27 Burst results for "Radiohead"

"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"When you're calling it a D sharp, for example. What you said was definitely not patronizing because I had no idea that there'd be a difference between a D and an E flat. On the piano, it's the same black key. So I always think of it as being the same. Sure. But string players are always taught that, you know, you push the second finger higher for your F sharp and F sharp is very nearly a G when you're playing a D major. But if you're playing a minor scale or a minor key, then you put your slightly different place. Yeah, it's bizarre, isn't it? It is very strange. But for whatever reason, it totally works when you hear it. Johnny Greenwood, thank you so much, it's been a pleasure to talk with you. Thank you for your music. And I'm expecting one or more of your scores to be nominated for Oscars. So, you know, I don't know if you care very much about awards, but I wish good luck in awards season. Thank you. Thank you, Terry. Johnny Greenwood wrote the scores for three new movies, licorice pizza, the power of the dog and Spencer, an is radiohead's lead guitarist. After we take a short break, recruit a Ken Tucker will review new and reissued music by country music star Connie Smith, who can describe as an extraordinary singer. This is fresh air. This message comes from a PR sponsor, smartwool, from hiking summits to running errands, backcountry skiing to couch surfing, smart wall base layers are everything you need to go anywhere. They make versatile merino wool base layers that offer all day comfort for all your adventures. They're the first layer you'll want to put on and the last layer you'll want to take off. Shop smart will base layers, socks and accessories at smart world dot com. You may not know Connie smith, but our rock critic can Tucker includes himself among the many hardcore country fans who consider her one of the greatest country vocalists ever. He's been listening closely to her two most recent releases. One is a new box set from the German reissue label bear family records called later shade of blue, the Columbia recordings, 1973 to 76, four CDs chronicling smith's entire output at Columbia Records. The other is her most recent collection, 2020 ones the cry of the heart, produced by her husband, country music star Marty Stewart. Together, Ken says these two releases do a lot to confirm smith's status as one of country music's finest song interpreters..

Johnny Greenwood Connie Smith Ken Tucker Oscars radiohead Spencer Terry skiing Tucker Columbia Records Marty Stewart Columbia smith Ken
"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:18 min | 8 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Music from Johnny Greenwood's soundtrack for the new film Spencer about Princess Diana. Johnny Greenwood is my guest, and he wrote the score for Spencer and for the new film, the power of the dog. He's done several Paul Thomas Anderson films, including phantom thread and the master there will be blood and the new film licorice pizza, which also has a lot of music of the period that the film is set in. Preexisting music. We'll be right back after a short break. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Johnny Greenwood, who you probably know from his work with the band radiohead, but also for his film scores, and he has three films he wrote scores for three new ones, Spencer licorice pizza and the power of the dog. And licorice pizza isn't by far the first film he's done with Paul Thomas Anderson. He scored Anderson's films phantom thread the master and there will be blood. So before you were with radiohead, my understanding is you were in a band with Tom York's younger brother, Tom York, is the lead singer songwriter from radiohead. So your older brother was in a band with Tom York. You were in a bandwidth Tom York's younger brother. Do I have that right? You do, that's right. So how did you end up playing with Tom York and forming radiohead? Well, they had a keyboard player who Tom's band had a keyboard player, which I think they didn't get on with, because he played his keyboard so loud. And so when I got the chance to play with them, the first thing I did was make sure my keyboard was turned off when I was playing. And I must have done months of rehearsals with them with this keyboard that was just they didn't know that I'd already turned it off and was just they made quite a racket quite a noise. It was all guitars and distortion and so I would pretend to play for weeks on end. And Tom would say, I can't quite hit what you're doing, but I think you're adding a really interesting texture that I can tell when you're not playing. I don't think you know you can't fix them. I'm really not playing. And I'd go home in the evening and work out how to actually play chords and cautiously over the next few months. I would start turning this keyboard up and that's how I started in with radiohead. Wait a minute. I want to make sure I understand this correctly. So the first period that you were playing with the radiohead, you turned off the keyboard. And so you were fingering the canes, but no sound was being emitted because this is an electric keyboard. So exactly. Nothing was coming out. And nobody noticed. Yeah, I mean, you know, we're kind of nicely GarageBand, I suppose in a small rehearsal room and I remember the first few songs when I did start playing melodies and Tom liked it and it was very exciting. So since you've had a foot in classical music and in rock for so long and have been important in both worlds. I think the division is melted away for a lot of classical performers, but not so much for other people, because so many people don't listen to classical music at all anymore. It's just not, I think it's become more and more of a niche. With the exception of film scores. This is one of the great things about film scores is that it brings a different kind of music, often, into people who otherwise wouldn't hear it. I think streaming has been quite bad for classical music because if you are keen to find out more about classical music, you might have heard that the base open violin concerto is a great piece of music. So you go on to Spotify or whatever. And when you search for it, you're presented with 500 recordings. And it's just, I think it's just a bit of a daunting and off putting thing. There's very little curation and very little and plus you're made to feel like it's just that it's somehow beyond you. And. Which is really sad, I think I do sort of more in the days when you used to listen to a record hundreds of times and get everything you cut out of it. And I'm the same. I'll listen to Mars Davis record on Spotify. And then rather than play it again, I'll move on to the next one. And there's just none of that sort of obsession. And I think classical music especially suffers with that because if you can live with the same piece of classical music for a few weeks, it'll reveal itself to you, but it's about having the patients to do that. I know you like performing in churches when listening to music and churches because often the period of music that's being played is from the period that the church was built in, correct me if I'm wrong here, but can you talk a little bit about that about the experience of being in an old church or cathedral and playing or hearing music there? Yeah, so I've spending a lot of time in Italy at the moment and the churches there have just some glorious and strange organs that I've been really lucky enough to play and write a few things for. That's opened up a whole side of classical music. I didn't know about all these early organs that have two sets of black keys so that you can play the notes in between the notes a bit like underscores. And I have keys that reproduce the sound of birds singing and if you look inside the organ these little boxes with water and blow air through them and these instruments are four or 500 years old and it just occurs to me that when you're sitting here in one being played, you are hearing an actual authentic performance from that would be identical to someone sitting in the same chair 500 years earlier. Because the walls are the same and the pipes are the same, and the organ is the same. And this is what it sounded like. And there's a sort of exciting time traveler sort of enjoyment to be had. With that kind of music I think. You've kind of made these organs sound like synthesizers with microtonal possibilities, bird sounds, yeah. Sure. Well, you know how well you know about music notation I want to patronize you at all. But you know that F is a higher note than G flat, even though on a keyboard it's the same black key. But when you play in a different key, that note really should be slightly higher. And when you're in the previous key, it should be slightly lower. So when you're playing in E major and you have your T sharp, that's a higher note than an E flat in C minor. So that's fluidity is something that these early organs tried to try to get biased by having these by doubling up the keys. So use one of the black keys when you want to play any flat, and the other black key.

