27 Burst results for "Radiohead"

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

08:14 min | 6 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"Never used before they played in a style was fairly new to them, and also when they started, they weren't all on the same page you know and I don't know if one of them took the lead with this album or the all had their part in it but the result speaks for itself night, they managed to make something that's consistent. You know the themes are explored from a few different angles. It seems that they got on the same wavelength after all. In must've been tough process to go through and I would've loved to see what challenges they faced and how they them I think. Will eventually maybe know a little bit more because I'm planning on listening to Radio head for quite a long time now in the same way to. Queen was a good introduction to well Quyen I guess. But Wimbley thousand, ninety, six, it was a good introduction to quaint I. Think is a pretty good starting point for radiohead actually when would you guys play this album? Would you play it with friends in the car? Would you play it alone or when the perfect time because we talked earlier, this album doesn't work in every environment in every context, and obviously each album has the perfect to kind of conditions to listen to. But this one I think it's It's more specific condition this one this one worked for me in two locations. One was alone in the car very nice to listen to you on the way higher men to Wack, and then the other one was actually at work when I'm doing wet because. A little bit for superficial raisin. But because they went to many of the lyrics or at least it was it was quite spas. It was really good flights to concentration just getting into is aren't getting in Vietnam, not trance but more a Florida state and Yeah. That especially like things like everything in its right place. The National Anthem even idiotic was with great for those reasons and Yeah. It was good definitely sort of more learn listening doesn't feel like something. I would chuck on at a party. But maybe maybe maybe the first song if our party something but Miceli, the more private listening on say what about you think along Like a place that you can, you can do like introspective in maybe just a peaceful place. It's a very individual. Testing. Yeah. I, think we're all on the same page here like I definitely agree it's either alone in the car where you can turn the music up or when you're doing something with your hands, you're free to think I duNno I it's not something. I. Would share with other people like like you guys both have said it's it's kind of personal or Another perfect place for this albums like when you're lying in bed in the dark with headphones and you're closing your eyes and just in it yeah. That was like my experience actually think when I couldn't sleep. Yeah. That was that was that some tough times anyway. So listen to most of their albums. What would you prefer I, can give them to you in best to worst in my opinion or I can give them from the real estate. What would you? What would you like best to worst I? K So my favorite album is code in rainbows and in rainbows released in two thousand seven. So seven years after kid I and in rainbows is a very good album and unlike kid, I, I would say it's not an album that you need to solely listen to by yourself. I. Think it's one that you wouldn't put on for a crowd or even a party and it starts off with probably one of the better potty songs probably the one cheese. Code fifteen step it's very update, and then it goes into my favorite song of the album could bodies snatches, which is a very heavy guitar and searing vocals and it's got some really good In fact, is spa few average songs and no bad songs eight the odds say old songs really possible Stephanie. So fifteen step buddy snatches and jigsaw falling into place would Bama three to sort of preview that. Album safe. It's something you would like the next one behind that is kid and we've talked about that yet. We mentioned it the one after that it was between okay computer and the bands. But I think, I wanna go to the band's because I'm just going for that indefectible. It's a little bit different and It's a it's quite heavy I would say it's the heaviest but more of a grunge. A typical nine stood of should've found heaviness to it. I'd say my my two favorite were actually not the heavy songs from those albums from that album it says high and dry, which a lot of paper we were recognized and also fake plastic trees Sir definitely give those to listen as I said, the next one would definitely have to be okay computer sir. people can stop yelling at me now and exit music for a film was the one I mentioned before with on that album. That's very good. However, my favorite on that album is could electioneering. Fantastic riff some fantastic vehicles on that one and I feel like for me that Peter Mayes with the album. But think a lot of other people will go for something something else may be paranoid android, and if I pick another one I would peak no surprises, which is a little bit less sort of a little bit more melancholy but nevertheless, it's very catchy and very nice. So. okay. Computer is very good in my book. It's just They have other good songs as well. Sorry. That one out say the most recent original release. So not very release in two, thousand, sixteen there at least a moon shaped pu it's a fifty two minute. Alba Longa but it also have melds into one. But in a nice way, it's very mood mood album. So like something you would wanna put on when you're playing may be chess or something you would want WanNa play when you're playing board game something that's GonNa Interrupt your concentration or play at work even but it does feel a little bit more pleasant than Something, you do at work like it's not as electronic as I would like it to bay to listen to it work. It's it's more small children that there are some upbeat songs been the, which is a very good one. My personal favorite off the album called the numbers but I would say overall, it's a very nice. It's almost like a familiar traded as a fifty minute track of inventive yet still palatable tons interesting. It's yeah it is an interesting one. It is an interesting one. The only reason it's tire is because Sometimes, I find hard to identify what what song is reached because they all sort of Meld together for me, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. No not at all. Then also listen to Pablo honey, which is not good. It's not good and Ages very poorly. I can see how people would think it was very good when it came out. Very cool hip thing to listen to and the one that sort of defines this album is crepe which I don't particularly like that much I think it's possible song but no much more and besides I don't think I have another song that I really particularly like from this album I listen to once like. Expecting good things from it and I wasn't exactly impressed but it's it's not terrible. It's it's just in fact, everything fits together nicely in terms of every song connor feels like a different color of the album but it SAM is just not super inventive and so Sophos, and then the last one I've listened to haven't listened to hail to the faith in two thousand and three haven't got so that one yet. But the last one I listened to was Amnesic, which I would rank dead lost and given a.

