17 Burst results for "Ramadi"

"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"That's actually. When when we got back from Ramadi, we we we got after it in a very similar way for several months. And I don't know how long you did. But the other is a lot of beer and other things that were drank in. And I don't know, you know, there's it was sort of it was sort of it seemed like the the normal thing to do. I don't know it seemed like we were going to kind of get it out of our systems for a little while. And, you know, get over it because it is it is, you know, it's not that big of a deal. I don't wanna make it sound like it's all crazy. But you know, you're over there. And it's like, okay, it's a little bit of it's it's a different. It's a different scenario, and you got to kind of process through the fact that everything that you just were doing whatever a f- a week ago two weeks ago three weeks ago is now completely different your life is completely different. And there's no one shooting at you. And there's no one not not you're not gonna losing your guys, which was the the weight that I fell lifted off of me about a month. Month after I got home. I was I woke up one morning, and I just kinda felt different. And I kind of I was like why do I feel I felt different in a good way. And what I felt was oh I was thinking about why do I feel different right now. And and as I sat there and thought about it was like, I'm not worried about any my guys getting killed right now. Which was the first time in months that I hadn't been thinking about that all day every day. And so, yeah, when you come home, there's there's definitely that. And I I think you I think you've got to pay attention as a leader to everyone in that group to make sure that guys are staying within the box and stain within. What's what's I guess possibly normal for those situations because you can definitely be you can will definitely be individuals that they'll they'll they'll go to foreign that. They're they're not making the transition and what they need is. You know, some help someone to come alongside pull along side and say, hey, man, let's let's take it back a little bit were. You know, let's let's readjust, and you know, life's going to be normal again. And all that. Yeah. Unfortunately, the the way we rolled in and out of the squadron when we left and came back to the world, it was pretty much an individual effort. So that and I also tempered with vac that your war was entirely different than ours. I would imagine years was more up close and personal than than ours. Tell you the truth. I don't recall ever reflecting on whether my guys we're gonna come back from this mission or not, you know, it's something that we just all did we all did it together. And I don't mean that to sound callous, it just just isn't wasn't part of my my thinking and that goes back to what cousin Kim asked. You know? How did you do it trying to bring everybody back whole? Yeah. I don't I definitely the without question thought about that. Every every day that was the biggest thing that I thought about every day was because there was guys getting killed every day. Basically, there's a memorial services every day. There was you know, one of the one of the things that I've talked about this a bunch, but there was a a vehicle graveyard outside. It wasn't it was on the way to the gate to leave camp Ramadi. There was a vehicle graveyard where all the vehicles that had been blown up and destroyed by ideas, and it was..

Ramadi Kim three weeks two weeks
"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"I put him on tail in Charlie. It was a company move wreck leading battalion, but it was a company move. And it was some branch on the trail or. Or something cut boom, and you know, nineteen casualties and a ambush after that. So for those of you that are in the military when you're moving at night, especially pre night-vision than the only way you can do is you have to be closer to the person front of you because you had to be able to see him. And so what that doesn't and you'll be within within being in sometimes when it's really dark you be able to touch the person in front of you. So therefore, if someone hits a booby trap or an ID or you get ambushed, the casualties are increased dramatically because you're just altogether. One thing about Ramadi is think when we got there they had a hundred forty known i-it's on the board at any given time and. There are a couple of different incidents. One win particular that sticks in my mind was when we were putting in the seventeenth street security station friend of mine's platoon was out providing extra security with gun trucks. And I guess he's his truck sat on an IUD all night. And then right when they were about to move it went off and took the front of the truck with it. Luckily, nobody was killed but it size. You can shoot back at you can't really prepare for it. Yeah. Sometimes you gotta get lucky. We we had the similar thing where we we go into a combat outpost in a convoy of just, you know, our seals hadn't convoy or heading to accommodate post, and my point man relief drivers someone said, hey, I think there's something head of us in the road stops the vehicle. I'm actually watched him. He gets out looking underneath the vehicle the flashlight to look and see on thinking to myself. This doesn't seem good could didn't identify anything we roll through we get to the combat outpost. And then a couple of hours later the dagger clearance team came through and found a triple stack, you know hundred twenty millimeter mortars that would have killed everyone in that vehicle for sure and if not a few others, so sometimes it's better to be lucky than good. And for those you out there if you think you're on an idea, maybe not the flashlight approach. Yeah. I've I had I did that it was my first deployment to Iraq. I'm I'm standing there. And my you guys were doing to target hit. And I might you guys..