Tom York Johnny Greenwood Paul Thomas Anderson Spencer licorice radiohead Spencer Tom Princess Diana Mars Davis Anderson Italy
"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I just love that. And I'm not sure exactly what to ask you, but can you talk a little bit about shaping it into that version of the theme? Sure, I mean. I'm a big fan of these historically very inaccurate recordings of baroque music, never done in the 70s, 60, 70, 80, even before the authenticity police stepped in and made everyone play with the right size of orchestra and the right kind of islands and because it's sort of glorious hearing this baroque music done with big romantic orchestras for all that would never have sounded like that. So that was a reference I sent to Paul. And he was also talking about that Kubrick film, Barry Lyndon. That has some big baroque orchestral things in it. And it was just on my level another excuse to get in a room with an orchestra and just revel in that beautiful big sound they make. Well, let's take another break here, by the way, thank you for that music. I really love it. Thank you, Terry. So let's take a break. My guess is, Johnny, Greenwood, and he you probably know him from his work with the band radiohead and also for his film scores. He has three current film scores for Spencer, licorice pizza, Po Thomas Anderson film and the power of the dog. And he's written film scores for Paul Thomas Anderson's there will be blood, the master and phantom thread. We'll be right back after a short break. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Johnny Greenwood. He is a composer and musician who you probably know from his work with radiohead, but also from his film scores. He's done several film scores for Paul Thomas Anderson, including the master there will be blood and phantom thread, and now he's written some of the music for licorice pizza. And he also has two other new movies that he's done scores for an addition to licorice pizza. There's Spencer about Diana Spencer, Princess Diana. And the power of the dog, Jane campion's new film. You started writing film scores Chris Paul Thomas Anderson asked you to write music for there will be blood. What was your first reaction when he asked you to do something you'd never done before? Had you ever thought about doing film scores? No, I hadn't. My reaction when Paul asked me was just excitement that I was going to get access to musicians and be able to write music for someone. And the fact that it was for a film, I didn't really up until that time pay that much attention to film music really and I just thought this is going to be a bit like being in a band with somebody except in a bandwidth Paul and the people who are making this film and going to be contributing music to it. And as a way to disassociate from it, I suppose and feel like it's not really to do with me. And when I started thinking like that, I just found it really enjoyable and fun to throw lots of music in this direction. Do you find it helpful to know that I have to write music that fits this mood or that fits this scene? And there's a purpose that defines what the music has to be. Is that helpful in digging out music from your brain? To know what it's for. It is, but I mean, there's a few cues in phantom thread that were written specifically for the scene they're in, but they're the minority really. It's usually more a case of writing music about the characters or the scenery or the story itself. Like in there will be blood, I remember being really taken with the story of HW in this sort of abandoned boy being taken. And I enjoyed writing quite a lot of, I suppose, quite sentimental music for that. And I enjoyed that easily as much as writing the more atonal and stranger. You know, relatively stranger orchestrations and things. And I try and avoid things like click tracks. So quite often, the players are just being asked to play two or three minutes of music. And the poor editor or director have to just, you know, put up with something that might not fit a picture or even move the picture around, so it fits the music. But this is partly from just trying to avoid computers as being the arbiter and how music is played and how tempos are conducted and we'll just ask the players to play something three or four different tempos. And then do the work in the edit and to making things work with a film itself. When you write for a movie, are you seeing the footage of the senior writing for before you compose it or you're composing it before it's even shot? Usually a lot of it gets written when I see the first test footage or footage of like with Jane campion's film, it was saying all of the footage of New Zealand that was standing in from Montana. And just seeing the colors of the film and understanding the script and the characters. And that's already lots of really fertile ground to start writing music. And I'd rather write twice as much music as needed and just keep going rather than panic about dropping the level of the music at the right place. So a line of dialog can be fitted in exactly in the right second and so I'm very indulged in that way in I'm allowed to start at work very early while films have been shot or even before. You started studying classical music when you were a child. How did you go in that direction? Was it through school were you assigned an instrument? Did your parents.

Paul Thomas Anderson Po Thomas Anderson Princess Diana radiohead Johnny Greenwood Chris Paul Thomas Anderson Spencer Barry Lyndon Paul Jane campion Terry gross Kubrick Greenwood Terry Johnny Montana New Zealand
"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 8 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on Fresh Air

"On Monday show, Johnny Greenwood talks about two aspects of his music life as lead guitarist for the band radiohead and as a composer of film scores. He wrote the scores for Paul Thomas Anderson's films there will be blood, the master, phantom thread, and licorice pizza, and.

Johnny Greenwood radiohead Paul Thomas Anderson
"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"This episode was produced by me. And me and Laurence Wu. Lane Kaplan Levinson. Julie came. Victor Eva is. Arya Steinberg, Yolanda, sanguine. Fact checking for this episode was done by Kevin vocal. Thanks also to Anya grundman, tomorrow charney, Jacob Gantz, dawud Tyler amine, Laura Al dary and foray masika. Special thank you to XL beggar's group and radiohead for letting us use songs from kid a and amnesiac in this episode. The new reissue of the albums called kid amnesia is out now and contains a bunch of never released before tracks. You can find it wherever songs are sold or streaming. Other music for this episode was composed by Ron T and his band drop electric, which includes Navi marvi, show fujiwara. Anya, mizani. Also, we want your voice on our show. Send us a voicemail at 872-588-8805 with your name, where you're from and the line, you're listening to through line from NPR. And we'll get you in there. That's 872-588-8805. And finally, if you have an idea or like something you've heard on the show, please write us through line and NPR dot org or hit us up on.

