34 Burst results for "Rajiv"

"rajiv" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

02:49 min | 9 months ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

"Okay. now. I'm back with rajiv to talk more about what's going on in programmatic markets these days. So reggie we were just talking about amtrak. Transparency and the presence of fewer idea phase. Out there in the world there is of course another big identifier. That's going to become less available in future and that's third party cookies. Which will be deprecated in chrome later than anticipated but it will happen. So i'm wondering. How do you expect the market to prepare for the coming deprecation of third party. Cookies in chrome given that it has been put off. What do you think will happen in this interim or perhaps limbo period..

rajiv reggie
"rajiv" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"rajiv" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Wanted a bunch of see the funds improving your one name more. You may be selling anymore yesterday because that allows to adapt so if you go back to lessen the gnc. The environment posed usc has been dramatic. Different vast. majority grow shops. That you talk about today including quality grow shops. Didn't really do a bridge. Emc in fact there's a whole new read of grow charge doing well today. Vast majority didn't survive the dot com collapse. It's like the don't see that many old bold traders exactly it's funny. You mentioned that my favorite extreme examples is always the short volatility option sellers. Those guys will put together like a beautiful three or four year track record during benign environments where they make two percent a month every single month sharpe ratio of three. It somehow ends up attracting a few hundred million dollars. And then they print the down fifty that ninety or one hundred percent which has had the case over. The last few years washes it all out. Rents repeat over and over again. Which back to your commentary these cycles in my mind in regimes. Sometimes they're quick and sometimes they last for years and decades the experience of my goodness the eighties and then they used to call it the lost decade. But then you had to call the lost decades. 'cause it was three and it's in a world of robin hood and day trading and people looking at things on a daily basis. It's hard to have that perspective. You touched on something. We really got into a few months ago on social which was ninety nine percent of the effort. People i think put into investing is the by decision. What should we by wind by stressing out about it in almost no one. I think we did a twitter poll on this sort of established or thought about how to exit at the time of the by. They just buy it and they say okay. We'll let you see how it goes. Let's wing it in your problems. On both sides you have problems with it does really well. The problems of does really poorly because emotions get involved and you didn't have a process in one of the things that is really thoughtful. You mentioned is seeking out that evidence to the contrary. I mean how many investors listening of your long bitcoin or short tesla as two good examples. You just spend all day online looking for confirming evidence just like you're only following people that have the same views. It's not what you should be doing. Literally the opposite is spending all day trying to kill your no one does that or maybe the old successful investors do but most people i know. Don't let's talk a little bit about you. Guys got started with the new company and now you manage gazillion dollars in the mid teens. I think twenty sixteen. He said seemed like a nice benign period for a few years and then ram twenty twenty came along walk through that period. What was it like. What were you guys sort of experiencing any major turnover. Did you guys just kinda closed rise. Put the austrians portfolio. Put your head in the sand or was it pretty active year. Walk us through. Like sometimes i'm envious opposed to say. Look we believe these fantastic businesses and it'll be on forever and below the happily ever after. Because i feel that kind of almost like a banned mongolia you happy to disappear and ending the war view. living a little more in uncomfortable zone because my view is that if you're not sure how deep the valley is the ten thousand feet just back off and if you go back to two thousand nineteen twenty actually or becoming fairly constructive on corporate earnings growth and again. It's that much more. data dependent. Another opportunity was for example. The urban bax for the first time about bought an airline last quarter twenty nine hundred todd. Perfect timing the years a by an airline in last quarter twenty nineteen. Nobody can attend that better by the way as january. All been one of the alice Wise this be heading in china. Do you may want to pay attention to that. This is early to portugal. Dan or something and the sars maybe nothing else to start cutting back to start cutting back the airlines and jan february date abouts and every came along at be started looking for and by the way we have also whose job is nothing but criticise everything they do. The competent is structured on that Man that's awesome. Spend a little time on that real quick not interrupt you a cool idea. Tell us a little more. I think because as you said the incentive is all too high five each other and agree. In fact i've read. People basically would eliminate anybody who disagrees with you because other style this. Abc you have walk. Exactly the same dotted line. Which i personally finding but crazy because then there's no disagreement you. All behave like lemmings. Any bottle of indo summit online. Because there's nowhere disagree so for that it's better to just structure. The team. Different one was incentivized compensated. Disagree with you so other words the bonuses dependent on the lake something they basically own the name to by default. They disagree with you and melissa chan the competition. It won't work because of bread. i eat his own. I sing. Nobody's gonna disagree with you if they know that. He asked disagreement or devastated but really wanted. You only made a decision to buy in an ongoing basis that is part of and if you wanna make documented which documented by the the disagreements and i think that has been an instrument informing the culture. Where disagreements are actually appreciated and documented. Just to make sure that what the disappearance aren't so every name. Eric line meetings mother said. Would you like this name as i like it. But this one's will person team hates it. You should talked about because unbalanced. All we're trying to do is get the favor in other words. If the odds are let's say to make a hypothetical number sixty percent positive forty percent negative. That's all you need. In fact once you get to eighty ninety percent conviction you in my opinion you no longer objective so in walk and walk ridiculously. They'll like the fans are the last decade. The truly believers debating bill. The question is able to get off the train. Been this time to get all the train. People like me all business of doubting jacks and never had the same upside because the oldest checking cross checking questioning cutting back data point. So that's important that is partly restructuring thought about doing them in the setting of the g. q. That it has to be done. It's hard to change with existing people by the way you must have got the team. Which is why. Didn't wanna bring in from friday because cultures are hard to change so that is part.

forty percent china Eric sixty percent ninety january twitter three ten thousand feet two thousand today yesterday fifty melissa chan portugal one hundred percent eighty ninety percent ninety nine percent Dan both sides
"rajiv" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Software People Stories

"Whenever the mother is owen. Johnny's doing the very aggressive feature is my inaugural so citing that s finish is a very high food is exclude. All of them. Played for men also but they'll lock more smart. Have any of your own world. Views changed after you saw and you go through the the breaks that she took and then kids and then getting back into at career. I was seeing this happening. In though.

Johnny
"rajiv" Discussed on Software People Stories

Software People Stories

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Software People Stories

"The company the software stories. I'm schiff. I'm chitra and ninety. We bring you interesting untold stories of people associated with the creation or consumption all software based solutions. You'll hear stories of wadsworth. And sometimes what didn't you will also hear very personal experiences and insights. That would trigger your thoughts and you to do. Even greater.

schiff wadsworth ninety
CDC Releases New Guidelines For Reopening Schools

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

CDC Releases New Guidelines For Reopening Schools

"NEWS, the CDC and the Biden administration have laid out a plan for schools to reopen CBS is Michael George reports, safety concerns have been raised by teachers. And some have made getting a vaccine a prerequisite. Our preference is to have our staff vaccinated. She DC's new guidelines do not mandate vaccinations for teachers who could get caught up in a quagmire of

Biden Administration Michael George CDC CBS News
"rajiv" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

AdExchanger Talks

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"rajiv" Discussed on AdExchanger Talks

"Hello everyone welcome. Back to the podcast. This is zach rogers. I'm the executive editor of ad exchanger. So pathetic went public today. I'm speaking to you on wednesday. December the ninth week for. Ipo's and it's not every day not every week lately. It's not every quarter you have an ad tech ipo. They've been scarce to to put it mildly in recent months and years. So i'm delighted to be talking with rajiv go l. The ceo palmach about his company going public. Welcome eve thank you. Act great to be here with you again absolutely so just to to sort of fill in some details for the audience before we jump in you filed last month to raise a what you hoped would be about seventy five million in public offering you. How did that. By a good margin you raised hundred nineteen million today. Congratulations thank you and <hes>. I think that values you matt paramedic at about nine hundred and fifty million darn close to a billion dollar valuation. Is that right. Yeah that's right. That's exactly right super. So how are you feeling right now. While i'm feeling i'm feeling very good very proud. I would say of our entire team now. It's been just a huge effort over five hundred employees to help us achieve this milestone. You know we've been a private company for fourteen years and we really look at this as the opportunity for the next phase of the company. So we're incredibly proud of what we've achieved but we're also excited to get back to work and get back to our jobs of serving our customers and in growing our business. Yeah i have to admit. I'm i bet you're feeling that way. I'm a little stunned myself. Having observed pathetic over these fourteen years all of a sudden. You know you're going public and with the great outcome and <hes>. So i i can only imagine how you must feel <hes>. And indeed. I would love to hear a little more if you wouldn't mind developing that a bit on. What the last several months. Where like i mean first of all. You can't do a traditional roadshow what's it like doing. A virtual road roadshow and how much internal work was necessary to get ready for this moment while i call this the sweatpants ipo. Because i literally wore sweatpants to every banker and investor meeting and had a nice dress shirt and proper sweater on top. But i think it's a little bit of the sign of how the world is changing right. Which is an it feeds into into why we decided to go public now. Which is that. The world is very different now and i think into the future than it was back in january and we think the opportunity is much bigger for our business for customers because so much has changed around consumer behavior right so consumers are doing things on the internet that they've never done before things like seeing their doctor in an app fitness classes streaming online buying cars online not to mention work from home at school from home and then consumers also have a lot more time to spend on the internet. Because they're not commuting. They're not going out for other things and you know there will be a new normal. Maybe six nine twelve months from now but i don't think it will look like the old normal right. It'll be some some new state. Where i think the digital economy will be a much bigger share of the overall economy. And i think what we see is that digital. Advertising is really an essential lubricant of how the digital economy works okay. Great and so that speaks to kind of an accelerated <unk>. Celebration of digital advertising. It was very bad cue to just from a business standpoint. however this year was <hes>. Overall good news for any company in the digital ad space just just from the standpoint of people working remotely and doing everything remotely. It was a bad year in every other respect for all the reasons that we all know. Could you talk about when you decided. Oh now's the time to go public. Did it have to do with the acceleration. That came with the pandemic shutdown. Yeah you know we had this insight. I think pretty late in cute to where obviously every company pulled back significantly in late march. Early april right in terms of their whatever. Their plan was for the year. Right is obviously the world was going through this this cataclysmic event but what we found in the middle of q two is that because of our unique profitability. We were able to really think about the longterm opportunity in front of us so we never stop hiring or stopped investing even in the toughest parts of of late march and april. We shifted where we were investing in. What types of things. We were doing <hes>. But we had an ability to continue to invest because even through that downturn able so as we extrapolated that into the future and we realized that the digital opportunity will be much bigger and we have a unique platform in terms of the innovation and the profitability. We we thought to ourselves that you know to be properly prepared for the opportunity in front of us. We needed to be public to have the most efficient access to capital.

