24 Burst results for "Radio Journalist"

British army helps clear backlog of virus-stranded drivers

Science Friday

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

British army helps clear backlog of virus-stranded drivers

"A backlog of truck drivers stranded at the border between the United Kingdom and France. Thousands of trucks started backing up at the port of Dover after France briefly closed its border to curb a new strain of the Corona virus detected in England. Another radio journalist has been killed

France United Kingdom Dover England
The Latino Vote in 2020

Latino Rebels Radio

04:59 min | 10 months ago

The Latino Vote in 2020

"Bernard will thank you so much for being on Latino radio with me. I. It's great to be here when it's finally great to connect as I was saying before. Big Admire of what you do, I don't know where you get the stamina and energy to all of the different things that you do. It's I don't know either. But I just keep you love what you do. You love what you do and and I'm first of all congratulations. I caught the film Kudos to you because. on. A couple levels. It's perhaps the first film I've seen. That actually gets into the nuances. So thank you. I've been I've been waiting for it so I I appreciate that and it means a lot coming from you. And I think you know I don't know exactly how old you are but I imagine we're close Gen-x, I'm genetic. So so am I so we are does already. But but you know I think for those of us who have been covering this you know I'm a I'm a documentary filmmaker. I'm not a not a print journalists or radio journalist, but I've been covering. Latin. Next Latino issues for most of my life wasn't my career and I think our generation we really got Steph to with the coverage being about the so called sleeping giant app you know my God that ridiculous term and And so it was exciting to be able to. Try to go after that nuance of diversity perspectives in kind of meaningful way. Obviously for me my team, the big thing was the like everyone else in the world was the pandemic and it just made. You know producing. Challenge because it's interesting I do WanNa talk about that. But but because what was interesting pre pandemic because I was covering the election I was actually in Las Vegas that weekend? And it was really intr the caucus right and actually went to a caucus and was on MSNBC in talking about it and everyone was talking about Bernie and everything, and it was fascinating to see you capture not only that but Texas and sort of this narrative that was coming out about the Latino vote and I can just see the thread right I'm watching it and I'm like Oh my God this is remember pre pandemic or this was wow this is a thing like you captured it and then all of a sudden boom. So talk to me about how it started because the beginning of the film to me really. You did a lot of to really begin to look at what was going on and then all of a sudden it took a detour but but but how has a filmmaker? How did you adapt because I was fascinated that you still went and because I want to talk about how you filmed the rest of it but but talk to me about the beginning and then the detour so you're you're absolutely right. So we you know. The production came together quickly I was just in the lead up to the Nevada caucuses I was I was raising money just hounding funders to get money to do this, and you know it's still always a little bit of a battle to. Communicate the importance of this story but we just got funding and I was doing what you are doing, which has to be you know to be boots on the ground, follow the campaign, and as you pointed out the narrative at the time was the very the deep enthusiasm for Bernie Sanders especially among Mexican, American voters younger lat next voters obviously there was just this groundswell of support that we heard from organizers, and so we're going to follow that story. You know what? There's this very clear enthusiasm for sanders among young Latino voters in black and Brown voters in general, and where is that going to go on at the time obviously Biden was incredibly weak. He showed very poorly at the caucuses. As, we all experienced and. I I was just struck personally by how much enthusiasm there was for Sanders I. In my lifetime you hadn't seen anything like that me neither I remember one night after a production day. Been Shooting all day and I was in a lift with my crew on the way to a restaurant probably have some drinks. After, grueling day and talking to lift driver, who's May he Gano and know of course I was asked to bring him with questions. You know who are you gonNA. Vote for are you interested in the caucus, etc And he said, you know something that to me was very telling He said, I'm GonNa vote for for Bernie for Bernie because my daughters are in college and they got really excited about him and so they influenced me to vote you know. So this is a story that you heard in a lot of places that younger voters were influencing their parents. So that was like the you know I was very interested in following that and what was going to happen on up in the lead up to Super Super Tuesday. So that was kind of the narrative is basically follow the campaign trail as it relates to the next vote and then see how it's all going to play out. None of US anticipated the pandemic. That was the

Bernie Sanders Gano Biden Bernard Las Vegas Radio Journalist Msnbc United States Steph Nevada Texas
"radio journalist" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"And the reasons that you smile this weekend you're also doing the same thing on Facebook and some of you are posting pictures as well which is a lot of fun let's go back to our calls here Rick is listing in Baltimore good morning Rick good morning good to hear your voice thank you I was curious and T. R. radio journalist who was unfortunately also forced you to insure a home he said that he was doing it in his closet because the clothes are allegedly supposed to provide better sound gospel and I wanted to get some more attention it also is going to require a chocolate covered gummy bears ready to go chocolate covered what gummy bears yeah I actually if I have a I mean yes there's a stash of candy in my house but if I had my choice I still prefer just plain old boring gummy bears I didn't mind the chocolate covered experiment but all but I think I prefer regular gummy bears I'm I'm not going to be in my closet only because I don't have a walk in closet in my home so there'd be no way I would fit however my router that I need to plug my cord into easy in a closet in my spare bedroom and my spare bedroom is the only room in the house that has carpet all the rest of my my floors are either tile or hardwood and so yes I do have a coup sticks in mind that's why I'm going to be doing the show in there and probably shutting the door because even when I talk on the phone it or a record sometimes I recorded interviews with other people who have podcasts then and are asking for me to be on their shows I can hear the echo it's probably not something that untrained ear can hear but I can hear the audio bouncing off my for my walls and so I do intend to hold up in my spare bedroom and turn it into a home studio there you go almost you can just hang selection you know close arouses cattle call for all right that if I do that I guess we'll have to take a picture to show people right out of the act I can help you well thanks for your tails back to the studio all right thank you Alonso's listing in Wyoming welcome to after hours pile on so Amy longtime listener first time caller great thank you show good to hear from you yeah what are your users since we brought testimony tonight sure some of your cookie recipes in the literature second of all how are you waiting for me to answer I'm sorry the second part of your daily team the Dallas Cowboys picking up anybody else and get after that okay Alonso thank you it's good to talk to you call anytime thank you you're welcome I don't know that we've ever had a call from Wyoming before have we that's awesome alliance maybe my first call from Wyoming since we started after hours here on CBS sports radio that's awesome let's see first question was she ever at the first question will help me this is my quickly my brain has moved on to the Dallas Cowboys question what was the first question will you be sharing any cooking yeah okay here's the deal Chris and Dave and I are brainstorming work compiling a list of potential topics because we know at some point when the NFL free agency goes dormant and they don't they've now had seventy percent of their free agents signed or at least tag so and while the draft is coming up how many mock drafts can you do exactly and so we understand that with sports essentially in hibernation in the NFL about to go temp to hit that same stretch we're gonna have to get super creative I am holding out with the recipes and the cooking as long as I possibly can so we have some other ideas that we're gonna do now they they do revolve around food they had a really good one so we're we're gonna do some shows that have to do with food with movies with stuff like that and I I recognize that to us those are all things that appeal to you right now because many of you are stuck at home and and food and movies are critical to your survival me too but what we're saving those as long as we possibly can it's actually we don't want to burn through all the good stuff really quickly so we we have to be careful how we drop those shows in but don't you worry as long as you follow us on Twitter after our CBS or on our Facebook page I will make sure that you don't miss out and the podcast is still intact every weekday morning so nothing's changed with the podcast I just got this tweet how long do you think this will last yeah obviously if I knew that I would be far less stressed about it it's going to be so strange walking out of the building getting on the elevator with my suitcase of equipment so I I have a hard suitcase full of equipment that I'm going to test on Monday and tied up actually right now one of the reasons my boss allowed me to come in for this show is because I have a bunch of questions to ask the engineer all my gosh here's one of them do you have a Mike stand do you know right now they've given me a Mike told hold that okay just to simulate this for a second with me like you're seeing a Kenny Rogers song pretend you have a microphone in your hand now if you have a hairbrush grab that if you have a water bottle grab that or whatever it is you have a pen grab your pen grab it hold up your mouth now do that for the next four hours because that's what I would have to be doing you know I talk with my hands right so if I don't it's not to mention I'll get tendonitis and I'm holding the microphone in the same place for four hours it's not it's it's not a it's not optimal so I'm I'm trying to get a Mike stand so that I can put the Mike in a statement I actually had my my mom's husband who's an engineer he's like suggesting a way to Jerry rig it with pipe I would like my pipe laying around my house so my stand is more optimal or this is what happens when I do basketball games I wear as a headset that actually has a microphone attached so it sticks out of the side of the head set it wraps around toward your mouth injuries the nose thank you have and I've got pictures up on my social media so I'm hoping they can equip me with a different Michael or a Mike stand because holding the microphone our system is not gonna work I'll hire someone to hold the microphone hours before I will hold it for four hours that sixty percent of the time it works every time anyway that's actually one of my my questions for the engineer this morning when we get done and then we're we're trying to figure out what kind of complex we have with our own internet line so all the stuff that you don't really care about and tell what you know what are the options when it comes to recording interviews what's our window for instance I got offered Wade Phillips defensive coordinator well Super Bowl winning head coach of the Broncos long time NFL coach both as a head man as the defensive coordinator so I got offered Wade Phillips said the gas because he has a new book out his dad was a coach **** Phillips and and he's he's been in the business for ever and ever ever and and so he's got a new book out and he's being made available whenever we might like to recorded interview with them I wouldn't expect coach Phillips to come on the show live and so we're trying to figure out how and when we can record interviews and all that that jazz so there's a lot of technical stuff that you're not so interested in coming up next though we've got questions for Hugh Douglas in Atlanta former eagle and falcon will join us and and we'll talk to about this decision to sign Todd Gurley and the fact that the falcons could start ten first round draft picks on offense that straight ahead it's after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio fans try to take parts that we're making history yeah mark Titus and Tate Frazier are two basketball diehards talking NDA NC double a and all things sports see we gotta talk about basketball yes some teams are going to turn into like I really like our chances maybe three sixteen we haven't been there fifty eight years whereas like Kentucky's like if we.