Ramadi Iraq
"ramadi" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"He does. 'cause you don't like to listen to anybody don't like thority. And of course, I told him, no doubt, it's it's a team. We don't have to. We don't listen anybody. That's a team. I was completely wrong because there's a rank structure and you absolutely. You know, there's, it's the military, even though it's a team and you definitely have you build relationships throughout that chain of command. And that is more prominent than in some other groups, but you still, there's a chain of command and you're gonna, you're gonna follow that chain of command. And there's been a lot of talk about the possibility mandatory national service as somebody who's gone through this program in had seen so many guys who are military, some of whom I knew back when they were in high school and were kind of, you know, I can't say the words on air, but they were f- ups and and then they come out the other end and they're, you know, solid citizens, not only how citizens but really making something of themselves. What do you think of the idea of mandatory national service? I love the idea of it, but at the same time as an American, I don't like the idea of mandating that people do something that they don't wanna do and I and I think the volunteer military that we have. Right now is. It's it might be the best in the history of world. We have a great military and I think to mandate it, I think is problematic. That being said, every single person that I talked to, especially kids that are the age of thirteen, fourteen fifteen few get the opportunity to join the military. Then I would definitely recommend it because like you said it, it teaches you a lot of things when it comes to the application of leadership principles, how much of what you learned in leadership training at the seals was applicable and how much of it was you're just in a situation and now you've got, you got to move you gotta figure something out how much of it is CD, your pants can stuff. Well, when I came in, we really didn't. And this is shocking. We really didn't have a process of leadership training that the leaders went through, and we would basically the leaders would learn OJT on the job training. You'd watch the person that was leading you. And then what is your time to take over? You'd kind of emulate what they were doing. And if you had a great leader that worked okay jet a bad leader, that was a real problem. And so when I came back from that deployment to Ramadi, that's one of the things I focused on. His, I realized that we really needed to implement leadership training for the guys because you're on the battlefield leadership is d- most important thing on the battlefield, and if you don't know what you're doing, you're gonna get people killed without question and will what would sort of they? Can you give me a couple of stories, sort of demonstrate that point. What's what's a high point of leadership that you've seen on the battlefield as opposed to low point that you've seen in terms of leadership? Well, one thing that's important to to clarify here is when I talk about leadership, I'm not just talking about me because I was in charge of the tasking it or the platoon commanders and charts, or even the people above me. I'm talking about every level of leadership, every person taking ownership of their piece of the mission and executing executing with a forty and executing with with real like passion about what they're doing. And so you have leadership at every level and when you don't have that it, it's very problematic..

Ramadi
"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Resident fighter pilot that has deal we knew we could start something and so we created echelon front overwatch what we call efl watch overwatch being the term that the nisshin we ran in ramadi in i think like it has a little appeal in the sense that now we're over watching our brothers green berets navy seals air force pj cct's marsov guys getting out and export com personnel were over watching them and help them with their transition we're over watching the companies that are in a war for talent and that's the thing that people don't understand even the seals are always hunting for the best talent somebody asked me you know funny enough with the with the most important job in the teams as they they thought it was going to say troop commander on the front lines that that is important at the end of the day that's what we do i said no it's actually beat about budget trucker that is like being hiring manager you are the filter of the talent coming through which ultimately will end up in that troop commander in that that troop chiefs hands in there has to be a standard we need to put some of our best guys buds to make sure that only the best or passing through the same thing applies to business you are constantly in this war for talent and we couldn't think of a better town pull than combat aviators cobra pilots a fighter pilots again all this special operations guys in direct support personnel come out of so calm that have the sauce skills leadership skills that you want they may lack the hard skills you look at the resume and it may not scream right fit but once you get these guys in interview and you see that one they their leaders that their humble but they're willing to roll their sleeves up and get after it and actually listen in learn that is the perfect employee if you can get more these guys into your business i guarantee you you will create your own army that will dominate your battlefield in whatever industry that you're in it's it's it's awesome because people every every single time i go talk company they'll they'll say man it seems like you just it seems like you did you do a bunch of research to figure out have you been working with us and we didn't know about it and i'd be like no well how do you know what problems we have it's like oh 'cause you're a company because you're a group of into your group of human beings are trying to make something happen guess what there's dynamics that happened with all different organizations that get together and guess what if you take these leaders because they're amazed that i can understand their business no i don't understand your business i understand leadership that's what that's what echelon front we understand so we can go in and look at what's going on and say oh we've got a leadership problem here and here's how we fix it and so to take that and say you know what we can actually give you people that understand leadership and they can help you solve these problems that is like you said reece's peanut butter cup peanut butter and chocolate that's what it is so it's been on speaking of bringing on talent like when this whole thing was going down like how far we get a little mike zarella that's a along front because guess what that's what we did bring bring the band back together and you know that's why that's just been it's been awesome if anyone that's come to the monster you know mike mike's putting putting on a great talk about leadership inside the monster frigging everyone loved it i myself included and i'd go.