zach rogers Ipo rajiv
PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

AdExchanger Talks

05:17 min | 1 year ago

PubMatic Founder and CEO Rajeev Goel on Taking His Company Public

"Hello everyone welcome. Back to the podcast. This is zach rogers. I'm the executive editor of ad exchanger. So pathetic went public today. I'm speaking to you on wednesday. December the ninth week for. Ipo's and it's not every day not every week lately. It's not every quarter you have an ad tech ipo. They've been scarce to to put it mildly in recent months and years. So i'm delighted to be talking with rajiv go l. The ceo palmach about his company going public. Welcome eve thank you. Act great to be here with you again absolutely so just to to sort of fill in some details for the audience before we jump in you filed last month to raise a what you hoped would be about seventy five million in public offering you. How did that. By a good margin you raised hundred nineteen million today. Congratulations thank you and I think that values you matt paramedic at about nine hundred and fifty million darn close to a billion dollar valuation. Is that right. Yeah that's right. That's exactly right super. So how are you feeling right now. While i'm feeling i'm feeling very good very proud. I would say of our entire team now. It's been just a huge effort over five hundred employees to help us achieve this milestone. You know we've been a private company for fourteen years and we really look at this as the opportunity for the next phase of the company. So we're incredibly proud of what we've achieved but we're also excited to get back to work and get back to our jobs of serving our customers and in growing our business. Yeah i have to admit. I'm i bet you're feeling that way. I'm a little stunned myself. Having observed pathetic over these fourteen years all of a sudden. You know you're going public and with the great outcome and So i i can only imagine how you must feel And indeed. I would love to hear a little more if you wouldn't mind developing that a bit on. What the last several months. Where like i mean first of all. You can't do a traditional roadshow what's it like doing. A virtual road roadshow and how much internal work was necessary to get ready for this moment while i call this the sweatpants ipo. Because i literally wore sweatpants to every banker and investor meeting and had a nice dress shirt and proper sweater on top. But i think it's a little bit of the sign of how the world is changing right. Which is an it feeds into into why we decided to go public now. Which is that. The world is very different now and i think into the future than it was back in january and we think the opportunity is much bigger for our business for customers because so much has changed around consumer behavior right so consumers are doing things on the internet that they've never done before things like seeing their doctor in an app fitness classes streaming online buying cars online not to mention work from home at school from home and then consumers also have a lot more time to spend on the internet. Because they're not commuting. They're not going out for other things and you know there will be a new normal. Maybe six nine twelve months from now but i don't think it will look like the old normal right. It'll be some some new state. Where i think the digital economy will be a much bigger share of the overall economy. And i think what we see is that digital. Advertising is really an essential lubricant of how the digital economy works okay. Great and so that speaks to kind of an accelerated Celebration of digital advertising. It was very bad cue to just from a business standpoint. however this year was Overall good news for any company in the digital ad space just just from the standpoint of people working remotely and doing everything remotely. It was a bad year in every other respect for all the reasons that we all know. Could you talk about when you decided. Oh now's the time to go public. Did it have to do with the acceleration. That came with the pandemic shutdown. Yeah you know we had this insight. I think pretty late in cute to where obviously every company pulled back significantly in late march. Early april right in terms of their whatever. Their plan was for the year. Right is obviously the world was going through this this cataclysmic event but what we found in the middle of q two is that because of our unique profitability. We were able to really think about the longterm opportunity in front of us so we never stop hiring or stopped investing even in the toughest parts of of late march and april. We shifted where we were investing in. What types of things. We were doing But we had an ability to continue to invest because even through that downturn able so as we extrapolated that into the future and we realized that the digital opportunity will be much bigger and we have a unique platform in terms of the innovation and the profitability. We we thought to ourselves that you know to be properly prepared for the opportunity in front of us. We needed to be public to have the most efficient access to capital.

Zach Rogers Matt Paramedic Rajiv IPO
Lines to get tested for coronavirus are growing long ahead of Thanksgiving and amid rising cases

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Lines to get tested for coronavirus are growing long ahead of Thanksgiving and amid rising cases

"As the holidays begin cases of the Corona virus to surging and covert testing sites are having trouble keeping up with the demand. Geek wire reporter Lisa Stiffler tells Cairo nights that the tests are free, though tests are free. No matter where you go, Um the insurance will pay for it. The providers can't charge you so if you are insured Your insurance company will pay for it. They cannot charge Uniqlo pace, but health officials are pleading with the public toe on Lee get tested if you have symptoms or came in contact with someone who has the

Lisa Stiffler Cairo Uniqlo LEE
Fatal police shooting of 21-year-old Black man sparks protests

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Fatal police shooting of 21-year-old Black man sparks protests

"York or happening throughout the weekend after Clark County sheriff's deputies shot and killed a young black man Thursday night. Coverage is Hannah Scott Reports. Dozens of protesters were met with a massive police presence last night as they flock to the shooting scene as word of 21 year old Kevin Peterson's death spread like wildfire on Social media nearly 24 hours after the shooting, Clark County Sheriff Chuck Atkins making this commitment participate as much as I can in ensuring that there is a complete throwing independent determination of what happened. How it happened and what could be learned from this incident. Sheriff's deputies involved in a drug investigation were after an armed suspect who shot at them when they return fire. But that contradicts what some witnesses are saying and the police chief of the homos has asked anyone who wants to protest there to leave their guns at home. In an open letter posted on Facebook Chief Robert Palmer said he supports people's rights to protest that he stands against racism. He went on to say that when guns get involved, it creates an uncomfortable distraction for my officers. Who are called to respond to the situation. He also clarified that citizens have no legal authority to stop anyone from doing anything and direct intimidation of otherwise peaceful protesters could subject you to arrest

Clark County Robert Palmer Hannah Scott Kevin Peterson Chuck Atkins York Facebook
Amy Coney Barrett: Talented judge, popular professor brings solid conservative credentials

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Amy Coney Barrett: Talented judge, popular professor brings solid conservative credentials

"President Trump named Judge Amy Cockney Barrett as Ginsberg's replacement, CBS News Legal analyst Jonathan Turley on her background Judge Barrett is in some ways a conservative version of Ruth Bader Ginsberg both graduated at the top of their respective law. School classes. Both went into teaching. Both started to write in the areas of procreation, a ll rights and Constitutional interpretation. Both were deeply religious. But most importantly like a Ginsburg judge, Barrett would come to the cord with a clearly articulated judicial philosophy. CBS has been Tracy with more. He's very highly respected, I could bear it is a favorite of religious conservatives for her strong anti abortion rights views, and, if confirmed, would move the court to the right for a generation. In 2016, she said. She doesn't think Roe v. Wade will be entirely overturned, but access to abortion would be restricted. I don't think that core case that rose core holding that women have a right to an abortion. I don't think that would change, but I think the question off Whether people can get very late term abortions. You know how many restrictions could be put on clinics? I think that would change. President. Trump first considered Barrett when filling Justice Anthony Kennedy seat After he retired in 2018, he nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh instead. That meant Barrett was already vetted by the White House that CBS has been Tracy. The

Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Tracy President Trump Ruth Bader Ginsberg Judge Brett Kavanaugh CBS Jonathan Turley Analyst Ginsburg Justice Anthony Kennedy Wade White House ROE
California milestone: 4 million acres burned in wildfires

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

California milestone: 4 million acres burned in wildfires

"More wildfires in California. Multiple agencies responsible for the official estimate of structures damaged have only been able to survey about 30% of the burned areas. That's KP Ex reporter Kenny Choi. A somber milestone looms there today as those wild fire steam on track to burn for million acres this

Kenny Choi Reporter California Official
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
Trump to Campaign in Battleground Nevada

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Trump to Campaign in Battleground Nevada

"President President Trump returns Trump to returns Nevada to Nevada for the first for the time first since time the pandemic since the pandemic of the president of the president kicks off his kicks visit off his Saturday visit Saturday with a rally with a rally near Lake near Tahoe. Lake Tahoe. Sunday, he Sunday, hosts he a hosts roundtable a roundtable and another and rally another in rally Las Vegas. in Las Vegas. The Trump campaign The Trump campaign had to change had to change venues venues at the last at the last minute. Do minute. tow limits Do tow limits on large on gatherings large gatherings in the silver in the state, silver state, which cannot which cannot exceed exceed 50 people. 50 people. Nicole Killian, Nicole Killian, CBS CBS NEWS LAS NEWS LAS

President Trump Nicole Killian Las Vegas Lake Tahoe Lake Near Tahoe Las Vegas. Nevada CBS
Seattle Pacific University Survey Suggests Younger People Are Showing Greater Levels of Loneliness and Anger

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

01:34 min | 2 years ago

Seattle Pacific University Survey Suggests Younger People Are Showing Greater Levels of Loneliness and Anger

"It's the end of the school year like no other before but time usually marked by prong senior skip day and of course graduation ceremonies closes without any fanfare and the grief is real Seattle Pacific university is surveying about twenty five hundred people seeing how teenagers and young adults are reacting to the pandemic compared to people ages twenty five and older and while both age groups say they're experiencing more depression the results show younger people are feeling greater levels of loneliness and anger most students in the class of twenty twenty were born in the shadow of nine eleven they begin their next chapter in the middle of a worldwide pandemic college freshmen don't know what class will look like this fall what college seniors entering job market during the worst recession since the Great Depression obviously the economic up people is going to destroy the class of twenty twenty for years and years to come Christine Weiss is graduating from Occidental College in Los Angeles her ceremony was supposed to happen last week instead she's back at her childhood home in Everett's where she's been living for the past two months after the pandemic shut down campus I'm one of the reporters on the Occidental newspaper and I was covering since the beginning of March and end of February how a lot of our study abroad programs especially students in Italy we're having to flee their countries quickly and try to get home before the borders closed and everything and I had this like got sinking feeling that this was

Seattle Pacific University Christine Weiss Occidental College Los Angeles Everett Italy Twenty Twenty
Seattle Governor Inslee orders temporary stop to evictions in response to coronavirus

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle Governor Inslee orders temporary stop to evictions in response to coronavirus

"This is called a nineteen Seattle a Cairo radio special report I'm Dave Ross and I'm Erin grill during the pandemic governor Jay Inslee says nobody will be kicked out of their place if they can't afford rent that's why I took strong measures we have put a moratorium on evictions for non pay payment of rent

Seattle Dave Ross Erin Grill Jay Inslee Cairo
"rajiv" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on KOMO