Facebook Rick radio journalist Baltimore T. R.
Is working from home really better?

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Is working from home really better?

"I love working from home from time to time. I like the quiet. I like drinking an entire pot of coffee on my couch while I right but the idea of working from home indefinitely is kind of terrifying David. Hammer Hansen says. I'm actually really lucky to be able to work from home. A lot of people don't have that option. They have to physically show up for work. Also a lot of jobs are going away entirely. So he says should be excited about working from home also. He says there's nothing scary about it. The whole idea of having to go into an office to work. These days is just such a caveman notion. I have been working remotely for pretty much the past twenty years. David is the CO author of remote office not required and he works from home. Actually he runs a company from his house. It is called basecamp and it's a platform where remote office workers can all connect and communicate but before that David spent years going to an office for work. And I never found There was some sort of special magic to the office. In fact I found for me that got far more work done. Had Far easier time accessing. That special sewn you can get into when you're working deep work when I was at home so for me the office was pretty much always imposition and I can totally see that if you are working from home for a few days getting in the zone is much easier at home than it is in an office full of radio. Journalists were all chatty nosy and gregarious and have Bumi radio voices but still home on my couch in my pajamas for weeks with Netflix and like nine seasons of the office right there all the time. How am I going to get anything done? The number one pushback we probably get for managers and executives as well. How do I know if someone is at home not like doing her laundry? You're on the couch playing playstation and I think is this really what you think of your workers is that the level of trust you have with people who work at your company work with

David Hammer Hansen Netflix
This Industry Hasn't Changed in 50 Years. One Man Is Trying to Change That.

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

14:56 min | 2 years ago

This Industry Hasn't Changed in 50 Years. One Man Is Trying to Change That.