Laurence Wu Lane Kaplan Levinson Victor Eva Arya Steinberg Kevin vocal Anya grundman tomorrow charney Jacob Gantz dawud Tyler amine Laura Al dary Yolanda Ron T Julie Navi marvi mizani amnesia Anya NPR
"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

04:22 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"There were these moments of like, oh my God, I can't believe we've done this. My favorite moment of the whole of that period was when kiddo went to number one in the U.S. almost by accident, you know, this little monster that we created was certainly everywhere and everyone was going what what's that doing there? And it was so exciting. I found that so exciting took into this lovely guy mister Frick from running stone and he's literally sitting there going how the hell did you do that? You know, it's like it was like a once in a lifetime opportunity. I've because I view a lot of people who are very sort of kind of electronic music subcultures and that was the music that I was listening to before enduring and a lot of them. They were like, oh, radiohead. And I for the first time I was just like, ah, yes, yes, that's right. You know, because The Rock and roll thing was not something that most of the people I knew were responded to. And it felt like that I was doing something that they kind of like, oh well, that's okay. I mean, you've got to accept. So make some music that sounded like today. Okay, so the obvious question is hanging here. How did an album that on the surface might seem like a bummer to many people, especially at a time when there were these competing visions of what progress means, do so well. According to Alex Ross, it's because the unease that radiohead Tom and Stan Lee were expressing with the albums, was an unease, many people were feeling. And I think, perhaps, and this is just my total kind of random speculation that the popularity of the records may have connected with people's unconscious or semi conscious, unease and sense that there was something superficial about that sense of complacency and well-being and that something else was coming, which indeed it did. Looking back on it, well, that doesn't seem so problematic anymore that they were insisting that people think about climate change that they were bringing up these issues around technology. And that they were just generally challenging complacency and then these records came along which did not really echo at all that general spirit of optimism and complacency. And I would say that the music itself is actually the primary arena. In which all this is happening. The song's lull you and then challenge you, I think, which is just a great dynamic. And it was an experiment that people wanted to where people were ready for. And so I kind of think of all this music as I feel like they're premonitions of what was coming in the early 20s first century and all kinds of issues and all kinds of dimensions that 9 11 was a sharp reminder that all was not well. And it has not really recovered that the 90s now looked like some kind of almost Victorian era when everyone was sort of dancing around smiling. It.

mister Frick kiddo radiohead Tom Alex Ross Stan Lee U.S.
"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

03:55 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Three, you must name it. Radiohead released two albums in the span of a year. Kid a in 2000 and a follow-up amnesiac. In 2001. Initially, critics didn't respond positively to the albums. But as it turned out, that was not the reaction from the audience. And I think that's the really remarkable thing that happened that this experimental offbeat record, which blatantly refused to continue where, okay, computer had left off was a huge success and actually really connected with a wider public. You forgot, didn't you? Cut.

Radiohead
"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

04:05 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Shooting yourself in both feet, self sabotage. If you've had any success doing anything really, you've definitely thought about that. You might have asked yourself, do I do the same thing that brought me attention and affirmation or do I push myself and try something new and risk losing the success that I've built? This was a question the members of radiohead were actually tackling in the late 1990s. They went from a successful band to perhaps the most revered band in the world. And their album okay computer was largely responsible for that. It was that rare combination of commercial and critical success. Yet, it had also nearly ripped the band apart. The sudden onslaught of fame, the constant touring. It all took its toll, and they had pressure on them to repeat the success of okay computer. Remember, this was the late 1990s, and even though napster and other illegal downloading platforms were around. The music industry was still making tons of money by selling actual records in CDs. So naturally, another radiohead album would have meant more money. And so back to that choice for radiohead. Try and make another okay computer and enjoy success again or go in a totally different direction and risk alienating the audience and potentially the bottom line. They chose the latter riskier move. It's a decision that makes more sense when you.

radiohead
"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:39 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Renowned Fatah. And I'm ram teen Arab Louis. Coming up, we dial back the clock to the turn of the century. Hi, I'm Jordan. I am calling and from Kingston, Jamaica and the United Kingdom through line on NPR. Part one is this really happening..

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"radiohead" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Hey Robin, check it out. Bob, what are you doing in that trailer truck? I've just come from the all songs considered warehouse. You know, where we keep all the albums and all the songs we've played over the years, I've filled the truck with boxes and boxes of records, so I can drive around the country and deliver copies for all of our listeners to here. I mean, I know we love to get more music from more artists out to more people, but there's much easier way to do this. What do you mean? Look, we have the all songs considered podcast, yeah? If listeners just support the podcast, they can help ensure they'll keep hearing new musical discoveries by artists from all over the world. All they have to do is make a donation to the public radio station of their choice. So how would they do that? Just go to donate dot NPR dot org slash music to get started. You make a donation and help get more voices and more music to more people. And you can do it from anywhere, your home or anywhere. You don't need this truck. Amazing, so that's donate that NPR dot org slash music. Donate dot NPR dot org slash music. Go now. I'm on my way. Hey everyone from inky our music and all songs considered. I'm Robin Hilton with a special episode from our Friends over at NPR's history podcast through line. It's all about the legacy of radiohead's kid a and amnesiac albums. When the band first released the records 20 years ago, they were initially panned by critics, but they still became huge hits for radiohead and are now considered to be among the band's greatest work. And that's partly because kid a and amnesiac so brilliantly captured what the new millennium felt like. And they signaled a new and ominous direction that the world seemed to be headed in. On this episode, through line talks with radiohead's Tom York and others about the ways the band confronted the monsters around us and within us, the prophecies of kid a and amnesiac.

