31 Burst results for "Rahul"

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

02:06 min | 7 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"Find us at. Www dot design. Heal dot on You know we open a range of services as we've discussed the audacity So anybody had any kind of a a requirement creative or design or printing work. They can actually use our services and it's very easy to firemen all the services of easley's leeann down on our own verbiage on orlando's and thicken Explored them At the same time as i had mentioned over twenty four seven customers or so. You know there's a life chat option if anybody has any series or anything We have Customer service agents and a man all the diamond can in order to be happy to answer Aside as i'm concerned i'm i'm not available person but i'm hunting s o You know if anybody has any questions and somebody needs any advisor to more than willing to do that and they can just reach out. We only i long island designed. Thank you ever who will be making do with every coal the links back to your wonderful business design dot com for being on the call as long as well as closing out the call by saying definitely.

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

03:57 min | 7 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"So i think the biggest benefit of for this ad in the beginning this People in technology space Because we are able to manage adopt and a committed very easily and been benefiting from that. But i cannot say that or almost for other industries. Because i'm sure there were people can't be off line. Yeah oh absolutely. Thank you so very much for sharing all of the grinding sorts and points of view that you have this route who now. I'd like to ask you given that. Things are changing so quickly and evolving sir. Quickly with technology i guess presumably in the technology spice predominantly. What can you say happening over the next decade me to predict or say something around that i don't know if i know it'll come to bite me back but we acknowledge are changing exponentially you know. Every two three years we see some a new product come into the market In every form of life that you don't nobody would have thought about like if you just go back five years You'd have thought you're going to have You know airbnb at all of these. Maybe five six years back but it also changed the landscape completely of industries. A new degrees and new industries have been so again so with the i it is able to make a lot of impacted is only making the non of impact And it just. I feel that you know. The three d. printing biz additive manufacturing. There's a lot that is changing now in all the which is changing the way traditional industries and businesses Your own. I'm going to be impacted so we definitely going to see a lot of change in the next. I've and years. I've seen humans have to adopt and they have to be very careful about what which they're digging today because Obviously the full of these companies that are large hugely investing into these new technologies awful particular sectors for example. You know i'm only a few days back. I was looking at a A documentary and what and there was The the developing these robots that can actually basically serve food on qsr jeans Mcdonagh's king and then making the cocktails and in old woman. Serving sodas and everything so thinking about the impact that can have that that they can make same thing we saw was of because we had in the printing space as well. We've been basically all types of merchandise and And now actually knitting t shirts printing them and dispatching them on their own. They're the company that's doing it. So if you think about amano workforce that there it goes in who actually manufacturing de shirts. I mean you know all of that is going to be my out and is going to have a huge impact on off in the next five ten years nope not only as users we. We are gonna be you know. There's going to be an artist change but even industries and businesses in. Oh you don't wanna be blindsided to what is happening around you and that is why it's really important to be aware about what what how the landscape is. Changing one of the new technologies that are coming up so that you can be best prepared or you can avert and you know Change your the way you do. Your business nikki. Very very knowledgeable very much on the pointy end as it were very passionate individuals with along with your siblings. And it's a credit to you what you've done designed. He'll i think now coming to the point of the covert who when people want to work with you. Where are they going to find you. And what is the process when they get up. I mean we had an online business. Anybody can.

five years amano five six years back Mcdonagh nikki next decade today two three years next five ten qsr years few days back one
"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

02:04 min | 7 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"They've actually gone back to their homes and the really happy because own they don't have to pay and then removed from their amnesia Don't have to be the logistics. I mean just the transportation that you know. These guys are stealing on a daily basis. That's crazy because in order to take any an average person about an hour and a half to reach office because in order to huge city and The same would happen in the evening now today. They're saving those three hours. So if you look at it from a work life balance perspective from only d of Woke respect and if shinseki perspective eve seem tremendous amount of improvement in You know within teams and within the employee employs and. I think that's something that is here to stay. And it's not going to be very easy for companies to bring those individuals back because being for the fact that today. Okay if they don't If the company doesn't allow them to do it and if the kind of work that they're doing right now they can do it. Also lena managing by objectives and then doing an acceptable quarterly. To stand. And say you sit you know. Why would they be raising on. Even companies scored isn't it. I mean we really honest with you when you have a hundred feet like for example us we have one hundred twenty now You know Issues that are happening in the office and more we know people are you know focusing on their work Because of the rules we have now so we know that efficiency levels are higher able to monitor lord stuff around that and then even for us the cost last right. I mean the cost of You know operating to an office and we had a full floor office and you. It's literally md. Now there's only if you're paying nothing so so that's there so but but i cannot see that funny business because none of people in the manufacturing space or the hospitality speech and they have you gone have that you have looked home..

one hundred today lena three hours about an hour and a half hundred feet twenty
"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:18 min | 7 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"And assets on that bul users to use and all that other person really has to do is going and there i'm name or their own wasn't invited or just information diaper doubt and thousands and thousands of 'em plates or designs that will be available for them. You simply download in in whatever they want to. As usual thing isn't it saves so much time. Yeah exactly and and you know people. Don't have cbs to understand that. There are students in university go schools or they're not people who were doing aside has low. Don't have a dime in oh Businesses they still have to get designed and now they kind of out to an agency auto finance and keep hiding them in the money so early. These people A diy at at the. We'd who and really helped you know because we are giving them that You know that the literal of designs that ideal is ian's a greeted by professionals but they're really blessed and blitz to them so they can just simply editor information on them and they're really high quality really really absolutely. I've seen some of the designs on the website and they are fantastic. There's no doubt about that now. We touched on the pandemic and the impact. It's having on industries. How is the pandemic impacted against the technology space in design sector. I think it's it's only you say that generates it's only been for the better because of the fact that A lot of people have today moved on to doing everything online is in it Not even going to office for example artie. You've been on a welcome home. Eleven months now to office for the next six months and east so But even visit technology company and an underdog people who you know. We've been an offline businesses and other than they're still very happy Working remotely and to what's really happened as people have understood that any kind of collaboration work can be done on..

Eleven months thousands today next six months
"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

04:22 min | 7 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"An extremely extremely important role in marketing. Any business today isn't it. I mean different because if you look at it You know any business today. has has to have an omnipresent has to be omni-present whether they they have to be on social media whether they have to be You know offline In their Merchandise that the You know employs elevating. You have to have consistency in your band. And your bland design and it was really really big role in making an impression on your customers. I mean that's how you really isn't that. How most of the users of estimates differentiate a good product. I'm a bad product without trying out before it out for you. So if you're walking on the street and you'll cross that you most likely not to enter. A restaurant is eighty bag. Signed edge not be a great Aren't even though it might be the best food in the low but you'll rejected at the outset. This is on its design on its branding Similarly if you're working in a grocery store and you pick up Get you bought And you didn't know which one you want to pick up and in these shelves that are hundreds of 'em so you're most likely attracted by the one which is the most appealing which seems the most Elegant in so it's sort of design automatically an impression of already of the abroad out and and it leads that first impression in your customers eyes so therefore it is really important. You know And be seen that shift be seen that shift customer in business entrepreneurs mindsets also when we started out on a lot of people. Were very keen on you. Know spending a lot of money on energies into getting constant randy getting quality designs bid by. Now it's changing because your users are more You know are more educated. You know they Everybody's competing at the competition is very high today. No matter which industry you are and you have.

first impression today eighty bag lot of money hundreds of 'em
Iran summons EU envoys for protesting reporter's hanging

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Iran summons EU envoys for protesting reporter's hanging

"And Iran say the Iranian Foreign Ministry has some of the German ambassador and plans to some of the French envoy as well. Both strongly objected to the hanging yesterday of an Iranian journalist. European Union issued condemnation of yesterday's execution of Paris space reporter Rahul Azzam. He was seized while traveling last year and convicted of fermenting violence during anti government demonstrations in 2017.

Iranian Foreign Ministry Iran Rahul Azzam European Union Paris
Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19

Purity Products

00:26 sec | 10 months ago

Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19

"Is admitting more than 19,000 of its frontline workers have had covert 19 more from Rahul Solomon, that's nearly 1.5% of its total workforce. This disclosure has been solved by labor groups who have criticized Amazons response to the pandemic, saying that the company put employees health at risk by keeping warehouses open. Amazon has added temperature checks, social distancing measures and other safety procedures at its facilities.

Rahul Solomon Amazons Amazon
Woman dies after gang-rape in India, second in a week

BBC Newshour

00:59 sec | 10 months ago

Woman dies after gang-rape in India, second in a week

"Two leaders off the Indian opposition Congress party have been arrested outside Delhi after they set out to meet the parents of a teenage gang rape victim who died from her injuries. Rahul Gandhi and his sister Priyanka was stopped as they attempted to walk across the village walk towards the village of the victim in neighboring utter Pradesh state. His and Barrasso Natarajan. Television pictures showed the Congress Party leader ruffle Gandhi falling to the ground as police officers tried to block its progress. The put up with the state government has imposed restrictions on gatherings in the village off the rape victim was died. Two weeks after she was assaulted. She was from the marginalized the Dalit community who often face discrimination despite laws that protect them. There has been a national outcry over the incident on India's governing Hindu nationalist B. J. P has been criticized for failing to act after the rape. Protests have been held in several places for a second day over the incident

Rape Rahul Gandhi Indian Opposition Congress Ruffle Gandhi Congress Party Barrasso Natarajan Delhi India Priyanka B. J. P
"rahul" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:29 min | 11 months ago

"rahul" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So I actually think we can do better than that's going to reveal exactly how but positive how we plan to do it is by leveraging weather simply because the stuff isn't easy, you call to run machine learning the very least influence muddles on hardware and to do it fast and you got to do it in a way that doesn't impeach typing. One of the things that might actually do is not right this Java scripts, how written most of the rest of our APPS but actually APPS work with existing Java libraries or Russet. Really, anyway that you want them compile it down so that it will work my percents. Fascinating as far as the competition with g mail I wonder, can you compete with Google's kind of economies of scale and what they can do with the for example, the smart auto completely the smart auto complete Google is kind of a killer feature. I wonder if you can replicate that. I think we can I don't think we could individually as an organization, but it's so obviously beneficial and I would actually argue it's more beneficial. This is what I personally find in Google docs competitive an email. But it's it's such an obviously good idea that I can think off the top of my head five startups working on it right now and I'm also an active angel investor. So it's something that I pay very close attention to. Stay close to. Think that's an especially given the advances that GP three has made and will working closely with open as well. I think that's in a fairly short period of time. It might be a year or two that will be libraries widely available to do that kind of thing probably actually going to rewind thought not library syllabi services I think that this stuff is hard enough from requires venture capital you'll have to pay for it, but it is totally feasible that this will become integrates people in the order of magnitude of years. Sea. Think this'll be available as a service and you can just import library or something like I. said I know Yeah. At least five teams Wokingham precisely event. Fantastic what else? What? What's the biggest engineering problem you had to solve and building superhuman? Biggest engineering problem that have been so so many. I'll tell you a fun story of when it was particularly hard to debunk. Something Bookstore is always fun. So for example, in order to power our blazingly fast search, we index emails using sequel, which some folks might know is it's actually a sequel lights database built into chrome. Turns, out, we are basically the only production user of this I think in the world according to the currency at scale. In other words, an extremely each attack bug in the full text search a sequel lights back crashed if certain specific requirements were met, and this was very hard to track down because the database has a very specific state in particular dive into the example just because you had to have unbalanced search. Trees unbalanced in such a way where the adjacent node was facts null. So you'd have to have an index with let's say a lot of words starting with a non starting with the letter b but some starting with the let's see such that when you insert new words would starting would let it tries to split the a node because they notice got too big but because he doesn't exist guess what it's votes and This was happening to hundreds of our customers. Every single day because chrome had updated the version of sequel like the. US and then our CTO Conrad competed feats that is truly heroic working feverishly morning all the way through nights I'm not even sure if he slept properly through one weekend, he jumped into superhuman the code base found out that the issue takes us there jumps into chrome the code base found out that the. Issue didn't exist there jumped into sequel light. The code base gets bisected himself all the way through the recent commits, and by the way, this software was extremely widely uses super battle tested and found the single errands line that was causing this crash. He then reproduced it locally wrote some tests submitted. A patch sequel is accepted the patch updated that code. We picked the team updated US sequel light they released that new code. That code with comrades fix is running in every instance of chrome around the world. So sometimes, the bug is not in your code. It's in somebody else's, and in this case, the book was not. Non Human wasn't even in chrome but we fixed it nevertheless not just the kind of thing you have to do if you're serious about quality. Interesting we'll any other parts of superhuman that that we haven't really explored much detail. Engineering wise. Sure does this GonNa be quite a few what kinds of things would you like to go into? Technical things distributed systems. Yeah Guy, any distributed systems stories? Not, really I'm sure we have. It's probably a little bit further away from what I personally get involved with. I'll tell you another web sequel story just because it sort of top of mind having having talked through all of that like I mentioned we are. As far as we know according to the chrome team, the only production, our web sequel at scale. And there was a point in time where they did not know that and so they were actually planning to remove sequel from. Chrome. To the extent that they had removed it from upstream versions of chrome before it hit production but in Canarian. And this caused a considerable degree of panic inside of concealment..