"Jamie. Thanks for joining us. Today is way getting started. Tell us about yourself well. Thanks for having me well. We are working on right. Now is a software application that converts audio and Video Co two tax using machines and with that we can do it in a fraction of the time that it would require for traditional services this and at a fraction of the cost so how we got there was looking at an industry that hadn't changed very much and transcription is something that's not changed a lot in the last fifty years and so with the new technologies algae's out there in terms of speech recognition and natural language processing and computing power. We've got opportunities to do things like what we're doing. Who and how did you come up with this idea. What was the initiative well. It started with a role I had at my previous this company zero and I spent a lot of time thinking about how we should market our products how we should talk to customers water customers saying about us and if we had all that information it'd be a lot easier to come up with campaigns and programs and sales strategies and what I realized with speech data is all those conversations. You're having with your customers. Whether it's in your customer support sportscenter or your sales teams that's great data but until recently it wasn't possible to mine all that data to derive insights and and now with the massive increases in computing power and and the amazing results you get from natural language processing in speech recognition it's become economical and so that's where the premise of the company started and we built it around those hypotheses and so what you go to market strategy. Oh Gee who you're going after what's the use case yeah well. We we recognize that as a I guess a North Star but where we started was like many startups we wanted to get the product in front of users as quickly as possible and so we built a tool a the basic tool to convert audio video text and we return a transcript while say you upload a thirty minute audio file will we can return a transcript in less than five minutes and at a cost of five dollars per hour so actually for thirty minutes is two dollars hours and fifty cents so we wanted to get out to market and see what kind of reception we would get and we did that and and the reality is with automatic transcription. The result from your convert conversion of audio to text is not one hundred percent perfect. There's still some issues with our algorithms machines that do this and a lot of it has to do with proper names and words that we just don't have in our dictionary and so what we did was stitched together the audio and the transcript into a browser so now what you could do is click on a word and you can actually play the audio behind and what that did was allow people to quickly clean up areas where there were mistakes and so that's the v. you want what we built and we got to market and we started realizing that a lot of journalists for example saw benefit in this and their use case a good example is they're doing a story. They interviewed a few people they WANNA get that story out as quickly as possible and now they can upload a file and interview file to us have a transcript back in and five minutes or less and they can work off that transcript and get their article out much faster obviously at a fraction of the cost the cost for human transcribers so that's one example and so who's your target market kit call centers sales people as a podcasters it anybody or yes we are focused on. Yes yes so I set up at. This is where we wanna get to and the ties to the beat of the enterprise selling where we're at today is more of consumers within side within large organizations so our target market is anyone that creates audio video content and right now. It's more so on the creative side so as you mentioned podcasters radio producers offers anyone that creates video content for their website or their brand. Even broadcasters are using our systems the reason we're focused on that right now is because of the quality of audio and video that these individuals create and they do much better through our the systems if your audio and video is of higher quality over time we're going to evolve the algorithms and get better at dealing with background around noise and and issues that hampered the audio quality and then we can get into the to call centers and and larger sales teams and what's your competitive advantage because there's a ton of people that are dabbling in this area and many different dimensions in directions well the number one reason that people choose sonics is because of accuracy and we've got are are proprietary technology that we use as well as leveraging a number of publicly available. API is that do speech recognition and that allows us to optimize around different languages different accents in different varying degrees of audio quality and people speaking at different times that type of thing so number one is is is accuracy and then the other is we built a number of tools around spoken word video or audio that make it easy for people to repurpose content and if you're you know a business. I think everybody knows content is king and the reality is a lot of the individuals that use sonics. I have amazing content but they aren't repurposing that content and getting the full benefit of Seo or optimizing for search and but how do you scale something like this because it sounds like you're biting off a big chunk. Yeah I mean that's That's a big question that is probably I believe quite a long answer that alone. I think we could have entire show about but I guess it's it's in parts and our experience our previous experiences. I've been through it a couple times and understand how you get through. The several state ages asked that right now. We're early in our journey. It's been a year and a half since sonic started and so we're we're really focused focused on customer feedback and making sure we're building the product in the way that it's going to benefit our target market and in terms of scaling. There's you know the way I guess I look at any organization and having to pass as I break it into three chunks. It's it's like what are we doing in terms of product. What are we doing in terms of people and then I lump everything else under programs. which would be sales programs marketing programs partnership programs? Thanks so we've got all of those going on where we are right. Now is mostly focused on the product side of things making sure. We're building something. That's valuable to the end user. The go to market strategy is have a website. Are you doing any advertising any content development. And how do you get customers. How did they find out about you. It's mostly organic right now and we have focused heavily on the content side of things so so we built a website optimize that for search and we do a number of things through social media and some direct orig- through those social media platforms that we have not yet paid for advertising other than we've done a an event event where we had a chance to talk to and meet face to face with customers but we're in the fortunate situation where this is a massive acid industry. There is a huge pain around transcription and the conversion of audio and video to text and it's really about optimizing search at this point and do you see that changing as far as your marketing strategy are you looking to raise is money to expand that or are you trying to bootstrap it yeah. That's that's another show unto itself as well so my last company we raised. I a lot of money was inexcessive. Two hundred and fifty million dollars and that is is I feel there's a time and a place and there's certain companies that require that kind of capital and it does come with pros and cons and with with Sonics. I'm taking a different tack and we're we're self-funding this and we're gonNA take that as long as we can and if there comes a point where I think it makes sense to raise capital because we really want to put the foot on the gas then we'll we will we'll entertain that ah but as of right now the the plan is to maintain this cell phone and so we're already driving revenues where building customers the prospects look good and that's a good situation to be in but I'll say never say never but I think when you look at the the traditional philosophy in Silicon Valley as you come here and the goal is to raise money and in my view the goal is to make money not raise money and so it's a bit different perspective although there's a lot of people that agree with what I'm saying being in our backyard it's it seems like the prize is to raise money but I feel like that. In some respects is a negative event and meaning. You need need to raise money to to get to where you you. WanNa get to but if you can build a business that is generating income. I think that's the ultimate goal. Yep because sometimes it's easier to raise money to make it so yes. I've seen that in many many times apparently but but I would think in a space like this is going to probably be whittled down to three major players. And how do you make sure that you're one of them. Well that that is the exact question I ask myself is this a winner takes all industry. If it was then yeah you wouldn't need to raise money money and compete and I'm not sure it is and that's why I think we're gonNA keep doing what we're doing and we'll see how the marketplace out now and build some great software for for people are GonNa Meantime and when you say it is that would imply that there's either niche or a capability ability that would fit a niche better than another one that does it because at the bottom of it everyone's using pretty much the same algorithms right yes so let me back up yeah. The the the nature of transcription is there are so many different market needs for it and I'd named a couple where we're focused on and so they're in our multiple opportunities. If you just focus in on in different industries so if it was just the legal industry for example or just medical industry or if you really focused on sales teams or call centers there's or podcasters a radio all those. I think we'll have vertical is solutions and we've already started to move down that path which is beyond just pure transcription the fact of getting a transcript back an audio or video file. is is one thing in an accurate way building tools for people those individuals to make their workflow faster is is where we're focused focused and we've done that with with podcasters for example a radio journalist for example and integrations into tools that they would already thirty us like Adobe Premiere are. Dobie premier or adobe addition and then we go as far as building publishing pushing tools to help get their she goes out to the market and in our case because we have built the system with the transcript stitch the audio guess what we now have an often we have the potential optimize their shows for search because because Google and other search engines do not crawl audio or video as well as they do text so those are some examples yeah I mean they're working on that supposedly -posedly though right I mean Google kind of announced that they're going to start searching podcasts. Yes yes they will again. I think I mean we work with Google pretty closely and we work with other. API's as well the reality is they don't build out systems the systems to the degree like they're more of a platform and so we see them as a partner as opposed to a a competitor

Sonics Google Adobe Jamie. Radio Journalist Partner Dobie Five Minutes Fifty Million Dollars One Hundred Percent Thirty Minutes Thirty Minute Five Dollars Fifty Years Two Dollars
News in Brief 22 July 2019

UN News

02:56 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 22 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations the head of the U._N.. Body that oversees nuclear states Yukiya Amano has died aged seventy to the International Atomic Energy Agency or I a said on Monday among many. Attributes United Nations Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez spoke of Mr Manos remarkable contributions to the peaceful use of nuclear technology and his commitment to cooperation among countries in an online message of support Mister Gutierrez tweeted that he had been deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Mr Romano a Japanese national and I a head since two thousand nine he was due to step down next March amid reports of an unspecified illness in a letter to the agency's board of governors announcing. Announcing his decision to resign Mr Mono wrote that over the past decade I E had delivered concrete results to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons in line with its mandate the speech last year he said that in addition to overseeing nuclear verification regimes involving Iran the agency had also helped countries you science and technology to produce more food generate more electricity treat cancer and respond to climate change. The United Kingdom is to send two hundred fifty troops to Mali. Molly next year in support of the U._N.'s peacekeeping operation in the country Minnesota a statement from the U._K.. Government on Monday noted that the soldiers were being deployed in recognition of increased instability in Africa's sil- region their objective. Objective will be to deliver long-term and sustainable peace in Mali for an initial three-year period according to the Ministry of Defence the contingent will be based in go eastern Mali joining a total international force around twelve and a half thousand strong in a video. They released by the U._N.. Mission on Monday the U._K.'s defense secretary penny modern said that there will be no caveats on the use of troops who will support a zero tolerance policy on sexual violence and work to promote the rights of women and children and finally. Really the killing of a radio journalist in Afghanistan has been condemned by the head of UNESCO Audrey Azoulay who's added her voice to calls to catch those responsible for the gruesome crime in a statement the Director General of the U._N.. Educational Scientific and Cultural Cultural Organization condemned the motor of Nesher Scwhab Zodda in the city of God is ten days ago Mr Cyb Zodda presented an entertainment program on local radio until he went missing when his body was found it showed signs of torture and stab.