"H. and welcome back this is Rajiv talking all things eating and yes normally we would be talking about life planning and what you need to do to have a successful retirement we still want to talk to you about that more but more importantly in this time we want to talk about the coral and what is on your mind what kind of questions do you have what kind of device you might be able to give you that truly is a pen panicking is not the option doing something about it in the comedy is probably a better course of action to end up taking you have a question we probably can guide you to the right answers to a six four two one one thousand because Sally on the line but we also have doctor Dan Nelson on the line this spring Dr Nelson back and then you and I were talking about health care as to what what people can do and you shared as a position not much at this time but talk a little bit about preventative care what can people do to prevent them getting into this this situation how absolutely the main main thing is just to stay healthy we talk about longevity and just and part of that you know including the lifespan of health span you know keeping healthy and keeping moving that's so important to our sense of well being but to our immune system to keep active that's a big piece of what we try to do with our patients and we partner with the long term medical clinics to do you can't cancel kind on the same page when it comes to that sort of thing so that's just taking care of yourself and being active the key piece about absolutely and you're not able to miglior with longevity medical clinic and and then I've been saying forever that you know one of the few people who really get it right in healthcare healthcare should be about preventing illnesses we don't fall ill and people don't pay attention to it till now I mean what would people give not to have the coronavirus talk to us about longevity and what they do and how people should be looking at that option well absolutely so looking at you know all the variables and nutrition and optimizing the care and looking you know we don't want to look at just you know be reactive wanna be proactive and and look at okay what are the risks in this age group very aging age group how do we keep you you know moving and active able live in your own home and avoid the nursing home number two zero three weeks ago today you and I were in the studio there a coma when the news is breaking so I'll never forget have afternoon that do you graciously invited me on your show but we've gotta be react we got to be proactive and not reactive and taking care of ourselves and you know our our good friend Dr Jerry mix and says what you don't measure you don't know so that's what they do they look at all the variables not just which is normal because what we're told is normal if not always a good thing so I think they take the extra step to move beyond that and we're we're totally on board with that and that's what that's what our philosophy two and then you can go to my website cocking your pain dot com and we're not we're got a skeleton crew of except that we're still seeing new patients at least online and were able to accommodate questions and follow up appointments online so if you want to put that out there this conquering your pain dot com this doctor Dan Nelson he helps people with things that we deal with in retirement all day long which is pains and aches and pains and moans and groans and he may have a better answer for you again thanks so much for taking time to come out on the Saturday to the show and I I hope you'll be back again with us because I want to give you much more time than we did today thanks so much okay great look forward to leveraging thanks for having me thank you you bet yeah thanks and that does leave the line open to a six four two one one thousand what's on your mind about corona give us a call we can talk about it and I think we have Sally on the line let's go to Sally we may not have time to answer the question what does not the question what's on your mind and my question is I'm seventy three I'm working full time for a company that has not opened their agency and it's in a hot spot the hot spot in the state I'm not gonna say where but I'm wondering how they can if there are they considered an essential service if they haven't opened yet what what is the nature of the work they do it's inpatient wow yeah that is emergencies so I I want to do this I mean I don't want.

Rajiv
Pence and Corona Task Force video press conference

Aging Options with Rajiv Nagaich

02:34 min | 2 years ago

Pence and Corona Task Force video press conference

"Yesterday was a very big very important day for our nation's providers information patients in terms of the emergency declaration and also in terms of the agreement with the house that secretary Mnuchin negotiated end up I want you all to understand some straight talk from the nation's Dr we really need you all to lean into and prioritize the health and safety of the American people no more bickering the more partisanship no more criticism or finger pointing they'll be plenty of time for that but we all need to hit the reset button and lean into moving forward the health and safety of the American people and our top priority more stories on how people can protect themselves more people on how people can get the resources that they need that we on leased from the federal government and state and local governments less stories look at what happened in the past again they'll be time for that I want you all to understand if Dr Fauci said this will get worse before it gets better but we are making progress to flatten the curve we are making progress three important points number one almost all people will recover ninety eight ninety nine percent of people will recover people need to know that and we heard a great story on NPR this morning about an eighty nine year old from that nursing home facility and are in Seattle who is recovered number two we must lean into protecting the most vulnerable those with chronic or severe medical conditions especially seniors now is the time for us to lean into that and we are taking measures to protect them at HHS secretary HR Bob Kadlec Bob Redfield I'm not sure why are hard at work right now leaning into that from the federal level but we need your help social distancing in mitigation they're not to protect the thirty year old or the twenty year old from getting corona virus there to protect your nana their protector granddaddy there to protect the people who you love in your life and we need your help and finally we all have a role to play if we are complacent selfish uninformed if we spread fear and distrust and misinformation this situation will last longer and more people will be hurt but if we pitch in and we share the facts we will flatten the curve and we will overcome this situation so finally my prescriptions know your risk I understand your circumstances and get the facts to protect yourself a corona virus dot gov well done listen to the live White House press briefing on the

Mnuchin Dr Fauci NPR Seattle Bob Redfield Secretary HHS Bob Kadlec White House
"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

Daily Sales Tips

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

"You're listening to the daily sales tips. Podcast I'm your host Scott Ingram. Today's tip comes from Rajiv Nathan otherwise known as Raj Nation. Raj Nation is the founder of startup. Hype man where he helps. Startups not suck at how they pitch and tell their story so they stand out to customers and stand apart from their competitors here. He is with today's tip. Let's talk about qualification. In the pre sale process. One thing that many salespeople are pretty good at is qualifying a pain point. So if you're at least a little bit experience in sales or done enough sales training minimum amount of sales training yourselves than you know that when someone expresses a challenge or an issue or a pain you WanNa do is explore that deeper you WanNa dig a little further to uncover like the root causes of that pain. The root cause of that challenge. And that's how you start to walk them towards a solution when they are able to see the significance or impact of their challenge. One key aspect that most salespeople overlook though is qualifying the agreement typically in a buyer seller interaction. Let's say for example you are demoing your product and you've got a screen share pulled up and you're showing them some features of your software. Let's say they pointing out and they say oh. Wow that's pretty cool that it can do that. Typically the response to that is pretty cool. Yeah thanks for saying that and then moving onto the next thing. This is a fatal error. However this is an opportunity to uncover more most times we hear them agree with something and we just move on. We say Yeah IT IS BRIANNA. We do that or yeah. I'm glad you liked that. We move on. But here's an opportunity to qualify not qualify pain but qualify agreement. If they say that's pretty cool it can do. That's pretty unique. That's interesting a good response is yeah we like to tell me. What about that is interesting to or yeah? That is interesting. How do you see that working for you right? These are ways you can advance the conversation. Don't just qualify a pain point. Qualify the agreement. This will help you draw. Closer towards in ultimate decision will help you better understand. Where are they at in their buying process? Today it's going to help you. Better qualify the overall opportunity which enables better forecasting and by the way. Sometimes that might mean. You are better able to forecast. This deal is not going to happen. Actually which in many cases is the best thing. You.

Raj Nation sales training Rajiv Nathan Scott Ingram founder
Qualifying Agreement - Rajiv RajNATION Nathan

Daily Sales Tips

02:50 min | 2 years ago

Qualifying Agreement - Rajiv RajNATION Nathan

"Today's tip comes from Rajiv Nathan otherwise known as Raj Nation. Raj Nation is the founder of startup. Hype man where he helps. Startups not suck at how they pitch and tell their story so they stand out to customers and stand apart from their competitors here. He is with today's tip. Let's talk about qualification. In the pre sale process. One thing that many salespeople are pretty good at is qualifying a pain point. So if you're at least a little bit experience in sales or done enough sales training minimum amount of sales training yourselves than you know that when someone expresses a challenge or an issue or a pain you WanNa do is explore that deeper you WanNa dig a little further to uncover like the root causes of that pain. The root cause of that challenge. And that's how you start to walk them towards a solution when they are able to see the significance or impact of their challenge. One key aspect that most salespeople overlook though is qualifying the agreement typically in a buyer seller interaction. Let's say for example you are demoing your product and you've got a screen share pulled up and you're showing them some features of your software. Let's say they pointing out and they say oh. Wow that's pretty cool that it can do that. Typically the response to that is pretty cool. Yeah thanks for saying that and then moving onto the next thing. This is a fatal error. However this is an opportunity to uncover more most times we hear them agree with something and we just move on. We say Yeah IT IS BRIANNA. We do that or yeah. I'm glad you liked that. We move on. But here's an opportunity to qualify not qualify pain but qualify agreement. If they say that's pretty cool it can do. That's pretty unique. That's interesting a good response is yeah we like to tell me. What about that is interesting to or yeah? That is interesting. How do you see that working for you right? These are ways you can advance the conversation. Don't just qualify a pain point. Qualify the agreement. This will help you draw. Closer towards in ultimate decision will help you better understand. Where are they at in their buying process? Today it's going to help you. Better qualify the overall opportunity which enables better forecasting

Raj Nation Sales Training Rajiv Nathan Founder
Ram, Salisbury clinch men's doubles title in Melbourne

The Tennis Podcast

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Ram, Salisbury clinch men's doubles title in Melbourne

"The doubles final. Men's doubles final. Won by Britain's Joe Salisbury and America's Ranchi Ram and. It was their first. Is the first ever slam for Joe Spur. Who played brilliantly today? And Reggie Fram. I didn't realize this. She study five years of age. He'd never want amendable slam either. He'd WanNa mixed doubles slam last year. What a moment for him? It was something like his fifty eighth. Men's Grand Slam tournament something like that fifty six or fifty eight thirty fine. He got his first one and for it's one of those partnerships switch has massively worked out for both of them. I mean Joe Souls you know not many people knew about each other souls bree eighteen months ago and now he's a grand slam champion. Ram has helped him get over the line and they were. I mean they were the seeded team. They're up against a inexperience this path and they showed their class in that in that match. They were the number of points they created in men's doubles where served dominates was extraordinary. They were so good on. Return and Joe Salisbury. In particular felt like the best buy on the call he was. He was fantastic and he's now put himself in a position to about the Olympics to to be at the Olympics and choice the partner. He's this puts him up to four in in the world and if he's top ten executive Olympics he gets to select his partner and he was asked by by Russell Fuller on the BBC explicitly. They would you like to play with Andy Murray and he said Yeah. I thought it'd be super cool and I'd love that which I mean tough on for Jamie. Murray very tough on but I mean amazing for diesels breed and Rajiv Ram mm-hmm island today used to be coached by Australian tournament director. Craig toilet would you believe I'm you this because when when when he said that unquote that it reminded me. I remember being in the tournament in Qatar in two thousand two when I met Craig Tully Abner Mason. Before he was an aid. Come over I think to sort of run. Some some sort of Kemp's training camps and I got into and I actually Santamaria Good Company. Really really good start to way before his tennis Australia days and he he used to be the head coach or captain of the Illinois University Tennessee he was. He was doing that for about ten years and he ran the whole program at telenor. University and on his team was Rajiv. Ram Delic remember him and he told me about those two and it was one of those where you know somebody tells you about players whose or coming up poor. Who's a college? I remember writing these down on a piece of Bay right. I'm going to look out for these guys you know and see what like What he's like? Mike is a man with a served. That's a carbon copy. If Pete Sampras yes I love it when that happened down to what he does is with his left foot ticks. Yeah it's extraordinary

Joe Salisbury RAM Joe Spur Andy Murray Joe Souls Rajiv Ram Mm-Hmm Island Craig Tully Abner Mason Kemp Pete Sampras Partner Reggie Fram Olympics Craig Toilet Britain Santamaria Good Company Russell Fuller America Wanna Tennis Jamie
"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