radiohead Queen National Anthem Peter Mayes Sophos Amnesic Vietnam Miceli Alba Longa Pablo honey Bama Florida Stephanie connor SAM
"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"It's it's so slow and touching, and it's kind of like even like he's is even telling it to himself some kind of a mantra. Really liked it. Yeah. It's one of my favorites as well. This was my favorite for the majority of the time I, I was listening to the album and then it changed losec. And it hasn't come yet. radiohead show as the orchestra has performed paces by Penderecki and Messiah. Do you guys those names. Anyway it's integral for my appoint Jonny Greenwood. The only radiohead member trained in music theory compares a string arrangement by multi tracking his UNDIS- Not. Anyway again leads onto the next point, which is according to Godridge, who is worked with radiohead when musicians saw greenwood's score they all just sort of into giggles because they couldn't do what he'd written because it was impossible or impossible for them. Anyway. I didn't really hear the sort of the orchestra bit as being quite difficult but. Apparently must have been either that or they were just very underpaid. But Yeah I I started out listening to this maybe the first second listen and I didn't really get it like this is this is one of those scenarios where. Sort of just felt like a slow song with Okinawa sort of not a hook but just a nice repeating sort of feel like a mantra feel. But then I really felt like I understood like. This, the way the lyrics came with the almost like the delay orchestra like that would he would say something and then the orchestra in response would sort of reply it would just become. More intense and more agitated and even. Just gave the gave the sense of being a a learn but also there was like a lot of space like there was no one was hearing the what was happening and he he could just like become more not aggressive but more sort of vocal and there was no response from like anyone else where he was trying to get it and Yeah it is one of the saddest things I will say it didn't really make me feel too sad like some songs sort of infect you with the sadness one. I just liked the song like just in a pure pleasure way and I didn't really get any of those feelings of by being uncomfortable being sad or melancholic or something like that. But I I don't even really counted against the song because it just felt as as good as it was gonna be for me and Yeah that that's basically all I have to say but it was is as I said, it was one of my favorites for Most of the time I was listening to it and it just gets better as the sun goes on it some. Now once you have some of those, especially some of his light of Arco Lonzo nineties when he sang I'm not here this isn't happening and then by. The pinnacle was when he his voice sort of melds with the orchestra at some point, it happens like know definitively once but there's like a like a where the orchestra is up and down and he's Voice of gets lost in that, and then it's sort of like that felt I don't know that felt very poignant to me this this song really like puts a clear picture in my mind you know every time I hear it. I kind of see myself standing in the middle of a gray and empty London for some reason thome you walk. Said this was probably one of his favourite works from radiohead because had real true emotion. And additionally he said he wrote it at the time he was recording a lot of the music implying the music from the computer and says, it was a lot about this pressure and the stress from the having international fame essentially then there's crill fingers which as I said. It. Sometimes works for me sometimes doesn't it's a three minute instrumental kind of meet point of the album just a bunch of atmosphere. It doesn't do a lot for me but I will say I do get lost no no under particularly deep sense but. I do get I'm listening to music when I'm listening to it but that's all I can say for angry. In after trigger fingers. There's a song called optimistic. and. I think the mystic kind of goes hand in hand with the next song called in limbo the first optimistic building to the second one into in limbo for awhile noticed that there were two different songs really okay and I really liked the songs I should've looked. As different songs but I do get what you mean. They do lead on. Yeah. Like listen to this album for a few times before sat down with the lyrics and only when I sit down with the lyrics, I noticed that they're two different songs. That in my head they're still kind of connected I really love both of the songs. That both is really contribute to the weird feel that the album..

Jonny Greenwood thome radiohead Arco Lonzo Penderecki Okinawa Godridge London
Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

"Joe president social Biden trump media is is mounting is turning uniting one of up his that's the pressure most a force aggressive on governors in support attacks of to the black stem against lives president week matter long trump movement violence as his by White again House campaign calling enters for more a new national phase guard to hit for everywhere the streets a third you look straight on social day the Biden's president's media made focus Facebook a public today appearance Instagram on his hometown Twitter this time you're tweeting leaving finding black Delaware NYC squares for the first call as a time movement up the since National started March by Guard the music industry in the Philadelphia losers has spread and he blasted lowlifes to other the president's celebrities are ripping handling you apart of even national to everyday unrest governor people Andrew saying it's Cuomo part his of agrees narcissism black L. Tuesday is New become York City more an online police important event didn't than that get the started America's job with done record well they labels being are supposed to we and protect can is being be the community forgiven embraced for by believing artists protect the like press the Rihanna property is more Alicia interested they in keys did that not and do Coldplay that in in power New Radiohead York City and last the Beastie night he's Boys then in offering principle most to of their deploy Biden's sites the went guard casting blank but himself no mayor text bill as de Blasio no console images says Lorraine he chief though doesn't the hash need tag in it contrast we have the not show had to a must loss the president of life be polished the last treasury five or days black states the heart National emoji must Guard is be also part has been being of out the solution seen in the Minnesota Britney not spears the problem governor says Tim she he walls says joined that the this blackout is one resisting is Tuesday not calls only movement part to send of the problem and in urged bigger fans numbers he accelerates to do the same saying it that's saying not Sager going people to make should stay his make off state ani their Washington devices or the nation to focus whole on again ways we're going to make to establish the world a better place peace on for our streets all of us when we address the I'm systemic Oscar wells issues Gabriel that caused it in the first place Sager made Donnie Washington

Britney Oscar Wells Washington Minnesota Rihanna Cuomo Philadelphia Facebook Donnie Washington Sager Gabriel TIM JOE Lorraine Coldplay Alicia America York City Andrew Twitter
Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

"Social media is uniting that's a force in support of the black lives matter movement everywhere you look on social media Facebook Instagram Twitter you're finding black squares as a movement started by the music industry has spread to other celebrities even to everyday people it's part of black L. Tuesday an online event that started with record labels and is being embraced by artists like Rihanna Alicia keys Coldplay Radiohead and the Beastie Boys most of their sites went blank no text no images though the hash tag the show must be polished or black heart emoji is also being seen Britney spears says she joined the blackout Tuesday movement and urged fans to do the same saying people should stay off their devices to focus on ways to make the world a better place for all of us I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Rihanna Alicia Facebook Britney Spears Oscar Wells Gabriel
The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

