq and the uprisings in Syria and Yemen but one conflict older. Still than all of those wars. This is the trouble in Kashmir the only muslim-majority state in India Dexter travel to Kashmir this year to observe firsthand a violent crackdown instigated negated by the Indian government and his article. Blood and soil in Narendra Modi's India was just published by The New Yorker. Here's dexter like so many anything than the modern world. The current conflict between India and Pakistan over Kashmir dates to the dissolution of the British Empire in nineteen forty seven. And what happened was it's fascinating story. the generally speaking The Muslim majority states became Pakistan. The hindu-majority states became came India Kashmir Nestle high up in The Hague. Malaya's is split in half basically two thirds India one third to Pakistan. And it's been that way ever since and in the beginning when the when the Indians wrote the constitution They gave Kashmir special status essentially recognizing it as its only muslim-majority state and the special provision in the constitution Were essentially designed to preserve that character that special character character and basically what what they did was grant really broad powers of autonomy and self rule but since the very beginning there were there was always a strain very very powerful strain in Indian politics and there was always a strain of Indian political leaders who resented the special status that that Kashmir got and resented the fact what they regarded as special treatment favorable treatment for Muslims and they always vowed that they would change it and they never did they kind of paid lip service to it they never had the power to do it. Narendra Modi became prime minister in two thousand fourteen was just re elected in two thousand and nineteen. He's now the most powerful prime minister that India there has had in decades and when upon his reelection earlier this year One of the first things he did was to essentially suspend the special status of Kashmir. He just did it in a stroke motive flooded Kashmir with with Indian troops and as basically tried to lock walk down the state. They've cut off Internet. They've caught off television. They've cut off telephone service. Everything so basically Kashmir's are cut off from from the rest of the country are also cut off from each other so it's really really tough move. I think what mode is doing in Kashmir is is the logical end point of Hindu nationalism. The The the vision of mody is to impose on Kashmir essentially his vision for the rest of India which is first and foremost India's for the Hindus and the minorities including the Muslims are second class. I was trying to figure Out a way to write this India story and to into right the Kashmir story and more important to get into Kashmir from which foreign reporters have have been banned and so it's off limits to foreign correspondents. They don't want any of them there. Now how could I do that. So I decided to call this very interesting woman. Very compelling woman and really one of the most prominent investigative reporters in India. Her name is Rana. She's thirty five years old and Muslim and utterly utterly fearless and completely bold and so I called her up out of the blue. I said Rana. My Name's Dexter can I come out And can we go to Kashmir together long pause and the phone sure So I flew to Mumbai. We've got an airplane together and we flew to Srinagar the capital of Kashmir. We landed in the airport. There were there were soldiers and police everywhere. There's a big sign when you walk in. Saint Foreigners Register here. I had put on local dress and I it's Kinda stared very intently at the ground And we walked out together. Rana how are you. I'm good dexter good to hear from you so we went up to Kashmir together and so as I understand it It's okay for you to go Even even if you ask a bunch of troublemaking questions Washington's as you no doubt did It wasn't okay for me to go so I did my best to look Kashmiri and put on a courtesy of the the local outfit if it. It wasn't very convincing I you you were kind of laughing at me I think at one point and said you know your I'm about ninety nine percent. Sure you'RE GONNA get a president And but we made it through like we got you know we got on the plane We've we Gar- and I thought we did it pretty well from the time that you were the curtain to the time that we boarded the flight until the time land I was I was convinced that this is not going to happen and then we did happen. It was quite adjoin. It was remarkable the ratings. Were there the scale of the violence and the skin of attention and our story the as big as that of that intensity was actually he don't be being hidden from the world media. Explain to people you know people in the United States they Kinda Kinda here about Kashmir and they go. God it's really bad over there What's this all about? There's a kind of history there which I think Most people don't know what what is what's mody trying to do And and why are the Kashmiri people so angry because I think we had a lot of anger there right or yes we did Saw Special status in the sense that non-kashmiris cannot cannot buy land in in the valley cannot invest in the valley and it is a sensitive place is on the border of India and Pakistan There has been a struggle which has been going on for its own statehood would offer his independent statehood for decades now and there is has been insurgency individuals The special status that has been granted into Kashmir was revoked by the Indian government without consulting the stakeholders schmear without consulting the Democratic leaders. who were behind bars? Who are still behind bars? The human rights activists every single human rights activist is behind but in Kashmir. So you and I think we had that one really remarkable day when we we once again we got in a car and we snuck out of car out into the villages Where I think it's fair to say the insurgency Z.? Has a lot of support and remember we went to that little village I think it was called paragraph and we interviewed those two those two young guys and his dad bad but those two young guys had been had been arrested or just just grabbed by