ramadi
"ramadi" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"About his book echo in ramadi some catharsis for me where i type in the end i was like oh god i'm healed that didn't happen we'll talk to a former army ranger who's trying to make a difference in afghanistan by creating unique cool footwear we say we may cool stuff in dangerous places them here and with our profits we thought little girls school in afghanistan and we'll speak to retired navy od master chief ken fall the founder of boulder crest retreat about his new book struggle wealth and how it is bringing boulder crests groundbreaking strategies for dealing with our wounded warriors to the general public we have got to come home from war and be productive members of society that we were on the battlefield and there are so many people out out here wanting to help you thrive in life ramadi the name of the city alone brings back memories of what happened there to both those who patrolled streets during the war in those who kept an eye on the news emanating from the deadliest city in iraq scott houston was one of the former the retired marine corps officer has committed his memories to paper in his book echo in ramadi connecting vets dot com reporter phil briggs recently sat down with using about why he felt the story of his marines was one that needed to be told why did you write this book that's that's a great question i always respond by saying why was it important for me to tell the story because you're right it's not just a book you know it's a story and it's a story about people and it's not just about the marines and sailors in the soldiers in the fighting and the friction explosions and all that sexy stuff that's normally romanticized on tv and oftentimes mis portrayed it's really about people and again you when you said it was spiritual you're the first person ever said it was spiritual because that's important to me because whenever i speak about my experiences to large audiences or talk about the book i always say that the core message is the power of human connection because it really is about the people these amazing marines that we fought with the people in iraq that supported us our interpreters who helped to speak the language our families who we left behind five thousand miles away as we fought for months and months and months on and are amazing gold star families who lost sons and daughters and they're still there for us so it is a it's not just another war story it is so many things from a leadership perspective as an officer mustang officer for the record listeners prior enlisted then switched over to the dark side but there are a lot of great components of leadership that are rife throughout the book and you don't have to read very far into the book before you can hear some of those components of leadership page thirteen the chapter entitled lieutenants in this chapter he talks about meeting the young lieutenants that will eventually join him in ramadi while they're still at school going through the grueling infantry officer course and he writes all infantry lieutenants have received phenomenal training and gone through rigorous mental preparation before they enter the operational forces what they tend to lack is a fundamental understanding of the magnitude of their responsibilities that only combat can prove to cure lieutenants were keenly aware they lacked experience but tried.

ramadi
"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"Business trip after you've had a few drinks with the co worker that's on travel with you it seems innocuous maybe it's totally innocent at the time don't go upstairs of the hotel to watch a movie because if you get to that point you're just putting yourself in a terrible position right and and in in that military context the idea that all of the built up momentum behind something like me lie the idea that you're gonna get right up to that moment on march sixteenth nineteen sixty eight where the only thing that stopping it from happening is a few pounds of trigger pool that's the last bit of you know that's your last opportunity to avert this catastrophe is just that few pounds a triple good luck with that you know that's something that you can't let it get to that point and that was something that and then i'll let you guys take it over but i wanted to talk about something that i it was fascinating that you picked up on soon as i said the word established dominance on the streets ramadi reacted against that and you're right that's incredibly important and it ties into you were just talking about about you would make people either back away from the situation or stop looking down the sights of their gun because when you're looking at a person down the sightsee your gun it's your framing of the situation and you haven't put down there now it's just a person it's not a target it's not anything like that if you got a bunch of people going into ramadi and they're thinking in terms of our job is to go establish dominance on the streets of this city we'll your framing that in a way that under the right circumstances could you know lead to trouble so framing it seems like is what you're talking about it and and i also wanna make it perfectly clear that if the soldiers marines seals that we work with in the battle of ramadi if they didn't dominate the street as we move down at.