The Big Picture

05:24 min | 1 year ago

The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

"I have a very special show today later. In this podcast I have an interview with Robbie Robertson one of the founding members of the band a significant figure in movie history as well. Who HAS COLLABORATED WITH? Martin Scorsese over the years. He has a new documentary that he participated in the basically tells the story of his life and the work of the band called. Once were brothers so I hope you'll stick around for that and inspired by that conversation. I had to invite on Ringer Staff Writer Rob Villa. Who is one of the funniest and smartest people I know about music? I Rob She's we'll thank you. It's an honor to be here of course alot rob you write about music and movies at the ringer as well and quite deftly and I think the use of music in movies has always been frankly an obsession of mine and I suspect that you are also a sophisticated thinker about this idea. Is that fair to say? Sophisticated is a strong word. But let's go with your role with your a guy who has a functioning brain that watches movies with music in them. Is that fair to say Aisha's? Amd during sonic the HEDGEHOG. That's the way I would describe my relationship with music and movies me I was that guy I feel like there's a lot we know there's a there's a conscientiousness about choosing songs in movies now because we grew up watching scorsese movies and then the movies of all the people who watched. Martin Scorsese movies and start making movies of their own and so the use of the pop song. We're not talking about score here. We're talking about pop music appearing in films you know what is your. What is your sense of? Who Does it well and sort of what goes into making a good choice for something that's really obvious or really obscure. I think the obviousness I see a lot more in prestige. Tv generally like that's the plate. Like any use of radiohead. Almost across the board. Like I I like a lot of Westworld but just the way that Westworld is uses those pop songs you know the old style piano version of pop songs. It's just you're just sort of leaching off that songs energy like the the cash that it already has and you're just sort of stealing and implanting it into your TV show or your movie like it's there's a difference between stealing a song soul and like taking a song and building a new universe around it like sort of recreating it in re-energizing it it's a it's a great point. I'll never forget the moment I watched the pilot of Ozark. Which is the last the last episode of ours. Ozark that I've ever watched and at the end of it Decks dark by radiohead began playing and I was like. Oh this is that JOE now. I mean no disrespect to say Chris Ryan. Who's a huge fan of that series but actually that choice indicated to me what the creators of the show thought they were doing and it wasn't for me you know it just didn't Didn't click with what despite liking radiohead and Jason Bateman and. I knew that there was a pretentiousness that I was not going to connect with their What do you think makes for a good song choice in a movie? I think it has to be at least a little unexpected. It has to re- contextual. Is it a little bit like I? There are instances where obviousness is what you need and I think there are a few of those and my list here but I I think. In general you need some element of surprise some just more gratuitous are just more surprising way of using it than what you would expect. Do you think it's important to saying something about character or the scene itself or because one of the things that that Robertson said when he and I talked which I thought was interesting was the he really likes the contrast he moments. That's the moment when you take a very sweet song. Said it against a very violent moment or you take a very sweet moment and give it something more braces and that's obviously a hallmark of a lot of the people that are best known for choosing songs and movies you know. Think of Quentin Tarantino or fincher. Scorsese are all these people that I talk about endlessly on this show. Do you think that the that music can play such a profound role in telling a story in that way? I think so. I mean you can go too far in that the phenomenon of every movie trailer now using like a really slow down creepy version of a pop song like you think. Fight THE FI. The fifty shades of grey beyond say series. You know like I suicide squad. I think did that. You know you can go too far in that direction and and just use it entirely as irony like. Here's a really sweet song to contrast with an ugly thing. But Yeah I mean. That's that's sort of an overused tropes at this point at the time in the heyday in the early reign of those people those directors like. Yeah that was a really effective use of contrast. So we're here to do a top five list. You'RE GONNA share your five favorite needle drops in movies and I'M GONNA share my five favorite needle drops. Now I don't know your picks and you don't know my picks you almost ruined this podcast by accidentally sharing those picks and I would like you. I'm I apologize profusely and I apologize for my choices. I think this is going to be yelling at me in the next twenty minutes. That's my concern. You know what my concern is is just being too basic right. There are some things that are sort of undeniably signature moments in movies and music especially in the last twenty to twenty five years when when I think this phenomenon has really picked up. Steam and my choices are not songs that were written for movies. They are entirely songs that had previously existed before the film came along. Is that true for you too? I think in all but one case my number five. That's not true but I think that's an important thing that you have to have a prior. Ideally you have a prior relationship with that song that the movie changes. That's what makes a really good moment for me. Not all of them but that's the platonic ideal. I absolutely love that. I probably have one song that that is out runs an opposition to that idea. But that's a great

Martin Scorsese Radiohead Robbie Robertson Ozark Westworld Rob Villa Staff Writer Aisha Jason Bateman Quentin Tarantino AMD Chris Ryan JOE Fincher
Bands People Hate That Are Crazy Successful: Nickelback

Bobbycast

03:13 min | 1 year ago

Bands People Hate That Are Crazy Successful: Nickelback

"Bans. That are crazy successful. And let's start with nickelback really one of the most accessible bands of all time how the Let's see here under ten. Nickel bag sold over fifty million albums. Okay they rank as the second best selling international act in the two thousands. Who Do you think behind the Second Best International Act of the two thousand? The only by one act I I. I know who. You're GONNA say thousands. Yeah one-two-three radiohead the Beatles. Oh more than two more than really had more than is this factual I look at my. He confirms through nearly a decade pop up. Culture has been incredibly cruel to nickelback. I've always been a lover of them more so than I think I would be because of all the hate on them like I would just kind of sit at six point five normally because they have songs we know unlike but because everybody hates him mechanical bad for them so I put them at like a seven point three because of that. Sometimes I think we get. Tricked me liking something. What do you mean? The songs are good. Sometimes I think that they're just on the radio so much that we're like all right whatever it has like uses uses. IRA's all right. It's not a bad song but if you heard that once I think ninety percent of the people that heard that once we're like this I don't think so I think a lot of songs only heard wants back. The other are lot. Yeah human number ones so many number ones. How many do we need to look at the Louisville eight nine ten eleven all right? They even had songs on super soundtracks Spiderman. I remember that one so you just want to be a hater because no croakers Kroger's hair. Yeah you I don't understand the hate like. Tell me why you're hater. I just at the time that came out to me that was was like it's easy music. Sometimes it's just like everybody doing it if it's so it's like Sam Nunn backward people go that song so easy to then. Why don't oh you write it? I think no. I don't think I can right but I think that most people don't try to do that because they don't want to get stuck doing that like our is easy music like like where where are where's the nickelback. Now there's longevity and nickelback there's no longevity and almost any of those bands the two thousands or any decade the longevity fifty million albums nickelback nickelback does a tour. Again they sell out. Yes touring this area. They do. I don't know they don't know where my mind is with them. Just like because you've been tainted by the media. No I love the media. I'm not a listen to people. Say otherwise they would just go away and they didn't care for at the time but why are are they. The most despised man as it became a thing it became like its cool to hate nickelback and I probably would to experiment hating on them to defend them. Yeah all right They won't even do interviews because they know half the questions to be about everybody hitting them. Imagine that was that'd be terrible. They still sell out of God's our tickets and we'll probably still be laughing ten years from now because of all their money billionaire. Yeah Right. Yeah

Nickelback Sam Nunn Louisville
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 1 year ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Jonny Greenwood, Radiohead And Tom York discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Jonny Greenwood, Radiohead And Tom York discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The band. Radiohead, says a trove of unreleased music has been stolen and is being held for ransom, but it's not going to pay up instead, it's releasing it giving all the proceeds to environmental activist group. Extinction rebellion guitarist Jonny Greenwood tweeted about eighteen hours of material from around the time of their nineteen ninety seven album, ok computer was stolen from singer. Tom York's mini disc archive last week, Greenwood said the hackers demanded one hundred fifty thousand dollars. So all eighteen hours of it will be available on the music sharing site. Band camp fans can buy the music for eighteen dollars for the next eighteen days Greenwood said it was never intended for release. It was quote only tangentially interesting extinction, rebellion, which stages direct action. Protests against climate change thanked Radiohead, quote from the bottom of our