NPR Robin Robin Hilton Bob radiohead Tom York
"radiohead" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"radiohead" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"Can i say one thing about what you said. Yeah i used to set. I thought this was brilliant in college. Had a c. d. alarm clock. Because i am fifty seven dollars probably more than that. Cds were not cheap in the nineteen. Burn the myself. I burned my. I would set my alarm to wake up to lake. You're never there by cake. Is cake yet cake. But i'm not familiar with that song and on their own long long student always through search strom resistance and they play a phone. They go dude. It's about like it's about someone that's too obsessed with their girlfriend boyfriend and they keep calling them. They're like you're not there. You're not there and the guy from cake was like guys. Let's put down the pastries and ready a jam. So strawberry jam. Oh my jesus ever. I love the because everyone knows. The guys of cake were obsessive desserts. They love desserts. I wonder what it really was. probably like. You know the resin and the ball get kicked in their see. Smoke the k. If we saw how every band name if we saw the moments like the days that they were considering all the different band names and the moment that they decided on the band name they chose. we would hate. You'd see a super to us because they relate you three four because there's four zero five five five seventy who's lying. You fire love you bono. And he's like you to you. You're always thirty percent spent so much time because my brother was always in bands like trying to help him think of band names and it always ended up being just like like i saw one of this was really one of his band. Names like maybe like a cs lewis book like okay. Maybe like narnia. No that's like too on the nose. Maybe like you know wardrobe now. Nobody will get that all in like you're searching through his different works. You like dawn shredder. That's cool on better. And he just takes all the mystery out of it which is the only thing that band names have going for them is like how did you think of that narnia school. But i think it's just because it's like nirvana. I remember the guy from bush. Like why are you call bush. And he was like well. Yeah you know. Men and women both have bush like the bushes. He didn't say that machine had. If you asked me a radiohead radiohead is the best band name. And i will take. I'll die on that hill. Now you're right. That's the only one that like even if you saw..

bono bush nirvana radiohead radiohead
"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"List our generations culture there there are huge cornerstone of this genre and of the time. The question is regarding this specific album I. think that most people that will give this album listener to even if they're into music that isn't perfectly conventional will feel like they're doing something a bit adventurous. You know what I mean like this is a good practice in living your comfort zone and I also think that if you really get into this album and analyze it and stuff, then it has a lot to offer. On the other hand for now. But with so much atmosphere didn't really get me as much as I hoped, it would when I'm trying to disconnect my feelings about this album from this decision, I find it hard maybe to recommend people because I feel like it has a high threshold to pass in order to enjoy you know then again I like this album a wanted direct towards it I you both said it like this is a big ninety s early two thousand album radiohead has been one of the biggest bands in the world since OK, computer came out and the whole experience was really good bitter Doina. The most obvious vote here. So maybe it should vote I shall i. Tip My hat to this salivated in. So for me, it's ominous. Stat. Cool. So this out and I, am really on the fence here I'm not not that it matters, but it doesn't matter. Just, out of interest just out of Because I get to vote. I'm going to give this. I'M GONNA, struggle the mustache and this album while I think we all really enjoyed is out of the quake. So. Our next episode is going to be about a documentary that is called Jiro Dreams of Sushi documentary from two thousand eleven. The first thing that came to mind when when they're too big topic was Schiller on. The. Then I thought that we well, actually I'm not one what's last musical that we did. The producers. We didn't do any any music. Oh, nothing was done any musicals so maybe I should have been not in my next next time around we'll get to see. Yeah but I don't think we discussed. Food maybe it makes sense you know because I usually wouldn't talk about culture nobody spoke with some know movies, TV music hooks, comic books but I think like something that is very much cultural. So I think that that could be an interesting push towards talking about it and it's supposed to be good. My experience good documentaries tell broad story like here. It's an old guy making Sushi and then they managed to get a bit deeper and final of the smaller lines and tell more personal story that we can learn from like I've heard about this movie a few times I've heard it's really interesting and I wonder what it has to say. So this could be a good experience. I don't want to get anyone's up but I just went on the the surf, the net video of like when it gets announced that it will be arriving net. which was seven years ago by the way but the top comment is This is the best thing you ever watch in your whole life guaranteed Walser high expectations. There's there's little to no hedging going on there but. Maybe I'll watch this every day if it's that good. It's the best thing ever watch not necessarily experience. Like, win on like when we get to the end and I'm on my deathbed well, also, there was a really good album I mean. That's basically anything it was better than Jiro Dreams of Sushi so. Now I kid but it actually looks really nice. It looks has that feeling of Where you watch people do things like woodworking leather making where you would never go to the to setup the tools to do it, but it's not to watch other people I feel like the same part of my brain will light up on the FM. I watched this is supposed to be a master in his craft. So that's always something nice to see. It would be bad to watch a guy who's just Yeah the one hundred makes the packs that you can buy the gestation. Even, though I'd love to have a big into that industry. So thank you Peter. Thank you for staying. True to our goal and thank you the listeners at home for helping us on the latest stage of our quest. We hope that you join us again next episode talk tease simple by by. The coach request podcast is part of all the people network visit our website at coach request podcast, dot com to contact us or see Eliza upcoming episodes. Follow us on twitter at CQ underline podcast and tell your friends about us. Find out.