Daily Sales Tips

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

"You're listening to the daily sales tips. PODCAST I'm your host Scott Ingram. Today's tip comes from Rajiv Nathan otherwise known as Raj Nation. Raj Nation is the founder of startup. Hype man where he helped start. UPS Not Suck at how they pitch and tell their story. So they stand out to customers immerse and stand apart from their competitors. Here he is with today's tip. One of the biggest challenges we often face as sellers is getting. The buyer are to consider a different point of view to consider a new way of thinking that would ultimately lead them to desire the product or service that we provide and a lot of this friction in challenge comes from not having the appropriate respect for the way they think today their current stance and their current position are surrounding the particular issue case. So for example. Let's say you overselling marketing software and the buyer is explaining to you how they might say yeah. You know we're currently using in Google analytics and retracting these four key. Metrics we're finding. We're getting some strong engagement around these areas and overall all we generally like what is providing us right. This is a situation where there's going to be friction generated if you you push on them your point of view without having respect for where they are today and this friction it comes to light when there is not a clear problem which they have expressed to you you know as salaries of were smart. We always always looking for okay. What's that pain point. The Babe identified which we can latch onto but one hundred percent of the time. You don't very easily get a pain point from them right sometimes. They are just happy. The way things are and that's may just be because they don't necessarily know differently or no better and when they give you a response that. Kinda says has yeah. Here's the lay of the land and they don't express any real concern or painter issue. If you come in and you try to then say no no. No you need to do it like this or will. We are software. Does this awesome thing will now. You're using friction into the buying the process because you become that aggressive pushy. Just trying to make a quick buck salesperson. So how do you not do that through a process that I call angle thinking an angle communication. If you've heard that Drake Song essentially you gotta gotta hit them angles. But what I mean in here is in a situation to avoid that friction in a situation where they haven't really presented a pain point. It's going to most offers end detrimental for you if you then just say well no. Here's what we have. It's awesome or hearing. Now here's all you gotta do it right because you don't have the appropriate respect for where they they stand today. What you doing to do is have respect for their current stance. And the way you do that is by angled thinking angle communicating which means and you simply say to them. It sounds like you're doing things this way. Which is which is pretty cool. It's great it's working in these aspects. Have Have you considered this angle before or let me show you a different point of view or I just want to introduce. He's a different type of angle into how you could approach this right. And those types of ways of communicating angle thinking angle communication that form of communication that way of broaching. The topic has respect for where they stand today because effectively effectively. What's happening if you take. This approach is you're not taking away their current stance from them. Right you're simply adding to it. You're saying hey I'm cool with this with how you're doing things now. I want you to consider what's also so over here now. You're not taking away from them. Not taking their composition away. You're just adding to their current position at the same time. What ear effectively doing is getting them to think deeper about their own situation and they will respect you for that if you get them to think deeper br about their situation without disrespecting their situation they will look to you and say. Wow this person's pretty smart. He understands ends. How things are done in this industry in this type of company or or or they he understands the market she understands the market. Well right and that's how how you want them to be thinking because now they will start to pro self probe more into their own situation. And that's where that pain point is GonNa get uncovered and on top of that. They will look at you as the expert who helped uncover that for them. And all you do is ask a question in a different way. All you did was respect where they stand today and not try to take that away from them but add to it. Have you thought about it from this angle..

Raj Nation Rajiv Nathan Scott Ingram founder
Angle Thinking - Rajiv RajNATION Nathan

Daily Sales Tips

05:21 min | 2 years ago

Angle Thinking - Rajiv RajNATION Nathan

"Today's tip comes from Rajiv Nathan otherwise known as Raj Nation. Raj Nation is the founder of startup. Hype man where he helped start. UPS Not Suck at how they pitch and tell their story. So they stand out to customers immerse and stand apart from their competitors. Here he is with today's tip. One of the biggest challenges we often face as sellers is getting. The buyer are to consider a different point of view to consider a new way of thinking that would ultimately lead them to desire the product or service that we provide and a lot of this friction in challenge comes from not having the appropriate respect for the way they think today their current stance and their current position are surrounding the particular issue case. So for example. Let's say you overselling marketing software and the buyer is explaining to you how they might say yeah. You know we're currently using in Google analytics and retracting these four key. Metrics we're finding. We're getting some strong engagement around these areas and overall all we generally like what is providing us right. This is a situation where there's going to be friction generated if you you push on them your point of view without having respect for where they are today and this friction it comes to light when there is not a clear problem which they have expressed to you you know as salaries of were smart. We always always looking for okay. What's that pain point. The Babe identified which we can latch onto but one hundred percent of the time. You don't very easily get a pain point from them right sometimes. They are just happy. The way things are and that's may just be because they don't necessarily know differently or no better and when they give you a response that. Kinda says has yeah. Here's the lay of the land and they don't express any real concern or painter issue. If you come in and you try to then say no no. No you need to do it like this or will. We are software. Does this awesome thing will now. You're using friction into the buying the process because you become that aggressive pushy. Just trying to make a quick buck salesperson. So how do you not do that through a process that I call angle thinking an angle communication. If you've heard that Drake Song essentially you gotta gotta hit them angles. But what I mean in here is in a situation to avoid that friction in a situation where they haven't really presented a pain point. It's going to most offers end detrimental for you if you then just say well no. Here's what we have. It's awesome or hearing. Now here's all you gotta do it right because you don't have the appropriate respect for where they they stand today. What you doing to do is have respect for their current stance. And the way you do that is by angled thinking angle communicating which means and you simply say to them. It sounds like you're doing things this way. Which is which is pretty cool. It's great it's working in these aspects. Have Have you considered this angle before or let me show you a different point of view or I just want to introduce. He's a different type of angle into how you could approach this right. And those types of ways of communicating angle thinking angle communication that form of communication that way of broaching. The topic has respect for where they stand today because effectively effectively. What's happening if you take. This approach is you're not taking away their current stance from them. Right you're simply adding to it. You're saying hey I'm cool with this with how you're doing things now. I want you to consider what's also so over here now. You're not taking away from them. Not taking their composition away. You're just adding to their current position at the same time. What ear effectively doing is getting them to think deeper about their own situation and they will respect you for that if you get them to think deeper br about their situation without disrespecting their situation they will look to you and say. Wow this person's pretty smart. He understands ends. How things are done in this industry in this type of company or or or they he understands the market she understands the market. Well right and that's how how you want them to be thinking because now they will start to pro self probe more into their own situation. And that's where that pain point is GonNa get uncovered and on top of that. They will look at you as the expert who helped uncover that for them. And all you do is ask a question in a different way. All you did was respect where they stand today and not try to take that away from them but add to it.

Raj Nation Rajiv Nathan Founder
"rajiv" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Can achieve certain metrics and along the way you get badges. There's social sharing within the platform so as a user of it pretty cool and now to put together the Science Rajiv is really fascinating fascinating to see how you guys put this together. Yeah we're very excited about it. And the best part is that we have demonstrable results Over years we've been at this for about fifteen years now and we've been able to show some pretty compelling in sustainable behavior change over five six seven years with participant so it really does work well this year. I went to the dentist one more time. Because you guys there you go Rajiv what would you say a time within the last fifteen years at the organization that you guys had a setback and what you learn from it as you may know an entrepreneurship There are setbacks every single day. And it's it's a crazy roller coaster. You know I I started this company. Precursor cursor this company which was called shape up when I was in medical school a twenty three years old and I got very passionate about behavior. Change how to prevent obesity or how to reverse diabetes and I actually dropped out of medical school for three years to build. The company eventually finished my degree but I decided that I wanted to focus on health. Promotion and using technology to scale interventions across crossed arch populations so after medical school instead of going do residency actually went back to the company and continued to invest and grow it and then two years ago we were acquired by Bertram Virgin Pulse in that stayed on as chief medical officer so as you can imagine as a twenty three year old starting a company I knew nothing about how to build an organization and you know about how to build a technology platform learned through the School of hard knocks along the way and made a Lotta mistakes. I think when I look back Rather than sort of picking on one MM particular event. I think one of the big mistakes that we made in our company was. We started to drink our own kool aid. We started the company on the idea that social support is is critical to behavior. Change that nobody will be truly successful at changing their behavior and sustaining that over time unless they modify their social networks that the people around them are supportive in encouraging. Them catching them. When they fall and sort of could've been conducive to their healthy lifestyle Because so often we go into the workplace in our co workers or having muffin often Monday and Bagel Tuesday and Friday. You know we are sabotage each other in that way in. That happens at home as well right so we need that kind of social support. That sort of where a lot of motivation comes in we saw other companies including our competitor virgin pulse focusing quite a bit on extrinsic motivation really kind of financial financial reward so paying people to change their behavior and I think we were very purist about our intrinsic motivation the social social incentives versus financial incentives. There's an we weren't really hard at that for many years in in it it does work and it does create sustainable eight affordable behavior change. But I think because we were so fixated on our own. What idea we fail to see that? The market was evolving and people's ideas were evolving and in fact the research was evolving to say. You know what the answer is not so cut and dry. It's not really one or the the other and in fact if you blend the two intrinsic plus extrinsic motivation you can actually have an even greater impact on people in on their behavior. And so you know. It's funny that we ended up joining forces with virgin pulse and I think we both sort of moved to the center of that spectrum. You know they came from the extrinsic side. We came from the entrance aside and we met in the middle and now our approach is to do both and I think it was a mistake we made and and really kind of just believing that we were right and we were sort of ideological about it and we failed to realize that maybe is. There are other people out there that we're doing things that were valuable as well. We learned that and we really started to thrive we embrace that sort of broader thinking. That's a great message Rajiv and one of the other. Thanks to that that just comes to mind is when you're in that spell because it does become a spell right you get into your head and what is it that you you do Rajiv to get out of it because so many of us do by our own ideas we we do. Eat our own cooking. How do we break out of it and see a fresh perspective perspective? What would you recommend the listeners? I think we have to actually seek out contrarian points of view and so people who we disagree with we have spent time listening to them on understanding. What what they're working on what their research says you know where they're coming from so we spent a lot of time shape listening to learning from our competitors? We go to a lot of conferences and we go to things that we might not otherwise go to because they might not confirm our beliefs they might challenge our beliefs. And that's what we thrive and so I think we've just kind of had to remind ourselves consistently that. Maybe there's a different way. Let's not get stuck in our conventional way of thinking and I think it's that constant challenging ourselves and putting ourselves feels uncomfortable positions that drives us to kind of keep an open mind. Wow fascinating a really great tip there for the listeners. Whether you be an entrepreneur more in in medicine listening or if you're an established executive provider leader in an industry Facet you really have to think and surround yourself with contrarian view sometimes even though it's not the comfort zone it may be what helps you see that blind spot that could potentially be fatal to your business and so really great call out the Reggie. Thank you for sharing that. What would you say one of your proudest medical leadership? Experience to date is so for years. I've been working with populations both an employer groups as well as in the community sort of running these kind of behavior change campaigns fitness challenges and competitions grassroots efforts to help people improve their life and my proudest moments were really when people would come up to me and you know. Even though I wasn't their primary care physician I still think of them as patients but people come up to me and they would say things like you save my life. You know not really you but this program saved my life. You know. I've gone off my medication. I was diabetic. And I've reversed my diabetes season. I'm off my medication. Lost so much weight that my knees no longer hurt and I can walk again. You know I took my grandkids Disneyland for the first time and I was actually able to keep up with them. So it's really those moments and I. There are hundreds of them in my head. The people that I've met that we've actually had an impact on and using technology people we have never met before but using zinc technology and using the science and figuring out a way to sort of engage that we were able to help them and empower them to make small changes led to huge results. And I think those are the proudest just moments you know. I don't know if the call that leadership or not but that's certainly where we get our excitement from working out of bed every morning. Yeah for sure. That's definitely leadership. Reggie even behind behind the motivations that you do this every day. Is there any story that you wanNA share that really got you into this because you have such passion United Behind Passion. There's a story. There are a ton of stories raise for me. When I was the first medical student I was shadowing physicians and working in their clinics and seeing a lot of patients and it just struck me that there were so many patients the majority of them struggling with? How do I lose weight? How do I eat healthy? How do I be physically active? And how do I if I have a condition like hypertension. Ah By blood pressure. How do I lower my cholesterol? We had no tools to help them. We really didn't other than just some sort of empty advice right going to join a gym though. Checkout outweight watchers. We were sort of resigned to the fact that they probably weren't gonNA change their behavior and ultimately we will put them on medication and that would be sort of the end game and that was frustrating to me. Because I knew that people had potential a change and we simply weren't giving them tools and understanding. What would work then? So I really thought how can we prescribe health and wellbeing and is there a resource that we can send people to program that we can give them. That would be truly successful. I couldn't find one and so I created it in that was originally called shape up Rhode Island which was the precursor to our company shape up and now virgin pulse. So that's sort of what my motivation was was. It just didn't feel resigned to the fact that we would have to prescribe medication for everybody. Everybody felt like we should really be focusing on prevention and when I talked to people who did change once in a while we get a patient that would say you know I lost twenty pounds or we the come in and their blood pressure will be down and say what did you do and they always said the same thing. I had an exercise buddy. I formed a group of friends and we motivated each other. My family did this together. It was always. That's social thread. And that was my sort of inspiration to say you know. Let's figure out a way to connect people and this was at the dawn of social media around two thousand four hundred thousand five and I thought maybe we can sort of take a facebook like approach to bring people together online to support each other offline. And that's what we did. That's so awesome and listeners dare to be the change you wish to see in the world and Rajiv found himself in the situation where he just didn't accept the fact that empty promises we're going to be he would he gave patients and he thought bigger he saw a couple of things at work in Iran with it. So I think Rajiv embodies that quote is he was the change that he he wished to see in the health world and with that has been an amazing ripple effect of better outcomes for patients stories that continue to come in to his inbox of people's lives that he's changing so the question is what can you do. What do you today find unacceptable and health? And what are you GonNa do about about it. Because it's doable. You just gotTa move it little by little. And it'll eventually get their Rajiv. What would you say an exciting project or focus that you guys are working on today? We're spending a lot of time. Around artificial intelligence we believe that one of the keys to motivating people will be giving them personalized highly relevant recommendations nations things that they can do and so we're trying to use artificial intelligence to learn about people over time and also to learn what makes people successful over time. So we've got millions of people on our are software. They use our mobile application on average three times a day. We're collecting seven billion data points every single month everything from biometric results to health risk assessment results..