ramadi
"ramadi" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on WGTK

"In ramadi by major scott using retired from the united states marine corps he has done ten deployments he's a marine mustang began as an enlisted man left as a major he served all over the world and iraq afghanistan the horn of africa but this book is about his time commanding echo company second battalion fourth marines beginning in november of six major welcome it's great to have you honor to talk to you thank you for joining me great to be on the program well it was and i wrote this book is a tribute to honor the spirit and the sacrifices of those marines you just mentioned and obviously the families as well are mazing gold star families that that supported us and i think that's really what makes this book so different is that it's not just another war street of course tells about the fighting and the friction but it also describes the people the marines that fought in the bloody streets of ramadi as we fought street history house to house fighting in direct contact with well trained insurgent forces four or five six times a day but it's also about the families and like i said are amazing gold star families that you know supported us each day while we fought under the most unimaginable conditions and and they still supported us this day that's what's so remarkable the arc of the story of corporal libby the first man that you lost and your call to his mom ginny all the way to page three.

ramadi scott united states marine corps iraq africa second battalion
"ramadi" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on WCHS

"And corporals and even some of the senior lancecorporals i mean just be you know figuratively like putting their arms around the junior guys who had never been there saying hey banned really pay attention to this because this is important you're gonna wanna know this because this is going to help you survive and went on the battlefield so we were backed iraq and it was six it'd be fought it was remarkable from those you know fifty or so guys that have been there before how bad city he god how much deadlier and how much bloodier the fighting had become now when we when we left ramadi in in in the spring of those seven things have gotten better obviously we baited attack and then the city fell again because let's face it jim you know we we we gave it back the iraqis and we punted it through what i call the grandstands of life because they didn't have the stability in place they didn't have the infrastructure they didn't have the training of a security force or an army to really have sustainability continuity to maintain that security so i don't think any of us look look back in and we say oh man we bled we fought we suffered and it was all for not because the city fell again and you know our history book show us that because it may of 2015 isis reared its ugly head and they took ramadi because it was the capital city valet ever but you know none of the marines talk like that and and it and it heartened me because uh they understand what marine suit and they were there to accomplish their mission killer capture anti iraqi forces but they also were there to help people that could help themselves and that's really the true spirit of what marid's to do and they did that day in and day out with extreme honour it was the extreme courage and that's what makes me so proud of what they did so we don't have regret because again i'll say that we won that city and had we established a presence in the middle east and bid students have our history like we did the pacific theater and in the european theater in in postwar is like world war two in those campaigns i think we would continue to have stability we.

corporals iraq ramadi marid middle east
"ramadi" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on WCHS

"Friction that i describe in nickel in ramadi they be bid become so desensitised to this bile that it was a very surreal experience to be at times where we would be engaged in these heavy firefights that would see kids and families almost on the streets as if it were a spectator sport like there were some soccer game and it was he was boggling to me because that was the nature of of what we th the war we are fighting or quick thing here before we go to the break so that you are a student of history compare if you would be marines urban sliding in ramadi with though the urban fighting in the old imperial city of way in vietnam in january and february of nineteen six the eight well those with significant battled and you know during that time and it and i think that's a great comparison uh and that's a lengthy discussion but you know during the tet offensive when we we you know ah you know there was a a very complex coordinated attack agc uh against both us bases in the us was was stood up to counter that type of fight uh you know they want and i say the same thing about ramati because you know we fought that's it you know for we handed it back over the iraqis and then itself and then we went back into re claimed that key ground in two thousand six and i think it's important for not only my marines but any soldier where serbs member the fall in that city or any city is to tell them that we won because that's what we do you know we just like in vietnam jim and then in iraq and afghanistan these key battles we're not fighting policies we're not fighting strategies we're fighting the energy and if the tactical level that's what marines do they attack and kill the enemy and they do it not only with absolutely thallady but they do it with honour and that's what really makes me so so very proud of my guys to this day on on how they conducted themselves on the battlefield there is such a young age all right we're gonna take a quick break come back with more major scott using our guest to book echo.