Jonny Greenwood Radiohead Tom York Eighteen Hours One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol Eighteen Dollars Eighteen Days
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Okay. To one a day to five a month. Hardly seems worth it even. For years. Tom. Hundred more years. We'll now you, you don't take care of yourself. Most people twelve hours a calisthenics every other day. Anyway. When when, in rainbows was announced another, like, hey, we got a new mix coming out like next week and the pay what you want thing. And everybody is gonna shake up everything. And like a kinda did it kind of didn't I mean, it certainly got people used to the idea that you want to pay. I mean it. That's what people left with that. They're like this is great. It's free. Okay. Yeah, I want that for every did you pay for that album at all? I did. I forget how much I paid for it. I think you proudly said fuck those guys are so rich. What do they need? My. The thing with that is they put an album up on the internet in two thousand seven when this was like novel friend of the show. Jefferson stock had been doing it for a while the pay what you want right thing. But everyone's like, oh, this is a sea change. Yeah. When one of the biggest bands in the world, does it right? Like they're like, oh, this is the new model for the music industry, every band can do this. And look how much money Radiohead made from it because they had labels doing cool Beavis and Butthead advertisements for fifteen years before this happened. Yeah, yeah, they had already worked up such a fan base. And, you know, a ban like them too. It's like. They're getting such a small percentage, but they have such diehard fans that they stand to make more. I think they said, on average people pay three dollars for that album. They've not made three dollars parabas on anything else. They've really you know. People point to like, oh, look at failed. It's like, Nah, I think radio have probably real happy with how much money they made off that album. Radiohead, even cared man. They were too busy being moping. Now, they're like, now they don't mope anymore. Now, now, they're just they're, they're, they're good boys. Now. They seem like they've kind of gotten over themselves a little bit. And I don't think they even like had to get over themselves. I think they kind kinda realized. Oh, yeah. It's like put on a show for the press anymore about. And like we own up to do interviews with do interviews. We don't want to anymore. Yeah, I think I think they were I don't think they were putting on a show. I think they really hated touring. While I was. That's why I kind of, like faking it in that documentary meeting people easy whereas like they were just like upset all the time. Why would you why would you pretend to do? I was gonna say it wasn't so much pretending that it was. After all that stuff. They kinda realize oh we have more money than we ever spend. We don't have to do press tours and shit like that if we all want to anymore, and then they released the king of limbs, and they're like, we don't even have to make good albums anymore, right? Yeah. Yeah. We'll get together. And you know, makes them garbage. I look to each his own. I listened to the king of limbs last year. Did you see win win the last time you saw them? Yeah. It's only that one time I've seen. Yeah. That's it. I've seen I was supposed to see them at that concert that got canceled. With Dave on Long Island. Yeah. Either is a big festival before. Festivals were everywhere. Right. Tom. I've seen them probably over ten times. What? Yeah. Really? Yeah. I've seen them a whole bunch. You're a real Radiohead head. I saw them when kid why didn't you let me see him, one of those times said a you I offered you take every time not every time now one time I slept out the UN. I know the, the, the most the, the sentence that I'm proudest of, but also makes me sound like the oldest fuck in the world..

Tom Radiohead UN Jefferson Long Island Beavis Dave three dollars fifteen years twelve hours
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"I don't know. Yeah. Let's go. I'm sick. I'm very sick. Talking for stop listening reading something else. And it's like I'll Joel bid this with a joke. But then I realized I didn't hear what have said. And that's why and then I was expecting. Yeah. But like I had no context of what you were talking about. It's hard to make a joke. When you see Zero Roka. contacts sorry they have more songs about cars than any other band, even the cars. That are you trying to argue that every song by the cars, kind of about cars got callers right in the name of the band. It's true. Ever hear the song, Dr. I've seen the movie that is based on. Didn't. A real cool movie drive. Starring the boy the handsome, boy, everybody loves a handsome, boy, everybody loves and Albert Brooks, I've seen. No, I haven't seen cars, the movie Tonle made three of them. You don't have time for that shit three of those things spinoff called planes and maybe planes to while how am I supposed to keep up with all their for children? Do you remember what you're going to say? Or no, I had nothing to say. I was gonna make a joke based on what you said, but I hadn't heard what you said. All right. So we talked about okay, computer, then after that years later, they followed it up with a double whammy kid, an amnesiac, how far after was amnesiac from today, I would say, like nine months or so. Like a baby. Yeah. That far. I don't think it was that long rather they were the same sessions great. And that was I remember that being really cool. That was the first time I had experienced band. I like having like, hey, guess what that remember how you're into Spain that new album for so long? It took so long to get here. We'll guess what? The new albums going to be out way quicker than than the time. That last one took remade. It kid was released October second in the year two thousand. It's two thousand amnesia was released. June fourth two thousand one November December eight months. Yeah. So okay, so it wasn't nine it's actually way June, what June fourth? Yeah. Eight months. Okay. So. Yeah. Well, just saying all. An amnesty. I came in a book. I remember at least the version, I got a book I spent so much money on Radiohead special edition. They were the first like band was like fleecing us. Yeah. They're like let's not even wait until there. Yeah. Believable amount of disposable money. Let's fuck pump them for all. They're worth now. They were the first ones to realize, these millennials will never have money. To disposable income at every stage of their life. We just wait till they turn like fifty right? Although then they then they turn that on its head within rainbows where they said, you know what we've taken enough you tell us how much. Yeah. Pay what you will pay pay. What you pay what you want when you will pay whatever you will pay whatever. No, no right into your will. Oh, that's what they meant by that. That's how they've got. Hey, we will. But that was now. Right. But give us everything when you croak now, remember, at the time that was a huge thing. We'll a they announced the album, good thing for like, put us in your will. Yeah. Like, you know. Or something where they're like their competitor to movie pass like, oh, something like fifteen dollars a month, and you can go see or it's twenty dollars a month..