International Atomic Energy Ag Mr Romano Mali Secretary General Antonio Guti United Nations Mr Cyb Zodda Yukiya Amano Mr Mono Educational Scientific And Cul Mr Manos Nesher Scwhab Zodda United Kingdom Audrey Azoulay Radio Journalist Ministry Of Defence Penny Modern Molly
We have to be peacemakers after years of conflict: South Sudan radio journalist

UN News

06:05 min | 2 years ago

We have to be peacemakers after years of conflict: South Sudan radio journalist

"This is Matt wells at you a news from its base in south Sudan's capital, Juba radio Maria station, run by the UN mission in the country. Unmixed is tasked with promoting dialogue, tolerance and peace. The three interlinked themes of world radio day two thousand nineteen mount on the thirteenth February the chance for broadcast journalist is huge given the level of suffering and intercommunal hatred generated by years of civil war after the world youngest country was born back in two thousand and eleven in an interview with you and uses Daniel Johnson presenter, Lucy Jubara explains how the radio station accomplishes its mission through community programs that involve women's groups civil society and government officials bringing all these voices together. Thousand six we had both fasting mainly in social than we have a big decision and Deuba, and then we have small offices here. And they're all of US House of them. Currently having a program goal democracy on action we being people who are in policy making makers bluer regarding to ease agreement. So we're having. Related to signing agreement and how he's going to be in. We've got into them. But we'd be people from either people from the community from leaning groups from my youth TV to say at these. And then of course, you perform the government itself isn't he having problems? So we've the government because the license and other issues, but still we are trying our best to bring these voices together. Tell me about how you'll journalists as a journalist responsible journalist, how do you deal with hate speech? And how do you find a balance an objective balance? And how do you decide what to report on? And what not to report on what we have for for code of ethics heavy TNA need. I am you have to defend yourself. And what you believe regards think that you're reporting, for example, e from related certain, I should each beat affecting my my reporting. And of course, we have our editors that will help you go through the line that the media has the same time you want to of course, you you can see and you can feel how people eager and relief into you. So if you come and you bring something that we make them fight again. I don't think it's good and all of us who are living outside their with or people, and he hold your somebody. So I don't think it's good thing for us to bring fuel to the fire. The as we say, you know, local language because for Judy to fairly from hate each trying, basically, they're medium to radio because we're all over the country. So in trying. Eat just all people. And that's what we are doing. It's difficult. Sometimes so went went has it been difficult. Given example, for example, you'll find hotels in the media of do people who are trying to make you to be in their sights example, you show them that. No, he just to spend piece, and then he had to show the listeners or to make them know that we have to be peacemaker start the dominant, you cannot take side. So you have to in the middle in between to get the point is what they're people were the people want to get it to the the official. So it's up to them to the people to choose. What is what is that? And can you tell me what sort of special events and community outreach may be phones as well. How do you actually get the opinions from all over the country? We have journalists in the states. They gotta material they got out and collected letters from. Ordinary people, and we were all the main office in Dubai, we do the same. But as I say here, we are. Franken them to go outside and record because of the security issues with the government, but we used to do we go outside record with the people. But we were facing some of the people they were afraid to tell what they feel they because of the security issues if their voices were heard on the radio, someone will come and then came them or even to detain them. So how'd you describe the failing in the country? Now is it more positive than ever been? Or is that not the case it was that too idealistic some of their their positively. You know, they they feel like okay p something we changed some of them. They feel now go to fight again. We don't feel safe, but they country on we have to change the situation we're facing, but it's difficult. It. It's difficult. You cannot say that one hundred percent positive, and how do you feel the message of the secretary General Antonio guitarist chimes with what you're doing in terms of? He says that radio is a personal interactive platform where people can add views concerns and grievances radio can create a community. How do you feel about what he says there? In starting doing this job, buddy. Love what I'm doing and integrity to the end of minorities icon. I see very happy. And despite way, my face, my people when I, you know, even the beginning when they take no I don't want to they're afraid or something like they tell them. No. If you did not talk. No, one will listen nothing will change. So what I do. Always. I say you have to say what you think otherwise, nothing we change and and change its on your hand you have to stick it out. You have to talk you have to be brave. So we don't have a critic all over the country. And so few people have living, for example, so many people have radios. So if you have any to anyone review is the platform for it.

Juba Radio Maria Station Official UN United States Deuba Matt Wells Daniel Johnson Dubai Sudan Lucy Jubara Judy Franken Secretary General Antonio One Hundred Percent
Triton Digital bought by Stitcher's owner, Scrippst

podnews

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Triton Digital bought by Stitcher's owner, Scrippst

"In the latest pod news, enterprise digital audio company TRITON digital is to be bought by scripts. Script also earned Stitcher and mid roll media as well as a number of US television stations. I've spent one hundred fifty million dollars on the purchase TRITON. Digital is projected to earn forty million dollars next year in revenues scripts used to also owned radio stations, but they sold those earlier this year. James careless, a well respected. Radio journalist covers podcasting, provides money-making opportunities for radio world. It covers Canadian and UK podcasters and you'll find it linked from pod news dot net today. Also podcast SEO often forgotten about, but a very comprehensive guide willing to from Kerri green. His podcast mystery for you. What happens to the Chicago sun times podcasts, Robert fetter, who is as Chicago and media journalist. Now it's all of the much promoted podcast from the newspaper are no longer being produced and wonders. Why. Ads ways have been nominated for two digitally awards for best use of mobile and best publishing platform. Congratulations to them. And it's time to celebrate the day of the Spanish podcast with a live podcast marathon for twenty four hours from October the twentieth at one o'clock central European time. Our

Triton Digital Radio Journalist Chicago Kerri Green James Careless United States Robert Fetter UK One Hundred Fifty Million Doll Forty Million Dollars Twenty Four Hours
"radio journalist" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I listened to, these I remember my parents literally doing the jitterbug I think is what they called it in our living Rams. Needles, well, no to some of those like the twist and shout down. Jitterbug the crazy thing is that my mom has had her eightieth, birthday and we had a tribute to her and is kind of neat to to kind of think back at some of the Well obviously that's the Beatles, and they kicked off their first US tour this month the month of August in eighteen or nineteen sixty four excuse me Hi at San, Francisco's cow palace lorettes people remember that yeah within, the first few sections are seconds rather of the, first song that, night at least one radio journalist. Traveling with the Beatles was trampled to the ground won a young female fan who. Broke a leg broke his leg actually trying to get, to them and thanks to an off hand comment. By George Harrison about, the group's favorite, candy remember that in the days leading up to the show the Beatles themselves were, pelted with. Flying jelly beans throughout that night sat they were injured but they left the cow palace that night by ambulance after their limousine was swarmed Cirque, fans it was a scene that would soon become. Familiar. To them, as they continued on their, first historic tour of, America in the months ahead now although Lorette people aren't throwing jelly beans at. Us okay in excitement or going berserk or swarming her. Limo are Our cars they are calling, us every week, you know really a lot of, people call us every week and they learn how much the rash strategy and the. Triple p. program will save them all right it'll it'll, provide hope and provides us safety saves, them from taxes as from market, volatility and in, many cases it's as their future retirement or their retirement funds that they're currently taking, and utilizing. So we've been very blessed to make a difference in people's lives that way I totally agree and this is all about getting information so you, know when you give us a call you're going. To. Be leaving, your name and your phone number Email address So that we can get, information into your hands and also your, zip, code, because, we, have, advised all over the country and we want to make sure that the right person gives you a, quick, call, back, but it's simple to leave. The information. And simple not to lead the information here's the, thing it there is no risk obviously you, need to get the information so that you, can make a decision based on you, know, really what are the options out, there and how might they apply..