the Indian army a couple of weeks before and remember they. They walked us through that kind of what they had. I've been through and you know when you do that as a reporter you. You'll often just don't know what you know. They said well we were beaten. We were tortured interrogated the beat us with they beat us with bamboo rods And they even used electrcity on us and I remember I think his name was Mussa far. He rolled up his leg and he he showed US those burn marks on his legs and and that that was the moment I knew. Okay this is real then. Of course the further he went talking about it he started crying. I mean these these these teenagers that essentially paramilitary forces and Ross Chew Rifles. took the broncos away Threaten the woman in the family that now that Chimera a special status in Kashmir's revolved. They can marry their women. One of the woman said that she had to hide her daughter-in-law because the central paramilitary forces also shouldn't Dan with rape some. That's the kind of story I mean. Not just that look in the story of the thirteen year old boy shake when we then dead did he was playing cricket and I almost thought for a second I said hang on this boy. He was behind bars for teddy bears. And why is it so normal wisey playing cricket and in his father said this is the life in Kashmir i. He was also detained twenty years ago. It's like a cycle of injustice. And this boy comes to us. Listen you know. We're recording this interview. He showed his his showed the marks on his back and the wounds and it was it was inhuman it was inhuman to say the least they inflict this on a thirteen year old. So let's talk about you for a second. I think what what we saw in Kashmir and what we I. I think it's fair to say what we've been seeing in India. Since Prime Minister Modi was first elected in two thousand fourteen. It's become a tough place to be a Muslim. I'm in India. I think it's fair to say and I. The the sort of Hindu Muslim divide has been in India for you know forever her But you've you've lived your whole life on that. Divide when when you're just the girl in nineteen ninety two. There were really horrendous Bloody riots swept Mumbai and yet your family was her caught right in the middle of that and you had to flee tell. Tell us about that moment so you will have no in a pretty cosmopolitan society near the Sahar. International Airport Very the only Muslim are in a predominantly early Hindu society and we never really felt threatened. I mean we never really had a religious identity to ourselves. Because my father was a part of the progressive writers movement he was also a government schoolteacher. So we've never really seen with religious identity so I did not know what it was to be a Muslim India. I mean there has been post partisan bitterness. Listen with the Hindu nationalist believing that if Muslims chose to live in India and decided not to go to Pakistan then they must live in India second class citizens. How will you do not have a taste of it bill? Six December nine hundred ninety two when suddenly that evening all hell broke loose in the country. Our unable was the Guy Mr Bongo. He you know he was sweating when he knocked it out. Cafod opened the door and he said your daughter does need to be taken somewhere because because the mob is rushing towards your house have sports in their hand and said what happened. He said You'd only Muslim family have to save you You will not be spared because they're all coming for you and they are just blocks from you after take them out so they risked off and we lived in a seek household for three months and everybody was to come. I'm in the house dusk. Okay who are these people and and and and the hosted say. Oh Jeez they are in a house for a couple of Monday Muslims and that's the first time the word they are. Muslims really stuck to me because then I did not see myself as a Muslim the entire episode that give me religious identity perhaps the most traumatic episode of my life and from then on it's only been a downward slide up in my journey into adulthood and then then my journey and journalism has incidents in a way valuable to India's majoritarian. Slide the route that Mr Moody is now taking India into so so you when when those riots happened in in Mumbai Nineteen ninety-two you were. I think you were nine years old Ten years later there there was another really horrific series of of riots in the state of Gujarat. And I you're you're famous for writing about those rights and we're going to get to that in a second but what an riots in the case of Gujarat it's A. It's not a very good descriptive word because really most of that violence after a kind of an initial attack. Most of that violence was one way it was. It was Hindu on Muslims. So it's better related to describe what happened goods route as a as a PA- GROM I think probably probably fifteen hundred dead. Maybe maybe one hundred fifty thousand people homeless but you were you were eighteen. Nineteen years old. You were living in in Mumbai and then this is a wonderful story. You you You told your mom you're going trekking in the Himalayas But you didn't do that. Ah Tell tell us what you did instead so I thought it was going on a track but a night before I had seen on television. First Time visuals from the Gujarat riots where Hindu nationalists and local crowd were basically boasting on national television There's a Lion Hindi that the said Milanka Achey accused Don Baucus Baucus saw recently. Muslims have just land which is Pakistan and I saw that and it felt like I was reliving my childhood what I saw at nine nine it was repeating itself and I was nineteen and it was traumatic again and I didn't want to be helpless so there was a friend who sister was with the International Red Cross and she was traveling so I tagged along with her We took a train from Mumbai central station. We landed in the body and inventor auto and my name is Ron so there is a lot of ambiguity ron my name because it can pass over the Hindu name so I went around with windy on my forehead and and so you beat Goran relief camps wherein we've witnessed Women who were raped and who were left there to you just die. The children the trauma written all over them..