Google US CTO Guy Conrad
Unikrn CEO Rahul Sood on Esports Betting, Cryptocurrency

Esportz Network Podcast

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Unikrn CEO Rahul Sood on Esports Betting, Cryptocurrency

"I have to imagine most of our audience has heard you to court at this point whether it was through the Mark Cuban investment ties to crypto currency, the websites, great content or the eastwards betting explosion. It can be hard to keep up with you to court at times you're doing so many different things. The company said Classic Eastwards. Headache has traditional sports. Offerings has ways for people to wager against their Fred has ways for Gabor's to bet on themselves by you. Mode at creates simulated competitions for potential wagers I know I missing some things even that log list what I miss about you accord that else that the companies also offer. well, I mean, look at you pretty much summarized that we are. We were at a sports entertainment platform. Basically, what we're building is the future of entertainment wagering like When you think about wagering in general, there's is various areas is. There, there's like casino bedding. There's. There's. Your typical physical location, you walk into a casino and you go to a slot machine and you do something they're on. So Las Vegas Type Entertainment, all of that is changing. and then there's like sports betting what does the future sports betting look like an online book making look like? An and Unicorn is effectively using east sports in video games to create this this new era of betting because people who play video games and who are into. East. Sports are not just you know they're not kids. They're they're getting older and you know people like myself who who's in. My mid forties. I love to play Games and I I love to bet on sports and so we're sort of building the future of this face definitely people betting on video. Fares log as video games have existed I. Certainly have bet ever since I had some money in my pocket, I was putting it down challenging by Fred's various video games being Iraq cade or back the Gabe Q. OF NFL street. If feels like a pretty natural expansion of what video games are, can you talk a little bit about? The ways that you give gamers a chance to better themselves so unique. Eastwards. Betty massive thing. I'm here base of us. Vegas. We've got monuments to the value of bedding. But. What does that intrinsic nature of betting that is provided by you modes of UNICORD's thanks. How is the company capitalizing on that? Shirt. So look you know when when you think about the different types of betting, there's there's essentially three different types one of the spectator wagering, which is like ords betting where you're betting against someone or not against your betting on a match on an event that's happening that you're watching. So for example, you're watching club nine versus whatever fanatic or whoever it is you. Can you can watch match and you can place a bet on it just like you can watch traditional sport, the seahawks versus the raiders place that on that that's spectator wagering and we do that we do that really well Then there's the skill bedding staff where where you can now bet on yourself in a video game on a game that you love to play. And no one's been able to solve this away Unicorn has The way it works is let's say you play a game fortnight or League of legends or Doda you can connect your favorite video game to the Unicorn Platform and we give you odds on yourself So you're basically instead of you betting against me met you're betting against yourself. Are you betting against the house really and you're betting on yourself and and we give you odds for you to be one of one hundred for example, in Fort Night and you can go and you can bet any can play that and that's considered a skill Within those two categories, we have different types of offerings that are very unique to Unicorn. So for example, on the spectator side, we have streamer betting where you can watch streamers and you can place bets on your favorites beamers. It's very cool. We also have virtual east sports where you can watch virtual matches twenty, four, seven of East sports and bet on those. and. Then on the skill side, we have you mode as you mentioned where you can connect your favorite video game the platform bet on. Yourself. Against the House but we also have money match where, for example, you can create a a game of NBA two K. or madden or something and then challenge someone on the Internet and and then just just bat and play. It's very cool. And then, and then the third type of betting is is casino betting, which is your traditional Casino Games. So you up those three. Unicorn has the most most breadth. of N depth of anybody in the space, we've really spent the last six years building building this out, doing it in a legitimate way doing it with full regulation mind I just thinking about where the future of of betting entertainment goes I. Think we built some some big value in the brand on and the company in the platform and is this next year is going to determine where that goes. Absolutely I want to talk about regulation a bit in the future as you

Raiders Fred Headache Vegas Las Vegas NBA Unicord Gabor NFL Betty Iraq League Of Legends Seahawks Fort Night
"rahul" Discussed on South Asian Stories

South Asian Stories

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"rahul" Discussed on South Asian Stories

"Hello and welcome back to south. Asian stories were a year from south asians around the world and then covered their identities successes failures and most importantly stories. I'm your host samir desai in this episode. I chat with rahul. Rai rahul is an award winning actor. Currently living los angeles who has built a massive following on tiktok over nine hundred followers over thirty four million likes his videos are some my favorite some laugh out loud funny some emotional and some really informative like his other financial literacy tiktok account the laymen investor while ralph who spends most of his time honing his craft in acting and dance he also finds time for his other passions including martial martial arts and philosophy. He trained in tang pseudo. A korean based martial arts made famous by chuck norris and that the age of thirteen eighteen his black belt most recently. He started training in jeet. Cundo a martial art created by the one. And only bruce lee in this conversation. We discuss one. How rahul got his start in acting in l. a. and the biggest things he learned in the past five years to the rise of stardom of talk and how he got his inspiration from shows like the office and friends and finally his obsessive drive to be pure force of nature and acting just like denzel washington or marlon brando. Absolutely love chatting with rahul and he had a thoughtful strategic approach to everything that is absolutely infectious so without further ado please enjoy my conversation with rahul. Ri- rahul welcome to south. Asian stories were so pumped to have. How're you doing. Good dude Thank you for having me. It's an honor so if people who are stuck in quarantine. I'm sure many many of you have seen rose videos. He's a tiktok certified star. Can i say that. Are you a star. I would say that You know how man. If i find that i'm not really a i'm still in my apartment so i'm not really Enjoying the full The full spectrum of this stardom that i apparently have. Because i cannot see anybody right. No no tic tac tiktok red carpets or anything yet carpets anytime soon. Oh man well we'll get into that a little bit later..

tiktok rahul samir desai Rai rahul chuck norris ralph bruce lee los angeles denzel washington marlon brando
Fan Ownership - With Chris Hana - CEO At The Esports Observer

BIG Esports Podcast

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Fan Ownership - With Chris Hana - CEO At The Esports Observer

"Talk me through like some of the acquisition process because there's. I mean could be right in saying that there's probably like twenty acquisitions, and all of as sports history of a business that's more than say five thousand dollars for a t three sports team like an acquisition, and that number's Rod, or not I think the point trying to make. Is this billionaire acquisitions ever in a sports at the moment unless it's a team that say optic which is? is like a distressed asset or something like that? Mommy and there's a couple of there's a couple of also peripherals depending on what you what you consider east boards, and you know where we draw the line between gaming. I mean there's been there's been some. There's been some some proper requisitions to like to me. That was different because we're you know. We built us a startup. Everything. Yoho edge all you are right when you got to react to a fast paced market, lucky sports, and then all of a sudden your. You're dipping your toes into the corporate world. Again, And then you get like the all the requirements that kind of all read wants from you, and then all of a sudden you you get you get into this wheel of okay cool. We gotta do this. We gotTA THAT IT'S A. Different so I think so, the story is we got investment a year before same company, and then got acquired later, and the the big due-diligence was before prior to the investment and I think like I think that blocked me for probably two or three months completely, so you know I had a team that was taking care of things but I was really like I was really working on this on all the numbers compiling data sets, and you have that stuff left and right, but then you got to put in the right form. You know it's all these talks. That was a time you know. Before we went live, you know we talked about lifestyle getting healthy again and losing all the kilos. On. It was really with a lot of what a lot of stress in a positive way, too, but it's just. Fun You know. It's I looking back now I'd say it was a really good experience. Like at the time it's hard when you've got to act fast, and you got to work on your company, but then also your completely blocked in the process, my soul. Really in a really interesting like number video information that someone gave me today. WHO's well versed in traditional businesses? We're just talking about public. Elucidate sports companies in the industry AALIYAH. They have to release the financial reports by the thirty fester. July some extremely interested to see what comes out from those guys and anyone. I've essays and you know what he was saying. He's it costs about. About a million nosy year in day to public illicit business, and it really is because you need all of these. In when the I six says proved to us why your stock just went up by forty percent. It's been a lot time going through that. You need to prove that you haven't done something illegal. You need to use your extending entitled Potties to justify that stock price into. Your releases and to check through the bold reports, and that kind of stuff takes a lot of time and none of its shape. Recent prices? Everybody seems to be three hundred dollars an hour, so it takes a Lotta time. The and that's why I feel like. If you look at these sports industry right now I'm not saying it's not saying it's not mature, but it's a lot of startups. It's a lot of people just getting in doing things like doing things quickly and you. If you grow that like if that mature Swiss, certain point, you know you have a, you have a time where there's different skills that you need, and we just have different requirements. Right I mean if a company grows like your co changes like you know you need. You need different skills to complement. Would you can't do anymore? Because of time, constraints as well so yeah, it's. It's a very different thing. Yeah, that makes sense to me. Is like a really wish on. You wear a hood this from, but it's a good. Saying that say all the time which is like. The founder doesn't always make the best see. I think that's extremely important like it. You know direct example. I think is a good friend and a mentor CAL flurries from Unicorn. Who's the CO founder and the Chief Product Officer? It makes much more sense. I think the Rahul debate to say call isn't like doing public talks and I call isn't like being divisive the company and every time I talked to him. He's so passionate about the technology in the product, so it makes perfect sense, so rawls the for him to be the Sapio, but also like you were saying as as the company styles. Would maybe make sense to get A. You know inefficient him. Gray hit suit. Come into today the because ultimately it's up to them to run a smooth and profitable business. It's not up to them to Nari who the next best counterstrike's taint team is that you should pick out fanatic to up to them to make sure your reporting to the board properly and the numbers of flying.