Beatles Rams US George Harrison radio journalist Lorette America San Francisco
"radio journalist" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"And if you for mentioning it so what have you been up to since then well i've been doing some freelance work for a rags like the wall street journal just thought namedrop vat here business show and also been honing my skills collecting unemployment checks nice good skill to put on your resume thinking players really seeking that but i got called in for a meeting right after i applied for unemployment benefits at my local unemployment office and you have to understand that a while back i was a screenwriter and screenwriters are always going on and off unemployment because you're only employed for a few weeks or a few months at a time right right i never in that time got called in for a meeting so this was a red flag it's rather worrisome so i go into this meeting with a bunch of other unemployed people all freaked out and this very nice jovial lady running the meeting is like i bet you're wondering why you all had to come to this meeting and you were well it's because she says based on your field of work we've determined you are especially unlikely to find a job before your benefits run out oh so we want to make sure we teach you some job seeking skills because basically you're going to need it wow ouch what kind of confidence booster is that i asked you know that's not good first of all thanks for the pep talk and secondly i got suddenly really interested in everybody around me because what the hell fields were they in with job prospects as bad as a radio journalist you know what i'm saying yeah we're these wail oil salesman what was going on model t repairman shirt telegraph operators anyway this is a long way of saying i feel especially lucky.

wall street journal radio journalist salesman
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"New cancer drug combinations and so on and i have it on my own phone so every night i number crunch data as part of these cancer drug molecule models and johanna wild bridges is doing the same thing she says hi all i'm using dream lab to keep my phone happy at night i'm just wondering if it allows the alarm clock to go off whilst it's running of not needed to use the alarm until this week so i've been slacking on my calculations and someone who listeners have jumped in to help jonah and the answer is it doesn't affect the alarm on your phone that for a fact because i said well in alarm and it still guys off in the morning robert moore says are you stream i've every night and i wish is with the alarms and she says she shot up i think hands trying to sleep no right okay sorry for keeping your weight there let's go back to ethiopia with you alexa volume one best it that alexis all over the seven habits alexa nothing to malicious and what about these gaming developers the evening this is across i'm going to go back to addis ababa i there's a program that's been launched their called solve it i think the us embassy is involved in this and it's about teaching youngsters compete a coding hardware entrepreneurship and so on and i guess larry part of this is making sure that those network effects that you and bill would just discussing propagate further getting young people insta veloping so they become the entrepreneurs of the future say how's that going it looks like a great program so they get nine weeks of free training and many more features the us embassies working with humanity plas and i call gloves and you know the thing about it they would have found fascinating is all the attention appears to be in the major hubs with tech narrow be kept on legos maybe a cry but then there's so much exciting things happening in which the us embassy starting to recognize but also it's opening up ethiopia's our country is going through this huge opening up phase with economy liberalizing the new prime minister and this is all things that are going to begin to shine a spotlight on if you so i like that the solvit programme helps accelerate the skill development in upn address and allow them to compete not just on the rest of the continent but globally so the some healthy competition happening across africa right now which is really endearing and you're recently hanging out with some games developers in accra i gather so i love this because this guy's in our crowd called lady arts just built the first african game development company and they were responding to a real need so marvel or dc comics have this very huge franchises but they don't tell african stories black panther was just one thing but we had with how long for black panther these guys are telling stories from across the continent of superheroes of some mates and folklore which have been told usually by word of mouth by our grandfathers told us these stories and we were growing up and now they're turning them into very slick beautiful video games and they're working across platforms for for android and i just love where this is heading and they're based in accra and what it was the damage is fascinating is because they realized they can tell all these stories on their own so they've also build a portal and an app so that our game developers from africa can collect on this one place and then people can easily access all of these stories from across the continent it's doing so well they're looking for funding and they've got some alley revenue so really fascinating story out of aircraft fantastic yeah bill no that's brilliant more or less now another subject change hair because bellows to now the center many anything around from subject to subject well it is because we won't take him over the listeners voices at ain't always get as many listener comments in as i'd like to into the podcast so it

nine weeks
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"Madurai for that and he built i'm gareth mitchell two produces an electoral and we'll see an take half eggs and goodbye right let's carry on that at the end of the broadcast but we're still here for the podcast larry madore is still with us just been talking there about the tax seen in africa larry and this announcement from google that they're coming into ghana but you know how to load of stuff in front of me as ever we didn't get time for in the broadcast so maybe we could talk about some of the rest of the c over there as much as we can because you're talking to us from the nairobi bureau and we haven't talked back kenya way in this segment so pays is technically that often associate with kenya that's notable feel as well i'm sure then larry absolutely because people talk about impasse this money transfers services it's digital wallet for a lot of people who would otherwise be and banged in kenya as kind of the marker for technology and innovation ecosystem here but that's from ten years eleven years actually actually for being specific there's so many more exciting things that have happened in this kenya that is now called the african silicon savannah say no he's got a nice ring to it right london to silicon roundabout now okay article silicon fen never silicon swamp people draining swamps this days you know oh oh yeah so what's happening yeah narrow be in kenya hold probably home to some of the biggest most exciting things happening in technology across the continent and is not just because of huge multinational setting up office here because of the abundance of talent you're talking about coders or people with different technical skills that are available easily here education system is quite good but also just the ecosystem is much more developed than anywhere else on the continent and i just came back from capetown at a tech summit where there was a discussion on stage between narrow be accra lagos and cape town where should you often a startup if you want to do so and just joke who was the founder of one of africa's first video demands said oh you going to ever you eventually end up in lagos but also the cost of doing business in nigeria can be quite prohibitive so people naturally tend to end up in robie because it's kind of in the center of the continent and all the right things already exist in the country so it seems to be a natural place for whether you're studying startup or you are and multinational look at open in africa and you do get these network thanks went where if you have a group of entrepreneurs and the support structures in there and the tragic live in people arrive and effort becomes more attractive and businesses don't locate the whole thing bills for quickly actually and that is what happened because remember ten years ago when i started covering the ecosystem here there wasn't a lot that i was the first accelerated to open in narrow be in really many parts of africa and since then there's been ten twenty of them opening here and then all over the continent is a whole network of just incubators accelerators across africa and the work they have had it just building ideas and connecting them to funding and two mentors and then helping them build minimum viable products that they could get then get round a funding has been phenomenal hearing in the 'bout the activity going on in addis ababa for instance in the eighth european taxation and want to develop that a bit further with the larry but just to get some listener comments that i'm going to insert some listener comments on a different subject we're gonna come back and talk more about because if you weeks ago we were talking about dream labs i this is where he can use a mobile phone app to number cruncher whole aid of data to help in drug discovery of.