ramadi vietnam us iraq scott soccer afghanistan
"ramadi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As well and and what we really need to emphasize is that while there may have been a spike in civilian casualties and you can vouch in the coalition's own numbers you can see the spike in the admitted number of civilian deaths there as many as five times as high while you can see that spike at our numbers are likely conservative this one and five is likely conservative we're not counting west azazel which is where probably the highest rate of debt happened for reasons we'd be happy to go into further including the denial of an exit quarter but also because of these rule changes there was one in december 2016 and another when president trump entered into office so certainly there may have been a spy but these were still happening under president obama's well we wanted to aqaba up sollozzo the results will do so denial of alleged recorder so unlike many of the other cities an 'and feel free to jump in as well unlike many of the others that when they were liberated for isis from isis for example ramadi and faluji ah the military strategy was to allow isis fighters to exit to safely lease cities so that while they were trying to retake them billions would not be trapped with isis fighters one of the major reasons why isis was able to so effectively huh hold civilians hostage in west mostar specific because there was no exit quarterfinal them to take and leave through this was a deliberate decision made with the support of united states nerd did the idea was a two and nihilists isis to kill them into over there so that they don't come over here and of the consequence of that was that thousands of civilians were trapped in mozell and many thousands probably died because of.

trump obama ramadi mostar mozell president aqaba
"ramadi" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on The Daily

"But really what stuck with him what he was never able to move beyond was a single day back in his first tour in ramadi iraq oh yes this is your march sixteen for two thousand four linford handwritten room before thing happened so he said down to the family house everyone doing i'm doing pretty good sorry i haven't written sooner but it's been real busy kuwait was barring right here in our ramadi i'm trying to readers riding it's different story if a city with a lot of bad guys that are already out and about so this is right when the war in iraq is starting to come off the wheels when american troops are starting to realize that the insurgency is is something bigger and more organized than they thought and so we're doing a lot more patrol now than we did before yesterday on patrol we had a hundred kid following a well things are going good i just wish i could have a beer right back level again this is not a week where everything happen and on a spring day april six two thousand four damien rodriguez takes a squad of about a dozen marines out on a foot patrol swiss set out from the combat outpost as removing through and leave hillary realize history tsa normally have kids throwing rocks there's a very empty this is about eleven am something like that said that strange is very strange yours here veterans vietnam vets people at that say it you know it's kind of evidence quiet what he didn't know is that there's this vast coordinated attack by insurgents about to happen citywide and they round a corner walking down the sidewalk governor urban boulevard and and.

kuwait ramadi iraq american troops damien rodriguez hillary
"ramadi" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"The war started in september september xi two thousand one and from there i deployed to iraq as a platoon commander and then as a seal task unit commander when i was a task unit commander i fought in the battle of ramadi ramadi iraq the capital of on bar province an very tough fighting in incredible effort by the soldiers and marines on the ground and also the guys that were with me as well from my seal task unit and ended up being the most highly decorated special operations unit from the iraq war an incredible sacrifices were made for that victory in when i got back from vat deployment to iraq i took over v training for the west coast seal team's and the training that i took over training where you've got the boat on your head of your carrying logs around or your doing a bunch of pushups and pull up soon runs in swims it's the the real training where seal's actually learn to be seals two shoot move communicate to fire maneuver to close with and destroy the enemy and they learn about combat leadership and i did that for my last few years in the seal team's taught that and then i retired in two thousand ten and what i did that i started working with companies with businesses and helping out with their leadership and their management and that developed into a leadership and management consulting company which is called echelon front that i run with my buddy and former teammate leif baben who was one of the platoon commanders that worked for me in the battle of ramadi and we wrote a book together which was called extreme ownership and that is how i ended up being on tim's podcast for the first time we had some mutual friends kirk parsley in dr peter attiyah and they made the intro and that's how i ended up on this podcast the first time in that book extreme ownership is a book about leadership.

commander ramadi tim dr peter attiyah iraq leif baben kirk parsley
"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