Rahul Rawls Co Founder Gray Founder CAL Chief Product Officer
"rahul" Discussed on Toys & Tech of the Trade

Toys & Tech of the Trade

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"rahul" Discussed on Toys & Tech of the Trade

"Helped us get in front of you know the right audiences. Daddy look it's people from all over the world which lesser-known It's incredible by people that are looking to acquire Help from the fact that we have these Just lasted to the world. It's it's really amazing. Yeah I think I think that with everything going on. It's it's hope which is important. And I think that when everybody unlocks their phone logs onto every social media platform or any or any news outlet. You we all know that. Always see or just mounting numbers of of just unfortunate things and we're seeing very few positives so like I said when when I receive. Is this press release. I felt that it was. It was a great positive thing that that people needed to hear that companies are pivoting and and being and being reactive and they're doing it very quickly instead of you know throwing a press. Release out there and saying yeah. We're going to do something. And then months and weeks and months go by and it was just that hollow words so I'd like to commend you both for not only stepping up but also putting something out there and not just lip service. I think it's a IT'S A. It's you know very very noble thing the last question I wanted to ask because I want to be respectful of both of your time's Rahul. Do you think and I'll start with you. Do you think that going this route is going is is going to make that? The government is going to want to reach out to more companies to create more hardware like this obviously with the defense production. Act that they push they wanted to. Kinda get other companies going into this but main gear voluntarily did this. Do you think that more companies are going to start revisiting the the applications of their hardware to do this sort of stuff like obviously we know that Tesla wanted to do something but again they wanted to do something. We haven't seen anything Significant yet neither. Have we from dyson? Yeah look at those companies are working on it I think it's a lot more challenging than what people think you know what what what's amazing about it is That if you look at like the Tesla video for example if you look at what other companies are building. They're building traditional ventilators. Which is a very complex thing to do right. Attract the way we built the live is we're using. We're we're we're using no moving parts. We're using software In a series of circuits to to be able to replicate what a traditional ventilator does a traditional ventilator uses things like turbines to push air and that sort of thing. We're not doing so so our unit is so are less complex that we could ship this in. May those guys are building You know they're they're like Landingham a man on Mars little longer and they're and they're shipping in August like they're sort of going down the traditional path. We went down the path of. What do we actually need to build an emergency ventilator? And that's what we did. I think that that simplification. Sometimes you don't need to reinvent the wheel. I that's that's the short version. I I feel with this with this instance if you were able to do it with less parts for a fraction of the cost and it's making a difference. I I don't see how other companies may wouldn't follow suit with that approach but to your point you know they're definitely trying to land a man on. Mars. Everybody wants to be a hero in this instead of just wanting to make a difference it aspect of of Louis soffer where we can make changes on. The fly is author updates that you can just add features right leg. Discussing things like could talk more apparent temple cycling Asian out of out of the ventilator. That's a feature that we didn't have for software wave with a just give him sickly program it and all of a sudden he shouldn't able so there's no hardware that we need to change to to act and the learn the learning curve for for the software. I mean if you guys have been stress testing so when it goes out into the field do you. Fee based on the advisory panel. Have they pretty much gone through it and found ways to streamline You Know Somebody. Who's trying to use that and learn it in ten or fifteen minutes like what's the learning curve you guys of established for the for the device the learning curve. You mean you mean for for users to be able to use it. Yeah so in other words. The the unit gets approved that goes into a hospital presented. It's it's pretty basic. I beginning in any respiratory therapist will be able to pick this up fairly quickly uses. It sounds ridiculous. But it uses like an android tablet. You know some Exalt were upset the floodings that you want you can set breath rate you can set you know different settings like things that are like minimum factors specifically for the patient on what a couple of things to to know you hear about people going on on on ventilators that have a twenty percent chance of living like so so basically what you get on a ventilator you basically are eighty percent going to die. That's what they say that's what they're saying in New York. That's what's happening to a lot of that has to do with the fact that the people who are operating the ventilators are either using very aggressive settings or other. You know they're just not they're just you're using setting that are designed for a different type of of sickness and an apparently and this is what we're learning as we go which is which is both a hoarder and also. I guess a bit of a blessing that people are learning. But it's a horror that people are learning on the job at the settings need to be changed differently for Cobras on. They shouldn't be as aggressive on. You know there's a lot of things that we learn along the way and the Nice thing about this this Reserve settings are available by touch. So you can change the settings you know like the X. Out of the the the expiratory pressure and things like that can be done just with the touch on the finger so it's pretty neat and then and then you know as far as the The the inlet goes the pressure that comes in from the oxygen. There's like a manual regulator on it. You know it's not it's not. It's not like rocket science. So that's that that's one of those things that I'm sure the people that here. This is going to wonder because again. You're creating something that's that's new but also simplified but still able to do what is needed without as much input especially going to your point if the settings for this particular illness or supposed to be a lot more a lot different you you wanna be able to account for that and have something that's easily customizable on a person to person basis yet and. I'M NO DOCTOR. But we've spoken to doctors about it and they've been telling us this as as we go along and Yeah and I mean it's just it's unreal. What you learn you know It's it's it's kind of a. It's it's surreal happening but yeah We've learned a lot along the way You know the Nice thing about this devices you can. You can change all these settings via software rather than having to kind of reinvent the whole device well to break bring things full circle. I that was actually my next question during this entire endeavor What is what's the most valuable thing you've learned so far and I'll start with with you Rahul I. What's what's the been the most valuable experience from this entire endeavor that's kind of imprinted itself on you Well I think You know the the biggest The biggest thing that I learned or not even learn but just saw was was the dedication that these that people have to kind of making a difference like people are actually Doing this because they want to help. Not Because They Wanna get rich you know. So we've got people at main gear that a working twenty four hours a day to make this happen. We have people in Italy during the same thing or doctors have been nothing. Short of extraordinary and selfless. Everybody wants to do just to help. And that's That's just an incredible feeling awesome. Wallace would've I've learned that there's will be people Miss World Basketball and a lot of people when dancing Rallo hakodate right like our whole set. Were not being born. People advisory that are that are that are weren't in something like were seeing each other eleven thirty pm at night talking about the limitations new ideas etc and also in also visit. General Public wants Lee with the press. Release Al just just positive feedback the receivables like ninety nine matching and. We'll just let the hand is amazing so far awesome. What what. What can my my audience. Our listeners do to help you guys. In this endeavour what what what call to action. Do you have for audience retweeted Gourd site share it everywhere? You can And you know and and ask for any like help us push to governments in hospitals. That are looking for this sort of thing you know. People talk about a shortage of ventilators. Send them away. All they can do is help us. Get the word out. And that's really what we care about right now. Actually Wallace anything had. That's it just spreading the word looking detention from the right people end. Yeah generate. Yeah that's why released the prototype. Hold it until we have a final Fleet right one get feedback looking to get the right people on board and the people took better for for all of us excellent. I want to thank you both for taking the time out of your busy busy schedules to sit down and trump it up with us and share more about the main gear. Live to find out more definitely. You can visit facebook dot com forward slash Maine gear or twitter dot com forward slash maine gear links for that as well as links to the main gear. Live will be in the show notes for this episode. Gentlemen once again. Thank you for your time. I really appreciate it. I hope you enjoyed our conversation with Wallace and Rahul to find out more about the main gear live ventilator make sure to visit main gear links will be in the show notes for this episode to visit main gear site. Follow them on social as well as reach out to Wallace or Rahul. If you're a medical professional and you'd like to secure some of these ventilators definitely reach out to wallace and Rahul. And they'll be able to assist with that the only call to Action. I have for this. Episode is to share it and also share the piece that we put out regarding the live ventilator In the hopes that we can continue raising awareness and when the unit secures the FDA approval hospitals across the world will be able to use these life saving devices and do their part to continue flattening. The curve. Wash your hands. Take care of yourselves and your loved ones. I'll see you guys in two weeks. Thanks for checking out toys and tech of the trade.

Wallace FDA Tesla dyson Louis soffer Landingham New York Basketball General Public Rahul Italy facebook Gourd Lee Maine
"rahul" Discussed on Toys & Tech of the Trade

Toys & Tech of the Trade

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"rahul" Discussed on Toys & Tech of the Trade

"I'm your host rich and if this is your first time checking out an episode. I'd like to welcome you and also tell you a little bit about what we do here. Toys and tackle. The trade is an interview series where we sit down with content creators entrepreneurs and just awesome folks that are on our radar and discussed the gadgets the gear and the tech that they used to run their businesses create their content and just be more productive when it comes to toys. It's more than just talking about their favorite action figures or funchal POPs. You'd be surprised. What people consider their toys? It could be cars. It could be guns. It could be knives We WANNA share every one of those unique toys with you. This week's episode though is going to be a bit of a departure from our usual format and while we will be sitting down with two entrepreneurs were not going to be discussing the toys in tech of their trade. What we are going to be discussing is something. That's being done to assist in the coverted. Nineteen pandemic which has affected The world at this point and what we're going to discuss is actually a life saving ventilator that is being created for a quarter of the price of traditional ventilator and that company. That's doing all of this is main gear and I'll be joined by their CEO. Wallace Santos as well as their chairman of the Board Rahul. Sood will be discussing what goes into creating a device like this what hurdles. They've had to overcome where they are in the FDA approval process and much more without any further ado. Let me turn it over to Wallace and Rahul so you can learn more about the main gear live ventilator Wallace Rahul. Thank you guys for taking the time out of your busy schedule to sit down with us. Pleasure thanks for Adamus and appreciate it rich. Thanks for having US so before we jump into it. A little bit of background about main gear. Main gear is a Pc manufacturer they make some awesome hardware. A WHO's who of youtubers have main gear units If you look up People in this business that have been doing tech reviews for quite some time. There's definitely been the occasional main gear unit at their disposal but in addition to that they've also done Accessories PC chairs backpacks. But this newest endeavor is like I said incredibly timely with what's been going on with the current pandemic and the ventilator shortage and I want to start by asking Rahul. Who is the chairman of the board for main gear? How did you? What was the the spark that got you to want to suggest this to to Wallace? And the main gear team. What what what. Fired you up to get this ball rolling. Well mostly just watching You Know Governor. Cuomo talk about some of the challenges that were coming in watching what was happening in Italy where. There's actually video that I sent Wallace on. It was this doctrine Spain who was crying because he had to make a choice right between one patient. Getting off the ventilator and putting into another in basically making a life or death choice which is a horrible decision for Dr to May and then at the same time seeing what was what was happening in New York. You know where they were pleading for Ventilators Wallis being from New Jersey. He's he's been messaging me about you. Know he was messaging me quite a bit like a couple of weeks ago about friends and and friends of friends that were dying. It was insane and so you know so we saw this. We saw this as something that needed to get done. I end and I and I figured that anyone could do it right. It would be main gear and that was kind of how it all came together End End before had the discussion. As soon as I had the discussion with main gear. You know I just I I said. Let's let's get a team together and we built this This team of medical professionals Starting with a couple of my friends. Dr Deepak Corre doctor mcadam and and then and then a lady that I've known for years but a Carney who who is a a WHO used to be a A R- A respiratory therapist and and you know the the bottom line is we put together this team. We brought on some Inventors from Italy And and we just we just got this thing going. Within a month while that's amazing now with regards to establishing that that group of trusted individuals what what process where you looking at in terms of getting a unit like this out quickly was it a matter of knowing and having the components already in house and knowing how to pivot or were as team of advisors Directing you about what would be needed to get something like this done for a based on what was said for fraction of the cost. Yes so we started out with that which is a a a vision of what we wanted to create. Which is you know. We wanted to create something affordable. First of all because these ventilators are selling Walson I've had discussions with with with purchasers near fifty thousand dollars plus for ventilators and and we're saying well. There's there's gotta be a way to make a fraction of that price and we've done that. We wanted it to be portable So that it can be used in field hospitals We wanted to be a robust so like that that easy to build And can be can leverage parts that we know and then the last thing is We wanted to make sure that it was easy to use and the reason being is the trend. Were showing that you know medical professions. Were getting sick so we wanted to make it possible so that almost anyone in the field could use it as so simple to use and so when we did that We we spoke as I mentioned with that. With some inventor France from Italy who were who were who were building a platform as an emergency a ventilator and they actually have version one of this platform that we built is is is running on a actual people in the field in Switzerland now and And so it is being used. We've we've made some significant improvements to it And we're just in the process of of It's already been filed for FDA emergency clearance. We're just waiting for approval before we can for what. What kind of hurdles did you have to go through for FDA approval? I know a lot of people that are kind of getting a glimpse into this. This aspect of hardware are not too familiar with that. How did how did you go about just securing that initial that initial presentation to the FDA well so just dealing with a good FDA lawyer was was the first thing in the end getting all. The questions answered that we needed answered. You know making sure that the base system would support You know Guidelines from the FDA and then also Guidelines from from the Canadian Health Authority as well wanted to make sure that it would meet those specifications in those arms than it does And then and then just working with a with an FDA lawyer. There's a lot of work that goes into the initial filing. But luckily for us you know this. This is inventor that we that we work with out who who developed this. This platform is Is it already been kind of working to to to get this approved in other markets including You know in in Europe and other places and so So you know we. We're we're we feel like we're good hands and we'll see you know the the FDA is is moving faster than it ever has on but but the minute the country says it is no longer in emergency like then you getting emergency. Fda approval is is is no longer an option. So you know. We HOPE THAT WE GET OUT EMERGENCY. Fda approval because we'd like to make it available to other countries and because other other ventilators aren't coming until August right. And you know we. We could ship this thing in. May That's that's that's why we want to get people's attention. Have you received any pushback like and I say this because as many of you know as soon as you try to disrupt an industry that has you know for the longest time it's like you know? Elon? Musk space travel When you try to disrupt an industry where ventilators fifty thousand dollars and you're saying that you're going to be able to do it for a fraction of the cost. Have you experienced any sort of push back or negative negative commentary from the industry? No not really. I think the reason being an wallace if to add to this but I think the big reason is that we're looking to replace traditional.