Rajiv obesity Bertram Virgin Pulse diabetes Rhode Island School of hard Reggie facebook Iran
"rajiv" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We work with large employers all around the world and our our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system. A little bit and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate rotate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction it really is about. How do we help? People be healthier happier and more Productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners. For those of you. who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse? It's one of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentlemen like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team you you can imagine. Some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir. Richard Branson's leadership in his philosophy. Is If you take care of your employees. They'll take care curb your business and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees so strong and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and Aside from labor costs it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits that front. What are your thoughts on? What should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well I'm biased. But I think it has to be a behavior change too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity diabetes and heart disease as in our country and at the end of the day. There's so much we can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet our physical activity or lack thereof the stress is that we have in our lives. Just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic. I think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie what would you say right right now at at at Virgin pulse is an example of how you guys are improving. Health outcomes. Well I think we really tried to think. Outside of the box I think traditional health interventions inventions and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective. And they've been around for decades so we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people people feel like. They're failures rather than telling them that they're sick. What if we actually make them feel successful? What if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat? What would that do for self esteem for their motivation? And for the ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth. And the problem with that is they take a health risk. Assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk. Your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure..

Sir Richard Branson Virgin pulse Virgin Group Rajiv Reggie
Reproducing Deep Learning Models

Data Skeptic

09:34 min | 2 years ago

Reproducing Deep Learning Models

"I'm Rajiv Shah I'm a data scientist within a robot I'm also an assistant adjunct professor the University of Illinois Chicago so we're going to the fields that study earthquakes and things like that my background doesn't overlap with any earthquake studies but I do have quite a bit of a variety of background where I started off is an engineering didn't WanNa do engineering wet and studied philosophy studied law ended up getting a communications PhD did research for a number of years as an academic back then later switched over into data science and of worked at places like State Farm Caterpillar and then my Kern employer is data robot in terms of like deep learning are there any particular I know it can be applied so many places do you have a particular affinity for applying it to any types of problems or industries or things like that you know there's so many as you can do with deep learning I've played around with deep learning for example applying it to motion data that comes out of the NBA where players move around the court lots of other cool things you can do with images with video as well for example the motion tracking of how you can watch how people's arms and legs move in those posed let's think are totally fascinating a cool so I'll ask a somewhat rhetorical question but is all this deep learning stuff for real is a smoke and mirrors a can this technology really things for us the power of deep learning has really enabled us to now build so much better predictive models when it comes to areas like images video so what's unlocked a lot but on the other hand it hasn't overtaken everything one of the things we often teach folks to do is we often start with a very simple model then go to a more complex model in the cases of areas like images and videos simple models just don't work that well compared to the more complex deep learning models makes sense so as you've pointed out we've seen some really amazing developments from this science but certainly it's not a miracle cure which kind of leads us into our primary discussion Paper came out in nature that caught your attention for those who may not have read it could you share a quick synopsis of what you read there this was a paper published in nature and it used deep learning to study aftershock patterns following large earthquakes and so the idea here was we had different data about earthquakes we wanted to be able to classify identify whether or not aftershocks are likely to happen so I don't have a sufficient background in that area to really kind of just it from first principles if someone said they were using deep learning to predict lottery numbers I can discount it immediately if they said they were using it to predict the stock market I'M GONNA scratch my head for a while what was your impression about the possibility of using deep learning to solve problems like this no I was very excited when I read the paper being able to take deep learning to be able to solve a very complex phenomena like earthquakes but what happened is as soon as I started taking a look kind of a careful look at the paper I noticed that although they jumped straight to using a six layer deep learning neural network they didn't include things that typically most data scientists include such as a baseline model that simple starting point and how much better their model is then that simple starting point and so that got me kind of scratching my head wondering how much value was the deep learning model adding in this case Gotcha so that process you're describing of start with the simple model seems like skipped ahead in this paper is that one way to look at it yeah exactly that's that's how I kind of read it when I didn't see any simple baselines or that one thing that doesn't I get asked about deep learning because it sort of purports to do feature engineering for you in a way but machine learning one of its the big challenges are big secrets to making it work in my experience has been very clever feature engineering did they do anything like that or do you have a sense even in general if someone working on a simple model what sorts of things is might they wanna know that would be helpful in predicting earthquakes so this is an area where I was out of my domain. I'm not earthquake researcher so having that local knowledge at subject matter expertise to be able to figure out what types of features to engineer for example to improve the performance of this was something outside of my scope okay so I think I'm trying to think of comparable problems I started thinking about the weather and it's you know it's apples to oranges in a way but if someone said predict the weather tomorrow I would give them a lot of plausibility if they said they could predict the weather on today's date ten years from now much harder hill the swallow can we explore the gravity of the claims made in the paper what exactly were they. Predicting the paper isn't just trying to predict the likelihood of an earth quake which you might see something like a weather event which might be very difficult to predict but they were looking at aftershock patterns after a large earthquake the business a bit more of a tractable problem to be able to use a predictive model for I've seen a lot of projects which are sort of they begin as copy and paste jobs right you take her has netter some established deep learning architecture and you throw it at a problem and maybe you volve it I'm not saying that's the right technique that's technique I often see followed did this six layer model that they were using did it follow any of those patterns that listeners might be familiar with so for someone inclined to use deep learning that the the approach that they use was not unexpected in terms of using tools like carris to build a neural network maybe repeatedly adding layers until got a suitably high performance Gotcha end what did they report that empirically in terms of the results they generated so there was a number of different results that they generated but with him was a metric for how accurate the model was with an a you see of about point eight five eight UC is one of those numbers that I know it's definition it kind of like a Pearson's are coefficient I never know sort of what context to put that in could you in layman's term say like the impressiveness of the model or something along those lines well I think the impressiveness always comes from when you have another benchmark to compare it so here the UC of point eight five was appeared to kind of a naive benchmark of a very simple physical model approach so not a machine learning model but a physical model approach that had a benchmark of about point five eight and you see for those folks that are unfamiliar with they you see the quick synopsis of it as you see goes between point five for random to one for we've completely predicted every instance correctly so that difference between point five eight two point eight five is a sizable jumping performance yeah absolutely in fact one that we don't often see without incremental jumps in my experience if I think of things like image net or whatnot so when they were reporting all those details you pointed out something that was especially interesting to me how did the training and test sets turn out in terms of performance after I read the paper I started to dig into it a little bit because I want to see could for example improve upon the performance of the model as I started digging into it one of the things I noticed is that when I built the models that the performance on my test said actually was much higher than the training set and this is the train test set that the authors had used now for those folks who have done machine learning for a while no that that performance the much higher on your tests that data which your algorithm hasn't seen before is much better than what you've trained on that's an issue that's kind of a very yellow red flag that there's something going on wrong with your model your models shouldn't be able to learn more than you've already taught it although I have found that uh-huh deep learning practitioners have a a bit of folk wisdom that especially I see this and the image recognition community that the network is sort of a louder expected to over fit just a little bit in the sense that maybe you know if you're doing some sort of face project with faces it's actually going to over fit slash memorize of those faces while at the same time learning the underlying manifold of of features if you will and so I don't know if you approve of that point of view but do you find that that's is common and if so would you give a certain amount of slack maybe not as much as the authors wanted to take but how much slack do you think before we get the yellow flag yeah ah that's a little bit of a different thing over fitting is when we learn and memorize training data but then when we try the new data it doesn't work as well here was the opposite when the model learned the trading data it actually did much better when we gave it new test data the reason for this is what we call leakage that there's been some information that has leaked between the training time over to the test time and that's what's causing a much higher performance the test set and are there any formal ways we can measure that leakage typically one of the techniques says we just look at that difference in performance I mean anytime your model Doug better on data hasn't seen before compared to the data it has been is a red flag

Rajiv Shah University Of Illinois Chicago Assistant Adjunct Professor Researcher Scientist Engineer Ten Years
"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