Albert Brooks Joel Spain Zero Roka. fifteen dollars twenty dollars Eight months eight months nine months
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"It's very drunk, Tom, we're both very drunk. I was what nineteen nineteen years young at the time. Yeah, I was twenty. So we've had we were not allowed to. Yeah, we had put it in orange juice. Yeah. We're drinking screwdrivers like grandma used to we didn't know any better. Really? How do we get drunk quickest? Well, let's by that we tasted the vodka. We're like. Awful. Yeah. So we got Ange juice. Right. Makes it together. And we sat outside that, that concert like before it started like five hours early is me and you. Brecht screwdrivers sitting it was lovely sitting on a bench in the park. Yeah. As the sun was setting is very nice. That's what. You know, made us become friends. Yeah. We really opened up to each other remember, God damn thing. And then we put the rest of our vodka into water bottles. Yeah. Something that didn't look like it belonged in and we're locking in. And we're like, okay, we'll play it cool. Bring the rest of this vibe Gye, we'll go and separately. So different lines will go through security that way. If one of us gets vodka com confiscated the other one will get him forgot, I thought it was like for stealth. But then, yeah, it was like, no, then only one of us has to make it in, because these are like all vodka. And I was hammered, and I think the security guard was like you can't bring in that. That water bottle. It's not sealed in like, come on. He's like, all right. We'll is it water in their vodka. Maybe before it out, I yelled across all the lines to you who is also getting checked by security at the same time into it, Tom. It didn't work. He knew was vodka in the water bottle. Yeah. And I was getting mine through the guy didn't notice was It like. was like to get from out to be a blessing in disguise. Got more alcohol. We were good. We didn't need that. And then some large man, just collapsed on me. Remember? Things I've ever seen. It was beta band opening. Yeah. And number any part of their set. I don't remember any part of radio headset, and I remember like talking to you and I turned back to you won't point. Oh my God. That's weird Tim disappeared. And I looked down and there was a giant man on top of you. He had passed out from drugs. Yeah. But like on his feet and just fell backwards in a or squish like a bug underneath them. I could barely even see you. He was that big. Yeah. Is is a miracle I survived. And then I think it's friends were like mad at you. Yeah. I don't know what happened. Like I reflect simply just because I'm a coward sore sorry, and they move lose Fook. Isn't it? Told her friend onto you. Great show, ten out of ten. Hop the turnstile. You remember that I do. And it started everybody hopping, the turnstile the cops are still after you. Bootleg in this radio at your the, the number one suspect in this radio kidnapping case that they're trying to crack Tim, how could I have kidnapped Radiohead if I'm here recording this right now while the band is still missing. It's fair now. I mean I could have tied him up. Get a put gags in their mouths and nobody would hear them yelling and said, boys be back. I have to go record a podcast about you, which would be the sweetest revenge. Right. That's what really drove him. That's that's and they own. Gags in their mouth Radiohead had has nine albums. Okay. That's a lot of albums one. Nobody's ever heard Pablo Pablo, Honey? Too good album. You know what people say that, I mean, I guess. A classic jerky boys bit has to be well that's not bad. I would if they hadn't done that I would've liked to have named something after classic jerky boys sketch. Tom that jerky boys. Everybody go right now in Google jerky. Boys Pablo, Honey. It's forty six seconds and it sucks is not funny..

Tom Tim Pablo Pablo Radiohead Google Ange Brecht Fook kidnapping nineteen nineteen years forty six seconds five hours
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"I'm just I don't see head at the band for something that was stolen from them legally leaked online guys. Lock that stuff up. Yeah. Because then you wasted about twenty minutes of my time today. Well as I was skipping through. Yeah. Okay. A rehearsal version of paranoid Android, where like they're not playing very tightly cool. I can hear that like any band trying to play paranoid, Android. Right. I mean it was still it'd be Radiohead doing it. Benefits radio doing badly. Have you ever seen radio it on an off night? No. Oh, yeah. I've seen like ET videos and stuff for like they have to keep restarting songs and things like that actually, like I think that's very charming, when they're like precise. Yeah. And apparently the backstory of this leak is that they put out like an okay computer twentieth anniversary thing a couple of years ago. Yeah. You know what I feel bad that I was the recipient that you force, this leak onto me. I'm going to go with a leak. I had this from the band, o r u the unofficial. Sixth member. I'm in the running. What's your special skill? Grout, grouting tiles really. Yeah. Never no need to do that. I'm not very good at it. But nobody does would yeah yeah, like you know, he's not the best artists in the world as the best artists that Radiohead knows don't let time. You're curious that you would say east best soda sign now is, is a Nate Tom. Yeah. Yeah. I'm gonna go buy out of guilt, that the deluxe edition vinyl of, of the okay, computer officially released thing still have just rough trade three hundred dollars could just beat the files. I already did delete the files, Tom to save you from jail time. What no. Those were fingerprinted. My fingerprints. Yeah. And the bands. I mean, the bands, fingerprints are all over it. This week's episode of the complete guide to everything is sponsored by open fit. Tom, getting fit and staying healthy..

Nate Tom Radiohead three hundred dollars twenty minutes
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Tom Radiohead, earn English rock band formed in Abingdon themes. Tames Thames, Tim's Tim's the Thames in nineteen eighty-five, and we're gonna get emails. Let's start over. The band consists of Tom York, he plays he sings he plays guitar piano, and keyboards. And I'd say some other things sometimes shaker. Sometimes he plays that little drum kit. These two brothers Jonny Greenwood and Colin Greenwood, Jonny, Greenwood, plays the lead guitar keyboards. He hit he plays this weird move Moby synthesizer thing. He plays like one of those old like operator switchboard, sometimes he's plugging, connecting your call. He sometimes just has an old radio that he holds up to actually. And samples that. Radiohead. Then his brother Colin plays bass, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, Colin. I don't think anything else. Sure if you pick. That since base thing that they put in front of us. Colin yet to put something in front of he's not gonna he's not gonna walk across the state now. And yet. Wander off the stage. He's got nothing to do up there and O'Brien, which is this guy the, the people champagne. He's got the, the cleanest hair in the band. Absolutely. Right. Always has always Will Greenwood might have more luscious locks, but they're all greasy. Yeah. Ed O'Brien he conditions his hair. I was gonna say, looks like a head and shoulders man, and then fill sell a on drums. He's just another. That was due to a prank early in their career. They replaces head and shoulders with Nair and drew back. Eva steamed his head turn red. So angry was Tom, there's three people that you can consider the sixth member of Radiohead, but not all of them only. One of them can be the six Danny one time. Right. It depends on the context it depends. Oh, I thought you were saying it depends on the contests like there's, you know, who wants to be in radio longtime producer Nigel. God rich is the fastest one..