FDA Wallace Wallace Rahul chairman funchal Italy And Wallace Santos Italy wallace Spain Sood Adamus New Jersey CEO Cuomo Elon Wallis Dr Deepak Corre New York Europe
Bots Outperform Humans If They Impersonate Us

60-Second Science

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Bots Outperform Humans If They Impersonate Us

"Haircut I'm looking for something. I May. Third Bats aerobics want Machine assistant never identified fight itself as a bought in the demo and Google. Got A lot of flack for that. They later clarified that. They would only launch the tech with quote disclosure built in but therein lies the A dilemma because the new study in the journal Nature Machine Intelligence suggests that about is most effective when it hides its machine identity that is if it is allowed to pose As human till our Hawaiian computational social scientists at New York University's campus in Abu Dhabi. His team recruited nearly seven hundred online volunteers to play the prisoner's owners dilemma. A classic game of Negotiation Trust and deception against either humans robots half the time the human players were told the truth about who they were matched up against against the other half. They were told they were playing a bought when they're actually playing a human or that they were battling a human when in fact he was only a bought in the scientists found that the bots actually actually did remarkably well in this game of negotiation if they impersonated humint went. The machine is reported to be human. It outperforms humans themselves else so it is more persuasive. It is able to induce cooperation and persuade the other opponents to cooperate more than humans themselves yourselves but whenever the bots true nature was disclosed their superiority vanished and Rahul. Wants says that points to a fundamental conundrum. We can now build a really efficient botts that perform tasks even better than we can but their efficiency may be linked to their ability to hide their identity. which you know feels ethically problematic those humans humans who will be deceived? Why the machine they are? The ones who ultimately have to make that choice otherwise it would violate fundamental values of autonomy respect eh for humans. It's not realistic to ask people for consent. Before every bought human interaction that would of course revealed abouts true identity

Nature Machine Intelligence Machine Abu Dhabi New York University Google Rahul Humint
"rahul" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"rahul" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Ends of new technology including what he's doing now with big data and blockchain for who currently serves as the GM of big data data lakes blockchain at Amazon web services welcome to another episode of it visionaries I mean phase on chief continents or here mission work and on the other line Rahul what's going on in how are you great day and it's a great day to be talking about blockchain it is something that is in the news a ton and we are super excited to talk about big data data lakes blockchain and everything that you're working on on at aws but first how did you get into technology so I've been in tech for a while and I got an Undergrad degree in computers and then I had my first startup in ninety nine moved out to the bay area and I've been in tech startups since then and then joined aws in twenty eleven and I've been working on all things data related since that time and would when you joined aws what was kind of your your reason or excitement for joining like what was was the state of blockchain back then and this is an exciting opportunity will block back in two thousand eleven wasn't really actively discussed so I think for me was more about an opportunity to provide customers with the ability to really access large-scale computing and database capabilities as much lower cost than they could in the puff so we were able to get customers out of the business of spending capital for buying expensive wrecks of service and said they could just rent it for me to us by the hour about time and now the second and so that's what drew me to aws and then blockchain started to come into the news you know a little later on in my career word I'm taking a step back how does aws you know look at blockchain y are you investing in the area why are you excited about it YEP so a couple years ago we were just paying attention to what was happening in the industry around blockchain and we really wanted to learn from our customers about what problems that really solves for them rather than just get involved because the hype and you know as we learn more about what customers needed we realized that that was a real opportunity for some use cases that were uniquely served by Blockchain and what were some of the early you know like customer feedback or some of those early learnings from customers so what we found is we dug in with customers is that their use cases sort of split down to particular parts so there was one case where customers really just wanted alleger which is owned by a single entity imagine something like a DMV that's trying to track vehicle ownership and registration history and they wanted the ability to track that in a way the couldn't be modified or tampered with and so that was a case where they needed a verifiable tamper-proof record what had happened and but they didn't need any distributed trust so that was a really about centralized use of an immutable record and the second use case was where we found the customer actually did have a connected network of partners and there they wanted to be able to independently verify an audit what had taken place in terms of the transactions but between them and so in this scenario where you've got multiple parties participating and you didn't really want any one person to control the record of what had happened that was really the place where we saw these enterprise blockchain frameworks playing playing a role so those allow customers to agree upon how they decide the transactions valid and then record them in a ledger that's distributed to all of the participants who each person has their own copy and that was the key difference the we found is that those a need for maintaining a history the company changed but in some cases customers comfortable with a single entity owning it and you know the cases they wanted the ability to distribute it across everyone that was participating and so kind of like you were saying there's there's history of like you know economic and financial activity that happens you know using ledgers so it seemed like the logical attention for organizations to be able to have ledger like functionality and I'm curious what were those kind of like light bulb moments for customer as well you know I think what we found is that you know if you think about customers like the DMV example you know what they're really trying to do is maintain an audit log it happened and historically they've been using databases of this and the Tyne and it works but you have to build a lot of scaffolding around the database to me ensure that the data hasn't been changed for example an Admin could have gone in and edited records and you might not know if they're able to delete their tracks security starts with the journal or a log and that's append only so customers can only write changes to log and the full history of those changes is maintained and what we do is we provide cryptographic verifiability so we make sure that cryptographic no change no element of that history can be modified and if it were modified it would render everything that came after it invalid it would be easy to figure out that it had been a temporary had been does someone tried to change it something so in those cases customers instantly got kildee be would really solve their what'd lung problems and and would give them this verifiable record so the DMV type use case is one that's fairly common the other one that we worked with a customer called health direct Australia and they're all actually provide health information things like clinic hours and who doctors are and what their specialties are to the Australian population and they're required to be able improve the accuracy of the information that they've shown at any point in time so killing me was a perfect for them because they can record what they've shown to customer inquiries they beat and so and that record is tamper proof and can be verified at any time so any time they have to go back and prove what they showed they have that permanent record so it really simplified their architecture does this mean shorter lines at the DMV that's the real question no we're all hoping for you know it's funny I mean I think that it's it's something that is so obvious a lot of you know like government organizations or I mean I guess any any organizations need need to be able to protect their data but for a government organization where there's potentially you know so much at stake it seems like it's a no brainer was there some type of pushback you get from organizations that are kind of like trying to figure out oh how to use it or find use cases or is it kind of one of these scenarios where they WanNa do it and they just don't necessarily have the bandwidth yet yes so I think for customers who use case like if you imagine healthcare providers that need to maintain a record of how their equipment was maintained the modified or page and our HR and payroll departments that need to keep track of what's happened to employees history they've either been using databases with the a lot of scaffolding for audit trails or they had been using blockchain frameworks unnecessarily complicated for their use case so you know Sud- We were talking with the folks that at Isis about how you potentially have a company where let's say they have you know a thousand skews but each of those skews is something different you know if it's sold in a gas station versus a you know wherever it is so you'd have you know the same exact product skew so let's say like some I don't know apple apple bars or something like that that that that skew made by the company is different skew in all of their you know places that they're distributing that so it gets extremely confusing because you have the same product with multiple skews across like will different places so the supply chain can be super crazy and so kind of what you're saying is that if that you know apple bar goes from one place to the next that bose sides need to agree that the exact unit that is going from one place to the other has been delivered and then accepted by the other places that can right that's exactly right so you can essentially have people agree that yes You know I sent you this up Labar you agree that I did so I'm going to record that this blockchain and then each of us will have a copy of that record and then you can say okay then I got it from you and I sent it to this outlet and we can agree that that happened and then we can both have that record added and then each of us will maintain our own copy of that transaction history so that notion of distributing both the history of what happened as well as setting up a policy around how multiple parties can agree that the thing that they're stating happen in fact did happen that's that's really the crux of the blockchain use case and so where we see manage blockchain service come into play as where I have these complex networks where they don't necessarily own each of the nodes in the network and they might be working with partners downstream providers so for example the Guardian Life Insurance Company you know they have a huge network of providers of agents brokers and so for that I'm they're looking to use blockchain to essentially make a record of how their policies and payments flow through this network and APPA easily verifiable than usual what happened and so that that's a natural fit for Amazon manager blockchain and they're using the hypoallergenic fabric network for that or another example all is Sony Music and digital rights so they're looking at using the Amazon manage blockchain service to essentially keep track of the rights associated with intellectual property and music produced by their artists so where does this which distributed to go to whether than getting played how many times the end up getting played that whole complex network of things is what they're trying to record so that they can make sure the right people get compensated in the right way working directly with CEOS with CTO's like Heads of supply chain like who who are the different kinds of stakeholders in this so it's definitely a mix you definitely talked to existing customers but we've also seen folks that want to take advantage of sort of ease of use and he's been in administration that the manage blockchain service provides and they've come to us as net new customers yeah it's been it's been really fun to see what customers have been looking at and.