Kashmir India India Kashmir Nestle Pakistan Mumbai Prime Minister Modi Dexter filkins Indian government Rana Iraq Malaya Afghanistan David Ramnik Indian army Himalayas Syria Mussa United States Srinagar
"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

"Who would pay the price for Polin's murder coming up Rana guilty or not faces the consequences of his confession bullies Mass mister mind's mustache twirler 's for every hero there is a villain the new podcast original villains explores the psychological nickel and emotional factors that spawned both real and fictional villains every Friday villains focuses on a different real Org Fictional Evil Doer for fictional villains you'll delve into the social influences that led to that character's creation for real villains you'll learn the true story of their dark deeds and we'll explain what drove them to evil you'll hear episodes on characters like Don Vito the own and no country for old man's Anton sugar as well as real life villains like the iceman Richard Kuklinski and the Co ed killer Ed Kemper some fictional some are real all our villains follow villains for free on spotify or wherever get your podcasts or visit podcast dot com slash villains to listen now now back to the story on July twenty sixth two thousand one pool and debut was murdered outside her house by two masked gunmen one day later a twenty five year old Sher Singh Rana called a press conference and confessed to the crime he claimed that he assassinated Poulin with the dual pronged goal all of avenging the nineteen eighty-one Saint Valentine's Day massacre and furthering his own political career but police weren't so sure that he was the killer her they suspected he was just an opportunist who saw the crime as his chance to build a name for himself even after this confession they questioned poolings family including her husband they looked into strange evasive behavior by her household in the aftermath of the assassination but they didn't find anything that could concretely tie anyone to the killing and so they turned their focus back to Rana rounding up his suspected co-conspirators ultimately eleven people were charged with involvement in the shooting including Rana and his brother the trial would not be a quick and easy affair thanks to India's notorious judicial delays the timeline for the trial was so long one of the suspects would even die of natural causes while waiting for it to begin Rana's publicity stunt hadn't accounted for the years he'd spend in prison wade being for the judicial system to start moving whether he actually committed the crime or not he likely expected that he'd be given a speedy trial could demonstrate that there was no evidence against him besides his confession and he'd get off scot-free broad that's not how it worked out in fact run got so frustrated waiting for the case to reach the courts that he came up with a new scheme he was going to escape from the maximum security prison where oh he was being held on February seventeenth the two thousand four more than two and a half years after Putin's assassination a man in a police uniform arrived at New Delhi's Tahar jail with a warrant for Sher Singh Rana the policeman explained that he taking Rana to court as one of the guards later explained there were other policemen waiting near a police van we did not suspect the thing the day continued no one the wiser with Rana supposedly off the court that is until another police already turned up at the prison with a warrant for Rana the search was immediately on a reward was offered for information leading to Rana's capture but he was gone his troop of false policemen had spirited him away long before anyone realized he was missing although Rana was a free man his situation was less than ideal he was now a fugitive from the law also acutely aware of the ways in which his plan had worked he had an audience now and he was suddenly an upper caste hero he was intense on capitalizing on that but first he