Daily Sales Tips

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

"You're listening to the daily sales tips podcast. I'm your host Scott Ingram today's tip comes from Rajiv Nathan otherwise the first slide and say hey today we are here to talk about how we believe you can get to X Y and Z point headquartered in Detroit Michigan Four Hundred Twenty Employees Yada Yada Yada these awards or something to that effect maybe another version but that logic actually works against us because essentially what we're doing is asking someone to sit down for fifteen twenty maybe even forty aspect of your presentation and that is your introduction and this is something I had to learn the hard way from doing it the wrong way several times over our specific components of the presentation that you can modify to ultimately have the best results today I'm going to focus on one specific how most people will start sales presentation by showing a slide of a bunch of logos of their minutes to just hear US talk about ourselves and think about in any other context you've been in how much have you enjoyed being in a conversation and we have this tendency to make it all about us right we're pitching the perspective customer on are services. EVATT introductory slide might be like your technology capabilities and that's how most companies started sales presentation because they think it's impressing the other so we design a whole presentation built around our ability and our capacity to deliver on a product or service nights or that slide we'll talk about it will be a photo of where the company is headquartered and it'll be like Asian with someone where all they do is talk about themselves so that same logic applies to sales presentations and on top of that there are that's so vitally important it is because the I'll give you an analogy think about when you were a kid and you're by doing these things and then after you do that then you can reset and say so to get there here's what we need to understand first and then you build up the story slide after of course your cover slide your I lied should actually be providing them with the destination my college marketing professor race slide by slide to ultimately return to that destination towards the end of the presentation but give them the destination. I and here's why a person but the reality is the other person's not there to hear you talk about your own accolades the other person is there to figure out if you you are capable of solving their problem so naturally even if you do understand that the next course of action people take if they're going to modify their presentation and cut out those slides I mentioned before is try to build some type of anticipation they will work on an element is to say give them the gift and that's what you WanNa do you WanNa give them the gift I whatever is The big vision you are pitching them make that screaming the whole way through you don't want to make your prospective customers the latter case a story which is great that's what you WanNa sales presentation however where this differs then say your traditional story book is that your I'm excited to give them an anchor to logically to mentally hang onto so that the rest of the presentation makes sense if you will so start with your destination and then navigate them with with your quote unquote directions to ultimately get their show them disneyworld out of the gate to get to be able to ultimately figure out where we're going right give them the destination I when you type something into Google maps you have to have a destination to know the directions to get there with you after you're done downloading that make sure you come see us tomorrow for another great sales tip thanks for listening

Rajiv Nathan Scott Ingram Detroit professor Michigan
"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

Daily Sales Tips

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Daily Sales Tips

"<music> you're listening to the daily sales tips podcast and i'm your host scott ingram. Today's tip comes from rajiv nathan otherwise wise known as raj nation raj nation is the founder of startup hype man where he helps startups not suck at how they pitch and tell their story so they standout to customers and stand apart from their competitors here. He is with today's tip recently. I was speaking at a conference on the importance portent of pitching and how to pitch and all that good stuff and at the end of my talk. There were few minutes leftover for q._n._a. Now one person raise their hands and asked me what to do when you actually have multiple products and multiple audiences is as a result so you don't just sell one product or one service to one narrowly defined market. You've actually got several buyers. You've got several types of buyers and a handful of products or services under your belt as well and my answer to them was it is really about organizing the information that you have in front of you based on the problem set or sets that your audience's experience. Here's what i mean by that a lot of companies when they have multiple audiences will decide to you categorize it based on the products that they sell so let's say it software company selling something to do with like sales and marketing marketing software so they will have their lead generation software and separate from that they will have their marketing attribution software and maybe a third thing they would have would be moderate. Maybe something around like i._t. And how that has to do with the whole thing so what that company would do do in most cases is okay. These are three products who fits into each of these product categories and that is actually a backwards way of thinking thinking about it what you want to do. Instead is categorized based on problems set so there's a company i worked with out of australia australia and they actually believe it or not had nineteen different sub markets or sub audiences and this really was actually actually for only one service they won one piece of software they're providing and they were selling specifically into the wellness practitioner market so think of things like or think of audiences like chiropractors massage therapists psychotherapists. It's personal trainers yoga studios pilates studios things of that nature the general wellness and wellbeing market and they actually add as they identified nineteen different potential buyers between those different disciplines so again what most companies would do is is tried to lump this based on the product they sell the we extra took the opposite approach and we said okay what are the unique problems each of these markets face and after looking at the unique problems the different markets face. We're able to say okay you know what these five markets chiropractors massage therapists and podiatrists and and whatever else they actually all have the same problem problem so they get the same pitch we just swap out chiropractor for podiatrists in my old therapist versus another set of sub audiences that they had so what we do is take those nineteen markets and break it down to about four or five by categorizing it based on the a problem set they experienced and the product was actually not really i mean it was the same product at the end of the day for each individual audience. The key is what is their entry point into that product. What are they thinking about that gets them to the point of considering this product act and that's why we categorize around the problem because if you get that right then you can naturally develop the solution for him and i don't mean develop meeting. You're building something new. I mean logically you develop the solution for them. If they see you understand their problem so when you have multiple audiences categorize them based on the problems that are experienced right don't categorize based on product categorized based on problem and what has helped that company do you know who can remember nineteen pitches right so instead only being able to only having to remember four four or five works really well for them and they've been able to onboard hundreds of practitioners every month onto their platform so if you have multiple audiences nces categorized based on problem not based on product if you'll click over to daily sales dot tips forward slash to thirty one you'll find the video version of this tip the transcript and more about raj nation. You'll also find a special link to his startup hype man website where you can can get a free e book on how to really pitch case studies in your cold outreach to get prospects to take a meeting with you after you're done downloading that make sure you come see us tomorrow for another great sales tip. Thanks for listening.

rajiv nathan australia scott ingram founder
"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:22 min | 3 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rajiv Jane he is the chairman and chief investment officer GQG partners a firm with over twenty four billion dollars in assets under management Rajiv was the twenty twelve Morning Star international manager of the year he runs a number of different funds the Goldman Sachs GQG partners international opportunities fund the partner's emerging market equity fund and the partners U. S. select equity funds last year his global fund was positive while the benchmark was down nine percent over the past twenty years we've seen our performance in all of the areas Rajiv works in between three hundred and four hundred basis points Rajiv Jane welcome to Bloomberg thanks very thanks for having me I'm looking forward to this conversation because you're one of these people who have been shooting the lights out and I think most of the investing public is not very familiar with you or your background which is quite fascinating tell us about your personal history and how you got to running a large asset management firm yeah thanks very so I think for holding the egg I was born in India I grew up in India and I got hooked on the stocks that I was in high school I guess my dad won't keep me busy during summer they gave me some of those as you get older you know stock certificates and dividend checks is a writer tally those and we do it and haven't come in and I used to go to member going to broker and he was an ex army guy and he said look I did talk to dad the one they live he allows a high school kid to come to this broker how's it looking to see the average that our help all the people sitting here so that's how I ended up getting hooked came to US than I was you know twenty one to twenty one twenty two and it never been not doing the same thing ever since I guess I I can't do anything else so let's talk a little about your background it of Montebello asset management you were there for a good couple of years tell us what that shop was like and how that led to the decision to launch your own firm yes so eight it was it was a part of a large Swiss bank and was kind of a small boutique there for us seven eight years they will we could even afford a traitor side to ice to put in my own traits so I joined as a cool PM for global and and emerging markets and international actually in nineteen ninety four and now what's the the most interesting experience I would say would be the I begin to see I owe and two thousand two and quickly seventy percent clients virus yeah why was that well because the past performance wasn't great and there was a change in PM that's my V. O. saying it that I wasn't the one to blame so so you were did you begin as an analyst also had it how did you work your way up to the portfolio manager yes ma'am yes so he started at the at the U. B. S. or Swiss bank corporation then as an analyst and I did become a cool PM and after a couple years so what it this is a question that I've had people ask me you're the person perfect person to ask this what is the difference when you're looking at stocks as an analyst and trying to take an individual equity apart verses making the buyer cell decision as a portfolio manager very different approaches on say yeah look I think I think the asteroid there's a big difference between the two and I will scatter resin to parts of that the first is as an analyst you expected know as much as you can but as a powerful imagine you really don't have that luxury all waiting for getting let's say ninety percent of the information which is normal you can't get to that level of certainty but as an analyst you are expected no more that's a big difference and I think that sometimes when Alice become PM's this are a mess that they keep ending looking for more and more information which you know can can can be you know penalizing the second part is really looking at a portfolio the risk management on the part of the poor for the construction part become paramount you may love the name and actually dental of all the names on the portfolio but any conception portfolio the the you end up taking too much risk in a particular area and I mean if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine Chrysler lot of folks blew up because they had too much in a a because asking because it is because of the love this area and got cheaper and we love it more and kept getting cheaper so you got to be careful about you know and and most time it's the things that we love the kill us so let's talk a little bit about that and portfolio construction I think a lot of individual investors to them portfolio construction is really just the stocks they've collected over the years you obviously approach it very differently how do you think about portfolio construction in terms of what your holdings are in terms of how the diversified by either sector geography and and Leslie about the risk you just mentioned so the first part is that you're going to make sure that the business would be around for long right I mean if you're not sure of the biz gonna look like five years out you probably not should should be invested doesn't anyone for five years but you got to be careful because markets anticipate due to inform them as a lot faster than than V. we like to think if if if the drug is expiring in three years guess for markets are discounting a lot sooner many see bunch of names which are sitting at very low multiples because all of its of years out and it's it's a low multiples ones of for the markets are discounted deterioration right so that's part of the first risk management is that a little bit of a value traps situation for people exactly and I think I think if you look at what has happened last year the reason why a lot of folks have underperformed I feel investing is nothing but a journey a learning from my mistakes if you're not willing to evolve and adapt you won't survive long term it's very easy to say look I found this mouse trap and how wonderful it has worked since nineteen thirties so my question how many analysts around in nineteen eighty eleven nineteen thirties maybe they wanted to come live or efficient so the the little multiple trap is is is essentially markets being much more forward looking then we would be give it credit for coming up we continue our conversation.