Jiro Dreams radiohead Schiller Walser Eliza Peter
"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"Feel stuck to me so I've never listen to radiohead as well. I kept hearing about them during high school a lot of people listened to radio and. I. Think I had in mind something that is more like link one, eighty two or really. Yeah. So when diving into kid. I like a double check that I'm listening to the right thing because it was so different from what I expected. So listen to two key day a couple of times and even after it wouldn't add up to what I thought radiohead is so I went ahead and listen to. Okay computer and that kind of had a more. To what thought radiohead is makes you think what do you think blink one eighty two is because yeah well, it's not it's different from from blink right. Like let's say that okay, computer is more conventional music. Kita is totally experimental. It's more about the atmosphere you know just creating this overall vibe and I actually quite enjoyed. It took me by surprise by the way the first time that I that I heard it. It was like after a very long day at work I think I got out of the office around midnight or something, and I got like this thirty minutes walk back home and I was just exhausted. I just wanted to sleep in and I said, okay. Let's let's listen to something. And, it actually came perfectly because it really got me easily into what I assume was like the mood that the music is guiding you to that was my I listen to it. So I didn't have any any conflicts of thinking if I like it or I don't like it just got into the mood and I listened to a couple of times in Yeah I. Think it's a very special album. I think. I. Enjoyed it. But I gotta say because it's so much about creating that mood today I went to a food market and underway way try listening to it again and it just wasn't right like it because it was morning and people were walking and everything was happy and found not every environment works for this album. Yeah. Well, I, guess that's true for any album but yeah, but. I think like the best qualities of KITA is. When you relax when you let go and Kinda, let them use a carry you to the places that it wants to go let's at least my experts and and it was a good one. I've got actually a really weird coincidence. With Ye Byron. At you said, you were very tied when you listen to it while when I picked it for a topic and listen to it first time as you guys are I had like nicely. So I was running off baby one hour slate philosophy forty, eight hours or something. And then I decided. Well, pick this topic of. Listening to the album and like I was listening to everything in its right place and and kid, I, in the national anthem and the source sort of. The way intended maybe to be psychedelic, but there were very trance-like and because I was like not hallucinating but very sort of out of it just cognitively the music sort of really took me and it was incredible I just couldn't believe how will fit with me. So I think I listened to quite a few times actually the next few days when I couldn't really get slave and it. Was really quite interesting in one song in particular was was quite good being in that sort of delirious state that even when sort of I've got back to like a normal side health, I was surprised like you said the non it wasn't sort of like didn't have a lot of hoops or anything but for me like maybe the hooks went there but it still it was still very catchy. I was still in terms of repeat listens I was constantly like just cycling through the the album having a really good time I'm just very surprised at a hit because my my musical histories is just so much like a incomplete contrast because I'm used to sort of sixties seventies less so eighties and nineties onwards sort of more on head of for me and especially with the electronic fire and all that it's just it just doesn't really can't really identify with it, which isn't which isn't a reason I wouldn't like it I mean not identifying with a certain Brennan Music I'm sure there's there's a few country albums some people like. Even if they're not really considered himself to be that kind of person but I was just surprised how center the Booze I really hit me everything just felt unlike a lot of electronic music felt very genuine felt quite unionist. It felt like that we're really trying to go for something every every song had like a particular sort of feeling that I feel like it was trona translate to me, and at least for the first few listens I feel like I just understood what that we're going for it just almost like a subconscious level it hit on the right buttons for me and I just felt like I got the. There's a few albums there were maybe pet sounds I didn't really feel like I. I. got the sunlight even though I really liked the melodies like I don't know if they even was something to get the fell just like easy listening almost. But this one felt like especially with one of the songs I felt like before I really got it I was listening to it. It just felt like a bunch of noise and then after I got, it just made sense and I don't get that a lot with music like when I go really date with an honest I find that and this was just in the last few lessons. So yeah. I'll make claim now actually, this might be the face my most favorite thing of on the podcasts I thought. Wow, that's that's a big play it. Yeah that's wonderful. Yes. I chose it mostly because I wanted to find something to put in in the new category like a two thousand music with, but I also wanted to up think a non random whiter to choose, and that's why whatever number one was going to be on rolling Stein's top one hundred for the two thousand. That was good enough for me. You just live. This is an in their hand. Yeah. Yes. Essentially and put all the blame on them if it goes badly and RADIOHEAD I hadn't had much experience with I. Know at listen to two songs and I probably wouldn't inbound nine songs that I listened to before probably the first three songs. But all of their big album OK computer and it just never landed I never gave them another shot. It wasn't enough to turn me off from the band, but it was definitely enough just to not really down that avenue looking for new music and Yeah. This was an odd one, two kickoff with because the sound from their previous free albums is quite different and this one is sort of like a new style for them. So it was probably a nice starting point actually just to try to. Come at it as a fresh inductee into the radiohead discography. So I had a lot of fun actually with this and there's a few songs and I'm not sort of the main with. But for the most part I find, it's not flawless, but it's bordering on quite outstanding for me. So I think everything in its right place is an amazing opener for an album I. totally great..

radiohead Kita Stein
"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"Okay. So today we are talking about radiohead radiohead is an experimental rock band formed in Nineteen, ninety, five, the English and the band members are. Tom York. He's the main vocalist and writes all the songs most of the songs and he also plays guitar keyboards. So I've I've seen a few they live performances and he usually plays the guitar and. Then, there's the brothers, Johnny and Colin Greenwood and Johnny Does the Lead Guitar and is also a cable borders and his brother Colin is the bassist, and then there's anti Bryan who's backing vocals and guitar at as Philip. So way who does the drums so brief history of radiohead debut single CREPE was allegedly recorded in one take and the band didn't actually They were recording at the moment that would just sort of racing and they were rolling the types but this is speculation and. Band sometimes claim this kind of stuff. Sorry. Johnny didn't like the track too much. Think was a little bit too soft and he added some real heavy guitar pots united some since some long riffs and stuff and then ended up working really well for the song and the single wasn't that big in the UK however in the US. It caught on and they end up launching into not the ban Abbott. United. They they were much more popular than what they were previous song. It appeared on their debut album Pablo, honey which was released to the year later in nineteen ninety-three and that album at the time was much loved by fans not so much anymore but. For the time it was praised by fans not so much by critics. Asia. That They eventually got tired of playing pretty much every song especially crate on that album and If you listen to the album now you might say why I've listened to the album. It doesn't age as well as pretty much any other album the have. Anyway. So they started playing new sort of things they were trying out onto a that would just trying to think about different songs. I WANNA to play just to get away from their album and they songs more or less foam their second album called the band's so be ds the second album included six different singles knowhow and really launched the band's popularity even the will. Vary third album, ok computer really sort of brought them into international fame this. This is sorta the one that will come out of the mouths of radio headset fans as their as defining album of their career although it's not necessarily the the best album it's the one that they signed by. So in the same way that dockside, the million is pink floyd sit of. Flag album the one that ever. Understands but it's not necessarily domestic. Yeah. Think with the okay computer, they became one of those major bands Leah one of the biggest bands in the world, right? Yeah. Yeah. It's. It's. It's sort of that that fame level wherever onto the just recognizes the cover art even if they've never had a song from anyway. So then the world was pretty much. At the fate the critics were comparing they have rise to something like the Beatles, which is a big claim. Yeah Anyway. So as expectations were sky pretty much then next album, they just shifted stocks or in the way that Bob Dylan. As soon as you start locking something, he's doing he just shifts to something in Alphen divides fans quite a bit and. This next album, it was ranked at one on Rolling Stone Magazine's top one, hundred albums between two, thousand, and two, thousand and nine. So as a PODCAST, we've looked at the top five, hundred of on and this one ranks in the sixties. However, if you just off two, thousand, two, thousand, nine, it's number one. So new marina and probably more importantly. It's the topic of today's episode. So the album is called Kid I. It was released on the second of about two thousand quite early on in the decade it's their fourth album and it draws influences from Electronica Kraut Rock, which is sort of Jim Jam in rock that says it really a and jazz traces of their previous sort of experimental rock. Roots as well. So the creeping in and of the ten tracks making it onto the album they were noticing goes released adult really. Yeah. There was none of those. So they went from six on the band's to not sure how many of the hat on OK computer, but they just cut it off completely. But. It's also related to them marketing. They pretty much didn't do any further sheets or interviews to promote this album. It was all just online and it was made for streaming as well. So I'm not really sure if the fundamental sort of thinking bond but they I think it was maybe a little bit of a rebellion often Because they would just. Sort of thrown around the world with that one and this kid a album became their fist number one album in the sites, and also as I said, it's quite different to their previous albums. Sorry. At the time, it was where we save, but it was also some fans who've been with them obviously didn't like it and some fans never have heard of them reluctance out for the first time. But now I think people are starting to find that it's actually one of their better albums. By the Rolling Stone magazine Sir, do you guys have any experience listening to radio head like fans and if not, what was this like as a fest album fee guys from them I never listen to radiohead like I used to do vocal training when I was younger and my coach guide I don't know how to call her when when I got to her place before we started, we used to drink tea and we still listen to music and she used to play a lot of radiohead. So I never listened to them on my own but I had. Kind of an impression of their music, and he'd always sounded like something I would kind of like like I like the heaviness I like the type of sound of the tars vocals e have but I never really sat down and listen to them. So this is first album of their that I listen to and this was a bit of a word experience for me not because this is kind of weird album but like I'm still listening to the cowboy bebop soundtrack and to go from the the flow -I atmospheric day to the lively wild music of Cowboy bebop or you know the other way around is kind of an extreme transition. You know it took me a few listens to start to get this album. The music in this album is not based on a lot of hooks. Moments that stand out in repeated you. You can kind of go by it's kind of a harder album to get into. Usually this type of music takes more listens to get to know, and then once you know it fairly well, then it can really start to understand how it feels or or what it's going for, and it took me a while to get into like it i. it just sounded like a bunch of ideas from together and. After a few listens. It's it started to feel like controlled chaos kind of like it felt like the things that make weird also give it meaning in a way and the music does feel a bit messy, their instruments that sound a bit dissonant in jarring. The drums sometimes feel like they're not trying to even work with the rest of the band but if you of let it work if you kind of let yourself slip into the Trans Kinda. Feeling that the music has if you take all of it at once then it makes sense you know it's it's messy but it works and I start to enjoy the album like it took me a few listens but eventually did start real enjoy this album and I like it a lot I totally like the lost disconnected lonely. Sad feeling it has it has this weird atmosphere and when I started to really get to know this album better. I kind of knew what to expect when you listen to it. I have to say that there were two songs that just didn't feel like anything to me. You know a couple of songs that just didn't work I really liked this album, but there are two songs there that kind of.