Guard the Guardians

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

"Because when I look back at my experiences, and I look back at the casualties not only on my Yoda team. But also, the marines that we were deployed with and the marines that we had to go scrape off the ground when they would get hit by ideas. And then you see the same places back in the news again with ISIS trucks, rolling through them. I don't know for me. It's one of the things has never sat. Well, and I just I often wonder and it's not often that I get to speak with somebody. Who was there, you know, essentially the same same time. I was to get another person's perspective on. You know that that question you're like you've made such tremendous sacrifice. And then we're where's it at the end of the day? I don't think any of this of crystal ball with Sean that we could look into and say if we don't build basis here, we're going to be back there and ten years, but all pretty smart enough to know that if we didn't do that that was going to be the reality. So I often could affect question. You know, what was our mission? Dizzy succeed. Did we win in? I think personally I've never really had a metric of success for what we did in Iraq or Afghanistan. But my my real metric, Sean is the fact that we thought we did what we were ordered to did kill or capture anti ragging fighters. And we we we accomplished our mission in my real metric of success was bringing as many marines, and sailors back home is possibly could. That's really the only metric success. I had because as we look at the world stage today and see how unstable it is within that region. I guess you could think what did the sacrifices need. But I still stay very connected to the families of the marines. We lost our gold star families. And I'm always. Mazed as I talked to them and feel. The immense compassion and love from these families that I'm so lucky to be connected to that just like they were then even when I had to make those phone calls from the battlefield. I could hear the voices the love and support that they had were as as we fought in such a miserable place, and they told us to continue fighting in that they loved us, and it will be hind in they supportive, and I would think to myself where do people like this come from? They are just they're not ordinary people. Because they truly lost. You know, they lost a son or daughter, and there's a distinct difference because we go into this game making that curve is willingly those families. Don't. So I think that I don't have any regret for what we what we did. Or what we didn't accomplish. I'm proud of what all my marine insoles and say those dead as we fought in Ramadi, no six or seven I think that at the end of the day we won. And we brought home is many marines. In in members of my company in the battalion is possibly could. And that was attributed to the leadership that was exhibited at every level on the battlefield in the fact that we had some of the best training go into a game. Because every day was gained acre them, and there is no time out. And you know that as well. I'm I actually wrote about it in echoed Ramadi. Because I I hold my Yuji technicians in such high regard because you along with probably interpreters and the military working dog teams were the most intimate and people in that city back in those six oh seven that. The techs were were so in demand and never really put my finger on what type of person does it take to enlist in the navy or the Marine Corps whose sole mission in life is to go sniff out fight split materials. Put more explosives on top of it and below them up and get paid for that. What type create visual signs up for that? And I'm talking to one right now. So I'm always always have been always will be impressed with that with that job. It's just just a mind blower, no pun intended. Yeah. I don't I don't know. There's definitely some unique characters that I came across. Hopefully, we still all act at least somewhat rationally..

Sean Ramadi Iraq Mazed Afghanistan navy Marine Corps ten years
"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

Guard the Guardians

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

"Nonprofit helps veterans connector outreach programs to bills rank of character to deal with the effects of poster Matic stress, and we found that there's no shop vaccination fill that a doctor or the VA can prescribe any better than really getting guys together. And that's something that you're listening to is. Although you, and I have never met we share that same bond because we both bought in Ramadi, although we were ships passing in the night. Sean you were there shortly before I arrived. You know, exactly the the the dynamic nature that battlefield in how complex it was in. What those guys had to experience and. And the horrific life changing events, they they saw in the things that never be able to unseat because. It's it's just it's not to kill another human being not for anyone. I don't care how romanticize or cavalier is portrayed fishing on television or movies. It is a horrific. Life changing action for most. But in war killing is what happens marines are trained to kill in. In that environment. Especially in Ramadi. The destruction was everywhere in it would be everything around sometimes it eats at you. It's just an unnatural act. So yeah, there are plenty of guys that are suffering from the effects of post traumatic stress, and sadly, we have lost more more marines, and sailors two suicide because of that, and I think they're affected obviously to a higher degree than some people. That didn't experience that type of savagery that we saw back in OPEC's seven. And I wanna say this is I is I do most times when asked this question is that I never won the listeners or my readers do presuppose that my company or my marines where the biggest bad ass group of marines ever to walk the face about trust me echo company. Was there were some pretty bad ass marine? They took care of business. But there were plenty of other units on the battlefield in both the Marine Corps in the army that suffered as much as we did if not more they fought harder. If not more than we did. And they as much pain as we did. So what I talk about an used as examples in my writing in the story, you can understand this like some of the other veterans those stories are really emblematic of what all those warriors experienced during that time where we fought in one of the most highly contested areas of Iraq in Ramadi owes sakes, the deadly city of Iraq of the time. That's just where all the insurgents wanted to fight us, and it was based off of nothing more the timing because those pockets of insurgency migrate from city to city. There's the Baghdad there's a Faluji's there's the times there's the Ramadi and they have. Have the luxury of time and choosing the this time and place where they wanted to fight us on the battlefield. And as you know, six it was reminding, and I don't think it's a shock to anyone listening today keeping up with current events as we stand on the precipice of another battle in the Middle East ISIS Joe's Ramadi to gain a foothold back in Iraq. Because back that it is a capital city of alum our province in that's significant because we rooted those insurgents out, and we did our share of fighting. But I don't think any were surprised that it we didn't establish a presence in the Middle East. If we didn't build bases, and and defend that territory for which we fought so hard for the past decade that some some bad actor or some other insurgent faction would come back in and they would try and stay in a d stable government. And that was just the situation. That happened. I mean, we can read about it in the main should me today. Eight concede on whatever Cable News Network, we want you. But that's what's happening. But the marines are still there. The soldiers are still there in the army is still fighting in their winning. Have you ever wondered if the sacrifices that were made when you were in Ramadi were actually worth something in the end? And the reason I pretty personal for me to ask..