Rajiv Jane chairman chief investment officer GQG five years twenty four billion dollars seven eight years seventy percent ninety percent nine percent twenty years three years
"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rajiv Jane he is the chairman and chief investment officer of GQG partners a firm with over twenty four billion dollars in assets under management Rajiv was the twenty twelve Morning Star international manager of the year he runs a number of different funds the Goldman Sachs GQG partners international opportunities fund the partner's emerging market equity fund and the partners U. S. select equity funds last year his global fund was positive while the benchmark was down nine percent over the past twenty years we've seen our performance in all of the areas Rajiv works in between three hundred and four hundred basis points Rajiv chain welcome to Bloomberg thanks very thanks for having me I'm looking forward to this conversation because you're one of these people who have been shooting the lights out and I think most of the investing public is not very familiar with you or your background which is quite fascinating tell us about your personal history and how you got to running a large asset management firm yeah thanks very so I think for full I agree I was born in India group in India and I got hooked on to stocks that I was in high school I guess my dad want to keep me busy during summer they gave me some of those as you get older you know stock certificates and dividend checks is a wider tally those and we do it and haven't come in and I used to go to member going to broker and he was an ex army guy and he said look I did talk to dad the what they live he allows a high school kid to come to this broker how's it looking to see the average is that I don't know all the people sitting here so that's how I ended up getting hooked came to US than I was you know twenty one to twenty one twenty two and I never been not doing the same thing ever since I guess I I can't do anything else so let's talk a little about your background it of Montebello asset management you were there for a good couple of years tell us what that shot was like and how that led to the decision to launch her own firm yes so eat because it was a part of a large Swiss bank and was kind of a small boutique there for us seventy two years they will we could even afford a traitor side to ice to put in my own traits so I joined as a cool PM for global and and emerging markets and international actually in nineteen ninety four and now what's the the most interesting experience I would say would be the I begin to see I owe and two thousand two and quickly seventy percent clients fight us yeah why was that well because the past performance wasn't great and there was a change in PM that's my V. O. saying it that I wasn't the one to blame so so you or did you begin as an analyst also had it how did you work your way up to the portfolio manager yes ma'am yes so he started at the at the U. B. S. or Swiss bank corporation then as an analyst and I did become a cool PM and after a couple years so what it this is a question that I've had people ask me you're the person perfect person to ask this what is the difference when you're looking at stocks as an analyst in trying to take an individual equity apart verses making the buyer cell decision as a portfolio manager very different approaches on thank yeah look I think I think the asteroid there's a big difference between the two and I will scatter resin to parts of that the first is as an analyst you expected know as much as you can but as a powerful imagine you really don't have that luxury all waiting for getting let's say ninety percent of the information which is normal you can to get to that level of certainty but as an analyst you are expected no more that's a big difference and I think that sometimes even Alice become PM's this on a miss that they keep ending looking for more and more information which you know can can can be you know paralyzing the second part is really looking at a portfolio the risk management on the part of the poor for the construction part become paramount you may love the name and actually dental all the names on the portfolio but any constructing portfolio the the you end up taking too much risk in a particular area and I mean if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine Chrysler lot of four's blew up because they had too much in a a because waited rescue because it is because of the love this area and got cheaper and we love it more and kept getting cheaper so you got to be careful about you know and and most time it's the things that we love the kill us so let's talk a little bit about that and portfolio construction I think a lot of individual investors to them portfolio construction is really just the stocks they've collected over the years you obviously approach it very differently how do you think about portfolio construction in terms of what your holdings are in terms of how the diversified by either sector geography and and Leslie about the risk you just mentioned so the first part is that you're going to make sure that the business would be around for long term right and then if you're not sure of the biz gonna look like five years out you probably not should be should be invested does anyone for five years but you got to be careful because markets anticipate due to inform the mills a lot faster than than be we like to think if if if the drug is expiring in three years guess for Marcus are discounting a lot sooner many see bunch of names which are sitting at very low multiples because all of its of years out and it's it's a low multiples ones of for the markets are discounted deterioration right so that's part of the first risk management is that a little bit of a value traps situation for people exactly and I think I think if you look at what has happened last year the reason why a lot of folks have underperformed and I feel investing is nothing but a journey a learning from my mistakes if you're not willing to evolve and adapt you won't survive long term it's very easy to say look I found this mouse trap and how wonderful it has worked since nineteen thirties so my question of how many analysts around in nineteen eighties let alone nineteen thirties maybe they wanted to come live or efficient so the the little multiple trap is is is essentially markets being much more forward looking then we would be give it credit for coming up we continue our conversation with Rajiv Jane chairman and.

Rajiv Jane chairman chief investment officer GQG five years twenty four billion dollars seventy two years seventy percent ninety percent nine percent twenty years three years
"rajiv" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Rajiv Jane he is the chairman and chief investment officer of GQG partners a firm with over twenty four billion dollars in assets under management Rajiv was the twenty twelve Morning Star international manager of the year he runs a number of different funds the Goldman Sachs GQG partners international opportunities fund the partner's emerging market equity fund and the partners U. S. select equity funds last year his global fund was positive while the benchmark was down nine percent over the past twenty years we've seen our performance in all of the areas Rajiv works in between three hundred and four hundred basis points Rajiv Jane welcome to Bloomberg thanks very thanks for having me I'm looking forward to this conversation because you're one of these people who have been shooting the lights out and I think most of the investing public is not very familiar with you or your background which is quite fascinating tell us about your personal history and how you got to running a large asset management firm thanks very so I think for holding the egg I was born in India group in India and I got hooked on the stocks that I was in high school I guess my dad won't keep me busy during summer they gave me some of those as you get older you know stock certificates and dividend checks is a writer tally those and we didn't have in common and I used to go to member going to broker and he was an ex army guy and he said look I did talk to dad the what they live he allows a high school kid to come to this broker how's it looking to see the average is that I don't know all the people sitting here so that's how I ended up getting helped came to US than I was you know twenty one to twenty one twenty two and I never been not doing the same thing ever since I guess I I can't do anything else so let's talk a little about your background it of Montebello asset management you were there for a good couple of years tell us what that shop was like and how that led to the decision to launch your own firm yes so it it was it was a part of a large Swiss bank and was kind of a small boutique there forced seven eight years they will we could even afford a tender side to ice to put in my own traits so I joined as a call for global and and emerging markets and international actually in nineteen ninety four and what's the the most interesting experience I would say would be the I begin to see I owe and two thousand two and quickly seventy percent clients virus yeah why was that well because the past performance wasn't great and there was a change in PM that's my V. O. saying it that I wasn't the one to blame so so you or did you begin as an analyst also had it how did you work your way up to the portfolio manager yeah yeah yeah so he started at at the U. B. S. or Swiss bank corporation then as an analyst and I did become a cool PM and after a couple years so what it this is a question that I've had people ask me you're the person perfect person to ask this what is the difference when you're looking at stocks as an analyst in trying to take an individual equity apart verses making the buyer cell decision as a portfolio manager very different approaches on thank yeah look I think I think the asteroid there's a big difference between the two and I will scatter resin to parts of that the first is as an analyst you expected know as much as you can but as a powerful imagine you really don't have that luxury all waiting for getting let's say ninety percent of the information which is normal you can't get to that level of certainty but as an analyst you are expected no more that's a big difference and I think that sometimes even Alice become PM's this are a mess that they keep ending looking for more and more information which you know can can can be you know paralyzing the second part is really looking at a portfolio the risk management on the part of the poor for the construction part become paramount you may love the name and actually dental of all the names on the more fully on but any conception portfolio the the you end up taking too much risk in a particular area and I mean if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine Chrysler lot of folks blew up because they had too much in a a because it a risky because it is because of the love this area and got cheaper and we love to do more and kept getting cheaper so you got to be careful about you know and and most time it's the things that we love that kill us so let's talk a little bit about that and portfolio construction I think a lot of individual investors to them portfolio construction is really just the stocks they've collected over the years you obviously approach it very differently how do you think about portfolio construction in terms of what your holdings are in terms of how the diversified by either sector a geography and and Leslie about the risk you just mentioned so the first part is that you're going to make sure that the business would be around for long right I mean if you're not sure of the biz gonna look like five years out you probably not should be should be invested doesn't he only for five years but you got to be careful because markets anticipate due to inform the mills a lot faster than than V. like to thank if if if the drug is expiring in three years guess for markets are discounting a lot sooner many see bunch of names which are sitting at very low multiples because all of its a few years out and it's it's a low multiple zones of for the markets are discounted deterioration right so that's part of the first risk management is that a little bit of a value traps situation for people exactly and I think I think if you look at what has happened last year the reason why a lot of folks have underperformed I feel investing is nothing but a journey a learning from my mistakes if you're not willing to evolve and adapt you will survive long term it's very easy to say look I found this mouse trap and how wonderful it as well the nineteen thirties so my question how many analysts around in nineteen eighties let alone nineteen thirties maybe they wanted to come live or efficient so the the little multiple trap is is is essentially markets being much more forward looking then we would be give.

Rajiv Jane chairman chief investment officer GQG five years twenty four billion dollars seven eight years seventy percent ninety percent nine percent twenty years three years
"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rajiv Jane he is the chairman and chief investment officer of GQG partners a firm with over twenty four billion dollars in assets under management Rajiv was the twenty twelve Morning Star international manager of the year he runs a number of different funds the Goldman Sachs GQG partners international opportunities fund the partner's emerging market equity fund and the partners U. S. select equity funds last year his global fund was positive while the benchmark was down nine percent over the past twenty years we've seen our performance in all of the areas Rajiv works in between three hundred and four hundred basis points Rajiv Jane welcome to Bloomberg thanks very thanks for having me I'm looking forward to this conversation because you're one of these people who have been shooting the lights out and I think most of the investing public is not very familiar with you or your background which is quite fascinating tell us about your personal history and how you got to running a large asset management firm thanks very so I think for holding the egg I was born in India group in India and I got hooked on the stocks that I was in high school I guess my dad won't keep me busy during summer they gave me some of those as you get older you know stock certificates and dividend checks is a wider tally those and be given haven't come in and I used to go to member going to broker and he was an ex army guy and he said look I did talk to dad the what they live he allows a high school kid to come to the broker how's it looking to see the average is that I don't know all the people sitting there so that's how I ended up getting hooked came to US than I was you know twenty one to twenty one twenty two and yeah we're not doing the same thing ever since I guess I I can't do anything else so let's talk a little about your background Montebello asset management you were there for a good couple of years tell us what that shot was like and how that led to the decision to launch her own firm yes so it it was it was a part of a large Swiss bank and was kind of a small boutique there for us seven eight years they will we could even afford a traitor side to ice to put in my own traits so I joined as a cool PM for global and and emerging markets and international actually in nineteen ninety four and now what's the the most interesting experience I would say would be the I begin to see I owe and two thousand two and quickly seventy percent of clients virus yeah why was a will to the past performance wasn't great and there was a change in PM that's my V. O. saying it that I wasn't the one to blame so so you were did you begin as an analyst also had it how did you work your way up to portfolio manager yeah yeah yeah so he started at the at the U. B. S. or Swiss bank corporation then as an analyst and I did become a cool PM and after a couple years so what it this is a question that I've had people ask me you're the person perfect person to ask this what is the difference when you're looking at stocks as an analyst and trying to take an individual equity apart verses making the buyer cell decision as a portfolio manager very different approaches on thank yeah look I think I think the asteroid there's a big difference between the two and I will scatter resin to parts of that the first is as an analyst you expected know as much as you can but as a powerful imagine you really don't have that luxury all waiting for getting let's say ninety percent of the information which is normal you can't get to that level of certainty but as an analyst you are expected no more that's a big difference and I think that sometimes even Alice become PM's this are a mess that they keep ending looking for more and more information which you know can can can be you know paralyzing the second part is really looking at a portfolio the risk management on the part of the poor for the construction part become paramount you may love the name and actually dental of all the names on the portfolio but any conception portfolio the the you may end up taking too much risk in a particular area and I mean if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine Chrysler lot of folks blew up because they had too much in a a because that's where the risk is because it is because of the love this area and got cheaper and we love to do more and kept getting cheaper so you got to be careful about you know and and most time it's the things that we love the kill us so let's talk a little bit about that and portfolio construction I think a lot of individual investors to them portfolio construction is really just the stocks they've collected over the years you obviously approach it very differently how do you think about portfolio construction in terms of what your holdings are in terms of how the diversified by either sectoral geography and and Leslie about the risk you just mentioned so the first part is that you're going to make sure that the business would be around for long right I mean if you're not sure of the biz gonna look like five years out you probably not should be should be invested doesn't own for five years but you got to be careful because markets anticipate due to inform the melt a lot faster than than be like to think that if if if the drug is expiring in three years guess for markets are discounting a lot sooner many see bunch of names which are sitting at very low multiples because all of its of years out and it's it's a low multiples ones of for the markets are discounted deterioration right so that's part of the first risk management is that a little bit of a value traps situation for people exactly and I think I think if you look at what has happened last year the reason why a lot of folks have underperformed and I feel investing is nothing but a journey a learning from my mistakes if you're not willing to be involved in and that you would survive long term it's very easy to say look I found this mouse trap and how wonderful it as well since nineteen thirties so my question of how many M. was around in nineteen eighty let alone nineteen thirties maybe they wanted to go live efficient so the the little multiple trap is is is essentially markets being much more forward looking then we would be give it credit.