Jonny Greenwood Tom Radiohead Colin Tom York Ed O'Brien Thames Tim Tom Danny producer Nair Nigel Eva
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"But if Billy toll was sitting next to you, you wouldn't have you wouldn't have the guts to say that to his, you know what I think if Billy, Joel, you live. If I was granted an audience with Billy, Joel, I wouldn't feel nervous at all. I feel like I could say anything to that guy and he'd be fine with it. And he knows. Collar, Long Island. Joe's, he knows what I'm all about. I know what he's all about. There's no pretense there. I'd be like, hey, hey, Billy cut the shit. I like you. I respect you d think Tom York would have a similar response. Thom Yorke, he'd say excuse me. I have to use the toilet and then climb out the window while he was in their time York. Why just get away from you? Tom, you would not enjoy an audience with me now. I'd be nervous around him. Tom, I would be shaking in my boots. Why are we doing this episode? Now. Do you think you'd feel better? If you had Billy, Joel with you. Yes. Yeah. But that would that would that would spook Tom, your, your go get real. With always brought the piano mine with ace. We're doing because scoundrels leaked what was it eighteen hours someone seventeen or eighteen hours of? What do we call this? They're coming. Ter- session. Right. So radio heads of band. If you've listened this far and you're not sure what we're talking about radio. It's banned. People are like are they talking about that talking heads song. That good radio ban is a group of boys. They played different instrument, but they can most of them can play a few instruments. So, you know. Don't, don't pigeonhole them. Stop pitching pigeonholing Phil sell way..

Tom York Billy toll Joel Thom Yorke Long Island Joe Phil eighteen hours
"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Thinking about you. Anyone can play guitar. I've never heard anyone can play guitar. I saw it on a Chook bucks a lot. When I was younger, I never had the, the temerity to coins in and put my money where my mouth was. That's an expensive way to hear a song for the first time you don't like it. Yeah. What if I do like it, it's all night shoveling quarters, right? Or like great. I could it as now. Never buy the album, very, very got sunk costs. Jukebox gonna pay twice. Listen to this song, I think if you put enough money into the Duke bucks you should be able to take jukebox home at the end of the night. I mean yeah. Probably if you put enough money in e prank can't put as much money as jukebox worth into jukebox, not in one night, depend on how much though what if it's like ten thousand dollars a song. Well, I do you have any can you cite examples of jukebox cost? I don't know how many jukebox is have you got an inspected, how much they cost. I mean yeah. Anyone that I've used I've that you've used? But you hang out in some pretty CD places the last places that would have ten thousand dollar to boxes. I know you're talking about, like a country club jukebox. That's where I find myself most of the time. That's why couldn't listen to anybody can play guitar. That's why they wouldn't be caught dead letting guy like the fawns in there because he, you know, run-up that run up the Bill, no no money required. Yeah, yeah. The country club would be like we're ruined this man's playing all of our favorite. Fifties hits more free. Yeah. Normally we're making what like three hundred thousand dollars an hour. So why why now you said is one of our most requested top, the most requested topic falls far. Why now Tim, why is now the time scoundrels got out there today with scoundrels got out there today? I regret to inform you the band Radiohead has been kidnapped. This is a fundraiser for their for their ransom. You know what if Radiohead gut kidnapped? And their families were like oh, we don't have their banking information. I'd like to think that we'd all band together in pay pony up that ransom. I mean surely like they have accounts and stuff that have, you know, Radiohead has in their contracts or whatever we'll pay ransoms, if we get kidnapped guess what Tom what the count's were kidnapped to. Oh, I thought you were gonna say the accounts were in on it. Well, that's what we find out later. Right. Well, then they just twist you blew it. Turns at the accountants were working with the captors the whole time they should have realized. Visor stoops to crowd fund their release, and guess what? They get that money from us. And then they get all radio heads money too, because the accounts, it already liquidated those accounts. Do you are they did it to cover their own tracks? Boy. Well played radio heads accountants. I mean it's it's a little far fetched. But who knows what kind of counts, I got, nobody knows you is here about these celebrities, or, like, oh, I thought I didn't make, you know, like super famous people, and they're like, no, my coun- was telling me for years, like, now, you're losing money. And that turned out, they were stealing all the money. I think if you can cheat a superstar out of their money you should just get that money. That's such an easy thing. Just going to go in just keep a large room full of gold coins and everyday just swim around in that for a few minutes here would be that's easy for you to say now him..

Radiohead Duke Tim Tom three hundred thousand dollars ten thousand dollars ten thousand dollar
In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:28 min | 2 years ago

In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

"Time. I'm courteous. Studio. Three sixty podcast extra. We're celebrating the life and work of one of the great American choreographers. Merce Cunningham who was born one hundred years ago this week he danced starting as a member of Martha Graham's troop and then maye dances for seventy years and embraced innovation from start to finish new dance forms, new technology. New music new collaborators. Win four he worked with Radiohead and Siga rose on a beautiful piece that you're hearing called split sides. Cunningham dancers were famous for seeming to defy the laws of physics leaping high and suddenly switching direction in mid air. When Cunningham spoke with us in two thousand one he was using computers to try to make his dances, even more complex. Take always been interested in movement. There's no reason for that is just it seems to be it should interest everybody. We're we're so involved with all the time. I think of course of animals and birds watching their movements of always been totally fascinating to me. Movement is so much a part of our daily experience that we don't think of it as a thing, we don't even think we sort of do it. But if you thought about it say, how do you walk? How do you just the mechanics, but if we all walk the same why is it we all walk differently and that struck me years ago, and I thought well that was a way to think about movement that we were doing the same thing. But we all did it differently. My name is Daniel Roberts. I have a member of the Merce Cunningham dance company. I always feel that my legs are like. Needles of sewing machine when I'm doing cutting him they have to be very sharp and very articulate, and I feel that the torso has to be free on top of that on. So there's a strain that comes along with doing the work in the technique. And there's a clarity about the work in general, the use of space and the articulation of the torso limbs that I've never experienced before in any other dance form. I'm interested obviously in complexity which is to buy disadvantaged probably because it's made it difficult often for the public to really comprehend live with what we do. I think uses chance to avoid his own typical habits of making movement. And that's what's really interesting because he's even making it difficult for himself. It's not whatever feels natural. It's usually what deals completely unnatural. Chance operations came about in the nineteen fifties. There was wrist of an institute of random numbers where the decided scientists had decided that rather than using logic for numbers they could just as well use chance John cage. Took course, we're using it in his music composition. And I thought it would work with moving. I would say devise you sort of speaker series of movements. But then through chance means in the beginning, it was tossing coins. So that instead of you just using your own what you remembered about how things go you came up with this stunt. Up things which were. Sometimes impossible. But if you tried them, even though what it was was impossible something else came up to had experienced or I hadn't experienced before. I had the opportunity to begin to work with dad's computer it's called life forms, and it has mainly three screens with which you work one is what they call the stage on which you can place tiny figures, which move there's a screen with the larger figure called the figure editor on which you can make movements on the figure then there is a third screen called the time line, which is moving in time. You can put the the body and what say flat on the floor Prome. Okay. Then a few spaces later in the time. You could put it up in the air. Now, it will do that it will rise up on its feet and go up in the air. Of course, you can't do that in the way. It does it. But you look at it. I do and I think oh, but I could do it this way. Now if I hadn't seen this. I wouldn't think that way and and I. My work with it has grown more complex because I see more possibilities all the