Ramadi Iraq Middle East army Sean OPEC Baghdad Marine Corps
"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

Guard the Guardians

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

"Just leadership. I never subscribed to the ad set because he got shot at because you're in combat or whatever the case may be that makes you a better leader. It doesn't leaders lead in any condition, and although some thrive a little bit better or shine a little bit brighter under those chaotic conditions. The real leaders also know how to control those periods of boredom in in the absence of that chaos to make sure that the marines are ready to go. When the fight starts because that's the relief ship challenge is no missions into training task for train for periods of boredom. That's not hitting their avail later understands. A real leader on stands that you have to be able to big marines understand it. There's going to be the lows in combat but to get that same individual to go from sixty two zero that was a real challenge for me in in Ramadi two thousand six under the conditions. We were fighting in urban urban combat in. In the deadliest city of Iraq. At the time. It's really hard for people to understand again. I actually think in this case both whether you're in uniform or have never been in uniform is how much residual stress exists. Even if you were back inside the wire, and I think a lot of times even the combatants that are facing those conditions. They end up thinking while comparatively being on base is way safer than being, you know, out on the street during the patrol during raid during whatever the operation happens to be. But the fact that you're still getting idea indirect fire the fact that you're still getting gunfights between whoever's on the perimeter wall and whoever's out in town trying to make trouble the fact that you have all these stressors still coexisting with where you're supposed to find peace end rest. I guess that. I think. Really keeps people keyed up in ways that. I don't know when I read I guess historical documents about World War, Two World War One where there was actually a front end you were capable of going to the front, and you were capable of leaving the front, and you know, I've had some folks ask me will, you know, what was it like when you were not operating, and well, I don't know 'cause 'cause you're in the middle of everything, and you know, maybe your experience was different. But I never I never really knew where a front might have existed. Maybe the front was back in the United States. No, that's a great. This is a great point because that that pressure that is continually forced down on the individual marine or soldier sailor is always there. They can't ever really escape it. In Iraq, two thousand six in in what I write about in my book on Ramadi. It wasn't a matter of if we were gonna get shot at or Gaijin of firefighter is a matter of winning in how often that's just the nature of the game back during the surge strategy, but we can literally set our watches by when we get attacked in that city, and we were very aggressive in. We had the the luxury of of a lot of firepower within our company I had over two hundred fifty marines soldiers, sailors attached, my companies, we patrol the streets of Ramadi with patrol very aggressively. We were very effective in. Although our methods may have been somewhat unconventional. We were highly effective at what our mission was to do in our mission. Was you kill or capture anti Iraqi forces DAT was our mission in good at what we did. But that pressure that we're talking. Still hung over the guys in the marines. When they went back to the firm base. But they went back to one of the main staging bases at camp Caribbean or or camp Ramadi or Al Assad that you're right that pressure's. Always there in. I was talking to a friend about it in. I don't think it's any different though, generation Lee speaking, Shawn because in World War Two or Vietnam as a comparison that it World War Two they wrote letters back home to abate some of their frustrations pressure related. Our guys they sent emails, but whatever era would ever generation, it's always important that there is a space on the battlefield. So they can't decompress to some degree because although we work continually fighting in living in the city on patrol running six eight ten patrols daily there were..