radiohead Johnny Rolling Stone Magazine Colin Greenwood Tom York Beatles Philip Leah Bob Dylan Asia Pablo UK Jim Jam US
"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

The Culture Quest

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on The Culture Quest

"Welcome to the coach Quest podcast today in.

Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

"Social media is uniting that's a force in support of the black lives matter movement everywhere you look on social media Facebook Instagram Twitter you're finding black squares as a movement started by the music industry has spread to other celebrities even to everyday people it's part of black L. Tuesday an online event that started with record labels and is being embraced by artists like Rihanna Alicia keys Coldplay Radiohead and the Beastie Boys most of their sites went blank no text no images though the hash tag the show must be polished or black heart emoji is also being seen Britney spears says she joined the blackout Tuesday movement and urged fans to do the same saying people should stay off their devices to focus on ways to make the world a better place for all of us I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Rihanna Alicia Facebook Britney Spears Oscar Wells Gabriel
Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Social media, music world go dark for Black Out Tuesday

"Joe president social Biden trump media is is mounting is turning uniting one of up his that's the pressure most a force aggressive on governors in support attacks of to the black stem against lives president week matter long trump movement violence as his by White again House campaign calling enters for more a new national phase guard to hit for everywhere the streets a third you look straight on social day the Biden's president's media made focus Facebook a public today appearance Instagram on his hometown Twitter this time you're tweeting leaving finding black Delaware NYC squares for the first call as a time movement up the since National started March by Guard the music industry in the Philadelphia losers has spread and he blasted lowlifes to other the president's celebrities are ripping handling you apart of even national to everyday unrest governor people Andrew saying it's Cuomo part his of agrees narcissism black L. Tuesday is New become York City more an online police important event didn't than that get the started America's job with done record well they labels being are supposed to we and protect can is being be the community forgiven embraced for by believing artists protect the like press the Rihanna property is more Alicia interested they in keys did that not and do Coldplay that in in power New Radiohead York City and last the Beastie night he's Boys then in offering principle most to of their deploy Biden's sites the went guard casting blank but himself no mayor text bill as de Blasio no console images says Lorraine he chief though doesn't the hash need tag in it contrast we have the not show had to a must loss the president of life be polished the last treasury five or days black states the heart National emoji must Guard is be also part has been being of out the solution seen in the Minnesota Britney not spears the problem governor says Tim she he walls says joined that the this blackout is one resisting is Tuesday not calls only movement part to send of the problem and in urged bigger fans numbers he accelerates to do the same saying it that's saying not Sager going people to make should stay his make off state ani their Washington devices or the nation to focus whole on again ways we're going to make to establish the world a better place peace on for our streets all of us when we address the I'm systemic Oscar wells issues Gabriel that caused it in the first place Sager made Donnie Washington

Britney Oscar Wells Washington Minnesota Rihanna Cuomo Philadelphia Facebook Donnie Washington Sager Gabriel TIM JOE Lorraine Coldplay Alicia America York City Andrew Twitter
"radiohead" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"radiohead" Discussed on KCRW

"For techno pianos and chords and screens going back to nineteen ninety two for that one opus three it's fine day getting into brand new work from it'll Brian of Radiohead going as E. L. B. this is Olympic branding right here in case you're just.