had to get out of India travelling along a winding path through India and then across the order with a false passport ron made his way to Afghanistan he wanted a search for the mythical grave of the twelfth century ruler Prithvi Raj Chauhan on an icon of his show tra- cast the warrior and leader Class Johann was the last Hindu to rule India before Muhammad Gore defeated him in battle in eleven ninety two and laid the foundation of Muslim rule across the country some Indian songs in stories suggested that his burial place was somewhere in the deserts of Afghanistan Finding Johanna elusive grave would cement Rana status as a shot tree icon himself and even if he didn't actually find the grave if he made it to Afghanistan and claimed to have found it that it should do the trick just like his confession to poolings murder Ron seem to believe that facts were sometimes flexible things what really mattered let's optics Rana claimed to find the grave even posting a video of its location on Youtube clearly he wasn't concerned with keeping a low profile in two thousand six after two years on the run he was finally recovered by police and turn to jail in New Delhi Still Rana wasn't going to give up on his mission to show his cast that he was their hero and so jail diary from tr to Kabul Kandahar. It did its job the book helped Cement Rana status as a hero of the warrior class conservative political icon the people especially those from the high castes loved him his fans came out to support him when he finally took the witness stand in two thousand fourteen about fifty young men from Rana's warrior caste waited outside the courthouse during the trial one of the and declared he's a tiger whether or not he'd committed the murder didn't matter so much anymore he'd already gained the platform he yearly wanted perhaps that's why now he furiously denied any involvement in the murder hoping that he'd get off based on the lack of evidence that's what had happened for the rest of his ten co-conspirators all the charges against them were dismissed but thirteen years after the crime despite the doubt and confusion that's still mired the assassination thirty eight year old Ronaldo was convicted on the basis of his own confession he was sentenced to life in prison we may never know if Rana's initial admission was a risky publicity stunt or if he really was one of the three men who committed the murder but despite his conviction it would be wrong to consider the whole affair of failure for the rookie politician he was now a household name across India and many members of the upper caste were calling me hero just as he'd planned his sister Shikha Singh Rana's statement perhaps expresses this position Mosa singly. My brother Sher Singh Rana is innocence pool and killed so many innocent people even if ron up has murdered Toolan he has done no wrong as she was a bandit Shikha Singh Rana's mentality was set squarely in the cycle of caste conflict to indy begins at the top of the social hierarchy lower class rebellion couldn't be solved with Muir legal repercussions it demanded blood which was at least apparently what Rana had given them forty year old Rana got out of prison on bail two years after a sentence thing in two thousand sixteen his fans were ready to welcome him back to his home state of Utah conned upper caste citizens of neighboring states like Putin Davies Utah celebrated his return to two years after that in two thousand Eighteen Rana was implicated in another asked conflict related murder in Utah prudish adult man named such in Wallachia was murdered by a high caste group and while he has mother accused Rana in her initial report to police however he was never charged and this episode did nothing to dim Ron star if anything the suspicion raised his status as an upper class warrior and he has enthusiastically capitalized on that status since being released from Prison Rana has spent much of his time travelling around northern India giving talks to upper.