Madurai gareth mitchell ten years eleven years
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"Be evil slogan and they had for eighteen years and coming into africa where the regulations are often behind the west i don't know how much leeway they have and maybe that might be attraction as an attraction as well yeah they've chosen i rabi for instance from where you're talking to us now the availability of technical skills in their ob tends to be higher than lots of other places in the continent the cost of doing business and the general access to the continent is much higher narrow b but google has big office a lot of this ups are in africa rations come out of nairobi so it's kind of spreading the love on the continent at crafting is also great choice to be honest based on what i knew by that country and the city just seems like a natural choice as well to put it out there now elsewhere in africa we're going to go to addis ababa now and hear more about this severe robot now some people may have seen or heard about severe but she's say she meant to be she is quite a striking looking humanoid robots it's a real kind of tool site with a head that speaks to you talk to us affair she talks back he tells jokes and so on and certain everybody wants to look it up on video and say well narrow load videos of severe so people can get an idea so she's kind of celebrity right but i think i'm right in saying larry the first ever robot citizen also the press release says anyway he will see a citizen of saudi arabia i think audi arabia yes i remember that saudi arabia which is a lot of countries might so how does a robot get citizenship exactly and do they have the same rights as a human citizen i wonder but it yuppie is an interesting location because these people at icon labs have been working and they did some of the code i don't know what percentage but they say that some of the code on sophia the robot which has been getting a lot of which who say which way which will say well it's a fame it's an argument it has nurtured it's been getting a lot of attention as also in africa just about of what could be possible with this humanoid and getting it a staffer who's this study one year old founder of co clubs and ups they are doing also incredible things in up which is not somewhere that you usually pay a lot of attention no sure so so people who do want to see sufficient got the device gets invited bills give me a thumbs up i get invited onto chatchai's themselves the next time you see severe on the tv then you can say some of the k jimmy fallon oh yeah exactly yeah so so if you see severe on tv it's like some of the code was written in addis ababa where also the same people i coke people all behind i think something is arguably more important which is a teacher an ai teacher called your nettie who is there to help you teach young children through i'm here i'm harrick so just briefly tell us a bit about your annetta if you can i think that the important of your network being able to provide education to places in european but eventually this could be expanded across africa where teachers are usually very hard to come by the education systems are generally very underfunded and in cases where they are not that many that needed so much greater than the viability of this could be shipped at scale and at an affordable price i can imagine this blowing up across african for the s arben audiences and arben the people trying to teach the children african languages this could be huge game and i think that it's spun off from some of the technology that went into fair and it is really important as you say there is a crisis about teaching around world never do the demographic shifts me in assembly young people who need teachers not enough human beings today until and so we're going to have to rely on these sorts of technologies and they need to be made better and more effective to deliver that okay and what you look at the time on that night we're going to have to leave at sei thank you very much larry.

africa eighteen years one year
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"Which is quite interesting attracts a whole lot of money they basically doesn't deliver exactly what was promised there's definitely developments there's no argument about that that it's just unable to deliver all these outrageous promises and then we have this irrational reaction of basically people say well we're not gonna found all together because because it's not worth which obviously bad case i finally that there is this tendency i'm sure to say right we're going to i this solution it's not always the best solution where is a on best suited what kind of applications do you think so currently as it stands i think all the obligations it's which would really talk about outta mason not not so much so any applic application where where you have a constraint domain of some kind let's say industrial inspection of things that could be a big one undoubtedly things like google translate had improved but it still maybe not enough to say we don't need people translate books anymore it's not as good as to translate poetry and these sorts of things so any domain which has a very well defined frame in which the problem is stated clearly defined i think i can really make make a great impact there we see a lot of progress in his computer against does exactly because they are constrained domains there's fixed that of roles and and we can really train you know these models to the limit to for them to pick up these is the roof but the problem is in reality is not like that it's rules keep changing sort of no matter how well we play these games where we're limited by the fact that reality just doesn't obey these roles that's philip near ski skiing i should say he hampson listening to that big of a reality check now i think an unquiet reasonable one i think even people who are behind the the current sort of growth of some machinery techniques and deep landing light geoff hinton gruber accepted it called do everything i won't flip do during their is taking on those people who think that deeply and even generalized deep learning will lead to generalize altruism intelligence and i certainly don't believe that's the case other techniques may help with that and we can take things further we're not going to abandon a on or machine learning and data massive investment in places like china is going to achieve successes it might not take us to generalize entrees intelligence i can live with that okay yeah it sounds like you can i think we all can't bill thank you i'm in fast whichever leave on i google has recently announced a new artificial intelligence research center is going to be opening later this year in the capital accra in fact giggles being ghana for at least the last decade but other tech hubs in after erica are available nigeria and kenya of course spring to mind so what is the significance of investing heavily in ghana to consider that institite this opportunity to take the temperature of the tech scene across africa let's now pizza larry madeira who is the bbc's business editor across that region so tell us about this new research center google's opening in accra because this will i suppose join forces with other existing or planned research centers that google has elsewhere around the world then there so google is looking at it more of a hey i summer really in africa because this one this opening in ghana is interesting and i appreciate what google is trying to say that they want to collaborate local universities and research centres the work with policymakers on the potential users of artificial intelligence in africa which lot of tech companies might possibly not think about but they understand that there's many many use cases that advil intelligence could work in healthcare in agriculture and education and one of the interesting things about this also gareth is that choice of a cry and ghana not legos like you mentioned on arab or even capetown who often get a lot more attention when you talk about innovation in the continent one of the interesting things have been hearing from people that are in the ecosystem in accra is that there's a huge collaboration between the private sector and startups there and the government appears to get their regulations are very friendly and open to people that want to do these sorts of things a cautionary tale though i don't know if the regulations for artificial intelligence are there so google has a lot of people have pointed out in the last month or so quietly gotten rid of that don't.

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"Consumers to buy autonomous vehicles or are there just even issues safety being one of them that will stop people from for making the jump into the future if you like i actually believe that this won't be much of a problem i i believe that it's the reverse situation which may be a problem namely that people trust too quickly and i have a personal experience for that was in about two thousand thirteen i was riding in autonomous car of w in the research for it and we drove several hundred kilometers in autonomous car and for the first two or three minutes i was really anxious and what's to monitoring the car all the time but it will do the right thing and not put me into injure and then after four or five minutes i quickly recognize this car can drive by itself and i trusted it and i think that maybe a mistake because trust based on a couple of minutes observing a car but it's not really been thoroughly tested for millions of miles and so i think people may rather plus too early than and that's why we had bmw put so much effort into putting safety first and really testing the car in all possible nations that is reinhardt though ending that report from katie tech at zeki and built on i can't wait for these flying cars in twenty twenty i i think think you you might might have have to wait a little bit loan i i wish i could have any real belief that these things aren't that imminent the number she received the the accidents that you will head with their self driving car tests the slow rate of tesla autonomous cows and stuff like that it may happen it's just not going to happen as fast as we think it might and it does the question what's happening in the whole airfield okay which brings us onto our next item actually because another person not just saying hang on a minute you know i think it's getting a little bit crazy we're getting a bit carried away with ai and this is a blog post titled an artificial intelligence winter is well on its way and it comes from longstanding research philip peony eski and he's really challenging assumptions about how useful is or isn't in some situations and indeed about the very visible failings of autonomous cars so i thought great blog post really provocative let's get this philippe guy on he said yes we said great so the state of artificial intelligence discuss on one you know i think it's brilliant there's lots of good developments going on and many many many good applications i think showing up but on the other hand reading some of the over height statements about how close we are to solve in general intelligence or that were super close to solving autonomous vehicles and these sorts of things well that just collides with my own experience and my own expertise in the field you say the autonomous vehicles are if you like the most visible form i suppose incarnation of ai and maybe also one of the most obvious demonstrators of its limitations along with the let's say science excitement there's obviously an investment cycle going on right now particularly in silicon valley a lot of people had invested a lot of money in certain projects and one of the the hallmarks of of the current let's say summer is is the altemus vehicle in the all the promises that comes along with that and i think it's actually maybe quite ironic that it probably is the most difficult application that this technology could ever imagine so you say that we're heading into an ai winter which is rather bleak way of putting it then but what do you mean by that well i think there's actually quite a strong relationship between what's called a winters and stock market crashes it's mechanisms are similar so in terms of ai winter overgrown expectations that lead to over investment in the field and overinvestment might be irrational so people expect miracles and put money to to have these miracles delivered and then when these miracles don't happen they irrationally retract from financing altogether in both of these these behaviors is actually irrational i think is definitely something we should we should explore but many disciplines of science have this sort of constant stream of funding and things develop slowly it goes on whereas has this boom and bust cycles which is.