Ramadi Iraq United States Caribbean Al Assad Vietnam Lee Shawn
"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

Guard the Guardians

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on Guard the Guardians

"Day. However, applying technology at even the lowest. It's so I assume that you had to go through some sort of advanced infantry training as an officer. And then you also did work ups with your unit that you're going to deploy with and in this. I'm thinking specifically the echo company to Ramadi. Did you find that the tactics that you had been working up in your head or that you had been training on were a good fit for what you found in country or was there sort of a holy shit. Like rubber meets the road. We didn't realize that this was going to be the the nature of the beast. Once we got on the ground learning experience training that I received that every officer in junior brain receives is phenomenal it absolutely prepared us for arrack in the story of echo company in in Ramadi in the winner of six no seven is really one. I always say of collective discipline because it turned out to be. A series of events of life-saving vigilance patients in love I very lucky than echo company to have a group of very season combat veterans who were on the first deployments of Ramadi in two thousand four about fifty of my noncommissioned officers and junior marines had experienced a a level of fighting in the battalion itself segments worth brains suffered one of the largest casualty counts, sadly in modern warfare. So these guys knew what they were getting into in when I graduated from the expeditionary warfare school in Quantico with which is a school for captains rebound to assume. Command. I was told that I was gonna graduate early took command on Friday that week. And then the next Monday, I was in twenty nine palms doing a training exercise the training programs within the rink or had adapted. So rapidly bay off a current threat. In Iraq in a stand that they were getting the absolute best training that they could get have to prepare them to go into the fight in that was very refreshing to hear that those guys he had the ability to be responsive. I think for a lot of people on the outside of the military. They would not necessarily equate the military with responsiveness in terms of modifying accepted doctrine. But I think that for those people who have been in combat regardless of what branch here part of here. You know, a highly motivated to change whatever it is. You're doing to whatever it is. It's going to work, and you know, the ability to bring that back and to convince people that hey, you know, I understand that are accepted previous doctrine was X. But we need to do why. In order to make sure that our people can actually go over to this new environment and have the best chance of not only cheating. Mission but also coming back alive and you hit us about on. 'cause we degrade thing about our generation is there so adaptive that they don't will for the doctor catch up. They Bowman these programs in the needs of the warfighter on the battlefield in. That's something. That's very unique in something that the US military possesses, which is a massive force multiplier when it comes to the effectiveness in leaked out on the battlefield in. It's also something that the general population. Probably a lot of your listeners. Probably a lot of my readers. Don't understand Bonsor US military is to the current threat on the battle hill in the fact that ever portrayed in mainstream media or what they see on social media at the end of the day. Sean. Marines diesel jobs that are fighting this long or on terror they're winning. They are absolutely winning in its attributed not only to the training, but the leadership in the into nudity of these junior, marines and soldiers that are dedicated not only to the Jin. But also are there to take care of each other and take care of each other better than anything else that they've ever experienced? That's a success. And that's why they're winning in. You know, I always told all of my marines in this loss that made them. Listen to always said, this is that there is no such thing as combat leadership just leadership..

Ramadi US officer Iraq Quantico Sean twenty nine palms
"ramadi" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ramadi" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Ramadi iraq two thousand four the metal was upgraded to the navy crosses a part of an award review initiated by the pentagon in early two thousand levin who is sure the troops serve even wars after september eleven thousand one we're properly recognised for their heroism smis navy crosses the fortieth presented to a marine since the september eleven th attacks officials said he was april six two thousand four and after a relatively peaceful period the streets of more ramadi erupted into flames sms has had surges wage what would be an intense threeday war on the american troops he said as units were pinned down around the city a quick reaction forces were dispatched to provide reinforcement and a way out smith was called upon to go out with a makeshift q r f reaction force when other assets were exhausted he was teamed with lieutenant the staff sergeant who race to to ramadi to save another squad with eight themselves were ambushed go through ten was killed in the staff sergeant was killed and somebody had to step up and leave those marines to safety kennedy said twelve marines were killed that day of thirty three marines and a navy cormon would die over the course of the pointed threw mahdi according to the citation under heavy machinegun fire and rocketpropelled grenade fire corporal smith assumed command of the platoon and led them fifty meters across open ground to covered positions he then ran back across the fire swept field to evacuate his platoon commander and his weapons for smith the day was not done he then used machineguns at his platoon seventonne truck to to lead a counterattack against the local insurgent forces accomplishing the original mission of rescuing the isolated swan then he worked with an army bradley fighting vehicle platoon to evacuate the casualties work out a plan for all units returned to safety quote by his bold leadership wise judgment.

iraq navy pentagon levin american troops kennedy mahdi corporal smith commander machineguns Ramadi fifty meters seventonne threeday