GM Rahul
"rahul" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

15:21 min | 2 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Recognize that eat your back up off the wall dance to come and do. I think i only do because using that. Sometimes i do but i used to sing in a compulsively when we lived together yeah. We'd add a bunch of words and stuff. Eh the wall chicken dane come on well. I enjoyed that thank you. We're back. We're back or back again. Talk about dr rahul. Yes dr rahul. He was very interesting. You was yeah very very alpha energy. He did <hes>. I've been accused of bringing an alpha energy things and so i don't know if you noticed but i kind of laid off mile fitness for long enough enough to let things simmer by the end of it. I thought were very even footing. You probably notice any of these subtle things that were happening. These weren't these were primitive tribal jungle things that were happening. Now that went right over your head netball they were happening now but if we called him and asked him he'd say they were happening to what is man stuff stupid man's act like oh god what don't act like. There's specific man stuff that other people are impervious to. I'm not saying that for everyone. I'm saying it was happening and you missed it so if you miss it. I'm assuming it's because you're female. I think he's an alpha dude. I think i'm an alpha dude food and often when to alfred's together. It's a blowhard session and they will try to outdo each other in top one another and then i took a back seat for a while until that all subsided i i was kind of basically going out for here and then through that i think some trust came out and some things so yeah so look he grew up in compton in south central torrance horns bordering all that and i think in his neighborhood he had to take a stance himself and i think that's proceeded throughout his life and and i think i came from a similar background. Were you this whole bullshit. Stand your ground kind of cultural thing. I think it was just all happening. I guess what i wrestle with a little bit in these conversations sometimes but i feel like when we have these conversations nations about alpha. It's with this intense pride for myself well in general about the idea of alpha no. I don't think it's it's something someone should aspire to. I don't think it's a way to be. I think we're evolving away from it but i think i can acknowledge that i am a certain way. I'm not in the dark about who i am. Mm-hmm got it yeah. You're holding up is a virtue at all and i think some people through environment and then also just genetically. I i mean again. My dad was just you could smell his mosque. He just was genetically vat way and so was my grandpa and i i never met beyond that but seems to be in jeans a bit yeah u._c. Babies playing all the time and there's just some that are kind of outwardly more aggressive and yeah. It seems to be either genetics at least half of it. Maybe i bristle a little bit about or maybe we're just moving away from alpha meaning that like four ridded tech company or something if we're at apple steve jobs is alpha. He is wanting. The show is dominating. Everybody actually actually was alpha in the most conventional sense as well not in his physical no but no alpha has nothing to do with your physical exterior exterior. I'm not saying because my dad was big. He was alpha. My stepdad. Dave was the same exact size but he was just not alpha at all okay so i'm glad can you clarify that because in my head i feel like you quite like big guys with alpha. I'm not at all no in fact i would argue. Many of the most alpha men i've ever met are short bald hairy aggressive too much testosterone. Well maybe too much successor and or compensation sir who knows yeah. There's a lot in the recipe but no there's nothing to do with the physical size thing comes from dogs right. We're just coopting that term from dog packs yup in dog packs have alpha's and they're the ones who decide which way they're gonna chase the buffalo when they're chasing it. That's the leader right yeah now. Oh you could say i'm saying oh being leaders inherently desirable right but there's a way to be a leader and not be alpha as proven now. I think the current cook doc is not like jobs at all running apple. He doesn't seem to give me a big alphabet vibe and yet he's doing just fine right right right well anyway so yes. He definitely came in dr rahul. <hes> came in and had a big alpha energy b._t. Now that's all now although we might have or not loving avert whether or not i don't even really understand eighty to be honest. I do you big dick. Energy means big energy right. I think it's often used to explain guys who have some confidence and no one can really explain just just by looking at them but they have this incredible confidence and that confidence they're saying is b but i mainly hear it in a negative aug. Contexts yeah they'll include it in aggression in toxic masculinity conversations in all that oh i haven't. I've only seen online lying tweets. They're always funny seems always be funny. What we're talking about bernie bernie there's no toxic masculinity with bernie sanders but i elena's arguing that he's so confident in so open to being controversial going against the grain said it must be that huge hog and that made sense to everybody buddy. That's how i think of p._d. Maybe i don't know i just heard it in the context that men who feel entitled to the things around them because because they have a penis will if that were my understanding of v._d._i. I would think it was a crap negative saying that i'm i'm not saying you're saying anything anything. I just don't know what it is actually well. I definitely think that boys are obsessed with peanuts. Is let's start with some things we agree on boys are obsessed with pena size uh-huh they're obsessed with each other's pena size little kids show each other their penises little kids know when they have a bigger peanuts than all their friends very early on and if you have a bigger penis in your friends your friends envy vet so that gives you some kind of boost in your confidence so i can see it actually being the thing for some people not all people the only way to be confident etc but i definitely see some silly way to be kind of when we talked about it a million times. You'll don't don't care. That's great guys. Do care guys care about penis size. Girls don't stupid that they think about it but they do. It's just the reality of the world we live okay so among their peers if they're known as the dude in the circle with the biggest dick they're gonna have a certain level of confidence because of that because of having that moniker yeah maybe but the well maybe is to me a little dismissive of me having having been a boy all other boys yes there is a ubiquitous idea around yes guys in their penises and loving the size of it or not or whatever definitely a thing writes in. Do you think it transcends into adulthood for some people. I'm not talking about everybody. I'm talking. There's a significant enough people that it affected in a positive way that they knew their dick was bigger than their peers that it's worth giving a funny name to canal urging right but do you think those people if and when i'm sorry not if when that turns out to mean almost us nothing in life in their job in relationships are whatever do you think that reevaluate way yeah no because their friends even in their fifties or still bringing up mike speak dick. It's happening nonstop. No matter what achievement they've had with worker indication right dudes who no one of their friends is a big dick is going to bring it up all the time so they're always going to hear that from their friends. Got it all right so is kookaburra still in existence coup grew was a fast casual restaurant chain specializing socializing charbroiled chicken founded in nineteen eighty eight by l. A. based restaurant tours. Mike and ray band dalian together last name mm-hmm was kuku. Although the name cookery was in onomatopoeia to the crow of a rooster oh <hes> <music> we love onomatopoeia here embrace it after a series of expansions and ownership changes in which kuku struggled profitability throughout the nineteen nineties the last location in in santa monica location close in two thousand fourteen and i mentioned you that i used to see lisa bony their voice vice. You did look why moon oh my twenties you is there. Are there twice she by yourself yup getting takeout. I got now ask myself how much of my love for kukru is may be connected to having seen her there twice but i maintain it was damn good chicken. I wish it was still around then. I wouldn't like they had a great chicken salad. Oh they did nominal <hes> i love chicken salad and beautiful macaroni and cheese really delicious kind of like a boston market say similar architecture. Yeah functional tasted better much different. I enjoyed sterling good boston when i was doing idiosyncrasy and i was gaining lots of weight in a hurry i was a regular dealer at the boston market meatloaf platter and then a couple exercise of that macaroni and cheese <hes> <hes> oh my god i am so hungry but the ku ru macaroni cheese was real cheese that when they scooped it out their strings of cheese alice. I love that god which they relaunch should we do. It started a kickstarter. Whatever people do something to get it back o._k. Okay so he said redheads need more anesthesia. That was interesting because i've already done some research on redheads and i do know they have the low hanging goals. Yes yeah so this all adds up. <hes> into red heads are strange. It's weird that they never subdivided them into their own race. I mean it of all the dumb ways we've categorized race that are based on one or two genes of melatonin. Now that was one to single out as its own species. That's true we could lump them in with east asian. You'll take them on yeah. I'm happy to take on the red heads. Okay is there addiction in animals era. A bunch of stuff on this and basically looks like there is some evidence that there is is but there's not very much research in this so it's hard to make a full conclusion what well they know it from like research when the stimulant is artificially officially introduced addiction can quickly take over an often and consume the animal mice have been known to starve to death when faced with the choice between cocaine and food yeah the the wild chimps have figured out suicide mushrooms and they trip every single day or something like no but i think the only way to really know is when they're in a lab. I've been you can see there are options where they picking and is there a dependency and things like that. It's hard to know in the wild well. Let's just say hey that addiction in the sense that it's compulsive behavior and obsessive behavior is very beneficial in the wild. Oh yeah you know like someone who's fishing stream. That's taking <hes> all fucking day long in the obsession to do it. Over and over again is beneficial. That's true. Do you think they're the same. I think addictions a level above obsession and compulsion well for me. That would be an artificial line to try to separate them. I think addiction is compulsive. Also behavior well part of being an addict is having compulsive behavior but you can have compulsive behavior. I think and not be an addict addict sure yeah. I think there's levels to it yeah but i feel like i have a lot of obsession tendencies but i don't think i'm addicted to anything i agree but if you know a zero is a teetotaler and a ten is me you're not a juan no yeah you're like a five. Let's say or four or something whatever it is you. Don't drink destructively or pathologically but you also drink a lot yeah or frequent. I would say that. I don't wanna say a lot yeah but i mean quantity wise just frequency wise. You like to have a wine. I would hearken a guess. The you're a similar spot on the compulsive spectrum or do you think your high on the obsession compulsive compulsion ooh compulsion like propoals yeah spectrum ending a much higher wearing the palsy spectrum zero so far yeah knock i i feel like i've had some light facial freezing at times why yes just like in and around my eyebrow once or twice that's scary. It is scary. I know bell's palsy z. People can just get like bell's palsy god. I know i one time had i think i told you in college. I got frozen in my sleep. I remember this yeah. I i woke up but my body was still stuck was paralyzed. Sleep paralysis surreal thing right. Eh and kelly was nearby. I knew she was there but i couldn't talk to her. Taylor was so scary. The next stay. I was napping. I took a lot of absent college and as napping and i woke up in her face was just hovering over my face oh to see if you're stuck. That was kinda verte. She was seriously well. She should've taken it. I probably they wanted me like oh yeah monica that happens all the time like trying to wake myself up and i can't. I'm trying to get out of it so much. Alert enough haven't woken up fully to activate my body you. He don't take an e._m._s. Stuff seriously not your medical stuff right now. I'd say none none. No not none of i take your anxiety seriously. I've always always been very sincere about when you've explained that to me yeah. I wish she would take mine..

dr rahul boston apple Mike bell bernie bernie santa monica compton alfred pena bernie sanders testosterone Dave dalian Taylor melatonin l. A. stimulant juan
"rahul" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Mother. Nature is docking station is naturally built within us as we have things called nicotinic receptors opiate receptors cannabinoid receptors. There are nicotinic receptors on the tissues in your brain body. The nicotine eighteen just the compound equity not all the two hundred million other things that that all the cigarette companies have in their tobacco nicotine binds into a receptor in your body audie like a perfect lock and key it is not a foreign substance and neither is you know cocaine. Either is the things that come from popular neither yeah yeah we are one and the same with plants around us yeah it's so fascinating and yes we see this in the animal kingdom elephants hide fruit until it ferments and they eat it and get drunk. Thank chimpanzees get high. You know a lot of primates are getting high. They they know what stuff is could out there for them to eat and experiment with in some how they do it without addiction. I do i do know. Is there addiction in animals or as is the way that it's offered in plants without our manipulation. Just not that pop into where they get hooked. Yes so to your point back to peru so i had had an archaeology teacher who did all their work in peru. All the locals chew coca leaves in bolivia six months ago my teenage son or visiting hospital. Oh shut up. There's coca leaves doesn't get you high but it does allow you to function without headaches and fatigue at an altitude where your blood let cells are not fully stocked with oxygen because it's not oxygen up there for you right so it's not illegal. It's not unethical in my son and i didn't actually mention something that i wrote but cocoa leaves right on the side side with some coca tea less winded. It's not as much of a stimulant has kept me. If you think is going to keep you up on a long drive across the country. That's not what it does. It does more about you know not feeling winded from being at a high altitude so it's interesting again nuance to you know coca okay yeah. I wonder what's going on respiratory. If it's actually having any effect on cells in your lungs or anything there that's allowing more oxygen the bloodstream. I don't know my guess is not more oxygen entering the bloodstream. That's where lance armstrong was actually making more oxygen carriers by shooting epo the red blood cells or the shuttles. It was carry oxygen get low. We give them they get high he his normal. He raised them up as if he was training in colorado but us being in bolivia. There's no way that are carriers. Were higher so it's something something about the way that even despite having a lower delivery of oxygen to our cranking tissues. We didn't feel fatigued going back to the brain. The feeling of fatigue was reduced reduced by chewing on cocoa. That's my guess. I just made that right right right but i'm gonna haven't read about that but that sounds thinking. Let me throw one other thing. Okay i have taken my heart rate many many times at ten a._m. Of being awake all night doing coq ten a._m. I usually sit down at the computer and rights of emails like some seven eight page emails. That was kind of my routine so i would sometimes a little sweaty. It's only sixty eight million apartment. Just check him my my heart rate and quite quite regularly sitting there doing some emails. It'd be like one thirty five so i do wonder if the koga all raised the heart rate enough that it offset the reduction in in you know what that's very smart point the way our heart rate goes up is a way to deliver more half full carriers of oxygen. We're half full so we're gonna send you twice as much quantity over quality. You're gonna get about the same on oxygen but i'm having to pump more rapidly. Send you more carries over that. That's a good thought aw now the chewing coca leaf doesn't raise your heart rate otherwise i wouldn't have given it to youngsters right but that's a that's the way think smart common sense about oh how the body works because it's mechanical. That's what fascinates me about it. When you understand engine in won't run you go to very simple checklists right. You need compression. You you need fuel and you need spark one of those three things it's that simple and you have eight different parts that are in charge of all three of those things so you're dealing with potentially. Only forty issues whatever it's all going to boil down to those three things. We have all three of those things. You have a running engine so i would imagine you're part. That's the harley you name to write. There's a compression as the squeezing using the heart squeezes like a fast ring of towel. Oh right wyss twist. 'cause that's better ejection fraction. You get a more out like if we're going to take all the water our towel wow you twisted instead of balling it yeah so that's compression fuel is blood <hes> inside the blood. There's stuff that fights infections like the white blood cells and all that blood cancers from that but the fuel is actually the oxygen and the glucose that swimming around being delivered to you saint bolts ties to run brian mechanical. It's not a magic show and then the spark is an interesting one. The heart is under the dominion of these fine web of nerves on its surface and those listener they literally send little sparks to the heart muscle and the heart muscle compresses. Those nerves are only partially connected to our brain. Yeah knock me out. They'll still gonna keep firing hiring by meditate like buddhist monk for ten years. I can get them to behave a little bit. That's so fascinating isn't it. Now i want to go into your history a little bit because then when you come here at eight you go torrents. There's not a lot of kids from indian torrance. Are there no but i was brown so i never saw it. As <hes> i am brown. Central crisis never saw it as kid from india but it was like brown kid. There were other brown kids there. I was felt connected to people despite my gender despite my color. You didn't feel excluded. I didn't you know i think that's the narrative. It's a well warn one if i didn't feel that way. I don't wanna make you my narrative because it's convenient. No we'll your stories your story. There's no right or wrong but people more their stories because i think it fits a certain area. That's going to get them. Oppress hit or a little little pop on their website. I like it messy. I didn't feel excluded at one time. Some shit happened and i went home and told my pops i was like amanda weren't friendly with me. They were making fun of this or this and that and he's like did they throw stones rocks at you know he's complaining guy like. Do you know where we were yeah because open-minded. Everybody is here liberated. People are here compared to the region of the world. We just left. He had that disposition whereas i was in a place of gratitude it in yeah now about kids coming over. Were you ever embarrassed that it was like indian. Food is being cooked in the house any of that. I wasn't that guy might my parents. Parents were super progressive. Okay your brother also assimilated fit in beautifully. No we had our issues but they weren't culture and race based east okay. There were individual conflict base. It was me not liking being underestimated as a person not because i was brown male or you still have your struggles struggles <hes> they just weren't in the conventional box of race and culture. My parents were very progressive. They're laid back. We did a bunch of cool stuff but did i have beef with people in high school absolutely absolutely did i have heartbreak with my girlfriend. Of course those were the driving forces of my life. Not i was underestimated as an immigrant emigrant. I know that's a strong narrative a good narrative and so there's this deeper layer of struggling conflict that doesn't fit the conventional boxes and i think that applied.