Rajiv Jane chairman chief investment officer GQG five years twenty four billion dollars seven eight years seventy percent ninety percent nine percent twenty years three years
"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:24 min | 3 years ago

"rajiv" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rajiv Jane he is the chairman and chief investment officer GQG partners a firm with over twenty four billion dollars in assets under management Rajiv was the twenty twelve Morning Star international manager of the year he runs a number of different funds the Goldman Sachs GQG partners international opportunities fund the partner's emerging market equity fund and the partners U. S. select equity funds last year his global fund was positive while the benchmark was down nine percent over the past twenty years we've seen our performance in all of the areas Rajiv works in between three hundred and four hundred basis points Rajiv Jane welcome to Bloomberg thanks very thanks for having me I'm looking forward to this conversation because you're one of these people who have been shooting the lights out and I think most of the investing public is not very familiar with you or your background which is quite fascinating tell us about your personal history and how you got to running a large asset management firm yeah thanks very so I think for holding the egg I was born in India group in India and I got hooked on the stocks that I was in high school I guess my dad won't keep me busy during summer they gave me some of those as you get older you know stock certificates and dividend checks is a writer tally those and we do it and haven't come in and I used to go to member going to broker and he was an ex army guy and he said look I did talk to dad the what they live he allows a high school kid to come to this broker how's it looking to see the average is that I don't know all the people sitting here so that's how I ended up getting hooked came to US than I was you know twenty one to twenty one twenty two and yeah we're not doing the same thing ever since I guess I I can't do anything else so let's talk a little about your background of Montebello asset management you were there for a good couple of years tell us what that shot was like and how that led to the decision to launch her own firm yes so either because it was a part of a large Swiss bank and was going to a small boutique there for us seven eight years they will we could even afford a traitor side to ice to put in my own traits so I joined as a cool PM for global and and emerging markets and international actually in nineteen ninety four and what's the the most interesting experience I would say would be the I begin to see I owe and two thousand two and quickly seventy percent clients virus yeah why was that well because the past performance wasn't great and there was a change in PM that's my V. O. saying it that I'm always the one to blame so so you or did you begin as an analyst also had it how did you work your way up to the portfolio manager yeah yeah yeah so he started at the at the U. B. S. or Swiss bank corporation then as an analyst and I did become a cool PM and after a couple years so what it this is a question that I've had people ask me you're the person perfect person to ask this what is the difference when you're looking at stocks as an analyst and trying to take an individual equity apart verses making the buyer cell decision as a portfolio manager very different approaches on thank yeah look I think I think the asteroid there's a big difference between the two and I will scatter resin to parts of that the first is as an analyst you expected know as much as you can but as a powerful imagine you really don't have that luxury all waiting for getting let's say ninety percent of the information which is normal you can to get to that level of certainty but as an analyst you are expected no more that's a big difference and I think that sometimes when Alice become PM's this are a mess that they keep ending looking for more and more information which you know can can can be you know paralyzing the second part is really looking at a portfolio the risk management on the part of the portfolio construction part become paramount you may love the name and actually dental of all the names on the portfolio but any conception portfolio the the you end up taking too much risk in a particular area and I mean if you go back to two thousand eight two thousand nine Chrysler lot of folks blew up because they had too much in a a because way to rescue because it is because of the love this area and got cheaper and we love to do more and kept getting cheaper so you got to be careful about you know and and most time it's the things that we love they kill us so let's talk a little bit about that and portfolio construction I think a lot of individual investors to them portfolio construction is really just the stocks they've collected over the years you obviously approach it very differently how do you think about portfolio construction in terms of what your holdings are in terms of how the diversified by either sector geography and and Leslie about the risk you just mentioned so the first part is that you're going to make sure that the business would be around for long right I mean if you're not sure of the biz gonna look like five years out you probably not should be should be invested does anyone for five years but you got to be careful because markets anticipate due to inform the mills a lot faster than than me like to think if if if the drug is expiring in three years guess for markets are discounting a lot sooner many see bunch of names which are sitting at very low multiples because all of its of years out and it's it's a low multiples ones of for the markets are discounted deterioration right so that's part of the first risk management is that a little bit of a value traps situation for people exactly and I think I think if you look at what has happened last year the reason why a lot of folks have underperformed I feel investing is nothing but a journey a learning from my mistakes if you're not willing to evolve and adapt you won't survive long term it's very easy to say look I found this mouse trap and how wonderful it has worked since nineteen thirties so my question how many analysts around in nineteen eighties let alone nineteen thirties maybe they wanted to go live efficient so the the little multiple trap is is is essentially markets being much more forward looking then we would be give it credit for coming up we continue our conversation with Rajiv Jane chairman and chief investment officer of.

Rajiv Jane chairman chief investment officer GQG five years twenty four billion dollars seven eight years seventy percent ninety percent nine percent twenty years three years
SoftBank's Son remakes his inner circle with three newcomers

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

04:07 min | 4 years ago

SoftBank's Son remakes his inner circle with three newcomers

"And it's nine thirty in the morning here in hong kong i'm bryan curtis and i'm doug krizner at bloomberg world headquarters in new york so we've got action underway now in hong kong where the hang sang is higher by three tenths of one percents shanghai composite though remaining bit on the back foot here we're down about two tenths of one percent after falling three point eight percent in the prior session other markets trading mixed we'll take a closer look coming up right now this hour's top business stories yeah we did get quite a lot weaker fix from the c at six point four five eight six versus the dollar versus six forty two thirty five so we'll keep an eye and see how much that weekend's right now we've got the offshore at six forty seven o eight let's get to some of these top stories starbucks shares down nearly two percent in late trading the coffee chain saying it expects global same store sales to rise just one percent this quarter that's way less than a two point nine percent that analysts were looking for in the meantime bloomberg intelligence says the rising trade tensions between the us and china may way on starbucks ambitious plans in that country and starbucks was not alone we had oracle slipping more than three percent in late us trading the software giant is forecasting profit for the current quarter well below what the street was forecasting it may be a sign that oracle is struggling to pivot to cloud computing soft bank's top executive is remaking his inner circle we have the story with bloomberg's rainy asensio founder masayoshi sun is elevating to execs and one outsider the board is set to approve marcello clarify rajiv mizra in katsunori saga as executive vice president this is the biggest overhaul in soft bank's top management since song brought in google execs in twenty fourteen tick off the telecom giants transformation into a strategic holdings company sawn has not named a successor but his previously said he plans to retire in sixties he turned sixty one this august rainy in incensio asia and the last remaining original member of the dow jones industrial average is kinda getting kicked out this would be general electric the is being replaced by walgreens boots ge was part of the average back in eighteen ninety six along with companies like distilling and cattle feeding national lead and us rubber it briefly left the index but it has been continuously there since about nineteen o seven last year if you're wondering ge's stock was down forty seven percent while the dow in terms of the industrial average was up about twenty five percent where thirtythree past the hour let's get you caught up on early trading in the asian session particularly were hong kong is concerned the hang sang is now higher by four tenths of one percents shanghai composite though down about three tenths of one percent we're looking at the onshore chinese currency at six forty six sixty five with a gain of about three tenths of one percent against the dollar offshore were trading six forty seven thirty six so we're seeing a strengthening in the offshore you want after some weakness that had us at six forty eight handle earlier the end kind of holding steady bev we had a big move to the strong side in the new york session right now we're trading one ten zero three in dollar yen the nikkei is down about two tenths of one percent a lot of what i will describe as risk off in markets during the us session the haven trade benefited treasuries in terms of lower yields we had tenure to eighty nine in late us trading and that's where we find ourselves right now in the tokyo session the two year at two fifty four so we're continuing to see about thirty five basis points in that two to ten year spread we've got an opec meeting this week in vienna and some debate as to whether or not there is going to be kind of a concerted effort to reduce output there has been conflicting signals on that front wti in the new york session was down one point two percent right now in the electron accession are higher by about four tenths of one percent at sixty five thirty in seoul the kospi is ahead six tenths of one percent korean won against.

Bryan Curtis Doug Krizner Hong Kong Bloomberg World One Percent Two Percent Forty Seven Percent Twenty Five Percent Eight Percent Three Percent Nine Percent Ten Year Two Year
Nipah virus outbreak claims three lives in India

BBC Newshour

02:20 min | 4 years ago

Nipah virus outbreak claims three lives in India

"And supposedly safe spaces where individuals could live their lives cook dinners do the homework feed their dogs host their friends and their families to see their work in we'll come home from work to it was a human space for human lives each unique there's been international condemnation of venezuela's presidential election which saw nncholas maduro reelected in a landslide but with the lowest turnout in decades washington called it a sham and threatened sanctions against venezuela's allimportant oil sector most opposition politicians are either in jail or by car to the vote mr medeiros main challenger and refile cone described the election as flawed and called for a rerun the authorities in india have sent a team of medical experts to the southern state of kerala to investigate the outbreak of rare deadly infection the nipah virus three people from the same family died after contracting it this symptoms include fever vomiting and headaches making the virus hard to diagnose carolina's health secretary rajiv sadan says fruit bats of the primary source for the virus trying to draw blood samples from these widely by and testing for antibodies to find do this they are inside the second host are the domestic animals especially pigs dogs cats and so on and what we do know is that that has been human to human transmission the world health organization says it's much better place to deal with the current ebola outbreak then it wasn't twenty fourteen when thousands of people died in west africa but tetris at hannam said it was worrying that the diseases spread to a major city in the democratic republic of congo forty five cases if a bulla have been reported in congo at least twenty six people are believed to have died officials in the democratic republic of congo say ten people have been killed in an insurgent attack in the east they said the assault and the benny region was carried out by a ugandan rebel group the allied democratic forces world news from the bbc this is wnyc i'm shumita basu in.

Assault Benny West Africa Ebola Secretary Washington Maduro Shumita Basu BBC Venezuela Congo Rajiv Sadan Carolina Kerala India