Shikha Singh Rana Cement Rana Prison Rana Eighteen Rana murder India Polin Utah Ronaldo ron Putin Davies Wallachia Muir Toolan two years thirty eight year twenty five year thirteen years forty year one day
"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

"Pouring down their faces under their masks they needed to get off of these quiet streets and onto a main thoroughfare where they could disappear into to the capital the people demanded an arrest on June twenty-seventh the two thousand one one day after the assassination the police got a lucky break someone came forward with a confession bad day Sher Singh Rana called the press conference at the Doon Press Club in his home state of Utah Kanda it's unclear what the reporters expected to hear but undoubtedly it wasn't what Rana announced he a how long with an accomplice called Rajendra had assassinated pool in Davie the reasons he gave were less surprising at least to Indians with a keen understanding violent cast conflict Rama confessed he had killed pool on in retribution for the infamous nineteen eighty-one Saint ballantine's Day massacre got fateful day Poulin had murdered over twenty high caste men in cold blood for that Rana said had she deserved to Die Rana's confession placed the crime squarely within the larger saga of caste conflict they had defined Putin's life from the beginning but Rana didn't end his story there there was a whole other element to the tail one he wasn't ashamed to admit he explained that he'd also carried out the killing because he wanted a career in politics killing someone us made you famous too and just as he'd planned murdering Poulin Davey had immediately mobilized base of high caste supporters this second bizarre admission baffled investigators but when Rana walked into the police station in utera cons but all they certainly didn't hesitate to take him into custody confession was a confession still law enforcement wasn't convinced that Rana had actually committed the crime he'd confessed to first of all there was no physical evidence tying him to the murder and even his confession quickly proved to be at least partially fabricated his so-called accomplice Rajendra was in jail on the day of the assassination Shen that was a rock solid alibi that lie undermined run as credibility on top of that Rana's professed motive advancing his career and politics was served just as well by falsely confessing to the crime as it would have been by actually committing it is to say there is no reason why he couldn't be taking credit for the real murderers work for his own political gain and the gap between the killing and the confession which was confusing if Rana had actually committed the murder made perfect sense if he was falsely confessing to it it would take him some time to come up with a scheme of claiming responsibility essentially police suspected that Rana's confession was opportunism and nothing more where Poulin had been the avenging low caste hero he tried to become the hero of his own cast meanwhile police turned suspicion on another suspect hooligans husband in the week following the assassination Indian newspapers exploded with stories about marital discord the House of Poland and Ahmed Sing whom she had married after her release from jail in Nineteen Ninety-four these stories claim that at the time of her death Hulan was drafting a will that would have cut her husband out of her book royalties and Estate Boom Ed unsurprisingly insisted that his marriage too pullan had been a loving one and that their quarrels were rarely serious he also denied there was any will but he police weren't happy with the testimony to receive from Med and the rest of Putin's family according to a senior officer quote there were many loopholes goals in what the family members have disclosed it seems some of them were trying to conceal information on top of that there was a strange story any of the murder weapons which the assassins had dropped in the street members of Putin's household had allegedly picked up the discarded guns and stash them in the garage at least three people were aware of their location and all of them failed to tell the police investigators eventually learn the location of the weapons but soon after that they mysteriously went missing law enforcement was never able to test them for evidence that's the case was proving to be more complicated than it seemed despite the fact that Sher Singh Rana had all ready confessed investigators still assumed Rana's confession was simply political opportunism but he sorely misjudged the risks of taking credit for the crime it was too high profile L. to leave unsolved while the police might not have been convinced that Rana was there killer he was the best suspect they had and he was the one.

two thousand one one day
"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

Assassinations

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"rana" Discussed on Assassinations

"Due to the graphic nature of this episode listener discretion is advised this episode includes discussions of rape murder and extreme violence that some people may find offensive we advise caution for children under thirteen on the evening of February fourteenth the air seemed to have fallen still a little boy slid out from under the bed Brown eyes wide as he slowly edged his way to the door end slipped outside off in the distance by the river he saw his mother she was kneeling on the hard packed dirt road head bowed he ran towards her eager for the warmth of her arms but as he drew closer he saw what drew her is towards the ground Wayang in front of her was his father and not just his dad so many others all along the riverbank he saw every young man from the village they weren't moving their turbans were crumpled beside them in the dirt. their limbs were splayed at strange awkward angles and they were covered in blood the little boy knew what that meant the bandit queen had exacted her revenge.