bolivia nicotine peru lance armstrong cocaine stimulant colorado india torrance koga brown amanda six months ten years
India PM Modi defends Kashmir policy in Independence Day speech

Here & Now

01:14 min | 2 years ago

India PM Modi defends Kashmir policy in Independence Day speech

"There. Were celebrations across india today. Marking seventy two years since india's breakaway from british rule in his independence day address asset new delhi's red fort prime minister narendra modi defended his explosive decision earlier this month to strip indian administered kashmir of its special status satis bowing to restore the region to its past glory kashmir is divided between pakistan and india and has been disputed land since nineteen forty seven both both countries claim all of it but for more than a week indian administered kashmir has been under a curfew with no internet or phone service the b._b._c.'s rattled tandon joins joins us from delhi rahul mody said today that article three seventy which is the constitutional provision that granted special status to kashmir had only encouraged corruption option. What else did he say today. And how was his address received. It was a long address jeremy. He stood up at seven thirty in the morning. I think with millions of indians really on the edge of their s. seats to see what he was going to say about the issue of customer about that relationship which is very tense with pakistan ninety minutes later they got around so it was a defiant message basically mr modena's he likes to do portraying himself as

India Kashmir Pakistan Narendra Modi Delhi Prime Minister Jeremy Tandon Mr Modena B._B._C. Seventy Two Years Ninety Minutes
"rahul" Discussed on The Pitch

The Pitch

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on The Pitch

"That's it if i can console for these four events for the sizes which also by the way living in a metropolitan city if look them up the cluster the media is a forty are if you can pick up your sizes at that median and forget about the two tales i can cover most of my inventory and i'm seeing that now in in my data oh wow is right. Rahul turned a guy social calendar into a science back that up with data then topped it off with a little style know-how now but there are a lot of different size combination yesterday you know you have all different shoes in different sized blazers insurance. I'm just wondering how many times you can turn them. Ah automate that bit too so that model does exactly that when you join on it spits out to me and says that's assuming you're a forty. Two are yeah okay so if we were to long okay forty two long you come on. It'll tell me we have three forty. Two longs lasers as us for him. We are okay for three weeks. It's predictive buying then it tells me for the fourth week if he sticks on we need to buy something for him and so i can now time the rocket great i can look out for sale that can tell my bias to save about three weeks if he stays on him. Something rahul operation is so lean that he's figured figured out how to only buy clothes at the very last minute when he absolutely needs and while that might make rahul the king of bootstrapping the question becomes uh-huh how lean is too lean for investors looking for fat returns. That's when we come back and.

Rahul rahul three weeks
India imposes Kashmir clampdown to head off Eid protests

All Of It

02:50 min | 2 years ago

India imposes Kashmir clampdown to head off Eid protests

"There authorities in India have reimposed a military clampdown in the disputed territory of Kashmir ahead of the start of eat a Lotta festival on Monday Srinagar the main city in the Indian administered part of Kashmir is once again under lockdown it's been a week since India revoked cashmere special constitutional status which had afforded it a lot of political autonomy for more I'm joined by the B. B. C.'s Rahul tendon in Delhi Rahul why is this locked on being reimposed we believe that the log jam is re imposed because it was opened on Sunday morning so people could go shopping that would normally be a hustle and bustle across Indian administered Kashmir is people mocked the festival of Ede but it took a long time is being being reimposed because they seem to have been protest some reports of clashes as well so we've had Indian security man going around the area telling people to go back into the houses and the shops of being shot down once more it may be that later in the day that people within the area could go to the local mosque but we expect that the big mosque will once again have their gates locked down so on a day that is supposed to be a day where people would be with that family is walking around meeting their friends that's not going to be possible in Indian administered Kashmir as that lock down which has been in place for a week no phone lines no internet which is making communication frustrate difficult to substantiate facts that also remains in place the been some protests in Kashmir since the look does impose how extensive where these protests you think it is very very difficult to get an idea of the scale of them we have reporters on the ground who say that in some of them they may have been a thousand maybe more than a thousand people maybe thousands you gather together the Indian authorities say that's not the case at all they say that the silent majority inside Indian could administer Christmas support that policies and this is going to be for the benefit of the people that in the long term but I think there is no doubt that after a week of not being able to communicate with people within the area and across the rest of India and across the rest of the world that there is a rising level of frustration with many committees asking a simple question if you say this is a message to the Indian government that we support the policies that you put in place why you not letting us speak very briefly how would you describe life for the people who are living in Srinagar at the moment from what we can gather it's very difficult unable to move around difficult to get Manson's island with one story I sing a from Indian administered Kashmir flew to daily to get medicines because it was easier than trying to get them in the area that he lived in life is very difficult and I think as we move down this week with Indian independence day and focused on independence day it's going to remain very tense in the area who attended there in

India
India, Rahul Gandhi And Lauren discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

India, Rahul Gandhi And Lauren discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"In India the main opposition leader Rahul Gandhi has resigned as leader of his party and peers Lauren for reports from Mumbai Gandhi's party suffered a big defeat at the polls in may the Indian National Congress lead this country to independence seventy two years ago but after back to back defeats to Hindu nationalist Rahul Gandhi is stepping down as Congress leader in his resignation letter Gandhi says Indian democracy has been weakened and he predicts quote unimaginable levels of violence

India Rahul Gandhi Lauren Mumbai Gandhi Indian National Congress Seventy Two Years
"rahul" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on Acquired

"But we realized that superhuman was a perfect way to round out our trilogy on the modern productivity stack on the heels of our zoom and slack IPO episodes, and we learned that the timing would be perfect with some big news that just dropped for superhuman. Indeed. Well, they just raised their thirty three million dollars series b funding led by Andriessen, Horowitz on the heels of some very rapid growth, as you'll hear if you want to read more about the company after this episode you can click the link in the show notes for the New York Times article that broke the news now. Lou of doing our normal description of the LP show at this time we have a big request, please fill out the season. Four survey. It is tremendously important us here at acquired world HQ to no one who are audiences for better content, but to, to make sure that we work with relevant and interesting sponsors for everyone and to sweeten the deal. If you fill out the survey, you'll be entered into a raffle, where we will give out one pair of second generation air pods that you can use to listen to all the acquired you want, and there will be ten other lucky winners of free. L P show subscriptions for one year you can click the link in the show notes or go to acquire dot FM slash survey. And again, we deeply appreciate you doing this. It's hugely important to us. And in fact, if you have five minutes to spare right now, I'll even invite you to pause right here, and we will be with you as soon as you get back. I swear. I love it. Yeah. Love it. Cheesy in too, cheesy. Holy just great. All right. Well, lastly before we dive in, I want to thank the sponsors of all of season for Perkins. Kui counseled two great companies we have with us today. Ned Pruthi, a partner in the corporate insecurities practice who regularly advises clients working with the SEC now Ned aside from the window being open. What do you think has contributed to all these companies going public at once? Yeah. I think a lot of one of the factors is, is a lot of these companies are using the IPO as, as a truly as a marketing play not so much as, as really a marketing to raise money to, to further their business. But truly to try to gain more users and get the get the publicity of the IPO companies, you know, think grab users quickly if they have a strong position in the market. They've struggled relationship, it makes it more difficult for some other competitor to come in and, and dislodge them from market. And I really think that's why you saw a lift and Uber. Oh, be so a to get out, you'll right around the same time so that they could secure their market share publicity in the in their businesses. Great. Thanks ned. If you wanna learn more about Perkins coup or reach out to Ned specifically, you can click the link in the show notes or in slack. Now without further ado, here is our conversation with superhuman CEO, Rahul Vohra. So welcome acquired LP's to a very special episode of the P show. David, and I are sitting here in superhuman world HQ on California street in San Francisco. And we have with us an awesome guest, Rahul Vohra CEO of superhuman, welcome to the show. Absolutely. Thank you. Both hunting me. Yeah. You bet to give a little brief bio, so Rahul is the founder and CEO superhuman, the wildly popular blazingly fast Email app. That is changing the way. A lot of us, think about our relationship with our inbox and before superhuman Rahul was the CEO and co founder of report of selling. To Lincoln in twenty twelve. So if you noticing a pattern there, I think I definitely am Rahul is also an active angel investor in advisor to several start ups, and we are lucky to have him with us today. So I already said, welcome to the show. So I don't need to say that again, but the show like Thank you. you. Are we? Right. That this is your second office. This technically is our fourth office office, and you're about thirty people. Now here it looks like we all. Yes, it's nice and decked out and super human colors. It's like yeah. We do. Pinks purples. Although of trying to keep the we just moved in vibe, we don't want to go to crazy his. Yeah. Because we found as we grow so fast that, by the time we've made a place is it's like okay time to move onto the next office. It's awesome. The problem with early stage startup offices. Good problem to have good from nab, let's minute before we get to superhuman, which we're gonna spend most of the episode on can you tell us quickly on reported? How did how did you start it and, and it was a very quick turnaround. So repulsive was basically started to satisfy my own need. It was a classic case of scratching my own which I was at the university of Cambridge at the time. And I in fact, had just dropped out of the PHD program. I'd started a PHD there in machine learning and computer vision, this was way before, either of those things were cool or even feasible in any case, I dropped out, because I realized that what I wanted to be was an entrepreneur, but I didn't have an idea at the time that I wanted to pursue sway networks. Way into the pots of the university that helps staff and students creates companies cooled Cambridge University entrepreneurs and essentially what I would do is, I would actually come to folks like yourself, these angels, big tech companies, and I would say, hey, can I please have some money, and they'd be like why? And I'd say, well, I want to give that money to staff and students at the university of Cambridge who are making companies it's gonna be awesome. Trust me. And these folks is sort of rubbed the hands together and go cool. How much equity do we get? And I would say none whatsoever. This is this is a charity that we're running. We're trying to help people learn how to build businesses and by what we're going to make some amazing businesses as well. And as we've covered multiple times on the show Cambridge is actually a really great entrepreneurial hub. I mean, arm came out of Cambridge as did many other companies. It's crazy. Cambridge. Silicon radio. Let's see who else. That was that company that call quiet. I forgot the name boiler mother and winning companies to my partner. Riley wave was a grad student Cambridge as my friend, Nelson of impre, plenty of Silicon Valley was come from come from Cambridge in the UK. Yeah. Giving you money. They did. They should give me money in the end. But the point of the story is, I was thrust into this not for profit fundraising at a very young age with no training in this field whatsoever. And having grown up learning how to program on being a very competent program at the time, I was just wondering myself will, what tools would help me do this fundraising better. And I imagine if in my Email, I could see what people look like why they were based links to the recent tweets links to that social profiles than I would be able to authentically connects without person on established rapport so much better. Hence the idea behind repulsive. I couldn't find that product in the market. So in about six weeks. I just sat down and build out first version. And that was that was totally magical. I remember the first time I installed the plug in was was at first for G mail. And then chrome or was it, what was the implementation of that it was, in fact, always? As a chrome extension older before it was a criminal tension, technically it was a five FOX extension. This was in two thousand and ten where people it's kind of hot remember Nabet people was still skeptical. That chrome was thing, the taste may at the time we were all sitting in five. So it started as a five FOX add on later on it was a chrome extension. I do definitively. Remember that? I open experience have you can type someone's Email and, and then like a second or two goes by. And then boom, there's all this enrichment about them, and it's like now it's taken for granted, because this idea has permeated into sort of other products throughout the years. But this is something really magical to it. How did the connection with Lincoln happen? We've also talked to bunch of the show about the importance of Email to linked in into Lincoln's growth and unbefitting. So I imagine you popped up on their radar screen. Pretty quickly was the relationship like we had a great relationship, ultimately ended up in, I guess a technical consummation. They quietness initially like many aquisitions started. With a business development relationship, and the way that, that transpired was we were consumers of an API at the time provided by Dennis. You guys remember company cold. Rapley f-. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Noli. So rapidly is one of those first companies to acquired Nossa rap leaf, ended up transmogrify ING to some degree they became live ramp. And then they were acquired by axiom, and have recently spun out as a large public company, I think that now worth three billion dollars in most of the doing really well, but back in the day, it was a relatively small startup Colt rap leaf yet despite this mall size. They were the only company and remember this was back in two thousand ten to whom you could supply an Email address, and they would give you the full social context about that Email day. That's full-contact clear bit. Those are the sort of providers that would be the cops today. Correct. Yeah. Now, it's sort of those. Well, now it says sort of a almost a commodity marketplace for that data. But back then it was the sort of edgy. Crazy new thing that you able to do and so me being opportunistic entrepreneurial is like cool. Let's take this API. Let's package it up, which actually wasn't a crazy amounts of work. Let's, let's jam it into g mail via the use of a browser extension. So that's where the data came from. Now you can imagine that linked. Tune went onto pleased about an upstart selling that data Lincoln famously as always made it really hard to get mass quantities of data out of because they haven't network affected indeed, and we definitely didn't want or need mass quantities and everything, by the way, that we would doing was for the benefit of linked tins hardest core members which is ultimately, why it was such a good relationship with them, but they approached us to at one point, and will like, hey, listen. We really would prefer it. If you were not buying our data off the posses, and I was like cool. I would really prefer. It's if I. Had access to the. So. The only internal right now. We both stated on preferences for awhile until I think a few months later, we realized that maybe an actual business development relationship would be the best thing, which was truly remarkable, because I think that point in fact, it never grew beyond us that will own the ever about twenty companies the had access to this secret, Lincoln API that's us. And that was that was probably right around the time of their IPO. Right. This would have been Hof way through twenty eleven. I don't recall exactly when the IPO it would have been around that time, it was either ended twenty eleven or twenty twelve I believe the Chapa was dealing with is Adam Nash, who wants to be the COO wealth, Fronton, who's now after all books and he was super nice about it. So I went in and he was like, can you demo what you would do with Lincoln API on I showed him, the workflows, and he was looking for things like is the copy helpful, we trying to deceive uses clearly, no always stealing data. Absolute. Absolutely not. Is it for the value of the Lincoln member? Yes, it is. He was like, okay great. You should be opponent. I personally wanted to dive into that to sort of give context on how we got to where we are today. What I love to start to steer the conversation to is, is the founding of superhuman and David. And I have previously talked a couple of times on, on the show about things that companies do pre and post product market fed, and definitions of it, but the whole you, you at superhuman have actually built metrics around it, and found sort of systematic and scientific ways to find product market fit. I'm teasing sort of our analysis section here later because I won't folks to know that we're going to dive into the founding of superhuman right now. But where we got eventually is to accompany that waited over two years to launch and really built something sort of amazing and a very sort of both art and data driven way. And then we're going to sort of dive until that whole story, but talk to me about the initial idea for superhuman where it came from and how you convinced yourself that there's a business to be started selling..