Radiohead
The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

The Big Picture

05:24 min | 2 years ago

The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

"I have a very special show today later. In this podcast I have an interview with Robbie Robertson one of the founding members of the band a significant figure in movie history as well. Who HAS COLLABORATED WITH? Martin Scorsese over the years. He has a new documentary that he participated in the basically tells the story of his life and the work of the band called. Once were brothers so I hope you'll stick around for that and inspired by that conversation. I had to invite on Ringer Staff Writer Rob Villa. Who is one of the funniest and smartest people I know about music? I Rob She's we'll thank you. It's an honor to be here of course alot rob you write about music and movies at the ringer as well and quite deftly and I think the use of music in movies has always been frankly an obsession of mine and I suspect that you are also a sophisticated thinker about this idea. Is that fair to say? Sophisticated is a strong word. But let's go with your role with your a guy who has a functioning brain that watches movies with music in them. Is that fair to say Aisha's? Amd during sonic the HEDGEHOG. That's the way I would describe my relationship with music and movies me I was that guy I feel like there's a lot we know there's a there's a conscientiousness about choosing songs in movies now because we grew up watching scorsese movies and then the movies of all the people who watched. Martin Scorsese movies and start making movies of their own and so the use of the pop song. We're not talking about score here. We're talking about pop music appearing in films you know what is your. What is your sense of? Who Does it well and sort of what goes into making a good choice for something that's really obvious or really obscure. I think the obviousness I see a lot more in prestige. Tv generally like that's the plate. Like any use of radiohead. Almost across the board. Like I I like a lot of Westworld but just the way that Westworld is uses those pop songs you know the old style piano version of pop songs. It's just you're just sort of leaching off that songs energy like the the cash that it already has and you're just sort of stealing and implanting it into your TV show or your movie like it's there's a difference between stealing a song soul and like taking a song and building a new universe around it like sort of recreating it in re-energizing it it's a it's a great point. I'll never forget the moment I watched the pilot of Ozark. Which is the last the last episode of ours. Ozark that I've ever watched and at the end of it Decks dark by radiohead began playing and I was like. Oh this is that JOE now. I mean no disrespect to say Chris Ryan. Who's a huge fan of that series but actually that choice indicated to me what the creators of the show thought they were doing and it wasn't for me you know it just didn't Didn't click with what despite liking radiohead and Jason Bateman and. I knew that there was a pretentiousness that I was not going to connect with their What do you think makes for a good song choice in a movie? I think it has to be at least a little unexpected. It has to re- contextual. Is it a little bit like I? There are instances where obviousness is what you need and I think there are a few of those and my list here but I I think. In general you need some element of surprise some just more gratuitous are just more surprising way of using it than what you would expect. Do you think it's important to saying something about character or the scene itself or because one of the things that that Robertson said when he and I talked which I thought was interesting was the he really likes the contrast he moments. That's the moment when you take a very sweet song. Said it against a very violent moment or you take a very sweet moment and give it something more braces and that's obviously a hallmark of a lot of the people that are best known for choosing songs and movies you know. Think of Quentin Tarantino or fincher. Scorsese are all these people that I talk about endlessly on this show. Do you think that the that music can play such a profound role in telling a story in that way? I think so. I mean you can go too far in that the phenomenon of every movie trailer now using like a really slow down creepy version of a pop song like you think. Fight THE FI. The fifty shades of grey beyond say series. You know like I suicide squad. I think did that. You know you can go too far in that direction and and just use it entirely as irony like. Here's a really sweet song to contrast with an ugly thing. But Yeah I mean. That's that's sort of an overused tropes at this point at the time in the heyday in the early reign of those people those directors like. Yeah that was a really effective use of contrast. So we're here to do a top five list. You'RE GONNA share your five favorite needle drops in movies and I'M GONNA share my five favorite needle drops. Now I don't know your picks and you don't know my picks you almost ruined this podcast by accidentally sharing those picks and I would like you. I'm I apologize profusely and I apologize for my choices. I think this is going to be yelling at me in the next twenty minutes. That's my concern. You know what my concern is is just being too basic right. There are some things that are sort of undeniably signature moments in movies and music especially in the last twenty to twenty five years when when I think this phenomenon has really picked up. Steam and my choices are not songs that were written for movies. They are entirely songs that had previously existed before the film came along. Is that true for you too? I think in all but one case my number five. That's not true but I think that's an important thing that you have to have a prior. Ideally you have a prior relationship with that song that the movie changes. That's what makes a really good moment for me. Not all of them but that's the platonic ideal. I absolutely love that. I probably have one song that that is out runs an opposition to that idea. But that's a great

Martin Scorsese Radiohead Robbie Robertson Ozark Westworld Rob Villa Staff Writer Aisha Jason Bateman Quentin Tarantino AMD Chris Ryan JOE Fincher
Bands People Hate That Are Crazy Successful: Nickelback

Bobbycast

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Bands People Hate That Are Crazy Successful: Nickelback

"Bans. That are crazy successful. And let's start with nickelback really one of the most accessible bands of all time how the Let's see here under ten. Nickel bag sold over fifty million albums. Okay they rank as the second best selling international act in the two thousands. Who Do you think behind the Second Best International Act of the two thousand? The only by one act I I. I know who. You're GONNA say thousands. Yeah one-two-three radiohead the Beatles. Oh more than two more than really had more than is this factual I look at my. He confirms through nearly a decade pop up. Culture has been incredibly cruel to nickelback. I've always been a lover of them more so than I think I would be because of all the hate on them like I would just kind of sit at six point five normally because they have songs we know unlike but because everybody hates him mechanical bad for them so I put them at like a seven point three because of that. Sometimes I think we get. Tricked me liking something. What do you mean? The songs are good. Sometimes I think that they're just on the radio so much that we're like all right whatever it has like uses uses. IRA's all right. It's not a bad song but if you heard that once I think ninety percent of the people that heard that once we're like this I don't think so I think a lot of songs only heard wants back. The other are lot. Yeah human number ones so many number ones. How many do we need to look at the Louisville eight nine ten eleven all right? They even had songs on super soundtracks Spiderman. I remember that one so you just want to be a hater because no croakers Kroger's hair. Yeah you I don't understand the hate like. Tell me why you're hater. I just at the time that came out to me that was was like it's easy music. Sometimes it's just like everybody doing it if it's so it's like Sam Nunn backward people go that song so easy to then. Why don't oh you write it? I think no. I don't think I can right but I think that most people don't try to do that because they don't want to get stuck doing that like our is easy music like like where where are where's the nickelback. Now there's longevity and nickelback there's no longevity and almost any of those bands the two thousands or any decade the longevity fifty million albums nickelback nickelback does a tour. Again they sell out. Yes touring this area. They do. I don't know they don't know where my mind is with them. Just like because you've been tainted by the media. No I love the media. I'm not a listen to people. Say otherwise they would just go away and they didn't care for at the time but why are are they. The most despised man as it became a thing it became like its cool to hate nickelback and I probably would to experiment hating on them to defend them. Yeah all right They won't even do interviews because they know half the questions to be about everybody hitting them. Imagine that was that'd be terrible. They still sell out of God's our tickets and we'll probably still be laughing ten years from now because of all their money billionaire. Yeah Right. Yeah