Merce Cunningham Cunningham Martha Graham Daniel Roberts Maye John Cage Radiohead DAD Editor One Hundred Years Seventy Years
Jackson, Nicks join Hall of Fame

Ben Maller

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Jackson, Nicks join Hall of Fame

"Free. They rock and Roll Hall of fame inducted as for twenty nineteen of been announced. Steve Kastenbaum has a partial list. Continued with the tradition of inducting a solo artist who was already in the hall with a band this time it Stevie nicks. Heavy metal rockers def Leppard got the nod. New wave and rock bands. The cure Roxy music and Radiohead are in. Janet Jackson is an inductive. And they didn't leave out classic rock. The sambas round out the class.

Stevie Nicks Janet Jackson Steve Kastenbaum Radiohead Leppard
Radiohead, The Cure to Join Rock Hall Of Fame.

Ray Appleton

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Radiohead, The Cure to Join Rock Hall Of Fame.

"The rock and Roll Hall of fame inducted tease for two thousand nineteen have been announced they continued with the tradition of inducting a solo artist who was already in the hall with the band this time. It's knicks. Heavy metal rockers def Leppard got the nod. New wave and rock bands. The cure Roxy music and Radiohead are in. Janet Jackson is an inductive. And they didn't leave out classic rock. The psalm B's round out the class.

Janet Jackson Knicks Radiohead Leppard
Janet Jackson, Stevie Nicks And Radiohead discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 2 years ago

Janet Jackson, Stevie Nicks And Radiohead discussed on 24 Hour News

"Janet Jackson joins her brother, Michael and the Jackson Five as members of the rock and Roll Hall of fame. Sharon deduction Thursday, along with Stevie nicks, Radiohead, the cure and the top fan vote-getter def Leppard among others the induction ceremonies next

Janet Jackson Stevie Nicks Radiohead Leppard Sharon Michael
"radiohead" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on R U Talkin' R.E.M. Re: ME?

"Here that are sent back later to me this is like a really good radiohead song will you know when they played the radiohead was opening for them yeah but when they played the tibetan freedom concert a couple years later michael stipend tom york trading places for one song in each other's band to they do like seeing one radio at song came in saying one rem song and he chose this chose this one you sounds like a song that he would right did they do it sort of a freaky freaky friday situation where they had to like switch bodies they were both struck by lightning at the same time every night every night that's crazy this was just at that what's what tibetan freedom oh what am i gonna sing i don't know i never remember it'll create weird oh this is great i wish you were shorter no i think this deserves it i i wish you were on a shorter record but yeah it's an awesome i mean the fact that this and bittersweet me are buried in the middle of this album it's you the high quality of this album a lot of people say this is a masterpiece this some people wrote to me on on twitter saying that they couldn't wait for us to get to this because this is her favorite record by the way bittersweet me was recorded at soundcheck the basic tracks for it any right.

radiohead twitter michael tom york
"radiohead" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"But this sort of weapon ice phantoms which i know you think i'm right about a lot bernie is definitely an aspect of all this and it what's interesting is the radiohead fandom which kind of confines itself bookish lead to certain old school web forums and read it aren't out on twitter being like i am a radiohead i will destroy you not alana fans it wasn't a war which is i guess a little disappointing distant from an entertainment yet act if you wanna see that that kind of battle fresher but lana fans are are just are feared for us yeah they're really vicious about it and the you know how to get radiohead jax separately allow them were using you know the you get into that were in the world of stand culture of people don't know about its it's been going on for for a long time in fact again it all goes i learned how fierce it could be in two thousand eleven when i made in uganda was so triumphant in that moment ahead and unfair perhaps an unfortunate sentence which i think stenson stood up at the time in which i mention how influential gago was and trying them maybe as they say shade at a couple of other pop artists i mentioned that that christina aguilera made a i will knows highly seemed highly influenced by gaga and and a actually a few other artists do is one of those things there was a perfect storm of just pissing awfully eight fandom in onesentence but the christina aguilera fans went not sammy went nuts threatened my life and stuff and then the findings i hung out with christina herself and really enjoyed it for a voice coverstory a few months later and she was delightful and i i recognize things better than all the fans for completely modified they love me so that's all it that's on the past i hope i bring this up again i don't have more threats to my life from christie with the most intense you know sort of problematic fan thing i ever hand it was a sense i gave maybe to say i author think as a fan base shrinks and get smaller than the people left are more intense in that they get crazier that's interesting yeah the christina hive christina high was fears but i mean it is stan stand culture people proudly call them so stands and yet stands.

bernie twitter uganda stenson christina aguilera gaga onesentence christina christie radiohead lana sammy christina high
"radiohead" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"So it's now turned out that radiohead has not to suit alana del rey it also turns out that the people behind the legal negotiations are radio heads music publisher which might seem like a distinction without a difference but it does mean that this isn't you know tom york's sitting conferring with his personal lawyer trying to sue lana del rey which a lotta people kind of assumed and then there is a complication with creep will get into that in a second but i wanted to talk about first a brittany was what this says about the way the internet is kind of absorbing music news right now whether it's completely accurate or not and also what the says about the way that lana and radiohead are perceived what do you make of all this i mean it's really interesting to see what happened after monetary did about it and i feel like she's an artist who has a very very very large ferry um fervent verve and very intense phantom on the internet that kind of came at all sides to attack radiohead in this because she had also tweeted that it was one hundred percent of the song right said radiohead was trying to see her former they would accept nothing else eulogy kind of a suggested the an as we've learned over the last week it's that was false and that it's actually not even a um a formal claim has been made i don't think and it's also not one hundred percent at all um so is interesting to see how the sort of younger fandom monterey's fandom kind of came to attack radiohead and radiohead sort of ethos in their entire team behind going for this lawsuit and it was just the way that it was consumed in with happening so quickly as that every one penny took that one tweet from lana without any sort of claim out thereby radiohead without any sort of legal documentation to back it up and how all of us and became like this huge amounts war that really was an oil is yet and this broke on sunday night when you can't get comment from people really and why.