Lincoln Rahul Vohra Cambridge Ned Pruthi university of Cambridge founder and CEO Perkins David CEO partner New York Times Lou LP FOX Andriessen Kui San Francisco Hof
India's Prime Minister Modi headed for landslide victory: what it means for India

Here & Now

05:12 min | 2 years ago

India's Prime Minister Modi headed for landslide victory: what it means for India

"You, Robin will- India's prime minister Narendra Modi and his party are celebrating today after winning. Landslide victory. Today's news sent India's stock market soaring. And it follows six weeks of voting in the world's largest democracy. Joining us now is the BBC's REI. She's in Delhi divvy Narendra Modi was not on the ballot. But this election was a referendum on his leadership, so far and it seems like a pretty big vote of confidence in him. Indeed. We haven't seen a body comeback to power in India with this kind of mandate. He has overdone him said from the last time the numbers have gone up is still waiting for the final results. But the tally that's coming up is pretty clear and the whole election was fought in his name. Not even in his body's name every candidate in every constituency spoken in bed rallies, about Mr. moldy? So it was very clear to the water that your vote is not for the member of parliament, representing your constituency, but for Narendra Modi and it is to represent the whole country. So help us understand how voters. Did what they did here. Because since Modi has been prime minister there's been a farm crisis. There's been problems with unemployment, and growing religious divides, when Mr. moody has done an extremely successful communication campaign, and he has explained to the people that he is the kind of leader they need, because he can take decisions when they needed the strikes, that will made into Pakistan, right off to a terror attack onto a security forces forty-one security, forces were killed in the state of Cushman just before the elections was shown, as an example of what how countries should respond, especially to Pakistan with a country with whom we've had changed since for a really really long time. And we fought a couple of wars as well, his whole his party's whole attitude towards the Hindu-majority was another strong signal that went out to the public that the Hindu-majority is better off in the governance of Mr. moody, and his body. Not the secular congress party, which. Ruled the country for many decades. And even today when I went out to speak to people to find out how they were reacting to the government's re election, this is exactly what they were looking forward to this ad now, the Hindus will feel that they're not being discriminated. And what about the Muslim minority? Well, the Muslim minority of has seen a lot of, you know, there's been a lot of fear that the Muslim minority has experienced seen it among spears amongst educated, upper class, beatha Rian tracked with. We've also seen it in areas where mob, lynchings have happened people have been lynched for carrying transporting cows because cows are considered sacred in Hindu religion, and even people who are carrying cows of a slaughter, which is legally permitted were targeted. So the has been a sense of feel and a lot of people on Twitter today, for example have been talking about how going forward, the minorities will have to be subservient in a do the majority to live in harmony. But of course, the BJP potty denies all of that, and they say that, if you look at policies when the implement them we do not discriminate on the basis of religion, and that is what matters at the end of the day, where do these results Lee. Leave. Rahul Ghandi's party, the Indian National Congress. Well, it's a huge defeat for him. He just came in address the press a little while back, and he said he humbly accepts it because that is the people's worked, and he was asked about his leadership, and he said, that's something that the party will decide so lots of questions for mister gone to answer. And also, to reinvent because the congress if this is not a wakeup call for it to sort of strategize its messaging. It's the body workers and what it stands full. We don't know when it will be one more thing. What is the relationship between India and the United States like, and what is it likely to be like, with Narendra Modi staying in power? Well, the relationship has been pretty good. And Mr. moody has been credited with the, you know, refurbishing all his relationships across the world. He's seen to be someone who's been very successful with his foreign policy. He's made visits to the. United states. There's a strong community Indian community that that's supports him. And of course between him. And President Trump, of course, there seems to be more points of agreement than disagreement. Both of them have a very nation. I kind of agenda, not to say that the congress party here did not. But Mr. moody has also spoken about stopping immigration into the country. They're talking about bringing a citizenship Bill, which weeds out people who are not citizens and illegally. They've come into the country. So there, lots of common ground. And of course, the Pakistan being a common enemy China, of course being a common trade challenge to deal with. I think going forward, this is going to be probably good for both leaders, whether it's going to be good for both countries. Of course, is a question that icon onto at the

Narendra Modi Mr. Moody Indian National Congress India Rahul Ghandi Prime Minister BBC United States Pakistan Parliament Beatha Rian Robin BJP Mr. Moldy Twitter China President Trump
Modi plays Hindu nationalism card to seek re-election

FT News

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Modi plays Hindu nationalism card to seek re-election

"Election has turned into an ideological battle pitting an inclusive vision of a multifaith nation against the view, the Hindu should have primacy. Justin sing discusses the tactics. Used by prime minister, Narendra Modi and his opponents with Amy Kazman and Stephanie Finley. Nine the band. Police some of John Lear he DACA gig it out on a here. Niane to Don downtown. Why you are. Thank you cut it out. I turn on a. Yeah. League in Wadsworth. Go again in the sun. Are your go go to med goose multi? Somebody's at speak. And the political temperature is adding to the intense heat prime minister, Narendra Modi has been crisscrossing the country giving fiery speeches and so as mR Modi's main rival Rahul Gandhi, the president of the opposition congress party, Amy, it's long and staggered election. But Mr. Modi is a tireless campaigner, what are the main issues? He has been raising at his rallies for prime minister Narendra Modi. This has been mainly an election focused on national security in his first prime ministerial election campaign in twenty fourteen he'd been very very focused on the economy, and he talked a lot about how he was going to accelerate economic growth and get a lot of jobs created to absorb young people trying to get into the workforce. But as economic track record has actually been really patchy. So it's not a very strong ground for him to campaign on but the showdown with Pakistan in February in response to a terror attack in Kashmir that. All India law missiles to an alleged terror training camp in Pakistan, really switched the tone nature of the campaign and diverted public attention away from 'economics to issues of national security, so Mody and the BJP have essentially been campaigning tirelessly on this idea that India is under threat that it faces grave external and even internal threats and that Mody is the strong leader that Indian needs to cope with these threats. These threats include the threat of terrorism from Pakistan. They include the threat of illegal immigration from India's neighbour Bangladesh. And then there is this insinuation that. India is also under threat from internal enemies ranging from India's Muslim minority to secular leftists and Naxalites and that old together the nation needs a strong leader to handle these challenges and threats and that Mody. Who is very much seen as a strong strongman is the leader that India needs to handle these challenges. Congress bodies talk campaigners around Gandhi and his sister Priyanka how does their campaign compared to Mr. Modi's, and what are their main arguments? Modena's definitely an absolutely relentless and tireless campaigner he's a natural campaigner one gets the feeling he probably really enjoys giving these speeches in front of these huge adoring cheering crowds. I'm not sure that Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the congress or a sister Priyanka who's been drafted in as a star campaigner share that love of campaigning that the prime minister has they have struggled. I think to find traction with voters they were on a strong ground in December. When there was a lot of focus on the poor performance of the economy rural distress. And I think their campaign strategy gotta be able to knock after the showdown with Pakistan and the conversation turned away from. The domestic economic issues, but they have been trying to focus on domestic economic issues. Modi's alleged mismanagement of the economy rural distress they've unveiled the scheme that is supposed to see seventy two thousand rupees given to every poor household a kind of a minimum income guarantee scheme that is intended to lift the poorest of the poor out of poverty. So they've been trying to focus on the economy and bring voter attention back away from these kind of ideals of nationalism and some threat to the very real issues of their own pocket books. The best care. Wrong, glenn. He has also been trying to really smear Modi's image with a lot of allegations that he's a thief in connection with a controversial arms deal. We don't know. Which of these issues has really found traction with the voters was the congress able to bring voters back away from the idea of we need a strong leader to defend us against these various enemies. There was real dissatisfaction with Mody on the ground among many voters who had voted for him in two thousand fourteen they were unhappy with his economic performance, and they were inclined to you. I think vote against him. At least some what we don't know. What will only be clear on may twenty third on vote. Counting day is which way they finally went rallies are just one way to reach out to voters. There are also colorful posters multimedia advertisements. And song videos to make a strong push. But social media has emerged as a new factor in these elections, Stephanie how political parties using social media, and what are the factors driving up? It's using this campaign. So in two thousand fourteen prime minister Modi had already emerged as the king of social media in India. And from that time his party has been laying the groundwork for a sophisticated political propaganda machine using social media, mostly using what's up and speaking to party officials. They've said that they want to target every voter over what's app, and it's with very specific messaging speaking to one former data analyst of the party, he said that voters are targeted based on class based on caste based on demographic information based on past voting history. So what we have here is a very big very targeted. And very coordinated campaign from the ruling party and the opposition party. Just doesn't have the resources, and they haven't been able to keep up.