murder rape Brown
"rana" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Eye mr rana back and tell him oh yeah it's okay with the oakland mayors doing you know it's easy sean to say that we can stop all bad things from happening if we take this action the guy killed grant rana back is the guy that killed was in jail four years for kidnapping a woman and holding a hostage over a week and when he got out of jail he was set free because they didn't hand them over to the authorities that's what you're sanctuary city policies do so what do you say to the father that lost his son that was working overnight so we could pay for his college in order to stop my point two uh apologise to him in some way making feel better apparently how 'bout we change the policy so that can happen again how how how about every criminal illegal immigrant that is in jail when they're released we release them back out and send them back to their own country instead of releasing them back out in the population of put people at risk how 'bout we do that you against that albert we say every criminal who i ask for you are you you've ever gets out i asked you are you against it if they serve their time and they are here illegally they go home you don't let them back into american society to victimise other americans that okay or not any time you keep some protective measure yes you're going to cost of protecting your seeking it has the potential of being overbroad and bringing people in twelve people that are convicted of crimes that are here illegally you're going to allow them to go back out on the street to commit more crimes because you're not willing to deport them if we say when you commit any crime never gets out that we protect everybody from everything ever we don't want to do that he recognizes that some people who we catch per se heavy with the prior were simple assaulted we give them something to set and say we are basically want open borders you want full on amnesty open.

mr rana oakland kidnapping albert four years
"rana" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

Jenna & Julien Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on Jenna & Julien Podcast

"That doesn't that's not the same anymore i don't watch pretty much any log ever and a big reason for that is because i feel like the the idea of logging has become so um centered around shocking people for the sake of a video thumbnail and a couple of views but then forgetting what that means for real life and those two are so separated nowadays blogs uh you see the shock factor you see running around man on the street tubbs have you see like a lot of really annoying stuff you know there's there's a lot of good blogs out there but there's also a lotta shit that uh i just really i don't really wanna consume and i think it's because it makes me feel like i'm watching something that didn't really need to be created for that stupid walk because it because of what what is required to habit in life and i think this this video that logan made is a is a prime example of that um my initial reaction to video was like wow i can't believe that i click on his video that's titled we found a dead body in japanese suicide forest and then i actually saw that pretty much all of it you know the the blur face really didn't do anything and what got to me the most like jenna had said you know you've watched you watch dateline you've view rana murder trial you you've been disturbed to a sense of uh from seeing different aspects of death for me this was different than anything i've ever seen because of the fact that it was in a real log in that's what i'm so familiar with that medium is is like home to me um i've log for a lot of years now um and i've even logged in japan which jenin i i feel like we should definitely you know i feel like we should talk about that but like is at chroma crying author yeah launches let him in his in aci he needs a hug i don't blame them but yeah i also wanna talk about that his at something that i thought about a lot.

logan jenna rana murder japan
"rana" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on The Canon

"I like a standard comedy like if i was if i was going to go and buy a ticket to eddie i can't even picture serikow it we make so few standard comedy now i can't even everything things it like cash out katty shatter recycling you know yeah i'm i feel like i can watch a movie lake why do i keep going to say cop out the film with who is that even ice cuban forget oh i don't know what it's like the first moving ahead uh i'll say flat get hard what is wrong with me when i watch a movie like get hard with with will farrell i'm watching a movie and sort of judging it feeling like rana level i'm watching your level a good bad good bad but there's not that sense of complete almost submissive passivity watching holy girl where it's like you're going to do what you want to me and i don't even get the right to be like good bad yeah i i like that idea of seville submissive passivity it's like like when you watch estate or comedy you generally can tell here's the jokes are gonna come you know this is where you know it's going to be you there's a rhythm to it right and you know it's like watching a a a good horror film you know like there's a rhythm to the scares so in comedy same thing is a rhythm to the jokes and if you watch something like caddyshack or you know ghostbusters or something like that there are great comedies there you you you sort of you know your generally always ahead of it a little bit now you're still laughing but you kind of nowhere it's going covered so sad to me is that you could to name the intestines for khamis but because of what i do and all the cap i see for a living my brain is still like yeah daddy's home the.