Nickelback Sam Nunn Louisville
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 3 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Jonny Greenwood, Radiohead And Tom York discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Jonny Greenwood, Radiohead And Tom York discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The band. Radiohead, says a trove of unreleased music has been stolen and is being held for ransom, but it's not going to pay up instead, it's releasing it giving all the proceeds to environmental activist group. Extinction rebellion guitarist Jonny Greenwood tweeted about eighteen hours of material from around the time of their nineteen ninety seven album, ok computer was stolen from singer. Tom York's mini disc archive last week, Greenwood said the hackers demanded one hundred fifty thousand dollars. So all eighteen hours of it will be available on the music sharing site. Band camp fans can buy the music for eighteen dollars for the next eighteen days Greenwood said it was never intended for release. It was quote only tangentially interesting extinction, rebellion, which stages direct action. Protests against climate change thanked Radiohead, quote from the bottom of our

Jonny Greenwood Radiohead Tom York Eighteen Hours One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol Eighteen Dollars Eighteen Days
In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:28 min | 3 years ago

In the Footsteps of Merce Cunningham

"Time. I'm courteous. Studio. Three sixty podcast extra. We're celebrating the life and work of one of the great American choreographers. Merce Cunningham who was born one hundred years ago this week he danced starting as a member of Martha Graham's troop and then maye dances for seventy years and embraced innovation from start to finish new dance forms, new technology. New music new collaborators. Win four he worked with Radiohead and Siga rose on a beautiful piece that you're hearing called split sides. Cunningham dancers were famous for seeming to defy the laws of physics leaping high and suddenly switching direction in mid air. When Cunningham spoke with us in two thousand one he was using computers to try to make his dances, even more complex. Take always been interested in movement. There's no reason for that is just it seems to be it should interest everybody. We're we're so involved with all the time. I think of course of animals and birds watching their movements of always been totally fascinating to me. Movement is so much a part of our daily experience that we don't think of it as a thing, we don't even think we sort of do it. But if you thought about it say, how do you walk? How do you just the mechanics, but if we all walk the same why is it we all walk differently and that struck me years ago, and I thought well that was a way to think about movement that we were doing the same thing. But we all did it differently. My name is Daniel Roberts. I have a member of the Merce Cunningham dance company. I always feel that my legs are like. Needles of sewing machine when I'm doing cutting him they have to be very sharp and very articulate, and I feel that the torso has to be free on top of that on. So there's a strain that comes along with doing the work in the technique. And there's a clarity about the work in general, the use of space and the articulation of the torso limbs that I've never experienced before in any other dance form. I'm interested obviously in complexity which is to buy disadvantaged probably because it's made it difficult often for the public to really comprehend live with what we do. I think uses chance to avoid his own typical habits of making movement. And that's what's really interesting because he's even making it difficult for himself. It's not whatever feels natural. It's usually what deals completely unnatural. Chance operations came about in the nineteen fifties. There was wrist of an institute of random numbers where the decided scientists had decided that rather than using logic for numbers they could just as well use chance John cage. Took course, we're using it in his music composition. And I thought it would work with moving. I would say devise you sort of speaker series of movements. But then through chance means in the beginning, it was tossing coins. So that instead of you just using your own what you remembered about how things go you came up with this stunt. Up things which were. Sometimes impossible. But if you tried them, even though what it was was impossible something else came up to had experienced or I hadn't experienced before. I had the opportunity to begin to work with dad's computer it's called life forms, and it has mainly three screens with which you work one is what they call the stage on which you can place tiny figures, which move there's a screen with the larger figure called the figure editor on which you can make movements on the figure then there is a third screen called the time line, which is moving in time. You can put the the body and what say flat on the floor Prome. Okay. Then a few spaces later in the time. You could put it up in the air. Now, it will do that it will rise up on its feet and go up in the air. Of course, you can't do that in the way. It does it. But you look at it. I do and I think oh, but I could do it this way. Now if I hadn't seen this. I wouldn't think that way and and I. My work with it has grown more complex because I see more possibilities all the

Merce Cunningham Cunningham Martha Graham Daniel Roberts Maye John Cage Radiohead DAD Editor One Hundred Years Seventy Years
Jackson, Nicks join Hall of Fame

Ben Maller

00:42 sec | 4 years ago

Jackson, Nicks join Hall of Fame

"Free. They rock and Roll Hall of fame inducted as for twenty nineteen of been announced. Steve Kastenbaum has a partial list. Continued with the tradition of inducting a solo artist who was already in the hall with a band this time it Stevie nicks. Heavy metal rockers def Leppard got the nod. New wave and rock bands. The cure Roxy music and Radiohead are in. Janet Jackson is an inductive. And they didn't leave out classic rock. The sambas round out the class.

Stevie Nicks Janet Jackson Steve Kastenbaum Radiohead Leppard
Radiohead, The Cure to Join Rock Hall Of Fame.

Ray Appleton

00:40 sec | 4 years ago

Radiohead, The Cure to Join Rock Hall Of Fame.

"The rock and Roll Hall of fame inducted tease for two thousand nineteen have been announced they continued with the tradition of inducting a solo artist who was already in the hall with the band this time. It's knicks. Heavy metal rockers def Leppard got the nod. New wave and rock bands. The cure Roxy music and Radiohead are in. Janet Jackson is an inductive. And they didn't leave out classic rock. The psalm B's round out the class.

Janet Jackson Knicks Radiohead Leppard
Janet Jackson, Stevie Nicks And Radiohead discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 4 years ago

Janet Jackson, Stevie Nicks And Radiohead discussed on 24 Hour News

"Janet Jackson joins her brother, Michael and the Jackson Five as members of the rock and Roll Hall of fame. Sharon deduction Thursday, along with Stevie nicks, Radiohead, the cure and the top fan vote-getter def Leppard among others the induction ceremonies next

Janet Jackson Stevie Nicks Radiohead Leppard Sharon Michael