Narendra Modi Prime Minister India Congress Party Pakistan Mody Rahul Gandhi Amy Kazman Stephanie Finley Don Downtown Justin Sing John Lear Wadsworth BJP Modena Analyst Kashmir
Modis operandi: Indias enormous election

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:53 min | 2 years ago

Modis operandi: Indias enormous election

"The biggest democratic exercise on earth, India's general election, the scale of it is staggering some nine hundred million people began voting last week at a million polling stations the process will continue until the twenty third of may. The election is the first since Rendra Mody, the leader of the Barth the junk party was sworn in as prime minister of India. He switched to power in two thousand fourteen with an inclusive. Message promising jobs and progress. His focus on Hindu unity majority faith in India. Put an end to seven decades of secularist politics since then though his popularity has waned somewhat economic growth is disappointing unemployment is relatively high. But the recent boiling over of long standing tensions with neighboring Pakistan has revitalized Mr. Modi's bid for reelection. So the election is as -ticipant it'd the biggest in the world ever, Alex trolley, India correspondent with the economist based in Delhi, India's largest means the world's largest you hear that an estimated nine hundred million Indians are eligible to vote and Indians ten devoted relatively high rates between sixty and eighty percent host states more than one in nine humans is eligible to vote and then the rigmarole of actually conducting elections in country as sprawling and in some ways challenges this one means that pulling takes a long time. So tell us about the render Mody so Narendra Modi has changed Indian politics indelibly, and that's something that we could have said even before the two thousand fourteen general election, India's last one of the most striking ways, formerly as that. He presents himself as something like a presidential candidate the party that he leads party John party or J P, really. Rides on his coattails Audie m accord, but he speaks forcefully up got got a bit the head. But was our up. What he what he projects the image of a strong, man, perhaps very virtuous, man. Also, a man with a hopeful attitude about the future about India's greatness, and it's claiming its rightful role in the world now. Notably the campaign. He ran in two thousand fourteen was much more focused on India's booming economy or Connie that everyone felt should be booming harder. This time round. He's voting rather. He's asking voters to choose him much more in the basis of his nationalist credentials is ability to protect India, from enemies, foreign enemies, internal enemies. It's in many ways a darker campaign. No less contentious. So on that note that how big a part will Pakistan play as an election issue. We'll. Custodian is playing a very large role say an outsized role in this election because of something that began in February and the middle of February. There was a terrorist bombing Indian-administered Kashmir that was horribly successful killed forty Indian soldiers paramilitary forces and came as a real blow to the sense of the nation. No thirteen days later, Mr. moody, ordered airstrikes and it's unclear what damage they did. But Pakistan responded with airstrikes of its own. And there was a dog fight. And India was able to walk away from this kind of mixed military exchange saying that Mr. moti had sought and found vengeance for the loss of those forty soldiers. And that this proves that his is the government that will defend against Pakistan. So every day since then on the campaign trail from not only his BJP, but from the other parties as well, you're hearing boxed on Pakistan. Pakistan, as if as if India box on relationships were the most important of all matters facing the Indian voter strange in part because the India-Pakistan relationship has been frozen solid for the past four years and has nothing apparent to do with any of the bread and butter issues that tend to determine elections in India. Well, what are the the real bread and butter issues? What do the the Indian voters really care about? Well, right now, it's different at different times. But right now, it seems like farmer distress is one of the very big things. And then from the more urban even middle class side of the electorate, it's kind of jobs crisis. What you have is not so much mass on employment of the western kind. Although the figure is record breaking for India. It's still only six point seven per cent. I believe and that may look low by western stand. Words, but what it reflects is huge disappointment on the part of the Indian workforce. It means that a lot of Indians would rather get no work at all than take up the sort of crummy jobs that are available to them. This isn't part of product of greater education and greater ambitions. And it's one of the things Mr. moody campaigned on most centrally in two thousand fourteen the number of jobs in India is barely greater now than it was then. So there seems to be plenty to challenge Mr. Mody on who are the other contenders his political threats. So the chief contender standing against Mr. Mody in the national level is Rahul Gandhi. He's the Siahaan of the Gandhi family that the narrow Gandhi family is great grandfather was the first prime minister of independent India, and he leads a party that has been badly battered in recent years, especially since Mr. moody reached prominence on the national stage. They command pathetically small number of seats in the lower house. And yet the head of that party. A young gash seeming middle aged man is the best hope in the form of personality. The opposition has against Mr. Mody, that's the congress party. And what makes them powerful would make them worth our attention at this point. Are the fact that every other party in Indy every other big party a couple of exceptions has come to see Mr. Modi's government as as an existential threat, and so they've all banded together. And what you have right now is this coalition led informally by Rahul Gandhi. But supported by every other big political party in the country. Now if that coalition can hold together, Mr. moody will really have to worry about keeping control of the government. I mean, democracy seems to be kind of always under threat, and and more. So all the time as the world's largest democracy. Do you think in the provides lessons for the rest of the world will India's examples should be inspiring? And that it's managed to maintain a democracy against extremely adverse circumstances, what was terribly impoverished nations still as mainly poor one extremely heterogenous and yet people keep voting in and especially the keep voting out leaders. They don't like so India's democracy that's worked even when it shouldn't. However, that's not to say that there isn't fragility in the Indian system and a lot of people have been concerned in the past five years that Mr. Modi's extremely effective control over all the institutions of the state might threaten democracy. Should he win power fairly one more time? So that's not to say that this current election, isn't lively and fully contested in democratic terms. But some people are afraid that this prime minister. Won't be capable of seeing the next one through so

India Pakistan Narendra Modi Prime Minister Mr. Moody Mr. Mody Rahul Gandhi Rendra Mody John Party Congress Party Barth Alex Trolley Kashmir J P Indy BJP Connie Delhi Mr. Moti Eighty Percent
Illinois attorney general challenges Van Dyke murder sentence

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Illinois attorney general challenges Van Dyke murder sentence

"The case against a Chicago. Police officer convicted in the shooting death of teenager may not be over attorney general Rahul filed a petition to the state supreme court challenging Jason Van Dyke sentence of less than seven years in prison on second degree murder in the twenty fourteen killing of drug burglary suspect, lukewarm McDonald rather than his convictions on sixteen counts of aggravated battery with a firearm. The defense wanted probation the lost clear and the jets the law. Van Dyke to say remark. Vandyke attorney Jennifer Blake calling the latest move nothing. More than

Jason Van Dyke Van Dyke Attorney General Rahul Jennifer Blake Second Degree Murder Burglary Chicago Mcdonald Officer Seven Years
Sri Lanka's Parliament passes no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Rajapaksa

Investor's Edge

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Sri Lanka's Parliament passes no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Rajapaksa

"Dating back to the fourth century BC. They also found graves containing vases and jewelry now eight pink diamond has been sold for a record price in Switzerland. Daniel man reports. Ladies and gentlemen, the pink legacy diamond. Twenty four million twenty four million francs. And so the bidding and Swiss francs started at Christie's annual magnificent jewels auction in Geneva for the stone, which was discovered in a South African mine around one hundred years ago, it's thought the exceptionally large diamond was probably cut in the nineteen twenties and hasn't been altered since the auction near Rahul kadarshian close the bidding after five minutes. Forty three million five hundred thousand forty four million five hundred thousand all done at forty four million five hundred thousand francs last Johnson the room forty four million five. Forty four million five hundred dollars. The successful bidder was the American luxury jeweler Harry Winston, it's already renamed the stone. The Winston pink legacy Carta rectangle shape. It was rated fancy vivid, which is the highest possible grade of color intensity such diamond larger than ten carrots almost unheard of Francois. Cutie L is Christie's European chairman. The situation of

Christie Harry Winston Switzerland Rahul Kadarshian Geneva Chairman Daniel Johnson Forty Four Million Five Hundre One Hundred Years Five Minutes
"rahul" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

WNYC 820AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on WNYC 820AM

"Right now rahul locals we have been talking about in recent months is this idea of a free trade bilateral agreement between india and the uk but again i'm going to be devil's advocate the big problem in that one has always been this free movement of people that was the criticism right india would love to see far greater access for individual indians and business people to travel to and fro the uk and kelly for a lot of people who voted for brexit the idea of that free influx of people potentially from a hugely populous nation is is seems very threatening in fact the free trade agreement one of the critical challenges was immigration and think i think at something that's going to remain a challenge while the negotiations go on of course i conflict government again but i think as an individual we created the commonwealth alliance of young entrepreneurs six years ago and one of the biggest things that we have advocated in our communicates is a commonwealth business visa that allows people to just move and talk and trade unless you talk to each other meet each other you can't trade what's the purpose of all the discussions if as an entrepreneur i have to wait three months to go and meet a customer in a country because of these restrictions now if these are things that can be eased up immigration may not be needed any briefly does that is an issue for nigerian business people i think it's an issue for all low income highgrowth country is but i completely agree with rahul point this isn't about moving people it's about creating partnerships and to create partnerships we have to be able to sit down around the same table you're listening to the balanced from the bbc with me and my guests for multi the economy minister dr christian car our donor from nigeria amy jetta see me from the city of london kenneth lisa and from india rahul much donny now to a cheery story which we picked up because one of the the myriad strange little tails that you get here at an event like this jane hazel mccosh she's the owner of a stately home in cumbria in the north of england and produces and sells marmalade they run an annual worldwide mom laid festival and award with a commonwealth twist to.

india uk commonwealth alliance bbc amy jetta kenneth lisa cumbria england rahul kelly dr christian nigeria london donny three months six years
"rahul" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"In order that you're getting the all new feed being or if the very gung union eagerly confronted folded in the whole at beloved promote at the old mother leader that i've been going you go very y'all in all from ali fantastic how is the philip different some other best solutions and on all go look but he didn't who later arraigned that really do uh they won't blake ready to go down belated thought of all ray up been the feed ban it you go down a dynamically uh uh being the new people why do you or by the end of the network morning bought an and what we saw during the number income in ended up your whole right india has been amended on the rahul on whom the england that not all of it i mean do in one oggi cannot have the means row in defend rugged old and the john lewis deluded the goal of what he wanted to sign on that would be eager internet better going to india who both of them there would have your old the bring the white by from one end of the old daughter what are you gonna be ignored in any dined all manner whether you going in an idiot monitor the ozone any aid to the in to anything no all are therefore taken and don't know going into the oath no one or two per line that by going to be done in your whole okay we're gonna take a quick break this is pop tech radio we're talking with can an regard around is the senior global product manager for links this we'll be right back this palmtec radio.

ali india rahul england product manager blake john lewis
"rahul" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"rahul" Discussed on KGO 810

"What would that be oh boy uh was a little out a lot of different thing that i feel i victory we could undo done a lot of things right but i will say that pick a few things one is around really it on uh making sure startled see are you end up actually having to pay a lot of different issues and it's going to meet you the game owes you keep coming political problems and you need to pick and choose which required lives above ones and you need to have a good springboard in a good way to communicate that uh the rest of the leadership team as well as if they which are the problems and they could be marketrelated this could be related to be the people related as well and we need to going to have a a good radio being able to figure of visual problems you need to go taco and sometimes you don't have an answer ready and you meanwhile the decor it but he again forget about it so you can't get urgency necessarily become de driving factor her worst importance you need to ideally gloucester both the urgent and important and having a punchless dose that a thing that you need to go drafts i think as i would say is really critical because sometimes otherwise loading find it actually becomes much more expensive dick the camera so that makes sense of that so that i bet well i don't want to put any words your mouth but if we can a flip that around the next natural question then rahul is so from rear experiences c let's say i i have a business plan and i wanna start a company now and we know what is kind of the key piece of advice if there's one thing he said there's only one thing that you learn from me today this is what you need to know when you're starting with the big business what would that piece of advice bureau understand the why and you really need to understand why should those company this why should a customer or older a customer and why we'll be care about this and then the next question coming to the.

rahul