hundred kilometers three minutes five minutes
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"Intonation and property of the voice so that when you listen to it it sounds much closer to the original george bush it also has the advantage in that if you want to produce sounds that were never produced by the regional george bush you could produce those by generalizing across other dates will similar data so that's the approach of us with jamie dupree so how is that going to go forward with him i is he going to retain that same voice now would it might develop maybe it's the newell nets develop yes so one of the great things about about this sort of approach this voice copying is that although the the corpora isn't going to change the amount audio we're building from as we develop better and better machine learning techniques the quality will improve so as we go forward we will release new versions of jamie dupree's voice which will sound more like jamie dupree and as we do that the the ability for him to use his voice in a broadcast environment and to communicate which is in the end really what he needs to do becomes better and better so that's matthew elliott uhhuh giving us an opportunity to go through a brief history of voice in the there and it's fascinating and it's great to have those examples just to see how the different approaches allow us to do things which come to feel more naturalistic if you like and we're getting better and better doing that i mean obviously this is fantastic jamie dupree and it's going to be interesting to see how they manage to to make the show in this way it also carries with it some interesting implications about in how'd you know what point will you not be able to distinguish the simulated voice from from the from the real person and when might that become a problem because an endorsement by four president george bush's very welcome very pleased to have it but he might not actually feel that good about about those things so so it also then starts to raise really shoes their nazi course the performance possibilities are just enormous transforming radio drama so it's exciting tech it is at bill thank you and wouldn't you just know it we're gonna talk about an hour of course london hosted it's a summit last week and our very own katy cat sukey went to logan her fakers was very much on the world of transport we've just stepped outside a very busy conference center i'm pleased to be joined by professors even gary mani he is uber's chief scientists is also professor at the computational and biological learning laboratories at the university of cambridge let's start what's the coolest thing uber is doing at the moment probably the most exciting thing that we're doing is that we've been nounce that we're launching aerial ridesharing which is flying cars to bring people in and out of very busy cities by twenty twenty in la and dallas and by two.

george bush
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"I'm gareth mitchell today artifice voices and artificial intelligence including autonomous ride hailing in the skies but are we heading for an ai winter that's what one tech blogger has been saying if so they google isn't listening we'll be hearing about his latest research center we have bill thompson over here with some comments as we go along and in fact but i just want to take us back to about this time last week when on the program we were talking about the copyright bill going through the european parliament can use going to bring us up to date on this because the proposal includes these controversy upload filters doesn't it that's right so so the european parliament's mitchell legal affairs was voting on a revised copyright directive if passed by them it has to go through the processes and this includes two controversial articles article thirteen back upload filters article eleven and discussing those last week well they will both past article thirty was passed by fifteen votes to ten so the committee has passed it what happens now though it has to now go to the white bean approved on the legal affairs committee has to be version on the european parliament which might happen in july or september then it has to go through to the european council and then back to national national legislatures so it's not like the law has been passed and we all have to put in upload filters tomorrow is a long and protracted process and so those organizations who are opposed to it are still saying that you know they believe that this is a very bad idea and now in asking people to write to their mvp then members of the european parliament seven hundred fifty one of those representing all the countries including still at the moment britain because it still has mvp's so people are being asked to write to them if they feel these are a bad idea but of course the the committee voted because they believe that it is the best way to secure the future of the internet so this controversy continues it does and we will certainly report an thanks for something that's a lot for us because that vote happened that i went off air this time last week thanks for that bill now i well seconds the us news reporter who lost his voice due to a rare neurological disorder now that he's back on this time with his speech restored synthetically using the latest voice cloning technology the us supreme court has basically punted on the issue of legislative gerrymandering so just a short clip but it gives you an idea as what broadcast journalist jamie dupree's voice now sounds like now that it's been captured and cloned by sarah proc which is a scottish firm specializing in text to speech technology now i've been hearing how they did it but also getting a brief history of voice synthesis which is an phrase really given that the late stephen hawking's famous voice that was created by simulating the movement of air across actual tubes in the voice box as how they created stephen hawking's voice but then came an.

gareth mitchell
"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

Click

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on Click

"The world cup by sitting football isn't now wearing our england shirts out i three lines on our share it's thirty years of her tall be with that particular brush i believe there is football taking place i am occasionally alerted to it by twitter because i haven't figured out a way to turn that off but otherwise i just stated glide ignorance over what may or may not be happy because i think he this bit we could either talk about the world cup or go back to jones rescuing puppies i somebody actually taught in a bbc lift an esteemed colleague said garin still on about drugs and puppies was it management no engineer engineer and that clearly it struck a chord unfortunately it's a bit okay well we'll let that cold throng to its natural conclusion but on the world can gratuitously work in technology here because as this where a technology program the whole purpose of our conversation is technology it can never be although i suppose it can be introduced integrated areas his way but i won't beat myself up to you but it's the video system referee technically the are there yeah theory bill but this veil technology's really is going to see the england england game because we're good at cohen is that's my theory okay what does it do i have no idea i understand what i've just said i just had a pundit saying on the radio yesterday they think they can just walk in they take its end to end stuff now we all say that concludes the bbc special coverage of the technology of the world cup and football punditry from me and bill we got away with it and hope nobody important heard any of that let's get into the program this is that we did that people listen to and it went on the radio on the twenty sixth of june this is our world technology program and.

football twitter jones garin engineer cohen england england bbc thirty years
"radio journalist" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

The Flow Artists Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on The Flow Artists Podcast

"Between learning this and not feeling like you belong anywhere found that so incredibly sad to know all each end to think about the ms separate and i think that's what yoga's amazing because yoga causes can offer some you know community and have people feel that i really belong somewhere and that's what we is yoga teachers can really offer i mean there's so much in the booklets it's very very rich let's by someone ringer and say lots of different ways so i'd recommend it so brennan brands bribing the wilderness and the other is actually probably the first pub cast that i've listened to regulate and it's hold on being with chris tippett have you lessons gershon lists again already tell well at what about her she's she's an excellent interview and she the radio journalist and she came from years of radio lived in america i'm into to national public radio programs and so forth so she's she's been rambling belong time she runs her own business i guess code on paying with podcasts and blogs so forth and what i love about it is she interviews such wide range of paypal leaders in thinking of spiritual people hallet's and research into brett brown that's a good to listen to well john donahue's beautiful poet sition 's all of why range of paypal and what i love about it is one of listening i said frequently here the teachings of the sutras in the conversations that she's having an i'm always likening what i'm hearing is these really wise people saying things going but that's in the sutras you know some of these fruits so universally so universal that's exactly right you know there is many paths to union the divine whatever your in guy news as there are people in the world and and so it's it's wonderful to hear different people talking about it in different ways and in lots of ways to sang sang thing thank you saw.