rana
"rana" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on The Compass

"With each there was a huge rush of support for everyone who is affected but we saw that had happened globally as well and i think what happened was something fairly extraordinary that translated itself into a sense that something really had to be done it had to be seen to be done in had to be done quickly one of the first clothing companies to publicly recognised that its klay to being made in wanna plaza with the irish firm prime mark we near auckland's room the bowling i'm sorry magma announcement sunday that we were in the building on the rick cited responsbility many clothing brands also agreed to fund the setting up of two new organizations the accord on fire and building safety in bangladesh and the alliance for bangladesh work has safety more than two hundred companies have signed up and said they will only source clouds from factories that comply with safety standards and that protect workers rights livia wyndham stewart's is part of an ngo cold impact it works with women in the garments industry and she's just been to dhaka to talk to workers about their lives today have they been changes in you'll factory since rana plaza at monday at around apply they're a harp whatever their yes there have been love shifting his forty examples now we have accorded lines and now also time to time engineers comes to a check of our beating whether they are uh everything in place on not an also the edging the weight of the each floor with a it's heavyweighted or not.

auckland rick bangladesh livia wyndham stewart rana plaza wanna plaza dhaka
"rana" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on The Compass

"At a minor doesn't remember how she was rescued some survivors described waiting trapped in the hot humid darkness the days that they were unimaginable stories of people having to amputate their own limbs to free themselves one woman described drinking her own blood to stay alive the last survivor was pulled out of the rebel two weeks after the building collapsed the final death toll of the rana plaza disaster was one thousand one hundred and thirty four this is what happens next on the campus on the bbc world service i'm teela muslim dr among the ruins of ronna plaza rescuers found the remnants of clothes bearing the labels of some of the world's best known fashion brands it was a wakeup call for the clothing industry worldwide but what happens next four years later what his changed so he'll rana was jailed earlier this year over corruption charges he and thirty seven others including government officials could get the death penalty if found guilty of murder over the complex his collapse sara hussain is a lawyer for the supreme court of bangladesh is involved in the ongoing cases for compensation and justice for the victims of ronna plaza that compensation money is coming out of a voluntary fund set up by some of the big clothing brands around thirty million dollars has been pledged so far i think the trust fund was a really important innovation and i think we will have to recognize the context in which it happened which is it happen in run plaza which produces gunman's it produces clothes at people wear around the world and because it to it resulted in a response who choose a global response within.

murder sara hussain ronna plaza rana plaza bbc rana supreme court of bangladesh thirty million dollars four years two weeks
"rana" Discussed on The Compass

The Compass

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"rana" Discussed on The Compass

"Any enforce the law either david bribed or they didn't indeed and do the job on maybe there was also contribution about which organization uh he's in charge nearly four thousand people were tin wanna plaza making comments for international clothing companies most of them were women the day before the accident large cracks appeared in the building anxious workers were reluctant to go inside and they alerted factory buses but they were threatened with the sack if they fail to turn up for work most felt they had no choice the seven dollar a week wage afforded a traditionally paul workforce a degree of independence and financial stability those factory workers simply couldn't afford to lose that money one of the reasons why people are vulnerable to disasters is it they are excluded from our mainstream processes you know they live in informal settlements outside of normal planning the formal planning regime they work in the in fallen economy they have very little riots as employees so on that april morning while the bank on the ground floor remained closed because if safety can sense most of the workers of sohail rana's garment factory reported for work no was one of them got on his own upward iodine applied they flip signal gutter lemonade with a ninestorey building him i used to work on the six flew previous day factory announced general leave after seeing crocombe on the wall next day they cold on supposed to salaries and then they will give general leave some came some didn't out of fear we were working thought day threetimes loadshedding happened on the fourth time management started the generator just off to generate started we fell to tremble.

sohail rana david seven dollar