radiohead publisher brittany lana monterey tom york one hundred percent
"radiohead" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"The band radiohead for their song creep and apparently lantawan here's the original song called get free is my law this is the rebel so she ripped off from el that's right she ripped off from radiohead so creep was the original all this is obvious while and then back to orlando ray is is my law holy cow and so that's if that's pretty obvious friday only the lyrics are different that's not always the case though in some of the led zeppelin stuff they even kinda uses same lyrics in some cases lake muddy waters and led zeppelin on a whole lot of love and his his song songs called that's whole lot of love let's up on yes by muddy water song was called lot of love or something to anyway here's my water baby way down inside woman moment of unity government though unido god the house or got to have some love led zeppelin wait outside of running a unique did it give you my love going get hit by law paul okay so he the they changed momma to honey bothering cover that's great change man that's blatant nia as i was researcher this yesterday led zeppelin is done this allott at least ten song yeah that's why yesterday i didn't know which what you were talking of they've they've borrowed liberally here's another one there was a band called taurus and they did song that that they called spirit now listen to that compared to stairway to heaven.

radiohead zeppelin the house paul researcher orlando
"radiohead" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"To go to trial it was a huge blow to radiohead it raised questions about the safety of other big concerts so late yesterday cbc news reported that an inquest will be held into the death of radio heads drummed technician and that's why katie nicholson is here katie nicholson is a reporter with cbc's investigative unit she's been working on the story for a while she scored an exclusive interview with radio heads drummer phil cell way she's here to talk about the who in this story who is traumatized who is still grieving and who wants justice i katie hello so radiohead hasn't talk that openly about the accident how did you end up finding linda meet phil cell way the drummer also argued it was working on a a big story that has actually is rolled out this morning it was a at canada wide look at workplace fatalities and how they are are handled in in the country and you know by provincebyprovince and this case really stood out for us because the one of the common themes is that the families always feel that they have been robert of justice when the final decisions are made or if charges are stayed or if the finds the maximum fines aren't applied in a in a workplace fatality so you know we were just sorta saying hall wouldn't be great if we got radiohead and one of one of the ap's i work with just made the call and was instant it and i think it had to do with the timing because you have to remember in september that's when this all that the charges were stayed and so radio had had just been at that time wanting to do something to help support scott johnson's family who they had become tremendously close with an who they felt a a certain a burden on the they fell to weight they felt a need to help and support them in their their push for answers they felt so gutted i think is probably the best way to put it that this family lost their son on their tour and they wanted to use their power in their influence to in some way get them some answers get them some justice so they were suddenly.

cbc news technician katie nicholson reporter hall scott johnson radiohead phil cell canada
"radiohead" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Yeah no you have not included what i got well i'll show you actually because i can be the nice thing that kickstarter has all the humiliating experiences you've had buying things i kickstarter are always available so uh you know a lot of this stuff hasn't come yet uh air i so it wasn't cheap 200 some bucks and you kinda get the impression if even if you look at the video that there is a bonsai involved but what you get instead is the is a rock that floats and then you put the bond saying it but because the bonds i unbalances the rock so you then chip off pieces of the rock to make the bonds i balance oh this sounds like it's going to end poorly yeah i just i just it's in a closet somewhere anybody wants a i'll give it to you a free no cost floating rock floating rock it the rock does float i the guiding the bud zaire even watering the buds i could could cause price at wrought on site since the new at wrought that's what you need a fake banzai when they think of at a plastic banzai that at least wooden changes shapour grow or anything like that nso worry about killing it some say about so many of these things and i well look at it but like the rahman i buy ordered said i bought that is that a radiohead song you've got there is no fake plastic banza says it's it's like the fate fake plastic trees and cars you many of the radiohead the songs is totally depressing.

radiohead
"radiohead" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"And we ended up like this caused us to research where it set us off in here right we were like all right like the like yellow came out the same year is kid aaa which is like radio heads once they were done making listen to music and rhetoric of making like really challenging like art music so it was it's just his time his time line is insane and cold play might be the most derivative thing of another thing in terms of their relationship to radiohead like they they steal their cord progressions from radiohead i've witnessed s chris whatever the lead singer is martin come on how some respect it's like a human hair van warms a human the human hand sandwich chris martin a perform and he actually like steals with the way tom york plays the piano his head is lake vibrating back and forth like chris martin does that just like that's it's down to that level that he watches their performances them his like yes that i am that thing media aside from sure maybe ticket sales or like money made that argument aside if you're talking about the straight up art of the of the work that radiohead has done and were coldplay's then they they're not even comparable i mean okay computer and kid a are like two of the greatest albums of all time i can't even tell you i mean i w what's great culpable of the time one that yellow is on time and i don't even know yeah i don't even know i don't think there is this off themselves on yet us on the same song coldplay's derivative of cold so anyway yes i look guys get with it don't beyond greg gut felt side no when someone is pushing real false news that you they did not steal everything from coldplay are we're gonna go to a break right now and when we come back china.

tom york chris martin radiohead coldplay greg gut china
"radiohead" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on KKAT

"I just thought there was the catchy saw its pop and that's the song that if i listen to it and i'm in in the the car and i am i think anybody no like if i'm dr it like the yesterday maybe i was listening to it and i drove drove into the neighborhood and i'm immediately like law in turn it down because i don't want any i i don't even get come up under eu about it oh my gosh yes are a number two and a suit where are no number three's radiohead fifteen step yeah because i am of like i like rocking metal and they are just so the hansie and i just can't even handle at number two swear to heavens do not make fun of me hokuetsu perfect day have you ever heard that pull it up polar of real quick because this this oh shameful hokuapp perfect day that's lens may number two yeah toward it was read some of the lira now just play it plays a little shut up i looked for lyrics regretted outplay play some of it this is my number two hokuapp perfect day and wouldn't you know there's an ad look if we could skip the ed okay yeah i got it okay you're ready this is done make vis thomas rhett.

radiohead