radio journalist sition chris tippett gershon america brett brown john donahue
"radio journalist" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You know as a former yeah i began as a radio journalist um i'm seeing several newspapers now reporting on the djaama article in a way that makes it sound like it's a big mystery without citing the two very cautious in critical commentaries that accompany the article now it's not exactly fake news but i would refer to that as shotty journalism and i mean it's just one marketable v degree of vagueness of this study and the claims that they were making that they think just couldn't support the claims and i'll tell you this like i published seventy articles in scientific journals over the last thirty years i ever a respected scientist i'm not letting my emotions get carried away here find long i would be the first to admit it and say you know what they've got the data there's some kind of sonic attack going on um i was just shocked by the bay nature of this study and you'll remember before when i was on i mentioned that tom be reported white matter track changes and i think the last time we talk that was what had been leaked out about white matter changes yeah there's there's no baseline evaluation here to compare with no control group and this is relevant because as they said of the editorial many of the symptoms and signs that will reported a current the general population i mean and so there's no evidence there's never been any evidence in the scientific literature that sound waves can cause concussions or white matter track changes white matter track changes are common in in a way of conditions from dementia alzheimer's to depression to normal aging it's very common and when they looked at the concussion like symptoms they had one expert on their who was saying that it is these could be explained by um other factors he said that the neural imaging data from most of the cold war appear to be normal or to have non specific findings now.

scientist tom alzheimer radio journalist thirty years
"radio journalist" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Can go against a movie of its kind everything just went so well for it and i'm glad that it it was you know recognize i'm glad that it still talked about especially today um and again like i i can still vividly remember images as you know coming to mind from that fell than saying you know what that's one of the most beautifully shot films i've seen in easily blast ten years now were beyond its 10year but i just i just remember saying like that's gonna win best cinematography and i i told by took i actually okay ll truth back when i was a radio journalist in college and i had free access to a theater here i could just go and see screenings whenever i wanted to was the greatest thing ever but they actually that might they wanted people to come see it so they said bring any of your friends that you want an eight people showed up we were all congregated together for like a private screening and by the end of it the conversation you know that was the buzz at the end of the film you knew you had seen something special right so yes brokeback mountain is definitely very high on the list of greatest love stories on in cinema in my opinion uh and i'm glad that we got to talk about it tonight especially because i've you like not a lot of people do i i don't want a movie like that to be forgotten yeah and it's i mean people forget how quickly things move for the lgbt movement two thousand five doesn't sound doesn't sound like a go but yeah thirteen years were way different even thirteen years ago for the lgbt movement and it really was looking back a real brave film it to make and especially to get to actors in there who were widely respected and loved to cross hollywood to do that movie and it wasn't just two unnamed people these are two big names doing this movie i don't know as one of our i'd like we have to think of a commercial break okay yep towns great arial cigarette with us more love stories please that has your love story through onto ninety one.

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"radio journalist" Discussed on The Ryen Russillo Show

The Ryen Russillo Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on The Ryen Russillo Show

"Because i think they're only eight and if you start going double will cain we've got a problem that's going to produce programming for this network when the radio journalist view thankfully we put pen to paper we put these together all of us did these rowdy reading we have we have ten organizations that have bigger than the raiders will only has five we have ten a we have ten deaths weird double the size doubled the tedious but you have to approve them okay you the commissioner all right hey i really got ig so may i here's i know that hey will tank look man i know you've got to show that your thiesen but we're going to take all your content don't but market in market then take it so i said hey give me call nancy your jumped jumped so stupid got called right there's still got yup here at the way it i just want to make your or guerra dropping all of this everything that happened today is about doubly that john gordon didn't actually correct it sports broadcasting perfection i am here man we'll you could name five organisations of the state of california that a bigger than a raider now you could go you have my floor go la lakers la dodgers uh god uh la dodgers san diego chargers millions who is presented by progressive insurance insurance today i man so i'm on i'm on like day in i'm getting kind tips from you guys so here's i'm gonna i'm gonna try to get some advice on how to do this here's what i was thinking still guts i was thinking you know like after the super bowl public that monday maybe maybe the day after a cigarette exploring you know like a lease tune in our on sexual harassment on broadway what do you think they're gonna work.

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"radio journalist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The us air force has said he failed to report that the man accused of shooting dead twenty six people at a church in texas had a conviction for domestic violence this would have made it illegal to sell or give weapons to the suspected gunman devon kelli it was convicted by court martial in 2012 of assault against his wife and stepson a russian radio journalist has returned to work two weeks after an attempt was made on her life during a broadcast to john nieto fell and how is employed by echo of moscow one of the country's leading sources of independent news following the knife attack there was speculation that she might have been targeted for political reasons saudi arabia has maintained its verbal attacks against iran and its allies it's accused the lebanese militant group hezbollah of acts of aggression it considers a declaration of war riyadh has also blamed tehran for a missile attack on saturday aimed at the saudi capital by hutu rebels in yemen iran dismissed the allegation saying it was saudi arabia's wars of aggression the threatened the middle east fossil remains of two wrath like creatures understood to be the oldest mammalian ancestors of humans have been discovered in dorsey tune southern england the small furry animals survive in the shadow of the dinosaurs some one hundred and 45 million years ago scientists believe they can draw direct evolutionary line to modern humans the turkish president reg of child irwin has launched a project to build a new opera house in istanbul the two and half thousand seat theatre due to open in early 2019 is proving controversial because it will be built on the site of the ataturk cultural center a k m which has been unused for over a decade isabela allen reports it supporters wanted to be like the bolshoi theatre is to moscow and the sydney opera house is to australia the president abdur on his chosen to build a new opera house on a site with a troubled past named after moustapha kemal ataturk founded the modern turkish republic nineteen twenty three the akm was the center of istanbul's coach to my thirty years for 1978 until two thousand inmates when it closed for restoration that never took place critics of the new projects say it is an attack against modern turkey they see the building itself is representing the valleys the secular republic was delta on which they say has been undermined by ms to add that the president has dismissed.

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"radio journalist" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"radio journalist" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"The money twist hearing your screwed up but we're gone for a serious and saiful thoughtprovoking radio journalist king hanoi found we can't say we haven't been worn tryon crabtree art is donald trump mentally insane well that's been something that until now has been forbidden in the discussion by mental health professionals nationwide but the answer that question as answered by mental health professionals may be about the change they may be empowered now to speak out on what they think about donald trump's mental health even though they've never personally seen him earlier this month the american psychoanalytic association sent an email to its members encouraging them to offer analysis on behavior among those in the public eye if they feel inclined to do so now this has been known as the goldwater rule because back with barry goldwater and his run for president in nineteen sixty four the american citing psychiatric association a rule call the goldwater rule loosely after many commented on the mental state of barry goldwater at that time now goal water was in my view canarian the coal mine compared to what we see now with donald trump who was elected president goldwater effectively in the rear view mirror hidesites 2020 but he had no shot at being president it was a miserable disaster but now we're seeing a guy that's even more bombastic than goldwater get elected.

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